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caradino
Mar. 25, 2011, 03:59 PM
My barnmate and I have recently instituted Butt Kicking Fridays. Since neither of us are working with a trainer at the moment due to our horses' lack of fitness (both have had a LOOOONG time off until recently!) and our lack of funds, we help each other out each week by being the other's "eyes on the ground," and being the Voice of Discipline when it comes to doing no-stirrups work and really concentrating on effective position. We have a TON of fun and it really helps to have someone else say, "Hey your leg is a little loose, get up in 2-point!!" or "You're sitting crooked. Lift that left shoulder!"

Does anyone have any favorite exercises to share?? My friend is working mainly on keeping a balanced seat and strengthening her core and leg. I have some good ones up my sleeve, like up-up-down posting, lots of transitions without stirrups, and varying degrees of 2-point position, but new ideas are always a good thing! :)

CHF
Mar. 25, 2011, 04:05 PM
Love the Up-up-down excercise.... do a two point and then hold your arms away from the neck on each side (really good for the core) so your middle is doing the holding and not the hands for balance. And you can also add - close and open your hip angle slooowwwlllyy very controlled.

Can't wait to hear some of the other ideas too!

kateh
Mar. 25, 2011, 04:11 PM
Warmup at trot with one hand: on helmet, to the side, held in front, behind back. Repeat in two point. Bareback: bicycle (alternate lifting each knee up so thigh is parallel to ground), scissors (lift legs completely off barrel, close again).

Twigster
Mar. 25, 2011, 04:38 PM
At the trot, post 7 strides, 2-point 7 strides, sit 7 strides (without stirrups).

caradino
Mar. 25, 2011, 04:48 PM
At the trot, post 7 strides, 2-point 7 strides, sit 7 strides (without stirrups).

Oh that is brilliant. Love it! Will DEFINITELY add that one in!

norcalammie
Mar. 25, 2011, 04:49 PM
Besides up-up-down there is down-down-up and variations of both. Some riders get sloppy with the down-down-up exercise and kind of collapse. Also counting strides on the various sides of the ring - normal is say 12 strides - next long side do 14 - next long side do 10 - vary - do in 2 point which makes the adding strides harder. Also figure 8s and serpentines where you have to get the same number of strides in each loop, etc.

These are thinking exercises that help supple both you and your horse.

Lizrd
Mar. 25, 2011, 07:01 PM
Ones that I hate/love:
1) Putting heels in the stirrups instead of the balls of your feet. Helps you learn to keep weight in your heels.
2) Take one full lap of the arena to lower into jump position ever sooo slooowly - hold it one lap - then take one full lap of the arena to open from jump position.
3) Maintaining a consistent rhythm, ride the canter 4 strides in two point, 4 strides in full seat/three point, repeat.
4) Spiral in/spiral out both directions at a sitting trot no stirrups (no leaning or collapsing!)
5) Ride all gaits with one stirrup working on symmetry side to side.
6) Hold the crop across your horse's withers in both hands with the reins. Keep the crop perpendicular to the angle of your horse's shoulder so that it is pointing at the wall and the center of the arena. This teaches you how to better coordinate your inside and outside reins through the turns.
7) If you both ride together follow the leader is fun - you each get 2 1/2 minutes to be the leader then switch places. Great for getting horses to work in close proximity. Allows you to see one another's side-to-side balance and if one is leaning.
8) This doesn't necessarily work on eq but if it is just the two of you another fun partner "game" is to stay exactly across the arena from one another at all three gaits. You have to really rate your horses so that you are exactly hitting opposite corners at the same time. You should be in the middle of the long side at the same time, middle of the short side at the same time, then start to add quarter tracks and circles with transitions.

I am looking forward to reading everyone's posts!

