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Big Holsteiner Mare
Feb. 18, 2011, 02:32 PM
Always kept my stirrup bars down and not locked into place, was told a long time ago that it is better to lose a stirrup than to be dragged :(
Learned for myself last night, had a jumping lesson, put weight into my right stirrup and viola! off it came. I flew off flat on my back off my 17.3 hand Holsteiner :0
Current trainer says the bars should have been up, just curious what everyone else does.....

joiedevie99
Feb. 18, 2011, 02:36 PM
NO! Bars should never be up. Did you check your leathers before you got on to make sure they were firmly up against the front of the stirrup bar? Also, is the saddle old? The stirrup bars can loosen with age.

ExJumper
Feb. 18, 2011, 02:40 PM
Devil's advocate here: why is up an option if you shouldn't use it?

(Disclosure: Neither of my saddles has bars that can flip up. They are all one solid length of metal -- no hinge.)

Big Holsteiner Mare
Feb. 18, 2011, 02:45 PM
No, not old at all. Didnt check to make sure they were up against the edge though. Saddle is fairly new and in excellent condition.

Had just cleaned last week so maybe they just plain slipped off.

Still afraid to flip those bars up :0

Donkaloosa
Feb. 18, 2011, 02:51 PM
Bars down, always. I never had a leather slip off, but I did check occasionally to be sure that they were positioned correctly.

mjrtango93
Feb. 18, 2011, 02:52 PM
I was always told to leave them down when I had saddles growing up. Same reason, so the leather will come off and you don't get drug. My saddles now don't even have a lock on them, just the bar with a slight upward curve. We had a girl though that ended up with a new saddle from Crosby for next to nothing when her stirrup bar broke during a jump lesson. The metal just snapped right off, and not a terribly old saddle at all , maybe 6 years.

caradino
Feb. 18, 2011, 03:10 PM
I'm going to be the minority and say that I always flip mine up.

HOWEVER, the stirrup bars on my saddle are very easy to flip up and down. I can do it with one hand and without a huge amount of force, much less than the pressure my body would create if it was for whatever reason dangling from a stirrup. If I needed considerable force/a tool to flip them up and down, I would leave them down for safety's sake.

I have had a stirrup IRON break on me before though! I was cantering along in a half seat and the bottom part just snapped right off from the branches. So always check your equipment!

SonnysMom
Feb. 18, 2011, 03:20 PM
I'm going to be the minority and say that I always flip mine up.

HOWEVER, the stirrup bars on my saddle are very easy to flip up and down. I can do it with one hand and without a huge amount of force, much less than the pressure my body would create if it was for whatever reason dangling from a stirrup. If I needed considerable force/a tool to flip them up and down, I would leave them down for safety's sake.

I have had a stirrup IRON break on me before though! I was cantering along in a half seat and the bottom part just snapped right off from the branches. So always check your equipment!

Ditto to this whole post.
I use similar logic. If the bar can be flipped up & down easily then I put it up. If it is stiff to move the bar I leave it down.
I have had a stirrup come off. I was trail riding with a junior this summer that had one come off the curved style bar.

Funny thing is that I, like OP, also had a stirrup break while cantering. The flexi-stirrup had rusted under the rubber boot. It was less than 1 year old.
Funny thing was I had noticed that day the branch of the stirrup above the boot had a bit of rust. I took a closer look and realized that it was just really light surface rust. It never occurred to me that what was under the boot might rust let alone be that much more rusty than the visible part.

I too figure why have a lever that can flip up it you aren't supposed to flip it up.

sansibar
Feb. 18, 2011, 03:28 PM
I have had a stirrup IRON break on me before though! I was cantering along in a half seat and the bottom part just snapped right off from the branches. So always check your equipment!

Had this happen to me too! In the middle of a show during one of my best trips ever, right before the last jump. I was not happy. lol

Mayaty02
Feb. 18, 2011, 05:12 PM
I didn't used to do it on my daughters saddle, until a few weeks ago when I took her saddle off after her lesson and saw that the stirrup leather was almsot off the bar! don't know how it happened, but she's only 8 and just started jumping so I don't even want to think of what would have happened if it fell off during the lesson. Now hers are also very easily to push up and down, otherwise, I would leave it.

NCRider
Feb. 18, 2011, 06:35 PM
I really don't understand why anyone would take a chance with the bars up unless you were doing something where there was a very high likelyhood of jarring the stirrups loose where you wouldn't be able to stop and fix it (maybe hunting or xc but I'd almost rather lose the stirrup anyways than risk the drag).

To me riding with the bar up is like not wearing your seatbelt. Yes there are accidents where seatbelts do more harm than good but the overwhelming majority of the time, you're better off having had one on.

