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Missy's Mom
Mar. 23, 2011, 03:34 PM
I was tired of having to rinse my horses with the freezing cold water out of the hose at the wash rack this winter, so I did some research and found a camping portable hot water shower at Camping World. It runs on propane and 2 "D" batteries, and is a continuous flow (meaning instant hot water and no holding tank). It works great, and only cost me less than $170 including the tax. It has adapters so you can attach a hose for the output in place of the hand held shower head that is included.

fourmares
Mar. 24, 2011, 03:32 AM
Oooo, cool... I want one.

fivehorses
Mar. 24, 2011, 10:28 AM
is this the one you bought?

http://www.campingworld.com/shopping/item/eccotemp-portable-water-heater/37786

Missy's Mom
Mar. 25, 2011, 02:44 AM
is this the one you bought?

http://www.campingworld.com/shopping/item/eccotemp-portable-water-heater/37786

That's the one. Sorry I forgot to include the name.

fivehorses
Mar. 25, 2011, 10:38 AM
wow, glad to hear how well you like it. I think I am going to go get me one!
thanks.

KPF
Mar. 25, 2011, 10:47 AM
That looks cool, I don't have hot water in my barn and would love to have an easy way to get it. Where/how do you mount it and how far away is the propane tank?

tnscvaga
Mar. 25, 2011, 11:27 AM
I've used this also. I bought a hand trolley normally used for moving furniture and attached the propane tank and shower unit to it. I purchased an extra, longer hose from Home Depot in order to reach around my horse easier.

One thing I learned is that these are not heavy duty. Always drain all the water out after every use. Freezing temps and water left in the shower unit destroyed my first one.:mad: Also, on windy days my flame kept going out.

ArabX3
Mar. 25, 2011, 11:42 AM
I bought the one from Schneiders - it is run by propane. It works great. I used it in the barn for the wash rack because our water heater doesn't work and need to do a bath for a show. Very easy to use and nice hot water. I just put it on a two wheel cart so I can move it around and it is wonderful!

Fancy That
Mar. 25, 2011, 02:20 PM
I live right next to Camping World so I may just go pick one up.

I've always wanted hot water at my wash rack, and this seems like a great way to go at only $134?

Glad to hear it works okay. There are so many different models/types....I want one that is horse-friendly (sounds like I may need to get a longer hose?)

More feedback from others who use these please :)

EDIT: Same exact model on Amazon.com (appears to be about the same price, factoring free shipping from CW)
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000TXOJQ4/

Missy's Mom
Mar. 26, 2011, 01:11 AM
I've used this also. I bought a hand trolley normally used for moving furniture and attached the propane tank and shower unit to it. I purchased an extra, longer hose from Home Depot in order to reach around my horse easier.

One thing I learned is that these are not heavy duty. Always drain all the water out after every use. Freezing temps and water left in the shower unit destroyed my first one.:mad: Also, on windy days my flame kept going out.

The hand trolly is a great idea! We just hung ours on the wash rack bar. The wash rack was wide enough to be away from the horse. But I think I'll get a hand trolly!

Pennywell Bay
Mar. 28, 2011, 06:46 AM
Great idea. I got a Hott Wash for X-mas but I would not have spent that money on my own ( A luxury a single mom won't pay for...)

I have electric by my rack so it works.

I will keep that one in mind for my lower barn!!!!

michealsmith
Apr. 15, 2011, 09:58 AM
A wash rack should have hot water. They are relatively easy to install and are one way to save barn space.

trubandloki
Apr. 15, 2011, 10:04 AM
Looks interesting.

I find it strange that they do not give you an actual temperature rise available.

the_other_mother
Apr. 15, 2011, 08:52 PM
Im getting one! Yay!! :) Thanks for the info!

TheJenners
Apr. 15, 2011, 09:21 PM
Ooooo...hmmm....

Foxtrot's
Apr. 15, 2011, 09:38 PM
Do they offer enough pressure?

the_other_mother
Apr. 21, 2011, 06:28 PM
Well, crap. I ordered the hot water wash from Camping World and its backordered until May 15th. :( Was kind of hoping to have it now while it's still chilly for baths....but oh well, it will be great in the fall and winter.

KrazyTBMare
Apr. 22, 2011, 01:21 AM
I want to get a tankless hot water system. They are super small and work great for what is needed in the barn. My girlfriend has one in her barn but also has a large system for her house with no complaints.

I have to have a unit that runs on 120v as that is all the box on the electric pole to the barn can handle. Luckily, I have found units that can do that for around $200.

deltawave
May. 5, 2011, 07:54 AM
I have to have a unit that runs on 120v as that is all the box on the electric pole to the barn can handle. Luckily, I have found units that can do that for around $200.

Tankless/endless hot water systems are wonderful, but VERY heavy amperage is required if you want high flow and/or high temps. The voltage is one thing, but you need to know how many amps your barn's service can handle! The really skimpy/low power units will give you a little bit of warm water. Better off with propane if the electrical service is not up to the job.

Mali
May. 5, 2011, 10:08 PM
Interesting...guess I know what will be on my anniversary wish list this year ;) So much better than jewelry...

