PDA

View Full Version : Just got a Centaur Installation estimate...



zakkandtoto
Mar. 20, 2011, 08:32 PM
$10.75 per linear foot for 4 rail 5" CenFlex with 10' post spacing. Flat ground, no rocks, etc... One gate.

From what I've been able to figure, a little less than half of that is for labor.

My fencing experience is extremely limited, and I realize that markets vary around the country, but could anyone tell me if the above is the norm?

I had less than 500' to fence (a long and short side of a half finished long rectangle). I wasn't expecting the estimate to be over $5,000. :(

Also, could anyone explain the difference between Centaur HTP and CenFlex? I had asked for a Centaur quote and they came back with the CenFlex quote... I can see that it has a shorter warranty and that it's less expensive.

Any help or suggestions would be appreciated.

horseluver1
Mar. 20, 2011, 08:43 PM
I would be curious to know also, since I close on my farm at the end of the month and will be doing some research on fencing options. So any information would be greatly useful.

Guin
Mar. 20, 2011, 08:56 PM
$10.75 a foot? Is it gold-plated? :eek:

BasqueMom
Mar. 20, 2011, 09:43 PM
Nope, it's not gold plated, just the estimate.

Figured it (without a diagram) using our prices $1657 or $3.30 a foot (not counting shipping because I don't where the OP is located) for CenFlex or $2239 for Centaur. Posts and concrete usually run about $1.50 a foot so another $750 for those. Sounds like the difference is labor without seeing your quote which would be about $5 a foot.

There are big differences around the country on installation costs. Larger installations can get better per foot prices than smaller ones.

Cenflex is a tad thinner than Centaur but break strength is the same. The bracket looks similar but is one piece instead of two piece. Same tensioning systems, etc.

Doesn't hurt to get more than estimate. Many customers buy from someone like us with discounted prices and then hire the pros to set the posts, etc.
Some do it all themselves. Some have the posts set and hang the rail themselves. Often the material to go on the fence is the least expensive part of the project.

HunttoLive
Mar. 21, 2011, 09:14 AM
Installing centaur fencing is pretty easy. Far easier than doing board fence. I'm also wondering why they recommended doing posts every 10'. When we did ours they recommended 12-16'. That's 8 more posts right there.

Flat ground, no rocks and one gate. That sounds pretty straight forward. You could have all the posts in in one weekend and hang the fence the next.

lostkiwi
Mar. 21, 2011, 10:14 AM
We just had a local fencing company out to give me a quote on putting fencing (the centaur type) for one acre, with 1 gate.
Quote was $4600 (and I provided Gate as I have one already).

Ouch. So we are looking into doing the project ourselves. Figure should be able to do project for half that quote, hopefully even less.

Anyone use the corded flex Electrobraid rope? I saw it at the PA Expo and really like it. Thinking about sending them my fence plan layout and measurements to get a quote for a DIY project.

BTW we are getting our local lumber mill (where we custom order wood for our barn stalls) to make out fence posts. He does them for all the local fencing companies and if I get them direct from mill I save $3.50 a post.

zakkandtoto
Mar. 21, 2011, 01:36 PM
HuntToLive, I've never seen properly installed Centaur fencing and I'm not sure if I could get it up myself. Can it be attached without a helper?

I've nailed up enough replacement boards to know I could do that...

What's worrying me are the posts. I can not dig the holes and set the posts myself and have nobody to help me, which is why I figured I'd have it professionally installed, but if they're going to charge me $40 a post hole for installation...

I've got calls in to two other fence installers. Worst case scenario, I'll go with wood (would just need the post holes dug, posts set and the boards delivered), nail on the boards myself and hot wire the top.

lostkiwi, that quote is insane. Please post pictures when you're done with it.

BasqueMom
Mar. 21, 2011, 01:43 PM
Centaur's max recommendation for post spacing is 12 feet. Rolls are sold with
brackets for 8, 10 or 12 feet and price varies with post spacing due to the number of brackets required. 12 foot is the least expensive due to less brackets required.

10 foot is gonna of a middle of the road spacing--looks closer to four board spacing of 8 feet. Spacing choice sort depends on types of horses--with
mares and foals, we tend to recommend 4 rail and closer posts. For quiet guys, 3 rail with 12 foot is probably fine. Other questions are are there horses on the other side of the fence, any escape artists in the crowd. How hard are posts to set on your place...easy ground or rock to deal with. Just a lot of variables to take into account along with the $$$ involved.

Another question is are you thinking of running some electric also, especially
with horses on each side. Centaur's coated electric wire is often used between rails as well as the non-electric coated wire.

We try to emphasize for the DIY folks to follow the directions for the corner
and end/gate post bracing. No shortcuts, no reinventing the wheel. Just follow the manual.

GallopHer
Mar. 21, 2011, 03:42 PM
We paid to have our posts set and we installed the flex rails ourselves. It was pretty simple and was a good "bonding" experience with my husband. I love the look of the Centaur fence and we've been very pleased. No escaped or injured horses and we've had the fence for about 5 years or more.

Best of luck.

zakkandtoto
Mar. 21, 2011, 03:51 PM
GallopHer, do you recall what you were charged to have the posts set?

Somermist
Mar. 21, 2011, 03:56 PM
We paid to have our posts set and we installed the flex rails ourselves. It was pretty simple and was a good "bonding" experience with my husband. I love the look of the Centaur fence and we've been very pleased. No escaped or injured horses and we've had the fence for about 5 years or more.

