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holaamigoalter
Mar. 20, 2011, 10:42 PM
So I got this email about my horse that is for sale on Friday:

Hello , Have interest in your horse we will be upstate Ny looking at several Horse and are hoping we can demo yours , if you could also answer the below questions which will unable use to make a better assesment of the Horse. 1.How long have you had the horse, has horse been active and ridden in last 3 months ? if not when was horse last active and in what capacity. 2.Was he/she owned by a previous owner please provide info. as you are aware of on previous owner? 3.What are your reasons for selling the horse, please answer in some detail? 4.Has he/she had any previous health/medical issues that could affect its performance? UTD on medical?? 5.How does Horse Load ,Clip and Tack, requires shoeing 6. How is this horse on public trails, leads , goes alone , only follows in group?? 7 .Does Horse have any vices, or Poor Habits, what are you currently feeding and supplements 8 .Is there a special diet/supplement that they consume? 9 .Have you ever had any issues with this horse before/ and Scars or old injuries?? 10. If any, how many shows have the performed in? 11 .How did they place in those shows? how many horse approx. where in Competition 12.How is the horse around other animal(dogs) & around other horses? 13. How is he/she under saddle? ever ridden Bare Back? 14..Do they require soft hand/gentle mouth riders? 15..How sensitive are they to leg/mouth cues?please explain in detail if possible 16. What is Horse temperament, and in you estimation what type of rider is this horse suited For Beginner, Novice , Intermediate, college level, Professional etc.... If their is any other Helpful information you can think of please let us know, also if we leave deposit on Horse would you hold for 5-7 days? if so would the Deposit be Refundable? we are serious about a purchase and have 4-5 horses in mind that we are hoping to match best with my Daughter(1). God Bless have a Good day Christy & Noel:-)


I didn't respond and today I got this:

Hello, 3-20-2011 This is Noel and Christy, we contacted you about this Horse a few days ago. We are looking to see Her this Coming Friday 3/25/11 in the Evening. We will be coming from quite a distance (Long Island) so we would arrive until 5:30pm or so, In the interim please try to answer all thes questions to the best of your ability. As we are serious buyers and are view 4-5 horses between Friday and Sunday in the Up state NY area. We thank you for your information so that we can make an educated assement to match each Horse with the Rider. You may Fax your response @ 631-234-1914 if that is easier for you. .1How long have you had the horse, has horse been active and ridden in last 3 months ? if not when was horse last active and in what capacity. 2.Was he/she owned by a previous owner please provide info. as you are aware of on previous owner? 3.What are your reasons for selling the horse, please answer in some detail? 4.Has he/she had any previous health/medical issues that could affect its performance? UTD on medical?? 5.How does Horse Load ,Clip and Tack, requires shoeing 6. How is this horse on public trails, leads , goes alone , only follows in group?? 7 .Does Horse have any vices, or Poor Habits, what are you currently feeding and supplements 8 .Is there a special diet/supplement that they consume? 9 .Have you ever had any issues with this horse before/ and Scars or old injuries?? 10. If any, how many shows have the performed in? 11 .How did they place in those shows? how many horse approx. where in Competition 12.How is the horse around other animal(dogs) & around other horses? 13. How is he/she under saddle? ever ridden Bare Back? 14..Do they require soft hand/gentle mouth riders? 15..How sensitive are they to leg/mouth cues?please explain in detail if possible 16. What is Horse temperament, and in you estimation what type of rider is this horse suited For Beginner, Novice , Intermediate, college level, Professional etc.... If their is any other Helpful information you can think of please let us know, also if we leave deposit on Horse would you hold for 5-7 days? if so would the Deposit be Refundable? we are serious about a purchase and have 4-5 horses in mind that we are hoping to match best with my Daughter. If you have already sent a response please re-send as we don't have it yet?? Have a Great evening. Kindest Regards, Noel & Christy :-)

I responded with my phone number asking them to call for more info and got this:

Christy or I will contact you tomorrow to go over our questions we have.
If its easier for you to Fax answers you can to 631-234-1914. Just be aware if we do it by
phone it may take sometime as we will need to jot down your info. to paper. while you give the
info to us . Since we are looking at 5-6 Horses we will be using this info. along with the demo and
Live visit to make a choice and selection that best suits My Daughter and family.
So I apologies I have a systematic way of doing things , and It has brought
me allot of success writing info, and asking many questions.
Especially, Before making purchases on Products and or animals
I look forward to talking with you. I can also tell you that you would be our First stop on Friday late
afternoon. If you could also tell me also How many hrs are you out of the NYC (New York City)
Once again thanks for your time.