LauraKY
May. 5, 2011, 10:21 PM
Schneider's Tack has the same thing (but for horses) on sale for $149.

KrazyTBMare
May. 6, 2011, 12:55 AM
I cant remember the amperage but I remember a few years ago when I was looking into them that it was the right amperage. Ill double check of course. How do they compare to a washer? in regards to voltage and amperage.

kmw2707
May. 6, 2011, 12:38 PM
I ordered one through Amazon. They get it from Sportsman's Guide. I was told it was backordered as well, until May 6th, then a second email claiming BO til May 9th. I was happily suprised to get a 3rd email on April 29th saying it was out for delivery.

I have not tried it yet (need to get propane tank filled and batteries) but hopefully will get to this weekend (if it doesn't rain constantly!)

deltawave
May. 6, 2011, 03:22 PM
Mine is hard-wired to a 220V circuit (like an electric dryer), and draws 60 amps all by itself. But we have COLD water coming up (55 degrees pretty much year round) and I can have it at 100 degrees pretty much endlessly, at 3 gallons per minute. Plenty for baths. If I need scalding hot water I use a bucket heater.

Plumcreek
May. 6, 2011, 10:44 PM
The Schneider's model is only $119., without the 25' curly hose and fancy spray nozzle. I prefer the old sarvis washing curry combs that screw onto the hose for washing and rinsing off. http://www.sstack.com/stable_bathing-necessities/insta-hot-unit/

able master
May. 12, 2011, 10:29 AM
Ive recently discovered something that works great and its already put together for you!

Its this amazing portable Horse Washing System!!

I saw it at a couple of friends barns and after seeing how great it works, i knew i had to Splurge and buy this for my horse!

She actually doesn't mind it because it constantly has hot water, you have to check it out. I ordered mine on eBay under User name myrubberneck

I believe theres a website called myrubberneck too!

Its one item you wont regret buying!!!:)

deltawave
May. 12, 2011, 10:49 AM
How much do you sell them for? :rolleyes: :lol:

The website gets an "F" from the Better Business Bureau.

able master
May. 12, 2011, 10:55 AM
yeah i looked at that too, but im very happy with my product and so are my friends! I think those last reviews were from a few years ago!

I paid 549.17 for it!
Worth every penny!!!

TheJenners
May. 12, 2011, 12:31 PM
Reported :rolleyes:

Mali
May. 12, 2011, 09:35 PM
So the website says it puts out 1.4 gallons per minute of hot water - is that enough volume to bathe a horse? I notice that they have a 2nd unit that is more expensive, but it puts out over 2 gallons per minute. I'm wondering if that one might be more suited to barn use?

http://www.campingworld.com/shopping/item/eccotemp-high-capacity-portable-water-heater/42241

"•2 "D" cell battery ignition
•2.65 gallons of hot water per minute
•Adjustable water temperature from 80-150 degrees F
•Adapter attaches to any standard garden house style nozzle
•Includes 9' CSA approved regulator
•Includes hot and regulator for attaching to standard LP tank
•20 minute auto safety shut off timer
•Needs 30-80 PSI of water pressure
•Uses two D cell batteries for ignition
•1/2 NPT fittings for easy plumbing
•Includes 20 kW 10 liter water heater, 3.5' LP regulator hose, 1/2" NPT to garden hose adapter, stainless steel rain cap and hardware
•For outdoor use only"


How does one determine how much water pressure they have? I have very high water pressure and don't want it to be too much!

Moderator 1
May. 12, 2011, 09:38 PM
Nothing overt turning up behind the scenes, but as always, reader beware... ;)

TheJenners
May. 12, 2011, 09:42 PM
;)

trubandloki
May. 13, 2011, 10:25 AM
Marli, I doubt you have too much to worry about when it comes to too high water pressure.

I believe the maximum allowed in most areas per code is 80psi (if the main has more a pressure reducing valve would be required).


The problem with the information provided is that it does not tell you what it means by warm water. You really need to know what the temperature rise in gallons per minute it provides is.

Flow wise to give you a comparison, I am guessing your kitchen faucet gives you 2.2 gallons per minute.

baysngreys
May. 13, 2011, 10:27 AM
One of my boarders got me the one from Schneiders for Christmas (hint, hint, her horse hated the cold water!)

It runs off a portable propane tank and does produce a constant stream of warm water - BUT - you have to turn the water input pressure waaaaay down to get it really hot. And the output pressure (that you're spraying on the horse) is pretty low. I have really good pressure on the farm, with a plain hose I can blast the hair right off them!

I'm not complaining as it was a gift, but I certainly wouldn't give a full body bath in the winter and expect to get my horse rinsed clean with warm water. It's great for spot rinsing or a small amount of hot water to clean a cut.

Make sure you attach all the connections and hoses properly and tightly! Took about 5 tries to get it working without any leaks and that was with plumbers tape.
And as mentioned above, you MUST detach and drain the whole unit after each use. I got the system down but trying to get boarders to turn off unit, turn off gas, disconnect water hose, remove drain plug...

baysngreys
May. 13, 2011, 10:33 AM
Flow wise to give you a comparison, I am guessing your kitchen faucet gives you 2.2 gallons per minute.