RolyPolyPony
Mar. 25, 2011, 07:02 PM
My instructor's latest method of torture is posting and two-point w/ ONE stirrup (an switching which is the one ) - I find it WAY harder than no stirrups.

forward ride
Mar. 25, 2011, 07:15 PM
Ones that I hate/love:

5) Ride all gaits with one stirrup working on symmetry side to side.


this can almost be harder than no stirrups i think! i have one leg that moves more than the other & the exercise is the only one that helps!

idk if anyone has said this one yet, but i like to bridge my reins (in outside hand) and hold my other arm's forearm across the small of my back. really makes you sit up straight and not lean (as long as you sit up straight and don't lean) :)

HidingOut
Mar. 25, 2011, 07:27 PM
Hold your two-point through Trot, Walk, Halt, Walk, Trot etc... especially during the downwards transitions people tend to lose their position (and pretty much collapse into a sitting position) and through the upward transitions makes you really use your leg. It also works if you're horses aren't super fit because you can do quite a bit without over doing them.

TheOneandOnly
Mar. 25, 2011, 07:59 PM
Ive got a cruel one for you..

My trainer makes us do "jockey position". :eek: We put our stirrups waayyyy up so that the top of the iron almost touches the bottom of the flap. We have to get our butts out of the saddle and keep our backs parallel to the ground (somewhat like a jockey would). We trot laps and she times us for 6 or 7 minutes each direction. Literally TORTURE. But it kills the abs, butt, and thighs :lol:

mroades
Mar. 25, 2011, 08:11 PM
double posting, and posting the canter with no stirrups

SarahandSam
Mar. 25, 2011, 08:24 PM
Detach the stirrups from the saddle and buckle them together so it's a big loop... one part goes in front of the pommel and one on the seat, so you can still put your feet in the stirrups, but they're not attached to the saddle anymore. If you lean the tiniest little bit you go a-slidin'. My trainer's really loved that one lately.

dp1092
Mar. 25, 2011, 08:34 PM
practice transistions (walk to trot, walk to canter, canter to trot, canter to walk) with no stirrups.

do lead changes with no boots on, it's awful. But it taught me to keep my heels down when asking for a lead change :)

LookmaNohands
Mar. 25, 2011, 08:54 PM
OMG STOP, STOP!!

I am having FLASHBACKS!!

I did all this stuff YEARS AGO!!

OMG! OMG! OMG!

Where's my boxed wine?

OMG, OMG. . . !
:eek::eek::eek::eek::eek:

Wanderluster
Mar. 25, 2011, 09:05 PM
Bring both knees forward of the knee rolls in front of the saddle . Stay in balance in the walk, trot & canter.
I have many more but you have to pay for a lesson to find out. ;)

dp1092
Mar. 25, 2011, 09:21 PM
OMG STOP, STOP!!

I am having FLASHBACKS!!

I did all this stuff YEARS AGO!!

OMG! OMG! OMG!

Where's my boxed wine?

OMG, OMG. . . !
:eek::eek::eek::eek::eek:


Boxed wine :two thumbs up: :yes:

forestergirl99
Mar. 25, 2011, 09:22 PM
practice transistions (walk to trot, walk to canter, canter to trot, canter to walk) with no stirrups.

do lead changes with no boots on, it's awful. But it taught me to keep my heels down when asking for a lead change :)

No boots on? So barefoot?

Tha Ridge
Mar. 25, 2011, 09:31 PM
Spiraling in and out at the canter, without stirrups, is another good one.

Are you jumping at all? It's fun to set a bending line (doesn't have to be big—can be cross rails or even poles on the ground) and work on riding it as 3 strides, 4 strides and 5 strides. Gives a great understanding of how track can affect pace.

FrenchFrytheEqHorse
Mar. 25, 2011, 09:38 PM
This one truly is cruel and unusual, but it WORKS for people that have this problem:

When I was about 14, I rode with a trainer that had absolutely.zero.tolerance for looking down, EVER. After a particularly vocal few minutes during which we (a gaggle of giggling teenaged girls, the night before shipping off to a decent-sized horse show) couldn't stop looking down for whatever reason, trainer broke out the duct tape.

A tiny strip of duct tape on the back of your neck will REALLY, REALLY demonstrate just how often you look down at every single point during your ride. Of course, you can remove it with rubbing alcohol after you're finished (no need for that kind of torture!).

dags
Mar. 25, 2011, 10:02 PM
This has been an excellent thread so far- lots of creativity. I bet students of run of the mill programs are scratching their heads going, huh?