Noel & Christy:-)




So....scam right?

Koniucha
Mar. 20, 2011, 10:48 PM
If not a scam, then maybe they are robots looking at horses??

Beethoven
Mar. 20, 2011, 10:55 PM
I dunno. Doesn't seem as generic as a scam. Maybe they are foreign and using a translator? They seem to know more about horses than the average and actually want to come see the horse. I would answer the questions and see if they show up.

spina
Mar. 20, 2011, 11:46 PM
I think it sounds like someone asking (mostly) good, legitimate questions about your horse, and English probably isn't their first language. With the market being what it is, I must say I'm pretty surprised you A. didn't respond to their first inquiry, and B. asked them to call so you could answer their questions instead of replying as they requested, which would give them the opportunity to get translation help if necessary. They didn't ask for money, I wouldn't assume it's a scam. I think it would be considerate to reply to their questions. If they're still interested in including your horse in their road trip, you need to trust your instincts. Maybe ask a friend or two to be around when they come. Unless you really don't want to sell your horse.

holaamigoalter
Mar. 21, 2011, 12:00 AM
But the asking if they can leave a deposit and if its refundable? Seems a little quick to be asking that and seems like one of those send a fake check and then refund them the money and then find out the check doesn't clear. And only replying via fax? It doesn't make sense.

smileyrileyxoxo
Mar. 21, 2011, 12:04 AM
I don't think its a scam! these people just sound like non horsepeople trying to ask all the right questions and find a horse through some type of system....

doublesstable
Mar. 21, 2011, 12:07 AM
If not a scam, then maybe they are robots looking at horses??

Since I use facebook (LIKE) :lol:

SnicklefritzG
Mar. 21, 2011, 12:32 AM
They sound more like newbies to me. The fact that they asked about a deposit doesn't necessarily mean its a scam. They may just be further down the road saying to themselves "what if" they like such and such horse but still have others they want to see.

My advice would have been to respond to the first email saying "I would be happy to answer your questions, but would find it helpful if we could talk on the phone first". That might give you a better idea if they are genuine or not. I can understand though why they might want a faxed response if they are looking at a large number of horses and are worried about collecting and organizing data. If they have a list they send to everyone that might be easier for them compared with making a bunch of calls and then trying to take down notes, possibly miss details, etc.

SnicklefritzG
Mar. 21, 2011, 12:33 AM
one more thing: don't let the horse off the property until the money is in your bank account, regardless of who ends up buying your horse.

alto
Mar. 21, 2011, 12:52 AM
I'd wait to speak to them on the phone before providing such detailed information aboout my horse - I'm somewhat sceptical ...

LunaTheGreyMare
Mar. 21, 2011, 01:11 AM
I'd wait to speak to them on the phone before providing such detailed information aboout my horse - I'm somewhat sceptical ...

I agree:)

Macimage
Mar. 21, 2011, 01:12 AM
I would have answered their first email as those are all good questions (maybe a bit detailed, but pertinent).

Scammers usually don't ask those types of questions. Often times they don't even know what the item you are selling is and will have a story about being overseas and sending their shipper to pick up the "thing or item".

These folks offered to come to your location on a buying trip to inspect your horse.

It is great that they took the time to send you a second request after not hearing back from you.

I am one that prefers to correspond via email and would rather have all the information that I am gathering in written form rather than trying to write down everything you say on the phone.

Happy Trails~
Joyce

Jaideux
Mar. 21, 2011, 02:12 AM
Whatever you do, make sure neither one of them is about to become pregnant :P

As long as you're not divulging anything super personal, I think it's okay to give them a little benefit of the doubt. I doubt they could run too good a scam on just the answers to the questions and your fax number.

If they do want to put down a deposit, insist that it be in a cashiers check or cash, and that they must give it to you in person AFTER they see the horse. I'm assuming you aren't interested in selling a horse to people you haven't met/seen how well they suit the horse and vice versa, so stipulating that no money will exchange hands until after the meeting is reasonable.

