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Pat Ness
Mar. 25, 2011, 08:41 AM
Anyone out there know the names of horses that cribbed that were excellent in the show ring? or eventing or dressage or ?

I have a cribber that I want to sell and I just want a positive spin on cribbing to go in my ad for him.

Thanks.

GingerJumper
Mar. 25, 2011, 10:25 AM
I've known a lot of upper level horses, and in my experience most upper level horses have some form of cribbing or woodchewing or other stall vices. They are so "on" all the time and have such intense personalities, they are taking out stress the best way they can. However, if your horse doesn't have that real "on" or driven personality, it'd be better to just say that he's a cribber and say how you've managed it (i.e, collar, limited stall time, Likit treat, etc)

Ozone
Mar. 25, 2011, 10:39 AM
No matter what you do put in your horses sale ad for some, when they see at the bottom where you state he/she is a cribber that's the make or break for some regardless of upper level status. Just my opinion and I am the owner of yes, my very own cribber.. :)

Trees4U
Mar. 25, 2011, 10:52 AM
We had a cribber who was successful in the Adult division at rated shows.
The funny thing was he never cribbed at shows, so he only wore his crib collar at home.

Well, he wasn't really famous though.

He had other quirks that made him memorable though...

Pat Ness
Mar. 25, 2011, 11:00 AM
I agree I have no problem with cribbers and know a great local event horse that used to crib too but he is not remembered by the new group here.

That is not true of MANY people though. I think it would help all cribbers out there if an anti crib person saw how many successful horses are out there competing.

Ok - maybe it will help those that are on the fence decide...

Paris
Mar. 25, 2011, 01:51 PM
I think the junior hunter In Sync is a cribber.

I have a "nephew" to him and I inquired as my guys mother was a cribber too.. but luckily my boy is not one.

monalisa
Mar. 25, 2011, 02:38 PM
One of my show horses is a cribber and he has been very successful in the show ring at AA shows. He is a quirky horse, he wears a collar all of the time. Funny thing is that he has been on stall rest for 40 days now and has cribbed much less when not being turned out. Go figure.

vxf111
Mar. 25, 2011, 02:40 PM
Not sure how listing unrelated famous cribbing horses in your horse's ad is a selling point?

Pat Ness
Mar. 25, 2011, 03:24 PM
I am just looking for a way of turning what some see as a reason to not look at a horse into well lets give him a look.

Because it needs to be disclosed in the ad - I want to try to do it with a positive spin.

I will not be stating that my horse is related to any of these horses.

vxf111
Mar. 25, 2011, 04:18 PM
I just don't see this being effective?!

Like.. Abdullah was a gray! Gem Twist was a gray! MY SALE HORSE IS A GRAY!!!

If I saw that in an ad... my gut reaction would be "that ain't no Abdullah or Gem Twist!" ;)

I guess I just don't see that tactic hitting the reader in a particularlly effectice way. Unless the horse is a worldbeater, I wouldn't be inviting comparisons to worldbeaters in the ad because the sale horse is all but guaranteed to come up short?!

cidbad
Mar. 25, 2011, 06:34 PM
Cannonball cribbed on everything. It wasn't until he was retired for two years turned out in the field that he finally stopped. So yes cribbers can be great show horses.

kateh
Mar. 25, 2011, 07:12 PM
Someone who doesn't like cribbers is probably not going to buy your horse. Someone who doesn't mind cribbers likely isn't going to mind that your horse cribs. Saying "my horse cribs, but so did X!" just draws more attention to a vice. Use that space to say "cribs, but totally controlled with collar."

FrenchFrytheEqHorse
Mar. 25, 2011, 07:22 PM
Completely agree with vxf- Unless the horse being depicted in the ad had a 10 jump, and decent video footage of being a 10 mover, I would absolutely move on to the next one if there were mention of "famous cribbers". Not particularly tasteful, and certainly not going to make me consider taking a second look...

In my experience, for the population that absolutely will.not.have.a.cribber., the horse really would have to be a phenomenal animal in all other regards to make them compromise on the issue. Too much damage to stalls/fences to justify even the slightly-above-average quality cribber.

That being said, dear French Fry was a HORRIBLE cribber to his dying day, and it never affected him negatively in any way, so it definitely wouldn't be a deal breaker for me unless the horse had a history of health related issues connected to cribbing (some cribbers tend to be more prone to gas colic, others will live forever without any problems, but luckily, if they're members of the "prone to issues" group, you usually know about it at an early age).

Flashy Gray VA
Mar. 25, 2011, 07:32 PM
Cannonball cribbed on everything.

:yes:

OP, to be blunt, refusing to consider a cribber is not equivalent to being unknowledgeable and in need of either further education and/or a cool marketing scheme.

A lot of people are "anti-cribbing" for very solid reasons based on hard, even sad, experience.