Best of luck.

:yes:This. It is excellent fence. Love it.

relocatedTXjumpr
Mar. 21, 2011, 04:44 PM
I have about 9 acres to fence and have been setting fence posts myself for what seems like forever. I do what I can on the weekends when the weather allows. We have rock and the back half of my property is fairly steep. I am doing no- climb wire and wooden posts.

Can I say, I hate it...I just hate it. If I EVER have to do this again, I will pay some one to do it and I would use something like Centaur.

I keep thinking, if I had just bitten the bullet and PAID the $$$$$, this would all be done...alas, I tried to save money and do it myself....live and learn.

Sparky
Mar. 21, 2011, 04:57 PM
That's almost to the penny what we paid last year to install 5000 feet of 4-rail vinyl Gardner fencing. That included 9 gates, all hardware, and each post set in concrete. They had a crew of 6 and the job was beautifully done in 10 days. We live in Minnesota.

Tamara in TN
Mar. 21, 2011, 05:45 PM
Any help or suggestions would be appreciated.


start dranking...;)

Tamara

MistyBlue
Mar. 21, 2011, 05:46 PM
A lot depends on where you live too.

I have Ramm fence (similar to Centaur) and had my fencing redone last year. I had one paddock we put up ourselves 6 years earlier that got removed and redone in straight lines (instead of the drunken ones we had) and had the second paddock fenced.

I had *all* materials. All posts, brackets, insulators, coated wire, Flex fence, ground rods, charger...even all nails, screws and bags of quik-crete. They only had to bring the manpower and machinery, that's it.

Had 680 linear fence done, 4 gates. (had all gates too) Top rail flex fence, 4 rails coated wire, one line electrobraid.

Cost was $5k for installation only. :eek: :sigh: :no:
And I painted my own posts.
And they used my chainsaw because theirs sucked and wasn't cleaned so it didn't cut much of anything.

Fence posts were mostly pounded, a few had to have crete due to the wet because it was early spring when it was done.

I'm in CT. Where everything costs a freaking arm and a leg.

I will say though that my fence looks fantastic. (it better for that price, LOL)

The larger places around here that actually have big pastures...have no bloody idea how they afford to fence it in.

cdalt
Mar. 22, 2011, 09:45 AM
Sent you a PM.

shortbusgeek
Mar. 22, 2011, 01:31 PM
We've got Centaur (that we ordered from DoubleJ... I guess that'd be basquemom. Hi Julie!) and absolutely love it! It took forever to set some of the posts as we ran into some really hard ground, but others went right in. If you're not wanting to rent or buy an auger to make the post holes, you might be able to find a local fencing company to set the posts for you fairly cheap and then install the Centaur (CenFlex / whatever) yourself. It's just a matter of being able to use a drill with a screwdriver bit and attaching the tensioners.

Whatever you decide, good luck!

Pat Ness
Mar. 22, 2011, 01:41 PM
may I ask who you used? That seems like a pretty good deal!

TrotTrotPumpkn
Mar. 22, 2011, 01:42 PM
I'd personally rather have (at least the line) fence posts driven in instead of dug in and placed anyway. Is that not recommended for Centaur installation--maybe that is different?

If I were you, I would hire the posts set (and they can do the corner bracing too if you want) and then put it up yourself. But I'm a big DIY kind of gal. I've also helped build tensioned fence before, so I have a reference point, which is that it really isn't that hard. But maybe Centaur is different.

poltroon
Mar. 22, 2011, 01:57 PM
I'd suggest you pay someone to dig the holes or to drive the posts, and then consider the rest of the installation yourself. You do need at least a second person to put posts in and it's essential the end posts are set in concrete and properly braced.

The shorter your fence run is, the higher your cost is going to be per foot, just to get the laborers to your site and to deal with the startup costs. Centaur is also much more expensive for a corner or gate end than say a plain board fence because of the bracing.

I have a similar RAMM fence in combination with no-climb, and I'm very pleased.

But, yes. Fence is really expensive.

HunttoLive
Mar. 22, 2011, 02:46 PM
Hanging the fence was not bad. We knew the height of the brackets and pre-drilled. Then we set the top of the bracket with one nail, lifted the strand into place and then nailed in the bottom. I put up most of the fence myself.

I will say if you have one full roll hung uninterrupted it can be tough to get the slack out. What I did was to put a draw bar on the tractor and then terminate the fence strand there. Then I used the tractor to take the slack out.

poltroon
Mar. 22, 2011, 03:28 PM
BTW, I strongly suggest for any fence project using stainless steel deck screws and a cordless driver rather than hammer and nails.

GallopHer
Mar. 22, 2011, 03:51 PM
Zakkandtoto - I'm sorry - I really have no idea what we paid to have the posts installed. I'll look for the invoice, but I doubt I still have it.

deltawave
Mar. 22, 2011, 05:09 PM
Crikey! I did three paddocks enclosing about 7 acres for about the same $5000! :eek: Of course, other than one paddock's worth of setting posts, the "labor" was "free" and my very own. :lol:

poltroon
Mar. 22, 2011, 07:08 PM
I was able to get a guy to come and drill the post holes for $300. It helped that I'm easy to get to and so he could just drill them on the way to another job. He had the perfect machine and lots of practice and could do in a half hour what would have taken us days to do even if we had gotten the post hole digger working. He also could easily dig 4'6" deep holes for the corners.