Having the bars up won't help you if the leather or stirrup itself breaks. The only thing it can prevent is the stirrup leather slipping off, which can also be prevented in almost all cases by checking it before you get on and after any really awkward moment.

If you fall off and your foot gets stuck, you want that leather to release as soon as possible. Every second delay could have disasterous consequences.

If you're good enough to jump a course, you should be good enough to have a pretty decent shot of hanging on if one of your stirrups falls off. On the other hand, it oesn't matter how well you ride, I don't like your chances if you're foot is stuck in the stirrup as you're coming off your horse.


Hopefully everyone riding with the bar up is riding in safety stirrups so you're not relying on that bar being hit at the proper angle to come down then have the leather slide off.

vbunny
Feb. 18, 2011, 06:58 PM
The bar up is traditional for traveling. Stirrups can slip off on some saddles when when the horse is not wearing the saddle and pressing the flaps up against the bars, especially when they are well used. In fact, I actually have an old one that they can slip off very easily when not in actual use. Little annoying but still very secure when in use- and yes, I always flip them back down to ride in it.

Pussy Cat
Feb. 18, 2011, 07:53 PM
WWPCS?

(What Would Pony Club Say?)

Canaqua
Feb. 18, 2011, 07:57 PM
What vbunny says...DOWN while riding. Up if you are shipping or transporting the saddle and don't want the stirrup leathers to slide off and get lost.

Losing a stirrup is not that big of a disaster...annoying, possibly messing up a round, but not deadly. Getting your foot caught and being dragged? Disaster.

Sunnyhorse
Feb. 18, 2011, 08:21 PM
BHM, I'm curious -- what kind of saddle is it? Back when I was saddle shopping a couple of years ago, one of the owners of the local tack store told me that owners of some newer Pessoas were having problems with stirrups flying off the bars during use ...

furlong47
Feb. 18, 2011, 08:23 PM
Down, always. I have never had a stirrup and leather come off when I didn't want it to, but I HAVE had them come off during a fall thanks to the bar being down.

Kryswyn
Feb. 18, 2011, 08:25 PM
Part of getting ready to ride is checking your equipment. If your saddle does not have safety bars, then you should check that your stirrup leather is properly positioned and in no danger of slipping off during regular work. If you have safety bars, you should know the status of the hinge, ie. whether it can release the way it was designed to, or if it is too stiff to open easily and needs oiling.

Every so often I would check my stirrup bars by swiftly yanking them towards the rear. Mine always released easily so I always rode with them up.

cssutton
Feb. 18, 2011, 10:14 PM
In the year 1957, I was dragged.

Fare enough that I had time to think I was a dead man.

Ever since that day I not only insist that my bars be down, but that I ride ONLY in proper shoes, boots, etc.

Some saddles have the bars places so close to the flap, skirt or whatever, that the leathers are hard to slide off even with the bars down.

I would never ever ride in one like that.

If your leathers are coming off the bars, no matter how easy they are to slip off, you are not using your legs properly., jumping on your knees with your feet behind the vertical or something similar.

I can tell you that getting dragged is something you do not want. I can close my eyes and see the horse shoes, nails and all, going past my face.

54 years ago.

CSSJR

cssutton
Feb. 18, 2011, 10:19 PM
Part of getting ready to ride is checking your equipment. If your saddle does not have safety bars, then you should check that your stirrup leather is properly positioned and in no danger of slipping off during regular work. If you have safety bars, you should know the status of the hinge, ie. whether it can release the way it was designed to, or if it is too stiff to open easily and needs oiling.

Every so often I would check my stirrup bars by swiftly yanking them towards the rear. Mine always released easily so I always rode with them up.

Remember that when you test, you are pulling the leather back toward th.rear.

When you fall, only part of your weight is to the rear. Most of your weight is in a downward direction.

So even though it is easy to push your clips down when testing, the force is not all in the same direction when you fall, so your test might not be a true picture of what will happen in a fall.

CSSJR

trinityhill
Feb. 18, 2011, 10:47 PM
Bars always down. I'd rather take a digger from losing a stirrup then be dragged... All school saddles bars are always always required to be down here. Checking to make sure they are where they should be before getting on is just part of the pre-ride tack check. The bars up position is only for transport.

And This...


If your leathers are coming off the bars, no matter how easy they are to slip off, you are not using your legs properly., jumping on your knees with your feet behind the vertical or something similar.



Just this summer, one of my students who has her horse at home, came to me telling me she fell off a couple times because her stirrups were falling off the saddle over fences. She was convinced that the saddle had something wrong with it. She then got on one of our schoolies and I had her hop over some fences, and surprise surprise, a different saddle thats used in our program everyday, but yet the stirrups came right off over the first fence. She developed herself a habit jumping ahead off her stirrups so badly that she was pulling them right off, while trying to jump for her horse (the lazy minimal effort type of horse). We fixed the legs back where they should be and stopped the jumping ahead, and the stirrups stay on the saddles as they should.

boosma47
Feb. 19, 2011, 12:04 AM
Glad you are OK, my dear friend!