In terms of refunding a deposit, that's your call I guess, but I would be more inclined to simply hang onto the check (written out for the exact amount, no more no less) and cash it once the sale is final, as opposed to trying to cash it and then give them money out of your account. And I imagine all sales are final :)

And, if coming from Long Island, I imagine they probably board (though, who knows, maybe there are farmettes on LI), so it might be appropriate for you to ask to speak to their BO/BM. Of course your goal is to find out if they're real customers and not scammers, but for the sake of politeness, etc, you can say it's to find out about the program at the stable to so you can plan ahead to help the horses switch over to new grain, etc, and find out if there is any specific records the barn requires that you can facilitate getting there, etc :)

meupatdoes
Mar. 21, 2011, 02:42 AM
For the record, I think it's a scam.
(Additionally what is up with them TELLING you when your demo appointment will be, as if you don't have anything to do on Friday nights? Scammers really seem to think that the "This is the way it's going to be" approach is the key to success, and I can't possibly think of anything more annoying or alienating.)

But if you think it might be legit, I would insist on talking about the horse via a phone call and ask them to give me a number where I can call them. Not the other way around. Make them answer a phone like normal people.

During this phonecall I would ask them several questions about where they would keep the horse and who their trainer/farrier/vet is for references.

I would also explain to them what the meaning of a "deposit" is; the whole point is that it is not refundable.

No way, no how would that horse so much as set a toe off the property until it was paid for in full AND the bank had cashed and confirmed the final funds transfer.

turningpointequine
Mar. 21, 2011, 08:14 AM
I dunno. Doesn't seem as generic as a scam. Maybe they are foreign and using a translator? They seem to know more about horses than the average and actually want to come see the horse. I would answer the questions and see if they show up.

I agree. It doesn't hurt anything to answer their questions but you may lose a sale if you ignore them. Sounds like they are looking at several horses and just want a written description of each to keep their records straight. That's a good idea actually. I've talked to buyers several times to all of a sudden be asked "which horse do you have for sale, sorry I'm looking at several".

ktm2007
Mar. 21, 2011, 08:44 AM
For the record, I think it's a scam.
(Additionally what is up with them TELLING you when your demo appointment will be, as if you don't have anything to do on Friday nights? Scammers really seem to think that the "This is the way it's going to be" approach is the key to success, and I can't possibly think of anything more annoying or alienating.)

But if you think it might be legit, I would insist on talking about the horse via a phone call and ask them to give me a number where I can call them. Not the other way around. Make them answer a phone like normal people.

During this phonecall I would ask them several questions about where they would keep the horse and who their trainer/farrier/vet is for references.

I would also explain to them what the meaning of a "deposit" is; the whole point is that it is not refundable.

No way, no how would that horse so much as set a toe off the property until it was paid for in full AND the bank had cashed and confirmed the final funds transfer.

This 100%. Maybe I am a skeptical person, but my vote goes to scam.

Concetta
Mar. 21, 2011, 08:59 AM
SCAM

barnbum81
Mar. 21, 2011, 09:09 AM
scam, they give you deposit, you put it in bank, they ask for refund because they liked other horse better, you refund, they disappear, their check bounced back

grandprixjump
Mar. 21, 2011, 09:15 AM
Like some have said might be, might not be. But if it is, with these questions you would be REALLY improving the scammers knowledge of horses..

Halt Near X
Mar. 21, 2011, 09:24 AM
It is rare for a typical 419 scammer to send a follow-up email to an individual non-responsive target.

Their MO is to send out the same email to a very large group of people and then work with the ones who reply. This requires the least effort on their part. It also gives them immediate access to the most likely victims, since anyone who can see it is a scam or suspects it is a scam will opt themselves out.

Also, scammers typically do not track who they send the emails to in this way. They do NOT keep spreadsheets that list who they sent what email to and did the person reply. The one thing they DO track are willing victims -- someone who gets caught up in one scam is likely to get even more scam emails. But they don't track the ones who do not reply.

So if this is a 419 scam, it's a very drastic change of tactics for them.

I would just proceed cautiously. Give them whatever information you are comfortable with in whatever format you are most comfortable (email/phone/fax). See if they actually show up, or if their next move is to say they suddenly had to move overseas, but love your horse from your description, and will send a shipper... then you know for sure.

And let us know if it does turn out to be a scam, because if it is, it's the first new tactic I have seen coming from them in years.

Beethoven
Mar. 21, 2011, 09:48 AM
Whenever I have taken a deposit on a horse, I don't deposit it unless the horse gets sold. So, to me I would just hold the check and give it back to them if they don't get the horse. I would especially do so in this case. Hey in this economy, if you can afford to blow off a potential buyer than do it.

Again, I say it doesn't hurt to follow through. Also require the check be a cashier check if they do buy your horse.

I just don't think its the classic scam.

horsechick
Mar. 21, 2011, 09:53 AM
scam, they give you deposit, you put it in bank, they ask for refund because they liked other horse better, you refund, they disappear, their check bounced back

THIS

red mares
Mar. 21, 2011, 09:54 AM
Scam.