As I recall, materials only, my braced sections cost about $10/ft - 3 long 6" diameter dowels, 4 8' 4x4 posts (2 horizontal and 2 diagonal), plus a lot of sacks of concrete. So about $160 for 16'.

The line posts were $9 each, had no concrete, so that was about $1 per foot (depending on your post spacing) and then there's the cost of the rail.

MistyBlue
Mar. 22, 2011, 07:45 PM
Crikey! I did three paddocks enclosing about 7 acres for about the same $5000! :eek: Of course, other than one paddock's worth of setting posts, the "labor" was "free" and my very own. :lol:


The labor is the toughest part.

My fencing materials were reasonable. IIRC it came to about $2500 for enough fencing material to fence in about an acre in 2 paddocks and a 100x200 ring. Ring would be 3 rails of flex fence only. Fencing 1 rail flex, 1 strand electrobraid, 4 'rails' coated wire. That included all hardware, extras and posts. And the posts are 6" round line and 8" round ends/gates/braces. Except for the post hole auger rental for 1 weekend, the labor the first time it was done was free. Mr Blue and I.


And we got exactly what we paid for, LOL! :eek: :no: :lol:

Unfortunately when you *really* stink at fencing, you kinda gotta pay someone else to do it. A pro fencing company does a fantastic job, but you will pay through the nose for it. There are plenty of guys around here that are awesome at putting up fence but none wanted to be hired for it no matter what you offered. Apparently even those who are good at it still don't like doing it. :winkgrin:

I think they also charge extra for smaller jobs around here though. Because no way on God's green earth are the people around here who have 10 acres paying $50-$60k in labor only to fence that much in!

I think having the post holes dug only is around $3-$5 per hole if they don't hit rock or ledge. Not sure about setting the actual posts, but driving them is a tad cheaper than drilling/setting/tamping them.

skip916
Mar. 22, 2011, 09:05 PM
our fence perimeter goes around about 8 acres, with three gates and we have centaur (three rails) and a lot of corners/turns!

your quote sounds really reasonable to me. centaur is more expensive than wooden or electric, yes, but if you consider how long it lasts, little to no maintenance, painting etc, and just the fact that its AWESOME, you really aren't paying more than you would for the other types of fencing.

for example, when our pasture flooded september before last, the RAGING waters swept away about half of our fence posts and ruined tons of grass/footing but after the waters receded and after hauling all the trees and debris away the centaur was still there, and perfectly undamaged. all we had to do was replace the posts- instead of the whole fence!

can you tell i'm a centaur fan?
imo- get three rails instead of four unless you have babies or troublemakers!

BasqueMom
Mar. 23, 2011, 01:16 AM
Just want to emphasize how important the corners and end/gate posts being
properly installed and braced is to any flexible rail fencing or even the coated wire. Lather, rinse and repeat again and again! It's fine for line posts to be
driven if your soil/rock conditions permit it.

zakkandtoto
Mar. 23, 2011, 08:38 AM
Thank you all for sharing your costs with me. Sorry I haven't gotten back sooner - have a cold.

We're putting another offer in on the house today. The last was 90% of the original asking price (and 20% over what was owed) on a foreclosure. They rejected it with a simple "no". No counter, no nothing. Pretty cavalier of a bank that received public bail out money.

$300 for digging the fence holes sounds like a steal to me. I would gladly and happily pay double for it. But I can't afford to pay what amounts to $800/day for labor. I don't expect them to hand dig the holes with a garden trowel, I would think they'd have an auger and I once watched a BO dig dozens of holes in a period of a few hours using one. She was knocking them out like nobody's business and had a kid going behind her setting the posts. She got two new 1/2 acre paddocks up in one weekend.

I need an auger and a strapping young lad...

I spoke to the Centaur gals and they thought that if I could get the posts installed, I could absolutely run the tape myself. They also seemed a little surprised at the quote I was given and felt that it was more of a 3 day job than the 7 day job I was quoted.

Along with the fencing, I've got a quote from a demo company for $3500 to tear down an existing barn with 6' (I kid you not) aisle heights and 9x9' stalls and other quotes from several different barn companies offering to build a 2 stall + tack/feed room shed row barn for between $14K-$20K. Morton was the low quote, if you can believe it. FCP and BarnMaster were the high ones. Could get a prefab delivered for half that, but I don't know if that would lock in the grandfathering I'd need*.

On the bright side, I found an ad from a guy who will knock down old barns for free if he can keep the materials. He makes furniture from the wood and sells the metal.

fwiw, I actually did have more work for them. I was hoping to have a sacrifice paddock made, safety fencing put in around a pool, perimeter fencing installed to keep my Aussie in the backyard, and no-climb all around the paddocks to keep my dog from herding my gelding and getting kicked in the head - she's a lunatic and he wouldn't tolerate her nonsense for a New York minute. Their Centaur quote was so high, though, that the rest of the fencing was no longer an option.

*City code requires that all fence lines and stalls be 150' from any habitable neighboring dwelling and the neighbors are sectioning off and selling pieces of their lots. A new dwelling could pop up anywhere along the property line, so I'd need to have my fences and barn in and grandfathered before that happened. The existing barn is within that 150' zone and lost its grandfathering, so it could no longer be used even if it were in acceptable condition.