My favorite requires jumps and helmets that are no longer allowed. You can try with the new ones, but it's not quite as fair. We schooled routinely with a roll of masking tape atop our helmets, over practice medal courses, set to height. Given that I was on a TB, this was excellent to teach smoothness, to not "scream" the distance. It was perfect with with a knobbed velvet hunt cap, it's never quite worked the same on a GPA type. Credit goes to Carol Fulton.

Pixie0304
Mar. 25, 2011, 10:13 PM
back in France I got to cry my eyes out with some of these exercises LOL

No stirrups for the whole hour lesson

jumping with no stirrups

no reins on the bridle

jumping without touching the reins

jumping eye closed

jumping with your hands on your head

jockey style

CHF
Mar. 25, 2011, 10:18 PM
Oh these are all great... I have a feeling lessons are going to be "fun" tomorrow with all of this inspiration!! :)

TheOneandOnly
Mar. 25, 2011, 10:29 PM
No stirrups for the whole hour lesson

jumping with no stirrups


hahahahaha. apparently you've never experienced "no stirrup month(s)" :lol::lol::lol: Literally the stirrups are taken off and locked away.. for every lesson, every exercise, every day.

findlymine
Mar. 25, 2011, 10:36 PM
This one truly is cruel and unusual, but it WORKS for people that have this problem:

When I was about 14, I rode with a trainer that had absolutely.zero.tolerance for looking down, EVER. After a particularly vocal few minutes during which we (a gaggle of giggling teenaged girls, the night before shipping off to a decent-sized horse show) couldn't stop looking down for whatever reason, trainer broke out the duct tape.

A tiny strip of duct tape on the back of your neck will REALLY, REALLY demonstrate just how often you look down at every single point during your ride. Of course, you can remove it with rubbing alcohol after you're finished (no need for that kind of torture!).

I like that!!!!!

Big_Grey_hunter
Mar. 25, 2011, 11:16 PM
This has been an excellent thread so far- lots of creativity. I bet students of run of the mill programs are scratching their heads going, huh?

My favorite requires jumps and helmets that are no longer allowed. You can try with the new ones, but it's not quite as fair. We schooled routinely with a roll of masking tape atop our helmets, over practice medal courses, set to height. Given that I was on a TB, this was excellent to teach smoothness, to not "scream" the distance. It was perfect with with a knobbed velvet hunt cap, it's never quite worked the same on a GPA type. Credit goes to Carol Fulton.

Bell boots work well on the newer types. Plus, they bounce softly, so no angry horse when it gets smacked with falling objects :D

dp1092
Mar. 25, 2011, 11:50 PM
No boots on? So barefoot?

Yup...unsafe but it works like you wouldn't believe. It makes you appreciate your heels so much more haha

SnicklefritzG
Mar. 26, 2011, 12:22 AM
Ive got a cruel one for you..

My trainer makes us do "jockey position". :eek: We put our stirrups waayyyy up so that the top of the iron almost touches the bottom of the flap. We have to get our butts out of the saddle and keep our backs parallel to the ground (somewhat like a jockey would). We trot laps and she times us for 6 or 7 minutes each direction. Literally TORTURE. But it kills the abs, butt, and thighs :lol:

I'm willing to endure any kind of torture to kill my butt completely and send it into oblivion

AliCat
Mar. 26, 2011, 12:35 AM
I miss you and I am glad to hear you are enjoying your new horse :)

CPPCaptain
Mar. 26, 2011, 02:54 AM
At the trot, post 7 strides, 2-point 7 strides, sit 7 strides (without stirrups).

I've started to incorporate this into my team's riding routine as well, but instead of 7 strides, it's down the long side post, short side sit, long side 2-point, short side sit, etc. Only once around to begin with but eventually moving up to 3 or 4 times around each direction without a break.

Equisis
Mar. 26, 2011, 03:49 AM
Lots of positional changes at the trot and canter, like others have suggested, are very helpful in steadying the leg and working on an independent seat. At the trot, one of my favorites is sitting two, posting two, sitting two, standing two, and repeating. Also, shifts between full seat, half seat and two point. At the canter, posting without stirrups and doing variations of standing and sitting (ex. stand two sit two...), as well as cantering in a very upright two-point to build balance. If you jump, jumping without stirrups or without reins is good for balance and strength. Doing gymnastics or lines with eyes closed (and on an honest horse!) can also help with waiting for distances and not jumping ahead.