As mentioned above the flow quoted for the Hot Water Unit is 1.4 gpm.

If you want to see how much that is, turn your faucet on half-way - that's about what you have coming out to bathe your horse.

alabama
May. 13, 2011, 05:36 PM
The problem with the information provided is that it does not tell you what it means by warm water. You really need to know what the temperature rise in gallons per minute it provides is.
If you click on the Specs tab is does tell you this: "Adjustable water temperature from 80-150 degrees F" and this "Needs 20-80 PSI of water pressure". Of course, the temp doesn't really answer how hard the water is running when it's 150 deg. but I think someone here answered with her experience with it.

Mali
May. 13, 2011, 08:55 PM
Well - I just checked my gallons per minute at the barn, and my faucet is putting out over 17.5 gallons per minute! Somehow, I don't think this portable hot water unit is going to satisfy me. I can't go from my current water pressure to a piddly trickle and be anywhere near happy.

deltawave
May. 13, 2011, 09:11 PM
It's a little bit of algebra. If you have water at 60 degrees coming out of the tap at 10 gallons per minute, then you splice in hot water that's 40 degrees warmer than the tap at 2 gallons per minute, the water at the end of your horse will be 68 degrees. If the unit can raise the temperature by 60 degrees over baseline, you'll get your 10 gallons per minute at 72 degrees.

If you could live with flow of 5 gallons per minute (probably fine for bathing, which is mostly on/off with the water) then the same settings would get you water at 78 and 102 degrees. The latter is plenty warm for horse baths.

I think I got that math right. :) Mine can do up to 3 gallons per minute at a "delta T" (raising the temperature over baseline) of 40 - 60 degrees. Set at 40 degrees over baseline, our very chilly well water is right at the 95-100 degree mark, endlessly and in more than sufficient volume for even vigorous rinsing.

TheJenners
May. 13, 2011, 10:30 PM
That fact that you can do math like that has me in awe.... :eek:

deltawave
May. 13, 2011, 11:24 PM
It took me a while. :lol: I am so very, very math impaired but this kind of algebra does come in handy. And I'm still not sure those numbers are correct. :p

Plumcreek
May. 15, 2011, 03:09 AM
As mentioned above the flow quoted for the Hot Water Unit is 1.4 gpm.

If you want to see how much that is, turn your faucet on half-way - that's about what you have coming out to bathe your horse.

I have changed from blasting them with water pressure to using less water flow and the old Sarvis curry comb wash thingy. It would do the job with 1.4 gallons per minute, and gets the water right down to the skin.

http://www.horsehealthusa.com/details/Sarvis-Wash--Curry-Comb/125-12625.html

Actually, a lot of pressure soon blows these off the hose connection.

trubandloki
May. 16, 2011, 04:11 PM
It's a little bit of algebra. If you have water at 60 degrees coming out of the tap at 10 gallons per minute, then you splice in hot water that's 40 degrees warmer than the tap at 2 gallons per minute, the water at the end of your horse will be 68 degrees. If the unit can raise the temperature by 60 degrees over baseline, you'll get your 10 gallons per minute at 72 degrees.

If you could live with flow of 5 gallons per minute (probably fine for bathing, which is mostly on/off with the water) then the same settings would get you water at 78 and 102 degrees. The latter is plenty warm for horse baths.

I think I got that math right. :) Mine can do up to 3 gallons per minute at a "delta T" (raising the temperature over baseline) of 40 - 60 degrees. Set at 40 degrees over baseline, our very chilly well water is right at the 95-100 degree mark, endlessly and in more than sufficient volume for even vigorous rinsing.
Not going to even try to check your math. Going to blindly believe it.

A 60degree delta T is a pretty good rise.

In the northern states the water coming in this time of year is around 40degs. With a 60deg rise it would work nicely.

I am shocked it has that high of a delta T.

baysngreys
May. 17, 2011, 08:03 PM
All I know is that there isn't enough pressure coming out to really scrub a horse and rinse the way I like, and the temp, well, if I keep my hand under the flow of water long enough, it does kinda feel warm.

A neighbor has a small Insta-Hot hot water heater in her barn, runs off electric. I think it's definitely worth the extra cost.

deltawave
May. 17, 2011, 09:21 PM
I'm not sure I'd want to ask mine to do a sixty-degree temperature rise due to the electric it would u$e, but it is a monster unit, hard-wired on a 220V circuit with 60 amps all to itself. I have it set at 40 and it's just loafing.

Did I *need* one that beefy? No. Did we *need* a one-ton pickup to haul a 2-horse trailer? No. But I let my engineer husband make these manly decisions. :lol:

Our well water rarely goes below the 50 degrees that seems to be the eternal deep ground temperature.

springer
Jun. 6, 2011, 12:35 PM
I'm reviving this thread as I am about to order one of these things...
So more input please from those "in the know!" Can't decide which one to order!