When I was trying to rent out a room short term, I got a similar inquiry. It sounded legit until I asked for a copy of ID and they blew me off and I wouldn't go further with out it. Then I never heard from them again.

barnbum81
Mar. 21, 2011, 09:54 AM
they have been doing it to dog breeders for years now

spina
Mar. 21, 2011, 10:05 AM
I would insist on talking about the horse via a phone call and ask them to give me a number where I can call them. Not the other way around. Make them answer a phone like normal people.


Normal people? Does that mean only the English speaking ones? I think it's a bit narrow minded to assume that everyone is comfortable enough with the English language to be able to get all those questions answered over the phone.




No way, no how would that horse so much as set a toe off the property until it was paid for in full AND the bank had cashed and confirmed the final funds transfer.

That's really the bottom line. You control the sale, you control the horse. Taking a deposit is up to you, but of course you also control that - it can be a signed contract valid for one week (or one day, or whatever you want), and I'd recommend that you don't deposit anything - if they give you a check that you need to return, send them back their original check - registered mail.

It may be a scam, but it doesn't sound like it to me. Some people don't speak English, or they have some of the vocabulary but little grasp of the language, some people have a combination poor language AND social skills. Sometimes it's just a cultural difference. Doesn't mean they can't provide a good home for your horse. Just take proper precautions to protect yourself, as you would with any potential sale.

caffeinated
Mar. 21, 2011, 10:11 AM
I vote scam.

They're getting smarter. Much smarter. As they send scam bait out, more and more smart/savvy horse people are weeding out the scammers by asking pointed questions. In response, scammers are learning the lingo of the various communities they are targeting.

It's also worth pointing out that email scams have grown quite a bit, and aren't just coming out of Nigeria anymore.

sar2008
Mar. 21, 2011, 10:17 AM
Whatever you do, make sure neither one of them is about to become pregnant :P

:lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:

People in my office are staring at me wondering why I just blurt out laughing. Thanks Jaideux. :lol:

WishIWereRiding
Mar. 21, 2011, 10:51 AM
I think it's a scam. Why would you fax a response when you have email? Makes no sense! And scammers always add on the "God Bless" thing at the end, so as to make them seem more legit. I would ask them detailed questions about where they would keep the horse, vet reference, etc, what trainer they work with. Also, if they were real people who didn't speak good English, then why isn't the trainer looking for them? Scam I say!

paint hunter
Mar. 21, 2011, 10:59 AM
Perhaps hold the "deposit" check and if they chose not to see or buy the horse, give them back the actual check or money order they gave to you. Don't deposit it with the idea of refunding the money if not purchased.

leilatigress
Mar. 21, 2011, 11:05 AM
Those are all valid questions though if the horse is listed his/her ad should list answers to most of those questions. I vote newbies. I have a list of specific questions I ask sellers that vary a little on my requirements. I do always come armed with my own tack and a measuring stick to any seller. Though I am convinced when it comes time for DD to get her own horse we're buying the tack too, English tack is too damn confusing to fit and I have yet to meet a saddle fitter that wasn't a scam artist.

MintHillFarm
Mar. 21, 2011, 12:48 PM
I'd wait to speak to them on the phone before providing such detailed information aboout my horse - I'm somewhat sceptical ...

I'm with you. And I wouldn't give out any addresses either...I am a pessimist these days. There are scams everywhere,

I had an antique table for sale on ebay and had some weird responses like - "heading up your way in NY and would like to pick up the table this weekend"...

I think it sounds very odd.

SillyHorse
Mar. 21, 2011, 01:18 PM
Perhaps hold the "deposit" check and if they chose not to see or buy the horse, give them back the actual check or money order they gave to you. Don't deposit it with the idea of refunding the money if not purchased.
THIS.

Mel0309
Mar. 21, 2011, 02:06 PM
I vote scam.

They're getting smarter. Much smarter. As they send scam bait out, more and more smart/savvy horse people are weeding out the scammers by asking pointed questions. In response, scammers are learning the lingo of the various communities they are targeting.

It's also worth pointing out that email scams have grown quite a bit, and aren't just coming out of Nigeria anymore.