Ironically enough, they only require 1/2 acre per horse. Go figure?

Rabtfarm
Mar. 23, 2011, 09:13 AM
Fencing: I was able to install 5x6 landscape posts with 1 1/4" x 6 roughsawn pine rails(double, not triple) for under $1.75 per foot. I also added a single aluminum wire on the inside along the top rail. I used a compact tractor and a post hole digger to set the posts. I painted the fence system white(by far the hardest part of the job). The single biggest cost for me was the rails(adding a third rail would make the cost $2.25 per foot. All labor cost is obviously excluded here, but I almost think that we could install the fence faster than we could paint it!
I recommend at least 2 people to install fencing...but that was more to do with installing wood rails than anything else. The project becomes a materials movement exercise. I used a pickup with a roof rack: posts in the truck bed, rails on the rack. Had a generator to trim the rough cut rails; used a chain saw to lop off the post tops. I used string to set the rails attractively so I didn't follow the groundline perfectly but generally followed the ground contour.
With your dog issues you will probably want to install 4 foot wire mesh along the fence line. That will add to the cost per foot.
Lastly if you are installing a metal barn building, make sure that some sound dampening is included in the barn quote...even if it's just some rigid foam sheets to quiet things down. I have to believe that there is some sort of white foam roll material (like a carpet) that would help with the underside of the barn roof lighting and sound dampening. Have fun.

deltawave
Mar. 23, 2011, 09:38 AM
Unfortunately when you *really* stink at fencing, you kinda gotta pay someone else to do it.Or you have to choose fencing that is idiot-proof. :lol:

My husband and I sunk all the posts for the first two paddocks, including the concrete for the corner posts, etc. It POURED RAIN the entire day we did the job, and although he's the handy type, neither of us had done anything like it before. Not only did our marriage survive, but the posts are rock-solid, five years later! :D However, we contracted out the last paddock--some experiences are just not worth repeating. :p I strung and even wired all the fence by myself, though (Electrobraid) and THAT was easy-peasy. Hubby did the actual connection of the wires in the barn--I don't do electricity. :eek:

The quotes we got from Morton and similar companies to build the barn were CRAZY. We asked around and got the name of "the" local pole barn guy, who built our barn for 2/3 the cost and did a beautiful job.

MistyBlue
Mar. 23, 2011, 11:39 AM
You ain't kidding...I had quotes from Morton, A&B and a couple others for having our barn built.

Considering what we were quoted I'm wondering if they were putting in tumbled marble floors, a media room and an in-law suite. :eek:

(they do make gorgeous barns though)

We went prefab and finished ours for 1/3 of the highest quote and half of the lowest.

We, um, did get idiot proof fencing.

Apparently Ramm never counted on just how idiotic some folks can be, LOL!

Mr Blue and I look back on it now and laugh, it was a real Benny Hill-esque production. :lol: With some Monty Python thrown in. :winkgrin: But back when we were putting it in...our marriage barely survived it, LOL!

We started with a two-man auger for the post holes. They really do mean two MEN and not one male accountant and one little female Polak. :no: Did you know how far one of those things can fling a person? I do.

So we rented a little skidder type thingy you stand on with an auger on it. After hitting a billion rocks we got the post holes dug. However depsite using a laser and making straight lines and using spray paint to mark all post holes...when we finished the fence looked like Stevie Wonder did it, while drunk. It waved and swooped all over the place.

And putting up Flex fence and coated wire? That stuff comes in huge rolls. And it doesn't like to unroll. Ever. At all. Stripping ends and cutting it gave us agita! :lol:

But as badly as we put it up...it held and was effective 100% for 6 years! We needed the back grass paddock fenced and there was NO WAY I was fening anything again *ever* so we hired a pro. And if the second paddock was going to look great, the first one would've looked worse so we had that taken out and redone.

So while I still cringe at the cost...it does look awesome. Finally.

horsepoor
Mar. 23, 2011, 12:50 PM
Re/Centaur costs. I finally asked my SO how much ours was, knowing it would bring up some painful memories. We did three rail Centaur HTP on wood posts, all set in concrete because it is a wet, sloped area. We had it installed, and it ended up being about $13/ft total, including all the posts, Centaur, gates, and labor, plus there is tax on all that as we are in WA state. Smallish run -- about 1,000 feet total. I don't have the breakdown, but I bet the labor part was at least half of that. The materials were also a bit more expensive being out here in the NW corner of the US -- I'm sure we had shipping in there for a chunk too.

We had a really hard time finding an installer with experience with this type of fence. In the end, I wish we had someone come do the posts and we'd done the rest, but SO isn't terribly handy and at the time, I had a broken collarbone so I wasn't much help either!

zakkandtoto
Mar. 23, 2011, 12:58 PM
Rabtfarm, I saw an ad for a used true one man auger with tons of attachments. They're selling it for $1300 locally. I can hire day labor for $10/hr here...

I'm itching to buy the auger. My fear of impalement is the only thing that's stopped me.

deltawave, BarnMaster was the highest quote and the salesmen (I talked to them at an expo) were absolutely rude to me. They were giving me the "Little Lady" BS and trying to sell me on their giant corner (I could bathe in it) feeder when I really just wanted the bottom line for the structure. For a 32x12' foot shed row with a 10' overhang, they wanted $20K installed.

