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Ziutek
Mar. 7, 2011, 03:24 PM
I can move anywhere I want, where should I move to?

I want grass for grazing the horses (march-october would be nice), access (within 1 hr) to the best dressage trainers, preferably no snow. Would love to have access to good vets, farriers, other horse people etc.
I would like to live somewhere where I can find like-minded people - so liberal, not overly religious. Having farmers around would be nice, and no crime.
I would like to have a decent city or big somewhere nearby to have access to good restaurants from time to time and good shopping. Also would like to have a larger city within 2-3 hrs drive so I can have access to a good airport.

Does such a heaven exist?

fiona
Mar. 7, 2011, 03:45 PM
England!!

netg
Mar. 7, 2011, 03:48 PM
If money were no object, hands down no question, I'd head to the San Diego area.

Eclectic Horseman
Mar. 7, 2011, 03:50 PM
Ocala, FL

fivehorses
Mar. 7, 2011, 04:14 PM
Wellington, Florida

alibi_18
Mar. 7, 2011, 04:19 PM
What about Amsterdam?

Ziutek
Mar. 7, 2011, 04:28 PM
Amsterdam is not exactly horsey, but I would take Eindhoven region any day! But really anywhere in Holland would be fine. Germany or England too. Unfortunately it has to be in the US...

Ocala? Are there top dressage trainers there?
Wellington is a no brainer, but is the grazing good there? And surrounding areas, can horses live off grass most of the year?

InsideLeg2OutsideRein
Mar. 7, 2011, 04:34 PM
If in the US, there are a bunch of places in California that fit the bill. Otherwise, the Northern part of Germany is dressage heaven (if you like flatter landscapes ;)). Anywhere near Hamburg and you can pick your master trainer.

Ziutek
Mar. 7, 2011, 04:44 PM
I don't mean to sound ignorant, but I imagine CA as not having a lot of grass and being very expensive. Are there grassy areas where a normal person could afford a farmette (10-20acres) and still have access to trainers?

TheHorseProblem
Mar. 7, 2011, 04:49 PM
I don't mean to sound ignorant, but I imagine CA as not having a lot of grass and being very expensive. Are there grassy areas where a normal person could afford a farmette (10-20acres) and still have access to trainers?

When you said you could live anywhere, I took that to mean that money was no object.

You could find that in the Rancho Santa Fe or northern San Diego County area, but not if you are a "normal" person.

ToN Farm
Mar. 7, 2011, 04:56 PM
Everything you want can be found here in NJ. The only thing is that we do get some snow once in a while, but usually it's not a huge problem.

Lots of farms, within 1 hour or so to NYC or Philadelphia. Several BNT's with Catherine Haddad coming next year. Lots of shows within 1-2 hours. Lots of classy restaurants, good food at the super markets, etc. Low crime in the horsey areas. Close to the USET. Several vet surgical facilities. Good farriers. Let's face it, NJ has the horse as it's state animal.

Only problem is that it's expensive, but not as bad as California.

netg
Mar. 7, 2011, 05:08 PM
When you said you could live anywhere, I took that to mean that money was no object.

You could find that in the Rancho Santa Fe or northern San Diego County area, but not if you are a "normal" person.

Yep, not if you're "normal" - but some gorgeous places if you can afford it!


Personally, I'd choose to avoid snow or major humidity after having ridden in both. I'd rather not have grass than live through Florida summers regularly! (Thus my living in AZ, which doesn't have the big names but also doesn't have the price tag, humidity, snow, earthquakes, hurricanes, tornadoes...)

bkkone
Mar. 7, 2011, 05:08 PM
Aiken, SC!

mbm
Mar. 7, 2011, 05:18 PM
northern california is nice :) we have green grass from November - june-ish.

If you manage your fields then they can have grass all year with maybe a few weeks in the winter kept off the pasture to save the ground.

we have lots of trainers.... but i think first you need to figure out what you mean by "good trainer" then go from there.

depending on where in No Ca, it could be affordable to not so affordable....

of course we have SF. and it is a great place to live. it doesn't get too hot or too cold, it doesn't snow, not too humid... it is perfect :)

And, if you are boarding, up here there *are* places where the horses can be on pasture.