The duct tape thing sounds both perfect and awful- my coach has been harping on me for looking down after my fences lately, so hopefully this doesn't occur to her! I had a dressage trainer who used to make me put a whip behind my back and in front of my elbows to keep my shoulders back and my upper body from collapsing. It worked, but it was so painful! Sometimes before shows we'll ride in paddock boots and leggings or yoga pants- makes you feel like your leg won't budge once you get back in your breeches!

Darkstar
Mar. 26, 2011, 05:40 AM
double posting, and posting the canter with no stirrups

The late Jon Conyers, god bless him, used to have "no stirrup Tuesday" (hell Tuesday to students) - and a lot of the lesson would consist of exercises like you mentioned. Lots of double posting, treading, two-point, and cavalletti (raised and flat) with no stirrups. The ultimate test was to see whom could ride the horses that liked to be a bit "up" or "fresh" (ie, buck/crow hop) without stirrups while trying to concentrate on the equitation lesson.

My equitation trainer from long ago was also a bit "cruel and unusual" - I'm talking if your leg was not in the perfect position - she would tie the stirrup to the girth with bailing twine (your leg COULD NOT move). You'd warm up on the flat like this, then she'd put you on the lunge line and put you O/F - sometimes taking away the reins as well.

Pixie0304
Mar. 26, 2011, 11:32 AM
hahahahaha. apparently you've never experienced "no stirrup month(s)" :lol::lol::lol: Literally the stirrups are taken off and locked away.. for every lesson, every exercise, every day.

ahah, no worries, I DO know, when I say no stirrups, the stirrups were taken off the saddles .
I cant remember my trainers doing it for a whole month or more, but they sure did it more often than i liked it ! :lol:

Pixie0304
Mar. 26, 2011, 11:35 AM
another one I just thought of is, my latest trainer in the US, he was making me carry a crop between the inside of my elbows and my back to FORCE me to stay sit up straight :D

PaintPony
Mar. 26, 2011, 02:09 PM
So I'm not sure this is very safe, but in college out trainer would have us do "jockey style" by putting our feet on TOP of the stirrup. (between the two leathers) I can't say I'd do that now but I had crazy strong legs back then. :)

dags
Mar. 26, 2011, 03:03 PM
Bell boots work well on the newer types. Plus, they bounce softly, so no angry horse when it gets smacked with falling objects :D

Good to know. I always thought staying on the buck when the tape flies off and nails horsey for complying with the flying long to the 3'6" oxer was part of the exercise :D

Fun Size
Mar. 27, 2011, 12:58 AM
Hmmmm...we do stuff like this pretty frequently!

Drop just the inside stirrup at the trot and do a lap sitting, then posting, and make sure you do both directions.

Both reins in the inside hand, outside hand straight out, on your head, or on your hips (jump a course that way, too...even if it just cross rails, it makes you steer with your legs!).

Ride with just a bareback pad, but do your normal flat routine - posting/sitting trot, canter with flying and simple lead changes. Really makes you aware of your position! Then on to the poles...and the jumps! Love those.

Then add just a halter and lead-rope to your bareback days...only if your horse is an ok one to do that on, of course!

2 point transitions - walk-trot, walk-canter, trot-canter, and down again. These hurt!

...and the worst torture...

If your horses are good on the lunge line, have someone lunge you with no stirrups and no reins. Start with your hands on your hips, then do head, and out to the side. Then try twisting to the outside, then to the inside (this makes me motion sick sometimes!). Do all of that at the walk trot and canter.

Also tough and a good workout for your legs is lateral work into upward transitions - like leg-yeild at the trot and then transition to the canter. Makes you AND your horse work!

I'm sure I have more. I'm a weird one that likes all this stuff, because I know it makes me a better rider :D

Of course, all credit goes to my trainers on these!

Cita
Mar. 27, 2011, 09:16 AM
1) Putting heels in the stirrups instead of the balls of your feet. Helps you learn to keep weight in your heels.