Something like this fcpbuildings.com/w4/wp-content/themes/default/img/shedrowgallery/1.jpg but a little longer to allow room for tack/feed room would be fabulous - I'm in the South, so the more open the better - but I believe their quote was $14K plus labor. My gelding spent 4 months on stall rest in a 12x12' mare motel type stall with a 12' attached run. I think the airiness was the only thing that kept him sane. If I could get someone local to build something like that, I'd be delighted.

MistyBlue, did the auger skip? Is that why it came out a little wavy?

Horsepoor, I can't imagine spending that on fencing. :( The problem with finding an installer for Centaur is that the company prefers not to stack, so there's very little competition between them and they have no incentive to lower their prices. My "local" Centaur installer is a full 60 miles away and I live in a huge metro area.

MistyBlue
Mar. 23, 2011, 01:50 PM
MistyBlue, did the auger skip? Is that why it came out a little wavy?


Ummm...I'd have to say it was user error and not equipment error. :winkgrin:

The two-person auger kicked my arse. Imagine holding onto the turbine for a jet engine. Now imagine trying to hold on to the flocking thing when it's moving. :eek: :lol: :no:

The stand-on auger was pretty easy to use. It looked like this, but a tiny bit bigger and had a platform you stood on behind it instead of walking behind it:
http://www.rayrents.com/images/DitchWitchAugerFinished285.jpg

We couldn't keep a straight line because we really do stink at fencing. The machine wasn't the issue, it was us.

We did use the Ramm installer from our state. However the toughest part is putting the posts in. You can save a buttload of money putting up the fencing yourself after someone else puts in the posts.

Putting on the brackets and then sliding the flex fence in is easy. Even easier to string the coated wire type into the fence staples. The *only* hard part of putting up these types of fencing is unrolling the fencing so you can put it up. The rolls weight a lot and aren't easy to move, they tangle if they start unrolling the wrong time and they don't like to straighten out. As you put it up it tries to roll again and ends up looking like you're fencing using huge Slinky toys. :lol:

But there's a tool called a Spinning Jenny that makes it a lot easier. (so I hear ;)) and as long as you have at least 2 people to move/hang the fence and then something to tighten it with, you should do just fine. (you can attach it to a tractor, ride on lawn mower or even your car/truck to pull it straight before cutting and attaching the ends to the tensioners.

Once it's up, it's LOVELY to have. Wicked easy to maintain and tighten as needed. Takes 5 minutes, one person, 1 tool. No extra muscle needed. Tough as heck, takes tons of abuse, doesn't break, safe and doesn't need painting.

I had to remove a fallen tree from my back fence recently. The billion feet of snow we had over winter had melted and softened the ground *deep* and then we had some heavy winds. 40' tree came down on it, landed hard on the flex fence top rail. And had sat there a week before I got to it. (ground was a mire around it and I don't use that paddock until summer) Heavy as heck tree, had to be cut off in big chunks. Chunks moved with the tractor. When the tree was on the fence, it bent the top flex fence down about 6-8". Nothing broke/snapped, posts held fine and when the tree came off the fence the top rail bounced back where it belonged and the top rail had a light crease mark. That's it. :eek:

poltroon
Mar. 23, 2011, 02:23 PM
The two-man augers are a freaking nightmare. You will get hurt and you need heavy people to resist its action. Digging a deep hole with them is really hard. Seriously, I will dig the holes by hand rather than trying that again. It is faster and actually easier than fighting with the equipment, at least in my soil.

By the time you pay the rental, you're better off paying the guy with the fancy tractor. It takes a long time to get good at using the equipment (even a tractor with an auger), and the rentals won't have the sharpest augers, either.

Re: estimates for the barns. Yeah, everything is more expensive than you expect. Make sure the price quote you have includes sales tax, delivery, foundation, grading, and whatever utilities you were expecting.

Char
Mar. 23, 2011, 03:37 PM
What's with all the hole digging and multi-thousands of dollars worth of fencing materials? Does nobody use simple capped t-posts and electric fencing anymore? Is is the looks?:confused:

poltroon
Mar. 23, 2011, 03:42 PM
What's with all the hole digging and multi-thousands of dollars worth of fencing materials? Does nobody use simple capped t-posts and electric fencing anymore? Is is the looks?:confused:

Electric fencing is cheaper to install, but it is also, in my area anyway, less reliable and very high maintenance. This time of year when the grass grows an inch a day, you have to be mowing constantly. It is generally less secure. And it doesn't keep the dogs in.

In the summer, when the grass is not growing, and the ground gets dry, regular electric fence loses its punch.

T-posts cost as much as wood posts do here.

And I also don't enjoy having to worry about touching the fence.

horsepoor
Mar. 23, 2011, 03:58 PM
What's with all the hole digging and multi-thousands of dollars worth of fencing materials? Does nobody use simple capped t-posts and electric fencing anymore? Is is the looks?:confused:

Appearance was only a small part of the decision. Safety, durability, and maintenance all factored in to our choice of the Centaur. I also have Horseguard electric tape on covered (not just capped) t-posts for my cross-fencing but do not consider it reliable or safe enough for perimeter fencing.

marta
Mar. 23, 2011, 04:45 PM
i'm curious about your RAMM fence with no climb. we plan to buy something next year and are slowly starting to look at properties. those in our price range generally do not include a fence. for a variety of reasons i must have a no climb fence and thought my only option was having it installed in a conventional way with top board.

do you have photos or can you explain how you did it?