Ziutek
Mar. 7, 2011, 05:20 PM
Yep, I meant I could move anywhere in the sense that I have a "mobile" job, but certainly not in the sense that money is no object. I am maybe a bit above "normal" or maybe in the high normal range.
Grass is very important to me. I want my horses to be able to graze!

Aiken? What about trainers over there?

NJ - hmmm that is something that I haven't thought about... I always thought most of NJ is a bit urban-y?

Perfect Pony
Mar. 7, 2011, 05:26 PM
It's hard to say, are you buying property, or boarding? Are you renting or buying? How do you plan to pay for everything?

If you have a lot of disposable income (several thousand a month, or a 800k+ budget), Sonoma County has lots of pasture, nice weather, lots of trainers and shows.

On a little more modest budget (but still expensive), the foothills outside Sacramento (either up I-80 or Hwy 50) are very nice, and offer pasture since there is a lot of irrigation. There are also loads of trainers and dressage shows.

Eireamon
Mar. 7, 2011, 06:16 PM
Biased I know but where I live..... New Zealand.

Where I live is the most horse populated area of NZ. I can show every weekend and never travel more than a hour.
Pretty much Every Equestrian discipline catered for.

Lots of good trainers that travel,my farrier is the best,feed shops that deliver and put feed in bins for me. Good vets.

30,000 acres of forest to ride in. 61 km stretch of beach to ride on (and thats just the one of 5 close to me)

And all this and I am on 13.5 acres 15 minutes from the largest city in NZ.

InsideLeg2OutsideRein
Mar. 7, 2011, 06:32 PM
I don't mean to sound ignorant, but I imagine CA as not having a lot of grass and being very expensive. Are there grassy areas where a normal person could afford a farmette (10-20acres) and still have access to trainers?

Well, I thought money was no object and owning land wasn't part of the original post, unless I missed it. ;) I'm a normal person, rent a small apartment in San Francisco, board my horses in the North Bay -- both are out on grass (the old guy year round, the little one April - November). And northern California is very pretty. And we definitely win out on liberal! ;)

Hampton Bay
Mar. 7, 2011, 09:34 PM
Mark central and south FL off the list. Grass is really only significant from June or July through October.

I would look into the Carolinas and Virginia, maybe KY or TN. They tend to have grass more of the year. My friend in in TN has her horse on grass year-round in the Nashville area.

SamWerner
Mar. 8, 2011, 12:43 AM
Wellington FL...not sure about anyone else, but the farms I have been at have grass year round!

akrogirl
Mar. 8, 2011, 12:59 AM
I can move anywhere I want, where should I move to?

I want grass for grazing the horses (march-october would be nice), access (within 1 hr) to the best dressage trainers, preferably no snow. Would love to have access to good vets, farriers, other horse people etc.
I would like to live somewhere where I can find like-minded people - so liberal, not overly religious. Having farmers around would be nice, and no crime.
I would like to have a decent city or big somewhere nearby to have access to good restaurants from time to time and good shopping. Also would like to have a larger city within 2-3 hrs drive so I can have access to a good airport.

Does such a heaven exist?

Let me know if you find such a place, lol. AZ isn't bad, but we liberal, non religious folks comprise a very small portion of the population and the state is getting wackier by the day. OTOH, we do have great shopping and a pretty decent airport. The restaurants are okay, but not up to CA standards, imho.

littlemanor
Mar. 8, 2011, 07:43 AM
Central Virginia, between Charlottesville and Richmond--Charlottesville and Richmond have good restaurants, there are a number of good trainers, grass March (just coming in now) to October at least, small farms not too expensive at least if you go a bit east of C'ville, liberal mindset in C'ville, lots of farms, Richmond and D.C. for airports. There is some snow, but not a whole lot most years. Surprised more people haven't mentioned Virginia!