Always down!

Hugs [] to you, Woody, JJ etc.

Big Holsteiner Mare
Feb. 19, 2011, 12:11 AM
Thanks BoosMa, luv you and miss you!

The saddle is a newer pessoa A/O, never had a problem before :( Adjusted my stirrups for jumping and they seemed fine....

Kementari
Feb. 19, 2011, 01:38 AM
Down.

And I have had a fall because the stirrup came off the bar. This was not in the normal course of riding; the horse basically sat down like a dog in front of a fence to refuse at the last possible moment, and my leg swung back as I weighted it to try and rebalance myself. All witnesses - and me - agree that I would have stayed on (messy though it would have been) if the stirrup hadn't come off. As it was, I was given a perfect 10 for the cartwheel I performed off the side of the horse. :lol:

But all that? It's a whole HECK of a lot more pleasant than being dragged. I don't care HOW easily the bars release; I'm not risking it.

sadlmakr
Feb. 19, 2011, 01:57 AM
My cousin told me about her grand uncle being dragged to death by a horse. Long before the safety stirrup bars were invented. 1880 or so.
A friend also fell after a jump. Just bad timing on her part but her foot was caught inthe stirrup. Thankfully it was in the open position. It slipped off and she was safe.
I have seen some Asian imports where the stirrup safety bars are in a position where the stirrup leather can't slip off because the bar is so tight against the saddle there is no way the stirrup leather can slip off.
Examine the safety bar and make sure it works. Yes I have heard of them breaking too. Bad castings can break where there is a bubble in the metal.
Since so much of that is being done in Third World Countries now I am not surprised at it any more.
I wanted to use only "Made in USA" fittings and could not find any. I did find some brass halter buckles but they were three times the price of the "Imports".
I was always told by my riding instuctors to keep the stirrup bar open.
So I do.
JMHO
salmakr

AliO
Feb. 19, 2011, 02:42 AM
Eek, i've never even thought about this! Im running out to my tack room right now to go put my bars down!

doublesstable
Feb. 19, 2011, 02:59 AM
Had this happen to me too! In the middle of a show during one of my best trips ever, right before the last jump. I was not happy. lol

WOW never heard of that. My irons are 40 years old... I'd better check them.... :eek:

I like Exjumper don't have bars that lock, just one bar of metal...

AliO
Feb. 19, 2011, 03:05 AM
WOW never heard of that. My irons are 40 years old... I'd better check them.... :eek:

I like Exjumper don't have bars that lock, just one bar of metal...

I'd never heard of stirrups breaking either, and there are 3 posts in a row about it!:eek:

Pennywell Bay
Feb. 19, 2011, 08:31 AM
I have to say I ride w/ them up. Part of this is because that is what I was taught way back when. Mine do flip up and down easily. I am rethinking it. Interesting thread.

*Liz*
Feb. 19, 2011, 08:46 AM
I always ride with them down if that's an option. (One of my saddles has the curved bar that doesn't move.) I've never been drug, and I don't want to be.



If your leathers are coming off the bars, no matter how easy they are to slip off, you are not using your legs properly., jumping on your knees with your feet behind the vertical or something similar.


While I can agree with this statement most of the time, I do feel like there are exceptions. For the first time in my life, I had a stirrup slip right off my saddle a couple weeks ago. The horse I was riding decided to stand up near vertical, I nearly fell off, had no idea what happened, thought the leather broke. Now that's a special situation, but I have ridden out many a rear and I don't think I used my leg improperly to cause that to happen.

cssutton
Feb. 19, 2011, 10:09 AM
I always ride with them down if that's an option. (One of my saddles has the curved bar that doesn't move.) I've never been drug, and I don't want to be.



While I can agree with this statement most of the time, I do feel like there are exceptions. For the first time in my life, I had a stirrup slip right off my saddle a couple weeks ago. The horse I was riding decided to stand up near vertical, I nearly fell off, had no idea what happened, thought the leather broke. Now that's a special situation, but I have ridden out many a rear and I don't think I used my leg improperly to cause that to happen.



There is no perfect world. Likewise, there is no way one can have 100% safety and 100% perfect results when things go bad.

You just hope for the best under the circumstances.

With that said, rearing, bucking and wicked to the side shies can have results that are not prevented by any safety device.

For instance, you get shied off. Vicious shy to the right. Fall off the left side. Right foot caught in stirrup with leather crossed over saddle.
Whether the bar is up or down, the leather is not going to come off.

So you have to do everything possible to make your riding safe as possible. Bars down, proper foot wear, proper stirrup size, construction, etc.

