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Pcostx
Feb. 19, 2011, 12:34 AM
Hello!

Does anyone use rhythm beads on their horses while riding?

I'm trying to find out if the sound really does help you and your horse relax and find a consistent tempo.

Thanks!

tabula rashah
Feb. 19, 2011, 07:32 AM
I have used them before- mostly because I think they're a fun accessory. I do think that they seem to help a nervous nellie that's always looking for something to spook at- maybe it's just the consistent noise masks those other spooky sounds a bit less noticeable.

gothedistance
Feb. 19, 2011, 07:48 AM
Rhythmic noises drive me insane!! It is cute for a minute or so, but after that they set my teeth on edge. I need to hear the world around me, not a jangling set of beads that won't shut up. Like an ear worm song.

For someone who spends 90% of their time walking, and 5% trotting/5% standing around looking cute, I'm sure the beads are both adorable and fun.

Mine would end up being ripped off and lying on the side of the trail within the first mile.

JMHO :lol:

pAin't_Misbehavin'
Feb. 19, 2011, 08:27 AM
I got a couple pair because I thought they were cute. And because I thought they'd be handy during deer season, warning all and sundry of our approach.

But yeah. They drove me nuts. Horse didn't like 'em either.

Guilherme
Feb. 19, 2011, 09:06 AM
There's all kinds of stuff on a horse, particularly with Western tack loaded out for a trail ride, that will make "rythmic" noises. The beads are just loud add-ons.

I don't find that these things do anything to help a horse maintain a steady gait.

G.

SharonA
Feb. 19, 2011, 10:34 AM
I have some that I tell myself are good for keeping the rhythm and for scaring away deer so deer won't scare my horse (and for alerting people on foot. People are usually looking down at the ground and don't hear us coming down the trail). As if a deer would not have heard us coming two hundred yards away anyway. For us, I don't think they make a difference either way. Horse thinks they're just another weird thing humans have come up with, and I forget about them after a few minutes. I think they also can be annoying to other riders, if you're sharing the ring.

But, you can get them quite inexpensively (search around on the internet and you can get them for $15 instead of $70), and then if they don't work for you, you don't have to feel that bad about using them as a tacky mirror ornament in your car. And if they do work for you, that's great too!

Zarafia
Feb. 19, 2011, 10:41 AM
Never tried Rythm beads, but I used to ride my old Pasha at night a lot, and always with headphones and a cassette player. I know he at least paid attention to the music cause he knew when I would want him to trot or canter LOL. (Damn I miss that horse!)

pj
Feb. 19, 2011, 10:58 AM
Rhythmic noises drive me insane!! It is cute for a minute or so, but after that they set my teeth on edge. I need to hear the world around me, not a jangling set of beads that won't shut up. Like an ear worm song.

For someone who spends 90% of their time walking, and 5% trotting/5% standing around looking cute, I'm sure the beads are both adorable and fun.

Mine would end up being ripped off and lying on the side of the trail within the first mile.

JMHO :lol:

I'm with you. :) I won't even ride with someone whose horse is wearing them.

SPatterson
Feb. 19, 2011, 10:09 PM
I find them kind of irritating unless it's December. And then I break out the red-and-green ones with brass bells and jingle-jangle everywhere. Festive relevance makes them less ridiculous...right? ;)

JollyBadger
Feb. 21, 2011, 06:07 PM
*I* don't even like wearing jewelry, especially "clickly" or "jingly" jewelry that makes any kind of noise.

Aside from that, I am an accident-waiting-to-happen who has a knack for getting dangly jewelry caught up in things even when I am NOT in a barn or on a horse.

The trails I usually ride are not always well-manicured. Lots of honeysuckle around here, which has a knack for reaching out and "grabbing" clothing or straps.

In hunting season, I will put sleigh bells or something similarly loud on my breastcollar to let people know "I am not a deer," but beyond that I don't need any more noise. . .or things to get caught up in.:lol:

Auventera Two
Feb. 25, 2011, 11:34 AM
I have a set of them and like the noise, personally. But what I do now that is just as effective but much more functional is a dog tag with my name/number engraved. The dog tag is hooked to a snap that is on the center ring of my breast collar. It jingles softly and rhythmically as we ride. I mostly like the noise so wildlife can hear us coming a little better, but it gives the horse something to listen to also I suppose. When we're in bear country (riding way up in the northwoods) we use the bear bells attached to the girth which makes a little more noise than just the dog tag.

