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View Full Version : IHSA team members...tell me this!!



Rio Blanco
Mar. 17, 2011, 11:08 PM
How do YOU fundraise?

Our (newish) team is having a very hard time coming up with the finances to provide our members with what we desire to eventually: no individual coaching fee at the show, no out-of-pocket meal expenses, and having some team-related stuff to sport (i.e. magnets for the vans, etc.). Currently these are all things that members pay per person, per show....but I don't think that it's too far off to forsee that, provided we are able to do sufficient fundraising, these things could be paid by the team. We are just lacking (severely) in the fundraising department.

Secondly, how do you manage your money? Do you have a team account and member accounts as well? We are considering the idea of doing individual member accounts to divide up fundraisers that are not specifically for the team among the participating members, as out of our team of 30+ people, only 7-10 of us are dedicated enough to participate in EVERY fundraiser and team related activity, yet they all want an all expenses paid vacation every show.

Finally, I am considering trying to start something like the event that is separate from IHSA where there is a team of 4-5 that (on their own horses) have a 3-day type format equitation challenge that is held annually at I believe St. Andrews? We are quite far from St. Andrew's but I really like the idea and have just been tossing around the idea of making it a possibility sometime in the future to host something like this. If any of you are in the south/southwest, would there be much interest that you're aware of?

Edited to add more info about our team or to clarify this post:

(From my post #4)
"Opus, it is ANRC that I was referring to. I couldn't for the life of me think of what it was called. It's a pipe dream, I know, but if we were to do an "open show" as a fundraiser and make it open to local barns, I think we could get more participation than just a h/j show.

Currently attendance at meetings is mandatory or there is a $15 fine without 24 hour notice of a legit reason as to why you can't make it (i.e. illness, proof of schedule conflict at work, family emergency...that's about it) To my knowledge there are only like 2 required events a semester and the fee is the same, which isn't quite fair in my opinion as I think it needs to be more like $30 or so, that way it really cuts into your party fund if you don't participate. Alas, these fees must be paid before you are allowed to show....so if you just get fed up and quit, we're SOL on these funds."

(From my post #6)
"I guess I should also mention that we ARE a University (sports) Club. We get a pre-determined stipend based on a hearing held the prior year. There are restrictions on what these funds can be used for but are basically as you've outlined above. I, too, am concerned about our "financial transparency"....I really think we need more control on how many hands must approve any money removed from ANY team account. The tighter the control of the money and spending, the better. Some of the girls who have access to the team account have champagne taste on a beer budget!!!

Thank you so much for the responses thus far. Anything and everything is going to help us tremendously at this point. I will be sharing this information with other girls on the team!"



Sorry this isn't totally h/j related, if it needs to be moved I understand! Just looking for unbiased feedback to better our (struggling) IHSA team!!

mg
Mar. 17, 2011, 11:20 PM
Well I did IDA, but it wasn't sponsored/supported financially by the school, so we had to fundraise. Our biggest fundraiser was doing a wreath sale before Thanksgiving. We bought beautiful, local wreaths at wholesale prices and decorated them ourselves (bows, pinecones, and berries). We then either delivered or charged extra for shipping. We also did frequent tack cleaning/trimming fundraisers at the barn we were based out of. Plenty of boarders were very supportive of the club and liked to sign up for those. One time we had a raffle and lots of local businesses donated gift certificates and other items.

All members were required to participate in fundraisers and were given guidelines for the minimum amount of fundraising they had to accomplish. If they didn't, they would be off the show team. All club members were also required to gather sponsorships from local businesses and people every year.

To try to circumvent lazy/non-participating members, we took attendance at meetings and required people to be members of the club for at least one semester before being allowed to try out for the show team. We also had no issue kicking people off the show team, no matter how great they were at riding, if they were not being contributing members to the club.

I was the club treasurer for several years. We had a club account and kept track of how much fundraising each member did.

I do not envy you--trying to motivate a bunch of lazy college girls is no easy task! You really have to be willing to let people go if they are not participating to the necessary levels. Our club was fairly small and I think it was partially because some people were intimidated by having to actually WORK to participate. But I'd rather it be that way than working my butt off to support some freeloader!

Opus1
Mar. 18, 2011, 12:21 AM
Finally, I am considering trying to start something like the event that is separate from IHSA where there is a team of 4-5 that (on their own horses) have a 3-day type format equitation challenge that is held annually at I believe St. Andrews?

Do you mean ANRC? That's the only one I can think of that fits your description. And they usually rotate where it's hosted. This year it's SCAD, IIRC.

As for fundraising ... I'll have to give that (individual events) some thought, although I know we did several a year. Our college covered almost everything except entry fees, but we did ours to help get a new barn and some updated facilities.