If a horse was of the caliber of a Cannonball (RIP) and you had the resources to manage such a vice in order to have all that latent talent on 4 hooves, even an "anti-cribber" might do the cost/benefit analysis and go for it.

But for the average amateur horseperson doing that analysis with the average horse, many are simply not going to put up with the potential for issues.

Some people don't give a hoot about having a cribber and have their own facilities so they don't have to worry about finding a boarding barn that will accept a cribber, for example. The best you can do is market the horse's true strengths to a targeted audience and hope that you find such a prospective buyer in the doesn't-give-a-hoot category.

I think that ethically you need to mention it briefly in your advert and let the chips fall where they may. Prepare yourself to not get seriously bummed out when you find folks aren't willing to put up with the vice and thus specifically take a pass on your horse, period.

Wanderluster
Mar. 25, 2011, 09:43 PM
I have two cribbing hunters, both have funny personalities and seem to like human contact more than the average horses. My clients horse is so addicted to cribbing that he was about to be choked on the collar, it was adjusted so tightly that it was causing burns through the sheepskin padding. Now we have allowed him to have his habit unrestrained. He tears through buckets but is otherwise a happy fat carefree wonderful horse.
Mine will stop if I put any collar on her, she likes to crib after getting a treat. If I feed carrots for instance she will get excited and begin cribbing afterward.
I hated cribbing for years but there are enough good horses that have that habit to make me sit in the middle of that issue. BTW... I always give any horse that cribs a prescribed dose of gastroguard, sometimes they are trying to relieve stomach pain and cribbing releases endorphines. FWIW.

mrsbradbury
Mar. 25, 2011, 09:59 PM
I think cribbing is worth disclosing, but I wouldn't put too much thought in it. I certainly wouldn't point out other random horses that crib.

I personally don't give a rats you know what about cribbing, but other people do; and I promise that you are't going to change thier mind. period. ever.

Write your ad, and hope your horse sells. I have had a lady call me twice on the same horse, each time I told her the horse cribs, and she feeds me the same line about all the work her husband did on the walls/ fence etc. I tell her he cribs, I can't change that; if you feel you can;t live with it, then the horse isn't for you. My barn is lovely too; and I accept that some horses crib.


ETA: Like smoking; there is NOTHING POSITIVE about cribbing. Cribbers trash the fence, wreck the tops of their stalls, some break buckets, tubs and auto waterers, they have an increased colic risk, they tend to be harder to keep weight on, as they age they ruin their incisors making it harder for them to grasp food, they are on the top of the list for ulcers, the collars ruin their bridle paths, they chew up the crossties, they make bad sounds, some people believe cribbing is contagious ( a myth btw ), they bend stall gates, and on and on and on.

red2004
Mar. 25, 2011, 11:14 PM
IMO Pat Ness is about full-disclosure, and just wants to put a fun creative spin on her ad copy for what some might consider a deal breaker... Someone reading the ad might not instantly dismiss the horse, particularily if there are other compelling attributes.....

Pat Ness
Mar. 26, 2011, 05:13 PM
Thanks red2004 - that is exactly what I was trying to do.

fair judy
Mar. 26, 2011, 06:40 PM
i have had many cribbers. none ever had colic issues.

Talisman, a brilliant and very successful working hunter at nimrod farm in the late 70's cribbed with nothing to put his teeth on. :) on the crossties being braided he could flex his neck and crib to his heart's content.

cribbers continue their behavior because they are delivering endorphins when they do so. its horse "heroin" .

folks who are nitpicking as to the OP's request are..... picking.

RockinHorse
Mar. 26, 2011, 07:22 PM
I agree I have no problem with cribbers and know a great local event horse that used to crib too but he is not remembered by the new group here.

That is not true of MANY people though. I think it would help all cribbers out there if an anti crib person saw how many successful horses are out there competing.

Ok - maybe it will help those that are on the fence decide...

OP, I get the sense that you feel you must educate the buying public so they will like your horse. If I got that sense when reading an add for a horse, I would run far, far away.

Coppers mom
Mar. 26, 2011, 07:43 PM
OP- It's not that people don't like cribbing horses because it'll hurt their performance, it's because they don't want to deal with it. It's one of those things that people are either ok with it or they aren't. You're not going to change their mind or make them go "hmmm" about it.

Bogie
Mar. 26, 2011, 07:56 PM
People are very divided about cribbers. For some people it doesn't matter; others won't touch one with a ten foot pole.

You will not change their minds about cribbing by calling out famous cribbers.

BTW, I am someone who owns a cribber and I would buy another.

MatchPoint
Mar. 28, 2011, 02:45 PM
John Henry was a cribber

jody jaffe
Mar. 28, 2011, 02:57 PM
Woody Wade is a cribber. Big deal.