Char
Mar. 24, 2011, 01:21 PM
Electric fencing is cheaper to install, but it is also, in my area anyway, less reliable and very high maintenance. This time of year when the grass grows an inch a day, you have to be mowing constantly. It is generally less secure. And it doesn't keep the dogs in.

In the summer, when the grass is not growing, and the ground gets dry, regular electric fence loses its punch.

T-posts cost as much as wood posts do here.

And I also don't enjoy having to worry about touching the fence.

I'll agree with you on the touching the fence part. :lol: We've never had problems with maintenance, as far as grass etc. growing, we just use round up in about a 2' swath under the fence when the horses are off of it during rotation. Of course if you needed to have horses in it without a 2 week break here and there, I could see where weed-eating could be a real PITA.

We have 2 strands of plain old hot wire for our guys and boy oh boy.....they do NOT mess with it. :winkgrin: All it takes is one getting brave enough to try for the hay field on the opposite side of the fence and they both quickly decide that the grass is, in fact, greener right where they are. :cool:

poltroon
Mar. 24, 2011, 01:37 PM
i'm curious about your RAMM fence with no climb. we plan to buy something next year and are slowly starting to look at properties. those in our price range generally do not include a fence. for a variety of reasons i must have a no climb fence and thought my only option was having it installed in a conventional way with top board.

do you have photos or can you explain how you did it?

http://www.ponydom.com/farm/farm8.html

Feel free to ask any questions.

poltroon
Mar. 24, 2011, 01:39 PM
I'll agree with you on the touching the fence part. :lol: We've never had problems with maintenance, as far as grass etc. growing, we just use round up in about a 2' swath under the fence when the horses are off of it during rotation. Of course if you needed to have horses in it without a 2 week break here and there, I could see where weed-eating could be a real PITA.

We have 2 strands of plain old hot wire for our guys and boy oh boy.....they do NOT mess with it. :winkgrin: All it takes is one getting brave enough to try for the hay field on the opposite side of the fence and they both quickly decide that the grass is, in fact, greener right where they are. :cool:

It probably works better where you are. We have a short, intense growing season, and when the grass is growing, it is raining, which means you can't do a lot of maintenance.

When the grass isn't growing, the ground is too dry to carry the charge. Next time I do an install, I'll try the bi-polar fencing.

marta
Mar. 24, 2011, 05:24 PM
thanks for that link. photos and your comments were just what i needed. i will show it to my SO this weekend.
did you guys do the entire thing yourself? just you and your SO? did you drive the posts yourself, too?

marta
Mar. 24, 2011, 05:25 PM
how far apart are your posts and why did you choose to go with that distance?

poltroon
Mar. 25, 2011, 02:56 AM
thanks for that link. photos and your comments were just what i needed. i will show it to my SO this weekend.
did you guys do the entire thing yourself? just you and your SO? did you drive the posts yourself, too?

We tried to do the auger. It cost around $150 and we got sore bodies and half a hole dug. I called a fence guy in to dig the holes and he came and did them all for $300. That was his minimum fee to come at all; he would have dug a lot more posts for that money than we needed. It was money well spent.

All the rest we did ourselves. Bought the posts, painted them, set the corners in concrete, ran a string line, then put the line posts in and backfilled with the original dirt.

Me, DH, my dad, and my 3 year old daughter. (The three year old daughter was, alas, negative help. Got a lot more done a lot faster when someone took her for an afternoon.) We had a tractor to tension the no-climb. All of us are reasonably competent with tools, but none of us had done a fence like this before. We followed the instructions for bracing the posts quite closely from the RAMM site. I think it took us a month of weekends.

Our soil is fairly soft, and rocks were not an issue. We set the corners very deep because the water table gets high in winter and the soil is soft.

The posts are 8' apart, because this was the sacrifice paddock, where I knew I'd want the most fortification. Elsewhere we will possibly go 10'. I think I will not choose to go 12' - the 5' no climb is heavy, and it needs the support of the line posts. The only reason not to go 8' is the $10 per post approximate cost. For a shorter run of fence, I would probably just do 8' again.

Our goal was to do it right the first time, so we never needed to redo it.

marta
Mar. 25, 2011, 08:42 AM
great info! thanks.
so how many linear feet of fence was it that you installed in a month of weekends?

poltroon
Mar. 25, 2011, 11:34 AM
great info! thanks.
so how many linear feet of fence was it that you installed in a month of weekends?

Around 300. That included some amount of flailing, and rather a lot of child care. The most time is in the corners - that is, if we had 3,000 feet and still 4 corners, probably would have added only one extra weekend to set the extra posts.

MistyBlue
Mar. 25, 2011, 05:14 PM
We tried to do the auger. It cost around $150 and we got sore bodies and half a hole dug.

Oh good, it wasn't just Mr Blue and I who had that same problem. :winkgrin:

BasqueMom
Mar. 25, 2011, 05:21 PM
Been there done that--$100 something to rent something with a so-called
rock bit that just bounced off the limestone layer. Took a guy with big, big truck and equipment attached to it who made his living doing holes for utility poles. Even he had a problem...

zakkandtoto
Mar. 25, 2011, 06:46 PM
I just visited the property with a fencing/general contractor. The existing barn cannot be fixed to make it safe for my horse. It needs to be removed.