Oh, and I would suggest you make attendance mandatory, as mentioned above. If you plan to do several smaller fundraisers through the year, you can require members to do x-amount to fulfill their requirements. If it's just a handful, then make them all mandatory.

If you don't have the ability to kick people off or demand their participation, then set up fees accordingly. If you do the fundraisers, you pay x. If you don't, then you pay this amount instead.

Rio Blanco
Mar. 18, 2011, 12:26 AM
Opus, that is what I was referring to. I couldn't for the life of me think of what it was called. It's a pipe dream, I know, but if we were to do an "open show" as a fundraiser and make it open to local barns, I think we could get more participation than just a h/j show.

Currently attendance at meetings is mandatory or there is a $15 fine without 24 hour notice of a legit reason as to why you can't make it (i.e. illness, proof of schedule conflict at work, family emergency...that's about it) To my knowledge there are only like 2 required events a semester and the fee is the same, which isn't quite fair in my opinion as I think it needs to be more like $30 or so, that way it really cuts into your party fund if you don't participate. Alas, these fees must be paid before you are allowed to show....so if you just get fed up and quit, we're SOL on these funds.

kateh
Mar. 18, 2011, 12:33 AM
My team also received funding from the school-based on a club basis (vs team basis). We used that money to offset transportation costs, pay coaching fees, purchase helmets and team-owned show clothes, and hotels for over-nighters. Teammates paid a small transportation fee, bought a lesson package, paid for all IHSA member fees and show entries, and were responsible for feeding themselves. Each member was also required to "fundraise" a certain amount-$100 for members, $125 for showing members.

For a looong time we did virtually no fundraisers and had to pay the remainder out of pocket. If someone drove their own car to lessons they'd get money off fundraising (based on a per-mile calculation). Apparently this year they're really getting some fundraising done. In the past we've sold t-shirts (not a big seller) and chocolate covered pretzels, and now they're making shot glasses, which I think will be a big seller at a college campus. :winkgrin: They're also collecting sponsorships from local businesses. I'm not positive how they're handling it at the moment but it seems to be doing really really well. Check to make sure this is ok with the university first.

"Financial transparency" has been an issue in the past-one person handling a lot of money for the club at once. So there is one bank account and a google doc that the officers use to keep track of money. As for fundraising, you'd pay up front for the materials (tshirts, pretzels, etc) and then the money would go straight into your pocket.

If you're a recognized group at your university be VERY careful about handling money. Our school has a rule book about what you can and cannot do with university money. For example, we CANNOT use university money to fund individuals' lesson packages. If we did, we could lose our affiliation and all university money. And of course all "beverage" purchases for the formal's after-party is completely invisible to the university.

My advice? Make friends with student government board and allocations members!! We knew someone involved in the allocations process and while she couldn't try to sway the other board members, she could read through our application and tell us what would pass and what wouldn't, and how to word things more clearly. In our system, precedence is everything so talk to other club presidents/treasurers to see what kinds of things they get funding for. If the biking team/a capella groups/debate team can get the university to pay for coaching fees, so can you!

Rio Blanco
Mar. 18, 2011, 12:43 AM
I guess I should also mention that we ARE a University (sports) Club. We get a pre-determined stipend based on a hearing held the prior year. There are restrictions on what these funds can be used for but are basically as you've outlined above. I, too, am concerned about our "financial transparency"....I really think we need more control on how many hands must approve any money removed from ANY team account. The tighter the control of the money and spending, the better. Some of the girls who have access to the team account have champagne taste on a beer budget!!!

Thank you so much for the responses thus far. Anything and everything is going to help us tremendously at this point. I will be sharing this information with other girls on the team!

tamarak_equestrian
Mar. 19, 2011, 11:17 PM
Our university system is called OUEA but it's modelled after IHSA and I did show IHSA with our team even though we're Canadian. It's been a few years now since I was in university and the team was brand new at the time, things might have changed since then, so this is based on what I remember.

Here equestrian teams rarely get any money from the school whatsoever so it's a lot out of pocket expense or fundraising. Hosting a show can potentially earn money if you get a good deal on a facility and prize/ribbon donations. You can earn back what you spent on the facility through entries, and then for profit you can do a raffle, sell food and horsey stuff, etc. We sent letters to local horse related businesses or businesses a team or family member was involved in asking for sponsorship. There's bake sales, car washes, an event night at the campus pub, the usual. Boston Pizza has let us do a couple fundraiser nights there where I think we got a certain amount of money for every person who ate there that night and mentioned our team. We would carpool to the shows to save money on gas and avoid staying overnight when possible too, because as I said it was mostly out of pocket. We would have been in heaven with even a little money from the school lol. And we did have a set person to be our accountant/treasurer or whatever you want to call them, and that person was in charge of our bank account and writing cheques.