And they aren't all emails either. I got a call from a young sounding Caucasian guy at 1 a.m. about a pony I have for sale with a blocked phone number. I asked him if he realized what time it was and he said he was from Oregon and didn't look to see where the pony was but he wanted to go ahead and wire me money and have her shipped right away. Didn't ask me any questions about her and wanted to trade his stallion. When I said I didn't want to trade he said he would send the stallion anyway. I said no thanks and please call back the next day as I was half asleep. Never heard from him again.

SarahandSam
Mar. 21, 2011, 02:21 PM
I'm thinking scam, but I'd play along with it just out of curiosity... talk to the people on the phone, at least. I'm pretty sure they'd try giving you the deposit, saying they liked another horse more, and then wanting money back. However, I'd like to bust the scamming bastards, so if you get a weird vibe after continued contact with them, I'd probably call the police and see if there's a way to rig this to catch them in the act. (;

caffeinated
Mar. 21, 2011, 02:27 PM
Again, I say it doesn't hurt to follow through. Also require the check be a cashier check if they do buy your horse.

If they actually take possession of the horse, then it's probably not a scam. But asking for a deposit to be a cashier check is no guarantee of anything. Scams have been really successful largely because they are so good at faking cashier checks in the first place.

HRF Second Chance
Mar. 21, 2011, 02:50 PM
Scam!!! RUN RUN RUN!

Let me share a little story with you! We would get a similiar email from someone overseas who wanted to send their teeenager to come to the States to bellydance for 2 weeks (my other hobby is bellydance). The usual scam is that they send you a deposit and OOPS it's too big can you send me back the overage and it's written on a stolen money order.

The other scam I can see it being in this case is they take your horse on the hot money order, then disappear with your beast and sell it for whatever they can get from it.

Not to be a nay-sayer but this screams a scam.

mypaintwattie
Mar. 21, 2011, 03:40 PM
SCAM. The spelling, punctuation and grammar in the responses scream something is up, along with the way they word the sentences and the questions they are asking. If you reply, give them the contact info for a few local trainers who can help. Or just give basic, basic info and ask them questions like where they will board, how much experience the daughter has, goals with the horse, vet and farrier info, ect. But to me it screams scam. The scammers are getting much better because they get responses with specific information and are able to use it- years ago they would just ask about the horse or trailer, now they can ask if its a gelding or a living quarters.

GreystoneKC
Mar. 21, 2011, 04:28 PM
I vote scam.

Too many red flags: semi-broken English and odd capitalization and punctuation, asking about deposit and refund in first email, "we are serious about purchase" (they are always trying to show how seriously they are interested), "God bless" (as someone else mentioned, this is a staple), "coming from a long distance" and trying to tell you when they will arrive, asking you to FAX the info (not email) and avoiding phone contact, they said they would call and I'm assuming did not, Friday evening would be their first stop?, pointing out that NYC = New York City...

Yes, these people are asking some good questions, but some are strange and phrased very strangely. How many shows have they performed in? Wanting details about previous owners? Asking about what it "consumes"? OK, so maybe some of it could be a language barrier, but it does seem strange. I legitimate buyer with a language barrier would have this handled by a trainer.

I would speak to them on the phone and only after they pass that test, move on. If I took a deposit, I would not deposit it at all and return it, as is, if they did not buy the horse. If they offer to buy the horse, it must be paid for in cash only. And I am generally a trusting person.

holaamigoalter
Mar. 21, 2011, 04:50 PM
They called me and I got the name of her trainer. This would be her first horse. I called the trainer and the trainer was gone for the day so I'll check back in tomorrow.

I told them I would only accept the deposit in cash and if they decided to buy, the horse could not leave the property until the check had cleared. After I told them that they were pretty quick to get off the phone and never mentioned Friday at 5:30 again. Hmmm.

The girl sounded VERY young but that means nothing as I know a 40 year old woman that sounds like a 10 year old on the phone.

Alot of questions she asked sounded like questions that one would google to ask. Some were ridiculous questions that I could see my dad making me ask when I was that age. Like, have you ever ridden her bareback and what was she like. Huh?! She never mentioned what the horse would be used for or what level of rider she was.

Halt Near X
Mar. 21, 2011, 05:17 PM
Alot of questions she asked sounded like questions that one would google to ask.

Could be. But I can think of worse situations than an inexperienced, first-time buyer who looks up some checklists on Google and uses them to work through the process.

It still could be a scam, but if so your cash/cleared check stipulation will probably get them out of your hair.

DRSsporthorses
Mar. 21, 2011, 05:37 PM
ABSOLUTE SCAM

A. Why can't they pick up the phone and have conversation with you?
B. Fax?!? Really they want a fax instead of discussion....screams big red flag to me.
C. Looking at 5 or 6 as fast at possible. Does anyone besides me see this as a production line?
D. Get their references. Given the fact they are expecting information up front, I see no reason you can't expect the same.