I've always been told that this is dangerous, and can lead to you getting dragged if you fall. No idea - never seen it in action, and I hope I never will - but something to think about.

For me, the worst are 1) jumping with no reins, but your arms out to the sides like wings, 2) jumping with no stirrups, 3) jumping with neither reins nor stirrups.

Bareback posting is also a good one - a horse with sharp withers will quickly teach you not to land too hard ;)

Wanderluster
Mar. 27, 2011, 11:16 AM
Oh these are all great... I have a feeling lessons are going to be "fun" tomorrow with all of this inspiration!! :)

Agree ! Some of these are new to me ,who knew duct tape had so many uses. Ok here is one that hasn't been mentioned - drop stirrups then ride holding the bottom of the stirrup on the top of the foot.

nlk
Mar. 27, 2011, 12:10 PM
One year we did the whole winter in two point and the following year we did the whole winter without stirrups.

And are winters are November to March!!!

SarahandSam
Mar. 27, 2011, 08:49 PM
I've always been told that this is dangerous, and can lead to you getting dragged if you fall. No idea - never seen it in action, and I hope I never will - but something to think about

I thought so too just from the description, but my trainer, who is apparently reading this thread (hi Bri!) explained that your foot goes in front of the stirrup, with just the heel resting on the stirrup. So if you drop your toe, the stirrup falls off your heel.

Then immediately after explaining this, she made me do it, of course. (: Way harder than I thought! It's not unsafe or going to get you dragged, just makes you feel very precarious, and you really do have to keep your heel down--as soon as I started posting, my heel went up and I promptly lost my left stirrup. I also had safety stirrups and I was worried about pressing my weight into them too much in case the rubber band snapped off, so I might try it again with regular fillis irons and see if I can keep it up longer.

EverAfter
Mar. 27, 2011, 08:55 PM
Didn't read through all of them but this is one Greg Best did to me.. Worked wonders.

Take your stirrups off your saddle and connect them with the buckles. Drape then over the saddle. One of the straps IN FRONT of the saddle and one on the saddle (you'll be sitting on that one).. Your stirrups will have to be long enough to accomplish this, but if you lean to one side or the other you will fall off.. I came close like 10 times during that clinic.. it'll teach you to ride straight though!

SmileItLooksGoodOnYou
Mar. 28, 2011, 02:04 AM
Detach the stirrups from the saddle and buckle them together so it's a big loop... one part goes in front of the pommel and one on the seat, so you can still put your feet in the stirrups, but they're not attached to the saddle anymore. If you lean the tiniest little bit you go a-slidin'.

EverAfter mentioned this too, and this is a favorite of mine. Greg Best uses this a good deal, and I ride like this often at home. It's quite easy when you do it a lot, and you learn quick not to drop your weight around in your irons. I can still move my seat without any trouble.


This one truly is cruel and unusual, but it WORKS for people that have this problem:

When I was about 14, I rode with a trainer that had absolutely.zero.tolerance for looking down, EVER. After a particularly vocal few minutes during which we (a gaggle of giggling teenaged girls, the night before shipping off to a decent-sized horse show) couldn't stop looking down for whatever reason, trainer broke out the duct tape.

A tiny strip of duct tape on the back of your neck will REALLY, REALLY demonstrate just how often you look down at every single point during your ride. Of course, you can remove it with rubbing alcohol after you're finished (no need for that kind of torture!).

What a simple, easy idea. I'll have to try that.


she would tie the stirrup to the girth with bailing twine (your leg COULD NOT move). You'd warm up on the flat like this, then she'd put you on t

I enjoy this a great deal. I feel like this way you can really feel it when you try to slip your leg back over a jump or for a transition.


another one I just thought of is, my latest trainer in the US, he was making me carry a crop between the inside of my elbows and my back to FORCE me to stay sit up straight :D

The one not mentioned with a crop is to ride with a reasonable long whip and hold one end in each hand with your reins (sometimes frying-pan style reins in addition) and ride and jump with wide hands like this. It will keep you from using the neck to stay up and holding the whip keeps you from being able to grab anything else. Great on the flat too, forcing you to keep your hands wide and be aware.