paintlady
Mar. 8, 2011, 10:03 AM
Northern Virginia. We do have a winter, but it's generally mild (although not the last 2 years!). We usually have nice pastures from March - October. We have top vets and farriers. Plus, a large equine hospital (http://www.vetmed.vt.edu/emc/). There is no shortage of top level trainers and dressage shows - both schooling and licensed (http://www.vadanova.org/). Plus, depending on where you are, DC and Baltimore are close by. We also have 3 major airports in the area (Reagan National, Dulles and BWI). Overall, it's a pretty liberal crowd compared to the rest of VA too. Lots of Sunday shows too - so no worries about the area being overly religious. The job market here is pretty strong too. The only real downsides are cost and traffic.

littlemanor
Mar. 8, 2011, 12:38 PM
Oh, but a little farther down you can have most of the advantages of northern VA without the traffic and high cost of living, and with a little milder winter--if you don't need the strong job market, that is. Okay, I'm being a local booster, but just saying . . .

Tiki
Mar. 8, 2011, 12:53 PM
So, what areas east of C'ville and about how much for 30 - 50 acres for horses, NOW show quality, for broodmares and babies???

Truthiness
Mar. 8, 2011, 02:15 PM
second vote for northern california.
perhaps also the atlanta area.

aab
Mar. 8, 2011, 02:24 PM
I am not trying to hijack the thread, but I would be interested in hearing what areas in North Carolina would fit the OP's criteria. :)

scubed
Mar. 8, 2011, 02:48 PM
Chester County, PA

TheHorseProblem
Mar. 8, 2011, 03:29 PM
One more California suggestion: Ventura County. Close to LA, definitely farmland, grass year round, and some very BNTs, such as Jan Ebeling (if you don't mind rubbing shoulders with Mitt Romney) and Hilda Gurney.

MysticOakRanch
Mar. 9, 2011, 11:53 AM
I'm in the foothills of Northern CA - there are many affordable (at least for CA) places here. Good trainers, many shows, good vets, a few good to top surgical centers within a few hours each direction (UC Davis, Pioneer, Loomis Basin). I've had good luck with farriers too (and it helps that there is a farrier school just a few miles up the road - we end up with a l

We are one hour from a decent airport (Sacramento), and just over two hours from San Francisco. 10 minutes from a major show facility (that hosts one or two CDIs each year as well as other shows, including a GP Jumper show), 25 minutes from a gorgeous place that hosts shows, clinics, and inspections (including West Coast Hanoverian stallion inspections), and several other shows within an hours drive.

But... We don't have enough water to irrigate pastures - most (not all) of the Nor-Cal foothills are water restricted. We have nice, dry summers, no humidity, but as a side-effect, also dry pastures. In a "normal" year, we end up with green pastures from January through May or June. There are obviously exceptions, and if you are in the Valley, there IS plenty of irrigation water, but it is something to ask about if you look in the Foothills.

Funny, not sure how I got on this mailing list, but I get these emails on horse property available for sale every week, so I clicked on it this a.m. and found a few interesting places under $400k. Generally, the closer you get to the Bay Area, the more expensive things are, but also the closer you are to a world-class city :lol:

http://www.buyhorseproperties.com/northerncalifornia.htm

ridealot
Mar. 9, 2011, 01:21 PM
England - The food is not great but the beer is wonderful so are the riders.
Germany - They vill vhip you into shape......again sausage and beer only good thing.
France - Good riders and AWESOME FOOD......nice looking horses and guys a bonus :)
Ireland - Rains all the time.......nice green lush grass fear of foundering.... good beer.
Virginia USA - Perfect..... all types of food and beer and all the good riders clinic here or within an hour in any direction.


Just my opinion I know I am bias :)

cheektwocheek
Mar. 9, 2011, 01:57 PM
Chester County, PA



I second this one. Close to Devon & Kennett Square. Horse farms with indoors are everywhere. Dressage instructors galore.

Roads on the other hand, STINK!

Ziutek
Mar. 9, 2011, 09:10 PM
England - The food is not great but the beer is wonderful so are the riders.
Germany - They vill vhip you into shape......again sausage and beer only good thing.
France - Good riders and AWESOME FOOD......nice looking horses and guys a bonus :)
Ireland - Rains all the time.......nice green lush grass fear of foundering.... good beer.
Virginia USA - Perfect..... all types of food and beer and all the good riders clinic here or within an hour in any direction.