And he's turned out with two youngsters. Neither one of them cribs.


http://www.chronofhorse.com/article/doctor-of-confidence

callie208
Mar. 28, 2011, 03:02 PM
I agree with most of the other posters. You aren't going to change someone's mind. People who don't want to buy a cribber probably have a reason for this. My first horse died of colic due to her incessant cribbing when she was only 8 years old. I tried everything to stop her and nothing worked. I would never buy another cribber, unless it was a truly special horse. These kinds of experiences cant be erased by an ad campaign. In fact, equating your horse to a famous cribber, probably won't make much sense to people. I think it would just confuse me, and make me question the ad altogether. Just be honest about what the horse is and is not. There are lots of people who dont mind cribbers at all.

MintHillFarm
Mar. 28, 2011, 03:03 PM
I just don't see this being effective?!

Like.. Abdullah was a gray! Gem Twist was a gray! MY SALE HORSE IS A GRAY!!!

If I saw that in an ad... my gut reaction would be "that ain't no Abdullah or Gem Twist!" ;)

I guess I just don't see that tactic hitting the reader in a particularlly effectice way. Unless the horse is a worldbeater, I wouldn't be inviting comparisons to worldbeaters in the ad because the sale horse is all but guaranteed to come up short?!

I had to laugh at this comparison only because I have a gray Abdullah son that cribs!

Trees4U
Mar. 28, 2011, 04:03 PM
Since cribbing is considered a vice, I think OP wants to illustrate that many cribbers have become very successful even with this issue.
And maybe to get prospective buyers to at least consider instead of just immediately crossing it off their list.

There are many levels of cribbing - from the occasional to the hard core.

Zarafia
Mar. 28, 2011, 04:07 PM
All I can say that might be considered "positive" is that every cribber I've ever known was very smart.

horserule1
Apr. 10, 2011, 04:25 PM
I just bought a cute OTTB this winter who was passed over (sold at the turnout farm after season was over) because he is a cribber. After he wrecked (pulled off with his teeth) many boards on the paddock i finally found a collar that works fairly well --i have seen him try but cant get a hold--its the Dare collar. He was offered at a bargain price because most people wont touch a cribber (especially one who has been let do it)--do they let them do this at the track????
I have owned two other cribbers--one a broodmare who was controlled totally with a plain sheepskin covered leather collar and another incredible show mare who eventually quit trying and just wore a sheepskin necksweat. I wonder if once they get over the "habit" which might take some time if they "forget about doing it???
There are a lot worse habits they could do--stall kicking is my least favorite! I once lost a sale in the high five figures on a young horse (not a jumper) because he kicked the stall as a yearling and got some scar tissue (which didnt affect his soundness) and the buyer wouldnt take him with that showing on the xrays.

Corri Vale
Apr. 19, 2011, 05:10 PM
OK I have to tell you...I understand, from a marketing stand point, what you're trying to accomplish. And I'll tell you why.....I found this post as I was searching for famous cribbers. Now why was I searching for famous cribbers? To make myself feel better about my Cribbing/wind sucking lovable 3yr old thoroughbred. I just bought him last Oct 2010. It was not disclosed to me that he did, in fact, crib. I didn't ask simply because the sellers made such a big deal of his good qualities. How sound he was, how quiet he was, he's ready for shows. blah, blah, blah. So, I have 10 horses. Non of them crib. I have worked in a barn with cribbing horses. The interesting thing was that the cribbers were better mounts for students. I had rather have a cribber that you can train, than a mentally abused horse that will blow up without warning. Have one of those too..... So I get it. And you know If the seller had disclosed this to me, I would have appreciated it and still would have taken him. But, horse traders are notorious for not being up front. My moto is "Every horse has a story"

chunky munky
Apr. 19, 2011, 05:24 PM
I think you will find that with show horse, the more it has won the less the cribbing matters. I think that people that keep the horse themselves in their own little barn where they personally have to fix any damage and listen to it out their bedroom window may be less forgiving. In the bigger show barns many owners don't even see their horses in the stalls or paddocks very often. I think you will find that this type of owner/rider most likely doesn't care what he does "on his own time" as long he is a good horse otherwise.

kahhull
Apr. 19, 2011, 06:42 PM
Kind of a spin-off, but since this resurfaced, I'm a little confused - is this something that would normally be considered necessary to put in a sale ad for a horse? I've never had a cribber so I've never thought about it, but I know for sure I've never seen an ad that called out a horse as a cribber. Maybe there just aren't as many out there as I thought so I haven't come across one. And if you're disclosing cribbing, should you disclose all vices? Like bucking or pawing or what have you... or just the ones that could cause health issues? This seems like a good opportunity for me to learn a little more about advertising a horse, especially since I'll be in the market for one in the next couple of years.