Other things to try:

dropping your inside rein and working on inside leg to outside hand

flipping the bight of your reins UNDER your horse's neck. If you drop the reins, your horse trips (for safety tie some string or twine across the mane), but as your horse's head/neck goes down in each stride it pulls your hands there, it's great to learn to follow the horse's mouth. Jumping like this is super hard for me.

dropping just your outside iron and being sure you're not shifting out for lead changes and corners.

Opus1
Mar. 28, 2011, 03:25 AM
The late Jon Conyers, god bless him, used to have "no stirrup Tuesday" (hell Tuesday to students) - and a lot of the lesson would consist of exercises like you mentioned.

:sadsmile:

Jon's the one who taught me to ride in the first place, when he was at Wesleyan. The beginners never had to endure quite the same torture as the advanced riders, but he worked us pretty damn good.

His death was the reason I got back into riding. I miss him so much.

(Sorry y'all. I know it's off-topic, but seeing his name made my heart jump.)

Late
Mar. 28, 2011, 04:30 AM
I love this thread! I'll never forget the time that Greg Best put tacks in the seat of my saddle (toward the back) because I was sitting in the saddle too soon on the landing side of a fence. He also had me jump with reins looped under the neck as previously suggested :)

I can't wait to try some of these on myself! the heel in the stirrup particularly sounds cool!

caradino
Mar. 28, 2011, 02:00 PM
I miss you and I am glad to hear you are enjoying your new horse :)

I miss you and the BWF crew, too!! I REEEEALLLLYYYY have to get out there for a lesson, or at least just to hang out.

And THANK YOU everyone else for the awesome ideas!! I'm going to print out this thread, these are amazing!

Gnalli
Mar. 28, 2011, 06:28 PM
Love the Up-up-down excercise.... do a two point and then hold your arms away from the neck on each side (really good for the core) so your middle is doing the holding and not the hands for balance. And you can also add - close and open your hip angle slooowwwlllyy very controlled.

Can't wait to hear some of the other ideas too!

We don't do the 2 point, but if my girls get sloppy, then they have to lose the stirrups and reins and go on a longe...they really dont like it...oh well. It works.

AliCat
Mar. 28, 2011, 09:16 PM
I miss you and the BWF crew, too!! I REEEEALLLLYYYY have to get out there for a lesson, or at least just to hang out.

And THANK YOU everyone else for the awesome ideas!! I'm going to print out this thread, these are amazing!

April 10th. I am doing schooling hunters on my new friend Gaston.

caradino
Mar. 29, 2011, 10:47 AM
April 10th. I am doing schooling hunters on my new friend Gaston.

Excellent!! I can't ride that horse to save my life, haha, glad you are getting along with him! What time does that division usually go? I have plans with a friend to visit my pony out in PA, but I can try and split my time to come cheer you on!

AliCat
Mar. 29, 2011, 11:46 AM
Excellent!! I can't ride that horse to save my life, haha, glad you are getting along with him! What time does that division usually go? I have plans with a friend to visit my pony out in PA, but I can try and split my time to come cheer you on!

It would be first division, running at the same time as Itty Bitty's.

http://www.briarwood-farm.com/uploads/2011_April_UnR.pdf

You could see all your buddies at once :winkgrin:

Twigster
Mar. 29, 2011, 01:13 PM
This thread is full of awesome ideas!

Unfortunately I think my trainer is reading this thread because she just took away my stirrups until our first show (4/23). My legs and abs hurt already...

Big_Grey_hunter
Mar. 29, 2011, 01:31 PM
I miss doing fun things like no stirrups, no reins, even two point! Unfortunately, my temporary horse needs all the focus on him. Changes in rein pressure, leg pressure, seat/body shifts freak him out.

AliCat518
Mar. 29, 2011, 05:39 PM
Ive been reading this thread for the past day or two....I tried the up up down and down down up for the first time in a few years. HOLY COW, up up down was a lot harder than I remember. I caught on to down down up pretty fast, but found myself having trouble with up up down. After a few tries, I finally got it...but my legs are hurting now!!

Beethoven
Mar. 29, 2011, 07:34 PM
All good ideas! Can't wait to torture myself on my old trusty boy. Going to try to do the stirrups attached to each other as I have been feeling crooked lately!

ponyjumper525
Mar. 29, 2011, 11:32 PM
No stirrups cross country.... and then the next day bareback.