CR Gorge Girl
Mar. 20, 2011, 12:42 AM
With our team, meetings are mandatory (weekly), if you miss >3 then you're off the team, no more showing.
As far as fundraising, we host a hunter/jumper show every year in the fall. This year it's going to be an approved PAC show and a Paint Specialty Show to draw more entries. In the winter (during christmas/thanksgiving break) we do another sort of fundraiser. This year we got items donated for a raffle, and we sold tickets for $5 each, and each member HAD to sell 10 or more. If they didn't sell them, then they bought them. No money=no showing. Our team pays for half our entry fee for each class, and we pay for the other half, hotel, gas and food.

ETA: I forgot that we're also planning a poker ride for the fall. These are fairly low cost to put on, and can draw a lot of people, and are fun! (This only works really if you're in a more rural area--which my school is)

I'dRatherBRiding
Mar. 20, 2011, 12:27 PM
I am an IHSA alumi, and I rode for 2 schools that each had very different programs. The first (fresh & soph years) was a school recognized varsity sport. We paid a per semester fee to the school to participate, I believe it was $500, and they provided a barn for us to ride at, a salaried coach, an athletic department advisor, transportation to and from shows, all entry fees, and meals while off campus. I think that situation was ideal, and although we funded a portion of it up front, the actual cost would have been far greater if it wasn't school supported.
The second team (junior & senior years) was non-existant, a couple friends and myself started it from scratch, but we went through the school's student council department to do so. It was actually classified as a "club" not a sport. As a club we applied to the student council for funding and recived a small amount to cover entries at a few shows, and the right for our officers to attend and vote at SC meetings, which earned us more visibility and recognition that helped our plea for funding the following year. We also did our own t-shirt and candy sales to fundraise. Our class graduated in 1999, and from what I understand the team (club) still exists, but I'm not sure what the funding situation is now.
My suggestion to you is to go to your student council and/or athletic department (if you haven't already) and sell yourself and the team to them. There are lots of draws to having a team, such as increased admission applications and school recognition. It also develops fitness, discipline, and leadership in team members. Bring lots of IHSA materials with you to show it is a legit thing, and a pretty big deal in the horse world, and sell it. The funding may be small in the beginning, but you'll be laying the tracks for those who follow you, as I hope we did years ago for my alma matter.

ETA: As I recall each school is required to host or co-host a IHSA show each year. You would be surprised (or maybe not) how many boys from the other clubs came of the woodwork to help all the cute girls on the Eq. team with their horse show! We had them doing jump crew, running the in gate, helping in the secretary stand, grilling dogs & burgers, and even holding horses once we were comfortable with them doing so. Since community service is a requirement of all clubs, they got their credit and we got the proceeds so all worked out well- just another reason to go to your student council for help.

Wonders12
Mar. 20, 2011, 01:08 PM
Fairly new team here (4 yrs as a club, 3 years competing) with about 15 active members...

Most of our money comes from the school (we request money though Associated Students) and then from riders themselves (who pay for lessons, IHSA dues, and entry fees). After that, we get a large chunk from sponsorships (we send out letters every year to local business, barns, vets, etc.) and an annual fundraiser we do in the spring. It's a wine tasting/silent auction night.

Besides that we've also done a bake sale (usually makes ~$200 and each member has to make a dozen of something) dine and donates, etc. But the sponsorships and annual event seem to be the most beneficial.

As for dividing up money, we have one bank account and it gets divided up relatively evenly. We help discount lessons, and if you take 2+ lessons a week, we discount the second one more than the first. Otherwise team funds go to team stuff like transportation, paying for office supplies, the occasional party (ex: at a potluck, the team with cover the costs for the main dish), etc. Once or twice we have been able to cover entry fees for a show, and we just cover the fees for whoever is showing that day or that weekend.

We have thought about dividing up money based on participation, but it gets to hard to manage. Plus, most of the time it's the officers who work the hardest, but if they take a majority of the money, it makes people mad. If someone is really not participating, we will put them on probation or remove them from the team. Other than that, it's up to our members to keep their other teammates accountable.

seeuatx
Mar. 20, 2011, 01:24 PM
The thing about ANRC is that it is very different from IHSA. In comparison, IHSA is like the poor cousin. I went to VI which competes IHSA, IDA, and fields a team for ANRC. We won ANRC while I was there and it was a huge deal for us because ALL of our horses on that team were our school owned horses. Many of the horses the different teams use are either privately owned by the riders or leased specifically for that use. So, there are some really, really quality horses there.