I won't even get into the lack of ability to schedule an appointment other than it seems to be a good time for them. :no:

Somermist
Mar. 21, 2011, 05:43 PM
Update from OP? Any more contact?

holaamigoalter
Mar. 21, 2011, 05:55 PM
Update from OP? Any more contact?

I posted as the second to last comment on page 2.

foursocks
Mar. 21, 2011, 06:02 PM
Just for everyone's information, the Nigerian scammers have been joined by a lot of American scammers, who have become much more successful over the past few years. Good old American Ingenuity! And, the use of "broken English" is not confined to non-Americans, either, trust me- I'm a teacher.

meupatdoes
Mar. 21, 2011, 06:30 PM
Normal people? Does that mean only the English speaking ones? I think it's a bit narrow minded to assume that everyone is comfortable enough with the English language to be able to get all those questions answered over the phone.


No, I meant normal people as in people who aren't likely to be using a fax number at their local Kinko's to avoid giving out a personal phone number that costs money to maintain and makes them much more traceable.

Sorry to burst your dramakins bubble, but sometimes people on COTH aren't automatically xenophobic or racist just because they don't just get their Benefit Of The Doubt dusted right off and immediately assume that "oh, well, they're probably deaf and need a special phone."

meupatdoes
Mar. 21, 2011, 06:32 PM
If they actually take possession of the horse, then it's probably not a scam.

What?

Then they sell the horse for quick cash to the first person or auction they find just about at the same time you are discovering that the check they paid for the horse with was fake and they are nowhere to be found.

Timex
Mar. 21, 2011, 06:50 PM
i dunno. i had someone send me a similar email, they showed up, tried the horse, paid CASH and took him home the next day. plus, i've got a really well-paying client who has 5 horses with us, and his emails are MUCH more poorly written than that (english not being his first language). spells phonetically, punctuation be damned, but he pays the bills!!!

holaamigoalter
Mar. 21, 2011, 07:15 PM
i dunno. i had someone send me a similar email, they showed up, tried the horse, paid CASH and took him home the next day. plus, i've got a really well-paying client who has 5 horses with us, and his emails are MUCH more poorly written than that (english not being his first language). spells phonetically, punctuation be damned, but he pays the bills!!!

Are you still in contact with the owner of that horse now? This horse is VERY special to me. She won't go to just anyone and I can afford to sit on her for now.

Silk
Mar. 22, 2011, 02:13 PM
And, the use of "broken English" is not confined to non-Americans, either, trust me- I'm a teacher.


^ This :) LOL!!!!!!

TheUnderstudy
Mar. 22, 2011, 03:19 PM
I'd say most likely a scam. My mom owns a boarding kennel and had someone send numerous emails, with good questions that would make it seem completely normal until he said he was from England and he was having a shipper drop them off, he would send a check for 3200 so she could pay the shipper and then keep the rest for 1/2 deposit. It was a bunch of BS and went on for months. Finally he called and it was an automated person on the other end. Took the checks to the bank, had them deal with it and said see ya later!!!

horserider12
Mar. 23, 2011, 03:27 PM
actually this is a long island phone number and I'm pretty sure I can tell you who the trainer is if you pm me. May just be a kid asking info for the trainer.

caffeinated
Mar. 24, 2011, 08:10 AM
What?

Then they sell the horse for quick cash to the first person or auction they find just about at the same time you are discovering that the check they paid for the horse with was fake and they are nowhere to be found.

Most (not all) internet scamming is not done with the intention of actually taking possession of the goods (or horse). The vast majority of the time they are about sending money in advance, and oops! they sent too much, can you please refund the difference?

People paying with bad checks, etc, is a different game completely.

Since there was a phone conversation here with an actual person (sounding like a young person who isn't sure what to ask) I may retract my previous diagnosis of scam, but would say to make sure further communications go through a trainer or someone.

mypaintwattie
Mar. 24, 2011, 02:23 PM
If the horse means a lot to you and you can hold on to her for a little longer then I would pass on the sale. Sell her to someone with more experience and knowledge who will keep in contact with you about how she is doing.

GingerJumper
Mar. 24, 2011, 02:51 PM
To me, it just sounds like they're very methodical and that english probably isn't their first language or they are just not educated writers. Ask them for a phone number, and set up YOUR own time for them to come look at the horse. You're the seller, you're in charge.