And avoiding nut case horses is a good start.

I got dragged for violating two of the major rules: The horse was a certified nut case sent to me by one of the greatest because he was a nut case and I was wearing work shoes because my now ex had a temper tantrum when I suggested I should pull on my riding clothes. She was in a hurry.

So one should examine every step of one's riding methods to be sure there are no oversights.

Yeah...and give a lot of thought as to with whom one rides.

CSSJR

LaurieB
Feb. 19, 2011, 10:31 AM
Many years ago, a horse I was riding reared up and went over. As he started to flip, I pushed myself off to one side, hoping that he wouldn't land on me. The force of doing so shoved my foot all the way through the stirrup. The horse hit the ground then immediately scrambled up and ran away. I was dragged--luckily only a stride or two because the bar was down and the stirrup came off the saddle. I watched from flat on my back in the dirt as the horse galloped across the arena kicking up his heels.

It was a horse I had ridden a thousand times without incident--and who never reared up again. We never figured out what had caused that response that came totally out of the blue.

Lucky for me, the bars on my saddle were down. I would never ever ride with them up.

katie+tru
Feb. 19, 2011, 11:09 AM
WWPCS?

(What Would Pony Club Say?)


Pony Club is not the end-all-be-all, nor are all of their rules very rational or current with the times.

Pony Club says always down. Must be down at all PC rallies.

I keep mine down at home. My leathers are new enough that I'm pretty sure they won't slip out. It's never happened to me, but it's happened to atleast two other riders from my barn.... at home and at shows. So, I put my bars up at shows because the last thing I want is to take a fence with one stirrup.

Tuesday's Child
Feb. 19, 2011, 11:45 AM
I always ride with mine down. The only time I ever had a problem was back when I was first learning to ride, I had a ridiculous "lesson" with a very poor instructor and a horse that would barely break into a walk, never mind trot or canter. The stirrup and leather ended up slipping off the saddle. Fortunately not a scary and dangerous situation (other than the instructor!! lol) like some others here have posted.

That reminds me though, I recently got a new-to-me saddle and have not specifically checked the stirrup bars. I am 99% sure they're down but will double check this afternoon!

Ajierene
Feb. 19, 2011, 12:12 PM
When I rode with peacock stirrups, the bars were usually up. The rubber band is going to give before the stirrups slip out of the bar anyway.

With standard stirrups, the bar is down.

I am getting kwik-out stirrups and may be tempted to put the bars up with stirrups like that, but the bars on my current saddle are stiff so keeping them down is just as easy and probably the most safe recourse when galloping over a cross country course.

goeslikestink
Feb. 19, 2011, 03:21 PM
Always kept my stirrup bars down and not locked into place, was told a long time ago that it is better to lose a stirrup than to be dragged :(
Learned for myself last night, had a jumping lesson, put weight into my right stirrup and viola! off it came. I flew off flat on my back off my 17.3 hand Holsteiner :0
Current trainer says the bars should have been up, just curious what everyone else does.....

down - never up as if your stirrup got caught then you will be dragged as it wont come off easily if you fell

snoopy
Feb. 19, 2011, 03:26 PM
DOWN.....

klmck63
Feb. 19, 2011, 03:48 PM
To me, odds are that any fall I sustain because my stirrup fell off my saddle (and I really do hope that I wouldn't fall off just because my stirrup fell off, exceptional circumstances not included), is going to be a lot less dangerous than being dragged.

So down, always down.

vacation1
Feb. 19, 2011, 03:49 PM
I'd never heard of stirrups breaking either, and there are 3 posts in a row about it!:eek:

It happened once to me, too. We were cantering around a turn, and then I was on the ground, going What? We couldn't figure out what happened (I mean, I am fully capable of falling off completely on my own, but everything seemed to be going fine right up until I vanished over the side) until we got the horse back, then tracked down the broken pieces of stirrup. So strange, looking at that seemingly solid piece of iron just broken in two. I'm still a little unnerved by that; of all the things I worry about, I hadn't considered the stirrup irons snapping in half a possibility.

cssutton
Feb. 19, 2011, 05:02 PM
Now I am going to get flamed, but that is OK.

I do not ride with rubber pads because that increases the risk.

And when I ride long hours hunting, I like to shift my stirrup from one position to another, which is really easy with the old worn slick pair that I have had since sometime in the late 1940's.

By the way, it would be interesting to know if the broken stirrups we hear of here were those really old nickel iron stirrups or the newer ones made in China or Taiwan or wherever.

Of course the old ones were and are hard to get that brilliant shine that the show people like. It takes a lot of elbow grease and often to keep them looking good.

As for jumping with one stirrup, I once saw a lady whom I believe to be Allison Firestone, jump all but the first two fences of a Grand Pix course with NO stirrups.

As I recall, she was making a tight roll back and the horse ducked shorter on her than she expected and she came within an inch of falling; managed to scramble back in the saddle but sans stirrups.

And my recollection is that she went clean.

A great ride.

CSSJR

doublesstable
Feb. 19, 2011, 05:40 PM
I often wonder why you don't see any adults using the peacock irons. I thought about getting some because it just seems right to have that safety factor. I have seen the ones that look like a normal iron but break out.. but would worry they would fail if I needed them.

Also, many new saddles don't have the up or down bar option. Maybe there is some reason for it. (?)

I was popped out of the tack recently in a show because horse over jumped in a massive way and I was in a cruddy saddle and lost my stirrup - jumped the next two jumps with "one" stirrup fine and then the very last fence in the course I veered left and didn't jump the last jump. I tried like crazy to pick up that left iron but horse was being a kookado. I look back and wish I would have just dumped the right iron and I would have been much better off.

GreystoneKC
Feb. 19, 2011, 09:11 PM
Down. Although my personal saddle only has the curved bar.
CSSUTTON's story about being dragged is horrible, and I don't want that to ever happen to myself or one of my students.

bornfreenowexpensive
Feb. 19, 2011, 09:25 PM
Always always down...even at a competition. I better damn well be able to jump a jump without a stirrup if I had too.

If something is happening that that my stirrup leather slides off and I fall off, then I probably should fall off.

There are much worse things to happen to you then falling off.

Spooky Alter
Feb. 19, 2011, 09:42 PM
If your iron is coming off the bar, your leg is not where is it supposed to be bar none. More work with out irons....

Always down, make sure that trainer has'nt pulled a life insurance policy out on you :D

belleellis
Feb. 19, 2011, 09:50 PM
I ride with mine down. Always have. About 5 years ago pony let out a huge buck, I stayed on but was crocked, he then bolted the other way. My foot got hung up in the stirrup. I swung around hit the ground bounced back up came down again and the stirrup came off. That was enough! Trip to the ER because I put my arm out to catch myself.
I am going to attempt eventing this year and am thinking about getting the peacock stirrups. It would just make me feel better.

Duramax
Feb. 19, 2011, 10:01 PM
I often wonder why you don't see any adults using the peacock irons. I thought about getting some because it just seems right to have that safety factor. I have seen the ones that look like a normal iron but break out.. but would worry they would fail if I needed them.


B/c the peacock stirrups are really only suitable for riders under 100 lbs. They aren't very strong b/c they are essentially only half a stirrup. There are many better choices such as the "foot free" stirrups- the ones with the "S" shaped outer branch.

Duramax
Feb. 19, 2011, 10:04 PM
Pony Club is not the end-all-be-all, nor are all of their rules very rational or current with the times.

Pony Club says always down. Must be down at all PC rallies.

I keep mine down at home. My leathers are new enough that I'm pretty sure they won't slip out. It's never happened to me, but it's happened to atleast two other riders from my barn.... at home and at shows. So, I put my bars up at shows because the last thing I want is to take a fence with one stirrup.

That's right, PC isn't real current on "how not to get drug." :rolleyes: :lol:

Duramax
Feb. 19, 2011, 10:07 PM
The only thing worse than being drug is watching someone else get drug. Will never get that out of my head. In this particular case it was a synthetic saddle with synthetic "leathers." Which are nearly impossible to adjust much less slide off the stirrup bar.

danceronice
Feb. 19, 2011, 10:20 PM
I don't ride with rubber treads, either, cssutton, so if you're flamed for that, me too. The pair I have now are lightweight, no treads, and I don't lose them if I'm keeping my leg on properly. The one time so far I have lost a stirrup at the canter, he was finally going well (last spring, when I'd only had him doing flatwork for a couple months) it would have been a bigger hassle to pick it up than just leave it, so I left it.

Bars down. My mother is the only one of my immediate family who doesn't ride (Dad doesn't any more, but rode my old horse back when my brother and I were in college) because she fell at a dude ranch and got hung up and dragged. She still has a bone chip in her ankle from it, and fortunately that was all she got. I'd rather take my chances losing a stirrup than getting hung up.

doublesstable
Feb. 19, 2011, 10:23 PM
B/c the peacock stirrups are really only suitable for riders under 100 lbs. They aren't very strong b/c they are essentially only half a stirrup. There are many better choices such as the "foot free" stirrups- the ones with the "S" shaped outer branch.

Figured there was good reason other than fashion... :D

PNWjumper
Feb. 19, 2011, 10:48 PM
Always down. That's been driven home to me by many trainers over the years.

I saw a kid get dragged by a bucking horse once because her foot went through the stirrup and hers were up. It was not a pretty picture, and certainly enough to reinforce the fact that they should always be down.

As for losing a stirrup, I agree with BFNE and others. I've lost a stirrup in the show ring and have done many a big jumper class with one stirrup and parts of courses with none (I've always had an issue with my right stirrup :lol:). If you're not balanced enough to stay in the saddle with one stirrup then you shouldn't be jumping (at least not until you spend some more time without stirrups at home). I don't mean that you should or can always stay on if a stirrup breaks or comes unattached suddenly, that falls under the "unpredictable" side of things (but, as others have pointed out, is far better than being dragged). If you stay on through the stirrup detaching, you shouldn't have a problem continuing.

I can say that in 30 years if riding, I haven't ever had a stirrup slide off of the bar or known/seen it happen to anyone under normal circumstances. I agree that you're doing something wrong (or there's something wrong with your saddle) if that's happening.....barring crazy accidents (like a horse rearing or sitting down).

Big Holsteiner Mare
Feb. 20, 2011, 12:42 AM
So my general post about stirrup bars up or down becomes a personal attack on whether or not my leg is in the correct position to be jumping at all :0

I am sooo glad that everyone on this forum can jump a course without stirrups or else you should absolutely not be jumping at all........

My trainer is a Grand Prix rider and I'm sure that if she felt I shouldnt be jumping I wouldnt be. Thank you all for your comments :)

atr
Feb. 20, 2011, 01:06 AM
Down.

I was dragged about 40 years ago. And like CSSutton, I remember it like it was yesterday. And I still have the scars.

My dear friends and old barn owners lost their 8 year old son when he was bucked off and got his foot caught, and the stirrup didn't release.

We all still have the scars from that.

Kementari
Feb. 20, 2011, 01:09 AM
Always always down...even at a competition. I better damn well be able to jump a jump without a stirrup if I had too.

If something is happening that that my stirrup leather slides off and I fall off, then I probably should fall off.

There are much worse things to happen to you then falling off.

:yes: Falling off happens, regardless of situation, but if you are truly worried about your ability to go over a jump with one stirrup (or no stirrups), then you need to do more work at home before you compete.


So my general post about stirrup bars up or down becomes a personal attack on whether or not my leg is in the correct position to be jumping at all :0

I am sooo glad that everyone on this forum can jump a course without stirrups or else you should absolutely not be jumping at all........

My trainer is a Grand Prix rider and I'm sure that if she felt I shouldnt be jumping I wouldnt be. Thank you all for your comments :)

Yeah, your stirrup likely came off because your leg slipped (though it might have just been "teetering" on the edge of the bar already, as was also suggested). But no one has suggested that if your leg slips once that makes you a bad rider. What people have said is that if your leather is coming off REPEATEDLY you need to look to your riding.

Everyone makes mistakes. Most of us admit it and move on.

doublesstable
Feb. 20, 2011, 02:27 AM
So my general post about stirrup bars up or down becomes a personal attack on whether or not my leg is in the correct position to be jumping at all :0

I am sooo glad that everyone on this forum can jump a course without stirrups or else you should absolutely not be jumping at all........

My trainer is a Grand Prix rider and I'm sure that if she felt I shouldnt be jumping I wouldnt be. Thank you all for your comments :)


??? Sorry but I don't understand the above comments. I think you got a lot of good thoughts and some really heart-felt stories have been told about being dragged. WOW....

amastrike
Feb. 20, 2011, 02:41 AM
For instance, you get shied off. Vicious shy to the right. Fall off the left side. Right foot caught in stirrup with leather crossed over saddle.
Whether the bar is up or down, the leather is not going to come off.

This is more or less how I turned my leg into a jigsaw puzzle last year. Only we were galloping, mare veered a bit to the left, I fell off the right side, and my left foot was stuck in the stirrup and my leg snapped over the seat of the saddle. Leather stayed on the bar. And this is the same saddle and leathers I was using when I got reared off a different horse--the leathers slid right off the bars.

Down, always always down.

PNWjumper
Feb. 20, 2011, 03:06 AM
So my general post about stirrup bars up or down becomes a personal attack on whether or not my leg is in the correct position to be jumping at all :0

I am sooo glad that everyone on this forum can jump a course without stirrups or else you should absolutely not be jumping at all........

My trainer is a Grand Prix rider and I'm sure that if she felt I shouldnt be jumping I wouldnt be. Thank you all for your comments :)

I'm with doublesstable, I don't understand your comments either.

Nobody said that *you* shouldn't be riding or jumping. Most comments to that effect were general and mine in particular was a response to katie+tru who said she locks the bars up at shows because the "last thing she wants to do" is jump a fence with one stirrup.

In regards to your OP, I would be checking my saddle if I were you. I would imagine that the stirrup leather was on the edge for one reason or another and that's why it popped off. Having it happen one time wouldn't worry me, but if it happens again (or repeatedly) I'd certainly be looking at saddle to see what was going on (this is assuming that if you were doing something funky with your leg your trainer would notice, and that sounds like a fairly safe assumption to make).

SSacky
Feb. 20, 2011, 03:40 AM
I have mine up because I have an older saddle (got it second hand) and the stirrups could easily fall off if I slid my leg.

That said, I have safety iron (the one's with the elastics) so that would pop off (and has done numerous times) so I feel safe.

cssutton
Feb. 20, 2011, 10:30 AM
So my general post about stirrup bars up or down becomes a personal attack on whether or not my leg is in the correct position to be jumping at all :0

I am sooo glad that everyone on this forum can jump a course without stirrups or else you should absolutely not be jumping at all........

My trainer is a Grand Prix rider and I'm sure that if she felt I shouldnt be jumping I wouldnt be. Thank you all for your comments :)

Let us go back to your original post:

"Always kept my stirrup bars down and not locked into place, was told a long time ago that it is better to lose a stirrup than to be dragged
Learned for myself last night, had a jumping lesson, put weight into my right stirrup and viola! off it came. I flew off flat on my back off my 17.3 hand Holsteiner :0
Current trainer says the bars should have been up, just curious what everyone else does....."

First, your trainer is wrong. So much for his being the last word on all things, maybe even including your leg.

Second, you asked for answers to your question.

One should never ever ask a question on the Internet unless one is able to take what they get.

Some answers will insult, some will be great advice and some will be totally incorrect.

In this particular case, mine excepted, the replies have all been informative and I hope have caused riders to examine their practices and equipment.

Don't forget that there are many who read and who never comment because they are beginners and too shy to comment. Our comments are meant for them as well.

So if our replies have not helped you, perhaps they have helped others who lurk here.

I suppose most of you here know that the founder of the Chronicle, Gerald Webb, was dragged to death in a racing accident.

http://chronofhorse.com/article/chronicle-horse-73-years-and-counting

Getting dragged is no minor matter and any discussion of it will get passionate comments from anyone who has ever had the experience.

CSSJR


__________________

EmmyTheHemi
Feb. 20, 2011, 10:31 AM
The saddle is a newer pessoa A/O, never had a problem before :( ...


OP, your issue may be a Pessoa manufacturing thing.

In 2008, I got a brand new Pessoa Legacy Event and within 3 months of purchase, the stirrups had come off 3 times. The final time was early in the xc portion of a horse trial. Landed (well ;)) and turned after a fence, and poof! no right stirrup. Looked down and left one was also hanging from the excess-strap-keeper.

It went back to the vendor; I waited 4 months for a replacement saddle from Pessoa. The vendor told me there had been "production problems." Stirrups have stayed on the replacement just fine ever since: 3 years of eventing and foxhunting.

The one other time I have had a leather come off was a fall a decade ago. Horse right, me left, leather off as designed, and only a sprained ankle to show for it. Stirrup bar latch down. Always.

kookicat
Feb. 20, 2011, 10:49 AM
I often wonder why you don't see any adults using the peacock irons. I thought about getting some because it just seems right to have that safety factor. I have seen the ones that look like a normal iron but break out.. but would worry they would fail if I needed them.


They tend to warp and deform over time from an adult's weight.



That's right, PC isn't real current on "how not to get drug." :rolleyes: :lol:

DRUG is not the past tense of drag! The word you're looking for is DRAGGED.

Anyway, mine are always down. I don't want to get dragged if anything goes wrong.

Alibhai's Alibar
Feb. 20, 2011, 05:09 PM
Long ago, I rode Alibar too close to the gate of the indoor arena. The gate was a swinging wooden door type of thing. It was not completely flush with the other end of the door, and my iron caught the very tip of it as we rode by at a brisk trot.

BWOOP!

The stirrup zipped right off the saddle. I remained mounted and Alibar kept trotting. I shudder to think of what would have happened if the stirrup bar was in the up position.

For my level of riding (pleasure riding and just a handful of local shows), I think the bar should be down when I'm in the saddle.

Duramax
Feb. 20, 2011, 08:03 PM
DRUG is not the past tense of drag! The word you're looking for is DRAGGED.


Awesome! Thanks!! :yes: :yes: :yes: :yes:

kookicat
Feb. 20, 2011, 08:27 PM
Awesome! Thanks!! :yes: :yes: :yes: :yes:

I did try very hard not to post that, but it annoyed me so much I had no choice. :lol:

Duramax
Feb. 20, 2011, 08:28 PM
DRUG is not the past tense of drag! The word you're looking for is DRAGGED.


Per the research I just did:



“Drug” is Dialect
But it turns out that treating “drag” as an irregular verb and using “drug” as the past tense is common in some parts of America. Linguists call it dialect, which essentially means it's a language quirk shared by a group of people. Dialect can be shared by any group of people; for example, quirks can be shared by people who live in the same region, were educated by the same system, or inhabit the same social class.
Using “drug” as the past tense of “drag” is a dialect common to people who live in the southern United States, but linguists have noted that it is used frequently in states as far west as Nebraska. Strangely, they don't say anything about it being used widely in the West, where I've lived my whole life, so I can't explain why I was confused.


And I am southern, so nah! :D

kookicat
Feb. 20, 2011, 08:30 PM
Per the research I just did:



“Drug” is Dialect
But it turns out that treating “drag” as an irregular verb and using “drug” as the past tense is common in some parts of America. Linguists call it dialect, which essentially means it's a language quirk shared by a group of people. Dialect can be shared by any group of people; for example, quirks can be shared by people who live in the same region, were educated by the same system, or inhabit the same social class.
Using “drug” as the past tense of “drag” is a dialect common to people who live in the southern United States, but linguists have noted that it is used frequently in states as far west as Nebraska. Strangely, they don't say anything about it being used widely in the West, where I've lived my whole life, so I can't explain why I was confused.


And I am southern, so nah! :D

I lived in an area with a dialect for almost fifteen years as a child, and I don't type with an accent. ;) :lol:

katie+tru
Feb. 20, 2011, 11:45 PM
That's right, PC isn't real current on "how not to get drug." :rolleyes: :lol:



I saw a girl get dragged at a Pony Club rally even though her stirrup bars were obviously down. Having them down doesn't always guarantee they'll let go... atleast not right away. Someone on one of these boards also has a story about a rider getting her bootlaces tangled around the stirrup iron and getting dragged by that.

Personally, I feel like it makes a minimal difference compared to everything else that can happen to you. You can get dragged with them up or down. However, for children who have smaller feet but often ride in adult sized stirrups, bars down is a must. Bars down for any novice rider in general.

dab
Feb. 21, 2011, 05:29 PM
I often wonder why you don't see any adults using the peacock irons. I thought about getting some because it just seems right to have that safety factor. I have seen the ones that look like a normal iron but break out.. but would worry they would fail if I needed them.I have a pair -- Got them after I met my first horse's previous owner -- She had been dragged when my mare pulled her classic drop shoulder, spin, buck, & bolt move -- The woman spent 3 weeks in an ICU, and is lucky to have lived to tell about it --

Nobody who knew my mare ever questioned why I wore them -- I showed in them too --

Anyway, you can get 4 3/4" peacocks -- They come in both hunt stirrup and fillis stirrup styles -- I had a pair of the hunt style ones bend when my mare ran us into a post & rail fence and the stirrup caught on a rail for an instant -- So, I prefer the fillis style --

cssutton
Feb. 21, 2011, 07:08 PM
I saw a girl get dragged at a Pony Club rally even though her stirrup bars were obviously down. Having them down doesn't always guarantee they'll let go... atleast not right away. Someone on one of these boards also has a story about a rider getting her bootlaces tangled around the stirrup iron and getting dragged by that.

Personally, I feel like it makes a minimal difference compared to everything else that can happen to you. You can get dragged with them up or down. However, for children who have smaller feet but often ride in adult sized stirrups, bars down is a must. Bars down for any novice rider in general.

It happened so long ago that my memory is fuzzy, but I think I remember that at the time it happened there was a theory or story going around that Gerald Webb's spur got caught in the stirrup.

Or maybe it was the buckle on the strap. There was something about the spur. Maybe someone old enough from NVA will remember.



You are correct that clips up or down is not the whole story. They definitely should be down, but I will bet everyone here has at some time owned a saddle that took all of your strength to slide the leather under the bar because the bar was buried in the saddle.

That is every bit as dangerous as a clip up because if you get caught it is not going to come off quickly and easily. You will get dragged for a distance and if there is a rock or hard ground, it does not take very far. Horses have even been known to go nuts and run through fences of all sorts while dragging a person. So if something like that is close,..........you don't have long.

I recently purchased a used saddle to use as a spare while my old saddle gets repaired. I have not yet sent the old one off because the new one arrived with the bars buried.

So I took a pair of boot hooks and forced them under the bars thus compressing the leather. Now the leathers slide in and out just right.

Now I have to wait and see if the bars stay free after the boot hooks are removed. They have been under the bars for months.

If that does not work, I will send it out to be fixed, but I think it will.

This is important. There is no need to turn clips down if the leather will not slide out easily. You might as well have bars with no means of release.

As for children, I wish there was some way to get non riding parents to understand how important proper foot wear and the other things discussed here are. We see children riding in tennis shoes and every thing else, in stirrups too large to prevent a foot from going through, etc.

I shudder every time I see it.

Luckily I am no longer riding in venues where I am exposed to that suff and don't see much of it any more.

CSSJR