The existing fencing, which looked great from a distance, is complete junk. 4x4' posts set in no more than 13" deep. Best part? The boards aren't boards at all. They used 8' long, 6" wide cedar planking, as you'd see on privacy fences. I could break it by leaning against it. Contractor said he'd never seen anything like it in his 20 years of doing fences.

To knock the barn down and fence the property (wood for the horse and chain/wire for the dog) would run me around $10,000. I'd need to put a new barn in after that.

So roughly $15-20K, after I plop down the down payment, just to move my animals in. :(

The bank finally countered, but I'm not too keen on the property, anymore. It would exhaust my savings.

I gave my Centaur packet to the contractor. He seemed interested.

deltawave
Mar. 25, 2011, 09:42 PM
Exhausting one's savings is never, EVER the right answer. Sorry it didn't work out. Keep looking! :yes:

Digit2009
Mar. 28, 2011, 01:56 AM
A few yrs back, when renting a farm, we installed electrobraid. Talked w/the company at length, read all their material, watched the video, purchased all the stuff needed at TSC (who had just become a supplier for them). 3 of us installed it ourselves over a few weekends. Dug the holes w/a post hole digger att. to the tractor. Fence looked pretty good, but we were total newbies at it.
At my new place I was in a huge time crunch, so hired it out. Electrobraid again, love the product. Paid about $1200 in labor, 3 guys took 1 day. Had a machine that drove the fiberglass posts in. The corners are huge wood posts driven very deep so nothing else needed. Company's been around for a long time, has great reputation, and guarantees all their work. Have no regrets at all paying the labor, even if at the time, it was a huge blow to my ck book LOL (actually that's what 0% credit cards are for LOL )

marta
Mar. 28, 2011, 06:21 AM
there was electrobraid at the last barn we boarded at. electrobraid and boards along the perimeter and just electrobraid between pastures. looked great. easy maintenance.
does anyone know if it'd work with no climb the way the ramm or centaur does?

horsepoor
Mar. 28, 2011, 12:40 PM
there was electrobraid at the last barn we boarded at. electrobraid and boards along the perimeter and just electrobraid between pastures. looked great. easy maintenance.
does anyone know if it'd work with no climb the way the ramm or centaur does?

Do you mean, can you use electrobraid (instead of ramm or centaur) as a top to no climb fencing? Don't see why not -- you'd just have to install it offset enough to not hit the no climb and short out. I'm not a fan of electrobraid, but don't see why you couldn't use it. I don't consider electrobraid a substitute for ramm or centaur in visibility or safety, but for that purpose, you'd have the added benefit of it being hot and keeping horses off the no climb.

marta
Mar. 28, 2011, 02:04 PM
yes, that's what i meant. good point about visibility. the whole idea of putting centaur or ramm as top rail over no climb is for visibility.

poltroon
Mar. 29, 2011, 01:09 AM
yes, that's what i meant. good point about visibility. the whole idea of putting centaur or ramm as top rail over no climb is for visibility.

The top rail also protects the top of the mesh from horses leaning over and pushing on it.

mitchfromtimco
Jun. 15, 2011, 03:17 PM
hey i know this an old thread but i came upon it today doing some work and wanted to answer some of the questions, the difference between htp and cenflex is mostly in the thickness of the coating on the rails, however cenflex also uses a one piece bracket system where HTP uses a 2 piece that is a little better. you also get a 30 year warranty as comapred to a 20 year with the cenflex. as for installation costs...where to start...it varies from company to company obviosly, 5 bucks a foot is too high, i hope you didnt pay for it yet because you can find it cheaper, like through my company, however I have heard of some people who only do the installation side for seemingly nothing, PROCEED WITH CAUTION, centaur products use a variety of unique fasteners and tensioners that the average fence installer is probably not familar with. this fence can be put up on your own, but honestly its tough, if you are going to hire it out, hire it out to someone who will do it right for two reasons, it will last longer, and if its not installed correctly it will void your warranty, shoot me a PM or email if anyone has questions

mitch@timcohorseandfarmsupply.com

DiablosHalo
Jun. 15, 2011, 03:35 PM
I put in about 8100 of fence 9 years ago and it ran about $6/ft installed (including 13 gates). 4 rail 5.25 fence.

My friends down the road did there 4 five acre fields themselves. Had the post driven and they put up 3 rail flex fence. Looks pretty good. Took them a long time but saved mucho money.

I will say - if you have this fence - use at least one electric wire somewhere to keep them from putting their heads through/over to eat grass on the other side, rubbing on it, etc. My electric wire was out / then down for almost 1 year. My fence got ruined in tons of places.

mitchfromtimco
Jun. 15, 2011, 03:46 PM
did you warranty it out? what do you mean by ruined, like crumpled? sorry just curious

Phaxxton
Jun. 15, 2011, 05:45 PM
http://www.ponydom.com/farm/farm8.html

Feel free to ask any questions.

I REALLY love this. It looks beautiful. We have (and are quite happy with) Electrobraid right now, but I do ultimately want to change it to something like this in the future. That is likely years away, though... I will be making a mental note of this!