Just my opinion I know I am bias :)

Love this list :)))
What do you say about Holland? Denmark?

Ziutek
Mar. 9, 2011, 09:13 PM
And just to clarify, I am looking to have horses at home, buy a farmette (10-20 acres) and train with someone good. And by good I mean someone really good, BNT or almost BNT.
Sounds like most votes are for Northern CA or anywhere in CA if I can afford it.

Poody
Mar. 9, 2011, 10:28 PM
ridealot

England - The food is not great but the beer is wonderful so are the riders.
Germany - They vill vhip you into shape......again sausage and beer only good thing.
France - Good riders and AWESOME FOOD......nice looking horses and guys a bonus
Ireland - Rains all the time.......nice green lush grass fear of foundering.... good beer
Virginia USA - Perfect..... all types of food and beer and all the good riders clinic here or within an hour in any direction

substitute San Diego for Virginia.. throw a rock any direction, hits a trainer. Shows are close, too much good food,decent beach trailer to the mountains for pleasure rides. Acreage might be a problem..so whats more important .. fresh grass or great training?

atr
Mar. 9, 2011, 11:53 PM
What about Colorado? There are parts that have very little snow, there's a very active dressage scene, and some really good trainers. Depending on where you are, the culture is pretty liberal, too.

Napoles
Mar. 10, 2011, 05:17 AM
I can move anywhere I want, where should I move to?

I want grass for grazing the horses (march-october would be nice), access (within 1 hr) to the best dressage trainers, preferably no snow. Would love to have access to good vets, farriers, other horse people etc.
?
Ireland - Kildare would be a good spot.. Lots of good trainers come over here to train through Dressage Ireland - Conrad Schumacher, Jennie Loristan Clarke. Hell, Dane Rawlins has recently changed nationality to Irish! We had some snow this winter and last, but that is quite unusual for us!


I would like to live somewhere where I can find like-minded people - so liberal, not overly religious. Having farmers around would be nice, and no crime.

Ireland again! Ok - can't quite avoid the religious side of things in a predominantly Catholic country, but we're an easy-going country - nobody's going to push their beliefs on you. :)



I would like to have a decent city or big somewhere nearby to have access to good restaurants from time to time and good shopping. Also would like to have a larger city within 2-3 hrs drive so I can have access to a good airport.
Does such a heaven exist?

You can travel from one end of Ireland to the other in a matter of a few short hours!

eponacelt
Mar. 10, 2011, 08:31 AM
Virginia, hands down. Its less expensive than CA, has tons of trainers (BNTs, almost BNTs and otherwise), tons of shows, you can have grass almost year round if you want, and Charlottesville is a liberal bastion.

If you're looking for 10-20 acres, a fixer-upper type farm with a nice house, nice barn, but some fecning work needed can be had for about $400K on up. A totally done place will run closer to $1M or more, depending on location, but for that kind of money, you could have an arena, nice barn, good fencing and a good location.

suzy
Mar. 10, 2011, 08:35 AM
substitute San Diego for Virginia.. throw a rock any direction, hits a trainer. Shows are close, too much good food,decent beach trailer to the mountains for pleasure rides. Acreage might be a problem..so whats more important .. fresh grass or great training?

Um, yea, but what about ea-ea-ea-earth-qua-qua-qua-quakes!!!! I love California, but that's the deal breaker for me. ;) Also love Virginia but have heard that the humidity in summer is beastly.

Touchstone Farm,Ky
Mar. 10, 2011, 08:51 AM
I lived in Ca for years. Was on the Bay Bridge when the big quake hit ,two cars ahead of the lady who fell to the bottom deck. I now live in Kentucky <s> Great grass, Great shows, the Horse Park, Clinics all the time <Christof Hess, Jim Koford and Debbie MacDonald just in April> Plenty of good instruction. And we quit hanging liberals years ago !

cheektwocheek
Mar. 10, 2011, 08:57 AM
Plenty of good instruction. And we quit hanging liberals years ago !

:lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:

DougS
Mar. 10, 2011, 09:48 AM
I joined this forum just for this topic. Have been researching this topic for some time and getting more serious by the month:

NCAL: Grass Valley -- pretty good . . trainers, pasture Nevada Irrigation District (NID) -- Cute Gold Mining town along with Nevada City --10+ acres maybe under 400k 2000 sq ft house. We are trying to leave the state or would probably buy in this area. Many REOs Still more expensive than Charlottesvile/Richmond without the large horse community of Central VA. We passed on a 20 acre gorgeous property that was listed at 480k. Pasture and wooded pine portion-house needed work, wonderful old solid barn, when we were actively looking in 2009. had NID water.

Ventura County-- 20 acre min, 100 k an acre. Pretty impossible. There are some older smaller places, but still pricey. Water huge issue for pasture. We have a clinician/trainer in Moorpark/Somis so have seen a lot of this area. It would be our first choice if we could afford it.

San Diego. Just there for a horsey trip last weekend in Bonsall/ Fallbrook/ Oceanside.-- Gorgeous weather, but more and more difficult to get around. Traffic is a problem if one works. Many, many horse properties. The place next door to our friend's in Bonsall off Olive Hill Rd just sold for $550k 4 acres, ok house, but with great view.

When at WEG we drove around Lexington. Given what was said in this forum about KY we might reconsider as it is really, really nice and the prices look good. Politics is the least of our concerns. We really liked the people we met in KY. Very friendly, many transplants from upper midwest -- Ohio, Illinois.

We are planning a fall trip to VA, NC, SC, TN to scout properties as it is getting closer to that actual move.

blackhorsegirl
Mar. 10, 2011, 10:15 AM
Have you considered Virginia or Maryland? For Virginia, you must get outside what is considered "Northern Virginia" to get property that's close to affordable. Fredericksburg, Winchester, Front Royal can work. Lots of grass. It does get hot and cold here. However, there are trainers everywhere on every corner: Dressage, eventers, hunter/jumper, Olympic Medal winners. You could show at a schooling show every weekend if you wanted. Lots of licensed shows. Virginia Dressage Association and it's chapters is one of the largest GMO's in the country.

It's almost the same if you move north to Maryland. You must get outside of what is considered easy commute to DC. You have 3 large airports and, of course, the museums and attractions of a large city. Lots of malls. This is a very horsey area.

Oberon13
Mar. 10, 2011, 10:19 AM
Someone asked about North Carolina properties...

Western NC is great if you like the mountains, but a mountain does not a good pasture make. However, we are close to Tryon - 30-45 mins - (Paul Belasik does clinics there) and Joe Sandven lives and trains in the area.

The Piedmont (more central NC) puts you closer to better land for pasture (and minimal-ish snow, discounting the past two winters). Jim Koford is easy to get to.

Eastern NC runs into humidity in the summer and less chance for good grass year round (sandier soil).

Very general, I know! Anyone else have trainer suggestions in NC or ideas on grass in the various regions?

MysticOakRanch
Mar. 10, 2011, 06:02 PM
Um, yea, but what about ea-ea-ea-earth-qua-qua-qua-quakes!!!! I love California, but that's the deal breaker for me. ;) Also love Virginia but have heard that the humidity in summer is beastly.

That isn't all of California - just avoid the fault lines (mostly in the coastal areas). I always joke, when the Bay Area breaks off and falls in the ocean, I'll have ocean front property, worth a fortune. Up here (in them thar hills), we don't feel the earthquakes at all. Also don't have hurricanes, tornados, floods, etc.

If humidity doesn't bother you and you want year-round green, East Coast (NEDA/VA) seems the place to be. If you prefer milder Winters and drier Summers, CA seems the place to be. If you are OK with driving further to get to shows and training, but want REAL deals on land, everything in between...

arabiansrock
Mar. 10, 2011, 06:22 PM
No earthquakes in SAcramento. But... lots of traffic, typical city atmosphere.