Not fun, but so worth it!

Carley Sparks
Mar. 30, 2011, 09:23 AM
I worked for Cnd show jumper Hugh Graham many years ago. He insisted that we practice cantering poles. Every day. On every horse! It's an excellent way to develop your eye without actually jumping. I still do it every time I ride.

When your horse is fit enough to jump, gridwork is a great way to work on your jumping position without worrying about distances, etc. Amy Millar posted a series of trot grids at getmyfix.org in the 5 Minute Clinic.

ReeseTheBeast
Mar. 30, 2011, 09:31 AM
Awesome thread. I just sent it to my trainers.

Yes, I am a glutton for punishment!! :D

italian1982f
Jun. 23, 2012, 12:53 PM
I guess I have a pretty tame trainer. My trainer has yet to have me do any of these cruel things lol Maybe I should keep my mouth shut incase she is reading these lol

Foxtrot's
Jun. 23, 2012, 01:10 PM
I love this outside the box thinking --- when you have worked them all out, you could write the book (illustrated, of course). Much more fun than the plopping around endlessly.

Carol Ames
Jun. 23, 2012, 01:30 PM
ride with thumbs hooked:eek:, little fingers on the withers:yes:;)

AnEnglishRider
Jun. 23, 2012, 01:38 PM
Detach the stirrups from the saddle and buckle them together so it's a big loop... one part goes in front of the pommel and one on the seat, so you can still put your feet in the stirrups, but they're not attached to the saddle anymore. If you lean the tiniest little bit you go a-slidin'. My trainer's really loved that one lately.

THIS. Jump like this too. It will fix any of your balance problems!

italian1982f
Jun. 23, 2012, 01:46 PM
Well they may be cruel and unusual but I may just try some of them. I am have a problem finding my seat when cantering. I cant seem to find the rythm so my trainer said to work on keeping my heels down and relaxing some more so, some of these may help I THINK?!?!

MyGiantPony
Jun. 23, 2012, 03:35 PM
Two point. No stirrups At the walk. On a really lazy warmblood.Worst torture ever.

italian1982f
Jun. 24, 2012, 10:17 AM
I am just trying to figure out how you do a two point with out stirrups lol

LoveJubal
Jun. 24, 2012, 12:39 PM
My equitation trainer from long ago was also a bit "cruel and unusual" - I'm talking if your leg was not in the perfect position - she would tie the stirrup to the girth with bailing twine (your leg COULD NOT move). You'd warm up on the flat like this, then she'd put you on the lunge line and put you O/F - sometimes taking away the reins as well.

I have always liked this exercise for fixing the "swinging" leg over fences... Your leg cannot move back anymore so your body must learn how to hold that position. I rode like that for a whole winter one year - trainer's orders ;)

Opus1
Jun. 24, 2012, 01:54 PM
I am just trying to figure out how you do a two point with out stirrups lol

Painfully.

Jingo-ace
Jun. 24, 2012, 02:11 PM
Wow! There's some good ideas in here.. I gotta sticky it somehow so I can remember some of these little gems to try on my own soon! thanks OP for starting this thread!

:) J

SnicklefritzG
Jun. 24, 2012, 02:17 PM
Ive got a cruel one for you..

My trainer makes us do "jockey position". :eek: We put our stirrups waayyyy up so that the top of the iron almost touches the bottom of the flap. We have to get our butts out of the saddle and keep our backs parallel to the ground (somewhat like a jockey would). We trot laps and she times us for 6 or 7 minutes each direction. Literally TORTURE. But it kills the abs, butt, and thighs :lol:

Will it eventually make them disappear? If so, I'm doing that exercise every day. :lol:

Superminion
Jun. 24, 2012, 02:29 PM
I'm so late to this thread, but I had a trainer who used to make us ride with eggs between our knees and the saddle, as well as between our calves and the saddle.

You had to figure out how to grip tight enough not to let the egg fall, but not too tight to make the egg broke and made a huge mess. We did it on the flat and over fences. Nothing compares to egg yoke dribbling down the inside of your tall boots!

italian1982f
Jun. 24, 2012, 04:03 PM
I'm so late to this thread, but I had a trainer who used to make us ride with eggs between our knees and the saddle, as well as between our calves and the saddle.