SLW
Jun. 17, 2011, 10:37 AM
We paid to have our posts set and we installed the flex rails ourselves. It was pretty simple and was a good "bonding" experience with my husband. I love the look of the Centaur fence and we've been very pleased. No escaped or injured horses and we've had the fence for about 5 years or more.

Best of luck.

LOL!!! Hubba and I were replacing a 80' section of fence last Sunday. The summary is "We were having a fight and a fence got built." :winkgrin: Holy cow do NOT build a fence with an IT guy who gets paid to manage system processes....

alabama
Jun. 20, 2011, 01:42 PM
I hired out to have most of my 10 acres fenced (coated high tensile with wood and T posts). It was expensive (!) but it looks great. They had to cut trough brush/trees and the terrain was pretty varied. There's no way my SO and I could have done it without killing each other - and it would probably still be a work in progress today. Took the guys three days to do it and the worked their butts off.

MistyBlue
Jun. 20, 2011, 02:39 PM
LOL...gotta agree that fencing with the husband is fast-tracking your own widowhood. :winkgrin: :yes: :lol: :eek:
We fenced our little paddock ourselves. Ummm...never again.

And last year when it needed to be redone (because we're morons) we hired out. Yes, it's expensive as heck. Painfully so considering the fencing guys didn't need to supply one darned thing...not even a single screw or nail. We had it all. And it still ran about $5k. For 2 small paddocks that add up to about an acre.

But we're both still alive, nobody had any weapons drawn and my fence is stinking gorgeous!

mitchfromtimco
Jun. 20, 2011, 06:43 PM
Oh man...5k for an acre? I'm glad it looks nice, anyone else who gets a quote like that...please get ahold of me...that's highway robbery lol

TheJenners
Jun. 21, 2011, 05:09 PM
SO and I are going to be doing this sometime in the next five years, unless we find a place suitably fenced in something we can both agree on...doubtful.

He wants stretched smooth wire, says "done right, safest fence there is."

Me? Dear lord, the thought gives me the willies. Cows only, I don't want horses on that. I want four planks Centaur, but unless I win the lotto (which means playing it), that won't happen. My next best thought is what they are in now: four strands of the Centaur coated wire, with bottom hot and top plank of Centaur around the outside (http://a4.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash2/45600_1585120429519_1281017695_1620405_6242867_n.j pg); and five strands of the Centaur coated wire, top and bottom hot, between the paddocks (http://a6.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc4/37466_1555882098579_1281017695_1538511_2929010_n.j pg).

Again, fat chance.

I do like the no climb + synthetic top plank combination. I saved the site in my favorites in my "Properties" folder, so don't delete your Web site! :) It might save the battle between Wyoming cowboy's idea of safe and East Coast Centaur snob gal's idea of safe. Doesn't help we both have extensive hand-to-hand training, I can see it getting ugly. :lol:

Valentina_32926
Jun. 21, 2011, 05:13 PM
A local farmer should have a post hole digger on his tractor - mark off where you want posts to go, tell him the depth (provide a "marker" to indicate depth) and have him dig holes. You set posts and do rest youself. You'll need water to set the posts.

poltroon
Jun. 21, 2011, 08:04 PM
Oh man...5k for an acre? I'm glad it looks nice, anyone else who gets a quote like that...please get ahold of me...that's highway robbery lol

A smaller paddock will cost more per linear foot, because corners are so much more expensive. That's about what mine cost, but including everything - the concrete, the gates, delivery, sales tax, etc. The only labor we hired out was digging the post holes, which cost $300.

MistyBlue
Jun. 21, 2011, 11:01 PM
Yes, to be fair I have a lot of corners, end posts and gate posts. The two paddocks have 4 gates and tons of corners and connections. So lots of turns, ends and bracing.

Running long lines of straight fence with a few corners is a lot less labor intensive and not as expensive.

And that's total professional installation. It's also around the same to price out turning one acre of woods into one acre of grassed, fenced paddock around here. About $5-$6k each acre to go from woods to small grassy paddock. And around here the vast majority of land is heavily wooded. That's the cost if the land isn't also really rocky or wet/damp. That adds to the cost because there's a lot more grading, rock removal, sometimes blasting, drainage added in, etc.

That's the reason why open grassy land is soooooo expensive in CT. Costs a bloody fortune to make it that way.

mitchfromtimco
Jun. 22, 2011, 08:58 PM
ok i see now lol, i still wouldve done it for less ;) Im glad your happy with it tho!

MistyBlue
Jun. 22, 2011, 10:24 PM
Well where were you when I was getting quotes???? :winkgrin:
I'd have been a lot happier with it if I paid less! :D :yes: :D

Aggie4Bar
Jun. 23, 2011, 01:35 PM
LOL!!! Hubba and I were replacing a 80' section of fence last Sunday. The summary is "We were having a fight and a fence got built." :winkgrin: Holy cow do NOT build a fence with an IT guy who gets paid to manage system processes....This is why I waited until Mr. A4B was on the other side of the globe before enlisting a neighbor to help install no-climb. ;) Hubby and I are both engineers and both very capable of building stuff, but we tend to have very strong and differing opinions about "how" things should be done. And one of us (me :uhoh:) is a bit more stubborn when it comes to compromising...

We paid to have 3-rail board fence put up. We should have elected at that time to have no-climb installed. We also should have paid someone else to paint the damn thing.