IHSA/IDA are school or donated horses, and luck of the draw. Sometimes you go to a school that has some quality horse flesh, sometimes you pray before you ride... not because you are particularly religious, but in a "please God don't let me die today" theme.

A few of my good friends now did IHSA at schools in this area, and in comparison, the region I was in was absolutely blessed with some good schools and horses.

With fundraising, ours was covered, but my friends did bake sales, jump paintings, candy sales, tack cleaning days and used tack sales. All great ideas.

Jaideux
Mar. 20, 2011, 02:53 PM
1) You could buy your way out of fundraising at the end of the semester if you matched the amount fundraised. So, if we fundraised $50 that semester, they had to pay $50 to buy out of fundraising. Worked well for some of our very wealthy, lazy/very busy girls and it really increased our revenue :)

2) We sold shot glasses and the "LiveStrong" style bracelets with either an equestrian theme or a unversity theme. I think the shot glasses said "Get Lucky" with a horse shoe on them, and the bracelets came in the two colors and had the university motto or university name on them. Kind of an incentive to buy more than one to have the "set" :) These items are also small enough that it was easy to hold onto the leftovers/store them in the summer without too much hassle.

3) We had a fundraising chair AND a business manager. The fundraising chair was responsible for coordinating fundraising ideas, working with the school to reserve table space at events, making a schedule, and keeping track of who participated/inventory. The business manager was responsible for collecting the funds, depositing them in the university account, and hunting down people who owed "buy-out" $. This person also paid our bill at the stable. The president was kept very informed about the activities/statuses of these positions, but was pretty hands-off unless the chair requested help.

4) We also had a $$ penalty for missing meetings. Our meetings were monthly, though, and it was $5 to miss.

5) Our school subsidized part of the team. To help keep it fair, and to make showing more affordable (and to help increase the numbers), we set aside a proportion for show team costs that were group-based. So, if 20% of the team was on the show team, 10% of the budget was set aside for show team costs (setting aside 20% felt like "double dipping" to me). It was up to the show team to decide how to use that money, and the VP (whose primary role was Show Team Captain, went to the IHSA meetings at the break, did the entries, etc, coordinated with the business person to get the monies to pay for shows, etc) would lead that meeting. Usually the team voted to use the money to pay for the hotels for shows, but occasionally it was voted to be used for trainer day fees, and in the first semester I was president it was voted to be used to buy some low-cost show clothes in common sizes to start a small "closet" for riders to borrow stuff from. Then, went someone used the closet, they paid a modest rental fee (like, $5) per day of use. This made the closet somewhat self-sustaining, so as equimpent was worn down there would be money to buy a replacement, or buy a new piece that wasn't in the closet yet.

6) Our barn did a barn schooling show during the academic year and the team was enlisted to help prep the barn, prep the lesson horses, and help run the show. It was a mandatory event (either the prep day or the show day), with a $$ buyout option. Team riders could also elect to show in the show. The BO gave us a cut of all the entry fees, and we also did a bake sale/lunch table that we got to keep 100% of the proceeds from. It was educational, offered team bonding, and created revenue!

Renn/aissance
Mar. 20, 2011, 04:44 PM
I'm the president of Towson University's Equestrian Club and IHSA team. We have a four-person executive board (president, VP, treasurer, secretary,) any of whom can withdraw funds from the club account. The purse strings are actually held by SGA; we withdraw only after submitting an invoice, so that no one can withdraw money for non-club-related reasons. We're currently working on a shoestring budget with a limited amount of financial assistance from the school, which will change for next year. Said assistance is used to offset the cost of lessons for all members. All IHSA showing fees are paid out of pocket.

Our big fundraisers last year came from Sports Club's suggestion that we work for the football games- each person was paid $7.50/hr to usher at the Baltimore Ravens games. That did add up. This semester football season is obviously over and we're struggling to come up with more ideas so this thread is of interest to me. We do have team apparel for sale and profit a small amount off of the sale of each item and do bake sales, etc.

To encourage fund-raiser participation we're currently looking at pro-rating dues so that the riders who have been active in club events and fund-raisers pay less than the riders who ride the coattails of the rest of us.

JASecond
Mar. 21, 2011, 10:40 AM
We used to hold "Money for Manure" every spring. We'd sell tickets/boxes for $2 a piece. We'd then work with the university to draw a large square on the campus lawn with 1,000 boxes in it. We'd bring a horse to campus and let him loose in the box (put up jump standards poles around the box to keep him in the box). The first box he pooped in, the winner got $1,000. We got $1,000 which paid for a show or two of entries.

We also made $70-$80 at bake sales we had at our horse shows.