PDA

View Full Version : Riding Schedule for your young horse?



Ozone
Mar. 21, 2011, 10:54 AM
How many times a week do you ride your green horse?
If you are not riding what other type of work do you do?

I think I am being too generous with my horses schedule so I am curious what you all are doing. Thanks!

findeight
Mar. 21, 2011, 11:18 AM
Depends on how Green it is. Assuming you are talking just starting under saddle??? Anything from 2 to 3???

I had better luck schedualing younger horses shorter sessions more frequently. Attention span is about 3 seconds and it does not soak in if you go more then about 30 minutes initially.

Typical schedual for me with one just starting out was...

Tues. Lunge/ground drive with side reins 30 minutes.

Wed. Lunge/ground drive in sidereins 15 minutes. Mount (remove sidereins) and walk on loose rein 5 minutes. Trot both ways about 10 minutes. Canter once or twice around each way on as loose a rein as possible.

Thursday. Mount right up and w-t each way for a 20 minute total. Canter 5 minutes each way in a relaxed fashion, loose a rein as possible. Do some simple, undemanding halts each way.

Fri. About the same time frame but start to add a few large circles, a touch more contact and expect a quicker response to the halt.

Sat. Same thing again but build on what has been mastered on the basic level by asking for a little more. If they were good on Friday? You can even give them the day off.

Sun. Review.

Mon. Off.

So that's just a sample and, obviously, good manners in the groom stall and tacking up are part of the total time you are going to spend but I did not include it in your 30 minutes of training time. You also MIGHT have to just lunge that first day if they are too fresh to absorb anything...and I found once they work down, a real green colt doesn't absorb much but almost all are much more ready that next day.

As they get better, you add more time. Try to quit on a good note. 5 or 6 days initially, as they get good you can certainly reduce that. IME, a tired horse is jut that-tired. They don't really learn at that point, just too tired to argue.

This also works really well for older horses that have to do some remedial work, shorter sessions more often and resist the urge to try to fix it all at once.

And, you know, in a perfect world with a real fresh one, we could lunge/ground drive in the morning and come back in the afternoon...but most of us don't live there.

Pally
Mar. 21, 2011, 11:37 AM
If you aren't going to be riding/working them almost daily, I think it is more beneficial to schedule a few days in a row of work, followed by a chunk of rest, rather than alternating a day or two of each back and forth. This gives you a chance to reinforce what you are working on and really get them to absorb it, and most of them manage to just need q little review to get back to where they left off.

findeight
Mar. 21, 2011, 11:43 AM
If you aren't going to be riding/working them almost daily, I think it is more beneficial to schedule a few days in a row of work, followed by a chunk of rest, rather than alternating a day or two of each back and forth. This gives you a chance to reinforce what you are working on and really get them to absorb it, and most of them manage to just need q little review to get back to where they left off.


Absolutely. Try to never give them more then one day off at a time and remember the more days in a row you can get in with those short sessions, the more that little pea brain will absorb. Plus you don't waste time with a silly, fresh one and end up with that tired colt that is not going to get much except tired out of his session.

Don't worry, you don't have to do this forever but it sure helps that first 60 days or so. One reasons trainers that specialize in colt breaking seem so much more talented at this-they really aren't, they just devote the proper amount of time to it.

RyuEquestrian
Mar. 21, 2011, 01:32 PM
Keep it varied (so they stay mentally engaged), keep it frequent (so they don't forget) and keep it short (so they don't burn out). Those are my three rules.

We try to get them out of the ring as mch as possible, going forward on some trails behind our farm, both long lined and mounted.

They get to spend some time in the round pen free lunging.

And finally, they get their regular work in the ring.

Ozone
Mar. 21, 2011, 02:34 PM
Keep it varied (so they stay mentally engaged), keep it frequent (so they don't forget) and keep it short (so they don't burn out). Those are my three rules.

.

LOVE this! :)

The horse in question is (ashamed to say) 6 but a 3 year old training wise/mind.

My schedule has been:
M: Ride WT only some canter (circles, 8's all that type stuff)
T: Lunge WTC
W: Day off
Thur: Ride
Friday: Lunge
Sat: Off

and repeat for the next week. This is not working. I need to ride more even if it is 30 minutes U/S and some time on the lunge with sides after or before.

When he has a day off the next lunge day he is quiet but come the following day he is fresh.

After reading some of your schedules I feel riding him more is the key. I rode him last two day in a row and he's been excellent. I want him to absorb but not blow his mind absorbing.