You had to figure out how to grip tight enough not to let the egg fall, but not too tight to make the egg broke and made a huge mess. We did it on the flat and over fences. Nothing compares to egg yoke dribbling down the inside of your tall boots!

eeewww what a mess. yeah that would make you figure it out real quick lol

McGurk
Jun. 24, 2012, 04:12 PM
I love a lot of these ideas, and have used or had used on me most of them.

My personal favorites are the 5 strides 2-point/5 striders posting/5 sitting. The varaition I was taught you did one lap of 5s, then 1 of 4s 1 of 3s, etc,

Love tying stirrups to the girth to make students aware of when they pivot on their knee.

I was introduced to the riding with 1 stirrup, rater than no stirrups, by Andrew Mouw when he was at Morven Park. Great exercise for becoming aware of your side dominance or balance/crookedness issues. For work sitting, he had another great exercise. Take a small, riding school type crop or dowell and place it under your seatbones. Anytime you lose contact with the saddle or pick up one seatbone, the dowel moves. When you can ride all gaits and transitions keeping it in place, you're doing something right. Quick fix for canter departures and flying changes and for square halts.

The first time I saw the bight of the reins buckled under the horse's neck trick was at a Jimmy Wofford clinic at the Lexington Horse Center and I was *horrified*. There was a girl in the clinic who was struggling with her go-y horse, and she picked at him down to every fence, and he would get irritated and confused and just speed up and throw himself over the fence blindly. We've all seen this dynamic, and many of us have been the rider in this situation. So Jimmy tied the reins under her horse's neck and sent her out to jump a few more fences. I held my breath, sure it was going to be a disaster.

You could actually see the light bulb go on over the horse's head and him relax and start to hold a steady pace to the fence, and then the rider relax when she realized she 1.) wasn't going to die 2.) her horse was going better. They ended the clinic on a good note and safely.

I don't know if my ovaries are large enough to try that one, but I could see how it would be effective.

Feeltheride
Jun. 24, 2012, 07:40 PM
I would make my riders ride bareback (with bareback pad) and have their stirrup from their saddle hanging on their feet if they keep their heels down then the stirrup will stay on. If the rider dropped their toes then the stirrup would fall off and I made the rider get off and get the stirrup. It became tirering getting on and off the horse. Soon the stirrups stayed on the feet longer. :cool:

skippy60
Jun. 24, 2012, 08:14 PM
At the walk, trot, or canter, with or without stirrups, go "on your knees" (two point, with your arms stretched out to the sides if your horse is ok with it... hold it for two strides) "on your toes" ( Standing up straight in the saddle, ditto for arm position) ( hold it for two strides) "slide your heels down" (go back to your first position, and hold it for two strides) "touch your chin" ( touch chin too horses neck, with your arms stretched out too your sides like an airplane) (hold it for two strides) then repeat.

RedxHandedxJill
Jun. 24, 2012, 08:17 PM
Love tying stirrups to the girth to make students aware of when they pivot on their knee. For work sitting, he had another great exercise. Take a small, riding school type crop or dowell and place it under your seatbones. Anytime you lose contact with the saddle or pick up one seatbone, the dowel moves. When you can ride all gaits and transitions keeping it in place, you're doing something right. Quick fix for canter departures and flying changes and for square halts.

I love this idea! I've been working on square halts with my OTTB and I know its related to my seat bones but hadn't quite figured out a solution yet. Thanks so much!

SarahandSam
Jun. 24, 2012, 10:56 PM
My trainer likes to have us do "Peter Pan"--a grid of three bounce jumps, and you do them sans reins. First one you do Peter Pan--arms straight out to the side; second you do Tinkerbell--hands on hips; third you do Captain Hook--one hand on hip, one up making a hook shape. http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10150773649456983&l=7ffa1fb9bb

Freaking terrifying for our group of adult beginners, but it sure cures me of jumping ahead and my myriad other faults, because I'm so busy trying to remember what the heck I'm supposed to be doing with my hands!