I personally would love to leave NorCal and head to midwest or southeast, think KY or Virginia kind of area. But, dh does not have a job that moves easily, so here we stay.

winnie06
Mar. 10, 2011, 06:45 PM
Look into the Triangle area of North Carolina. Nice cities (Chapel Hill, Raleigh, Pinehurst), great weather, lots of grass, lots of horsey people, very active dressage group (NCDCTA.org). Several nice barns and and FEI trainers, lots of USEF/USDF shows.

mimiwenk
Mar. 10, 2011, 06:50 PM
Pinehurst, NC, Tryon, NC, Triangle area of NC. Va gets too cold in the winter.
Ocala, FL

kayandallie
Mar. 10, 2011, 07:07 PM
So, what areas east of C'ville and about how much for 30 - 50 acres for horses, NOW show quality, for broodmares and babies???

41 acres, $395,000 with 12 stall barn down the road from me south of Richmond, Va. I'd like some nice new horses for neighbors! (I have no ties to real estate listing; don't know owner or realtor, etc)
http://listings.listhub.net/pages/CVRMLS/1102095/?channel=oodle

coco21
Mar. 18, 2011, 10:37 PM
Another vote for Charlottesville Virginia area. Affordable, great horsey area, nice rolling hills with grass, wonderful Top Trainers, shows, clinics, Liberal minded people (not too many religious types). I think it fits the bill.

rizzodm
Mar. 18, 2011, 11:05 PM
I live in the central valley in CA. Lots of pasture and water for irrigation. There are a couple of dressage trainers in the area and where I ride there are clinics about every three months. Shows and other clinics are about a 1.5-2 hour drive. Ocean is a two hour drive mountains are a two hour drive and no worries about earthquakes.
Pioneer Equine Hospital is close and Davis is a 2 hr drive.
Real estate here right now is cheap! You could buy a nice house and board at a nice barn or buy your own ranchette.
If you want CA on a budget the central valley is a great place to look.

Dawn

Swing
Mar. 18, 2011, 11:40 PM
Biased I know but where I live..... New Zealand.

Where I live is the most horse populated area of NZ. I can show every weekend and never travel more than a hour.
Pretty much Every Equestrian discipline catered for.

Lots of good trainers that travel,my farrier is the best,feed shops that deliver and put feed in bins for me. Good vets.

30,000 acres of forest to ride in. 61 km stretch of beach to ride on (and thats just the one of 5 close to me)

And all this and I am on 13.5 acres 15 minutes from the largest city in NZ.

Sounds FAB! except you forgot to mention Earthquakes!!;)

Zugabe
Mar. 19, 2011, 03:41 PM
I thought the OP said it had to be in the US.

If I could move to a dressage mecca (within the US), it would probably be Florida. Not that I love the state, or humidity...but rather for the ability to ride year-round, and access to top trainers. It's the time to buy right now there with the housing market at a low...nice farms are going for a steal. SC and VA would be ranked up there too.

Otherwise, definitely Germany. :)

Valentina_32926
Mar. 21, 2011, 09:03 AM
Amsterdam is not exactly horsey, but I would take Eindhoven region any day! But really anywhere in Holland would be fine. Germany or England too. Unfortunately it has to be in the US...

Ocala? Are there top dressage trainers there? Yes
Wellington is a no brainer, but is the grazing good there? Yes And surrounding areas, can horses live off grass most of the year?
If a horse is in hard work then no - grass would not (normally) be enough to sustain them.

And the "yes" for Wellington grazing assumes you have enough money to buy a place with lots of grass (acreage).

Dressage Dreamer
Mar. 21, 2011, 12:31 PM
I have lived and worked in a number of horsey areas including wellington but Southern Pines, NC is my winner hands down for any discipline. Many of the farms back right up to the Moss foundation or are easily with in hacking distance. Great vets,farriers,tack shops and feed stores as well. Enough shopping,dining and nightlife to keep most content but Raleigh is only about an hour away.

Also a plus is several horse show venues right there like the horse park and the harness track, not to mention lots of local farm shows.

Gee can you tell I can't wait to move back! LOL