Pic:
http://www.hphoofcare.com/SweetsVicGlow.jpg

Dreamburger
Feb. 25, 2011, 11:58 AM
I just ordered a set and started using them for beginner lessons. So far, so good. The kids really like them, and it seems to help in getting them to maintain a consistent energy/rhythm throughout the lesson. I plan on having the kids make their own during camp this summer, and incorporating sessions with music.

baylady7
Feb. 25, 2011, 12:45 PM
I went from rhythm beads to a few sleigh bells, mostly to warn hunters and get the deer spooking *before* we ride up on them :)

tabula rashah
Feb. 25, 2011, 01:42 PM
I have a set of them and like the noise, personally. But what I do now that is just as effective but much more functional is a dog tag with my name/number engraved. The dog tag is hooked to a snap that is on the center ring of my breast collar. It jingles softly and rhythmically as we ride. I mostly like the noise so wildlife can hear us coming a little better, but it gives the horse something to listen to also I suppose. When we're in bear country (riding way up in the northwoods) we use the bear bells attached to the girth which makes a little more noise than just the dog tag.

Pic:
http://www.hphoofcare.com/SweetsVicGlow.jpg

A2 what is the bridle set up you have on your horse in this picture? It doesn't look like something I'm familiar with

Auventera Two
Feb. 25, 2011, 01:48 PM
It's a Rambo Micklem. Smartpak and Action Rider tack have them. It can also be used bitless.

tabula rashah
Feb. 25, 2011, 02:18 PM
It's a Rambo Micklem. Smartpak and Action Rider tack have them. It can also be used bitless.

Thanks- I'll take a look!

Auventera Two
Feb. 25, 2011, 02:33 PM
I like it because that particular horse is sensitive and likes to itch and rub her head with a regular bridle. She doesn't do that at all with the Micklem. Only problem with it is that I prefer to go bitless, but the bitless setup is a bit too "soft" for high energy away from home outings. (organized trail rides, endurance rides) In those situations I like to use the Zilco bridle and Little S hackamore. But I do use the Micklem bitless around home with no problems. There are actually 2 different bitless setups, one is supposed to be stronger than the other but I don't notice any difference at all.

Calamber
Feb. 25, 2011, 03:18 PM
A2, doesn't that strap under the bit tend to rub a raw area at the mouth? I like it except for that.

Huntertwo
Feb. 25, 2011, 09:38 PM
I got a couple pair because I thought they were cute. And because I thought they'd be handy during deer season, warning all and sundry of our approach.

But yeah. They drove me nuts. Horse didn't like 'em either.

I too bought them for hunting season and my horse was so on edge and almost spooky.

I could only guess that she wanted to hear what was going on around her on the trails, and the bells blocked out the sounds? :confused:

Nike13
Mar. 1, 2011, 09:33 PM
If the local wildlife can't hear a 1200lb mammal coming down the trail, backed by a far from stealthy human, I'd have to question the whole "survival of the fittest" theory. If the local hunters are crazy enough to take a shot at a target they can't positively identify, (a very real possibility, I will admit), I'd rather hang up my spurs until after deer season.
I've never used the beads myself. They annoy the life out of me on anyone else's horse. Though the Christmas theme does hold some appeal.;) I did put Mardi Gras beads on my mare for a costume class. Complete with psychadelic flowers on a grey horse! Didn't know we were ahead of the rythm bead curve.

pAin't_Misbehavin'
Mar. 2, 2011, 01:40 PM
I too bought them for hunting season and my horse was so on edge and almost spooky.

I could only guess that she wanted to hear what was going on around her on the trails, and the bells blocked out the sounds? :confused:

Ha. I'm with her. I've always hated barn radios for that very reason.:yes:


If the local wildlife can't hear a 1200lb mammal coming down the trail, backed by a far from stealthy human, I'd have to question the whole "survival of the fittest" theory.

Y'know, I actually find horses amazingly stealthy. I've had more than one sneak right up behind me without my knowing it. My old guy used to do it on purpose - tiptoe up behind people and press his nose between their shoulder blades. He got a kick out of watching them levitate, I guess.:D

Anyway, I've apparently (from their reaction) sneaked up on some wildlife while out riding. If the horse and human are just walking, and no one's saying anything - yeah, I've met a few of my non-domesticated neighbors that way.:yes: