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View Full Version : Sort of spin off - How to loosen QH HQs?



vbunny
Feb. 14, 2011, 05:11 PM
The thread on training different horse breeds got me wondering - ARE there things you do to loosen up QH HQs? I have a super (4 year old) mare in training (Han x QH) and the hardest thing for her is opening up her hips to use herself. I have just been working her like I would any other young horse (5 months training) - hacking and hills, some transitions, straightness, rhythm and circles, stuff like that. I haven't worked with a QHx as nice as her before, she could be really fancy. I watch the reining horses and they have much more movement and range in their toplines and HQ than most of the English ridden QH I have seen, but obviously it is possible. Have I missed something and there ARE there QH type dressage/flatwork things I ought to be doing with her to help open them up?

TIA

horsefaerie
Feb. 15, 2011, 09:49 AM
Lateral work. You want supple and responsive, use the lateral movements to get there.

Shoulder in and haunches in. Leg yield.

I have trained numerous quarter horses and they benefit as much as any other breed with the lateral work.

The reining trainers here use leg yield and a version of a haunches in to develop their horses.

alibi_18
Feb. 15, 2011, 10:16 AM
... and the hardest thing for her is opening up her hips to use herself...

Opening up her hips? in order to use herself?

Sorry please explain as I really don't understand that concept.

netg
Feb. 15, 2011, 10:55 AM
Lateral work. You want supple and responsive, use the lateral movements to get there.

Shoulder in and haunches in. Leg yield.

I have trained numerous quarter horses and they benefit as much as any other breed with the lateral work.

The reining trainers here use leg yield and a version of a haunches in to develop their horses.

Except they call leg yields "shoulder in" and "shoulder out" and confuse my mom. :lol:


I agree - lateral work. The QH trainers who have the best moving horses in the breed show rings use the lateral work to get it, too. It is what works with the anatomy of a horse, not just the non-stock breeds. :)

vbunny
Feb. 15, 2011, 05:10 PM
OK, makes sense. She isn't overly bendy through her body yet either, I'm sure it will work all around.
Alibi- she gets tight through her hips and doesn't take as big a step behind as I'd like. In other words, yes, she needs to learn to use herself more. She also seems to keep her hocks a little straighter (doesn't use them as much, bend them as much) as I'd expect just looking at her confo, and moves a little cow hocked - I'm not sure if that's how she is yet or she just needs strengthening and lateral work (as kindly prescribed above :)). Still, I like her a lot and like the feel she gives.

jcotton
Feb. 16, 2011, 08:58 AM
How is her trot after she canters?
what about some leg yields, shoulder in at the walk, then long and low rising forward trot --think auction trot. Then go to canter with trot canter transitions.
You can also do leg yield and shoulder at the canter, too.
Most horses have better trot work after cantering.

mypaintwattie
Feb. 16, 2011, 01:28 PM
Having a chiropractor check her can make a world of difference if she is out. My mare always moves much better after a visit from her chiro.