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wehrlegirl
Feb. 8, 2011, 02:13 PM
Do you all think the Spanish Walk is a Haute Ecole movement? Or.... do you think (generally)this a 'upper level' dressage movement?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lpCvQBALBX0

oldbag
Feb. 8, 2011, 02:18 PM
It's neither.

spirithorse
Feb. 8, 2011, 02:32 PM
It is CIRCUS

Dressage_Julie
Feb. 8, 2011, 02:35 PM
It is CIRCUS

I agree, circus trick! :lol:

wehrlegirl
Feb. 8, 2011, 02:39 PM
Really??

spirithorse
Feb. 8, 2011, 02:57 PM
Yes:
all of the research I have done does not reveal the Spanish Walk as being a part of dressage. What is revealed is that it comes out of Spain, supposedly created by Spanish cavalry.

CHT
Feb. 8, 2011, 03:02 PM
I agree, circus trick.

The Spanish walk is fancy/pretty, but it is not part of the athletic development of the horse. it involves a disconnection of the horse's front and back, with the horse lifting its head and hollowing its back to be able to free up its shoulder that much without sitting on its hindquarters.

mjhco
Feb. 8, 2011, 03:09 PM
I agree, circus trick.

The Spanish walk is fancy/pretty, but it is not part of the athletic development of the horse. it involves a disconnection of the horse's front and back, with the horse lifting its head and hollowing its back to be able to free up its shoulder that much without sitting on its hindquarters.

Some trainers HAVE used Spanish walk to free up the shoulders. Kyra Kyrklund being one. Used it at the USDF Symposium 3 years ago.

chancellor2
Feb. 8, 2011, 03:21 PM
I have used full pass as a means to an end too. But that doesn't make it a high school or upper level dressage movement.

spirithorse
Feb. 8, 2011, 03:27 PM
Full pass was at one time part of dressage. It was a very effective cavalry movement.
It is a very excellent movement for suppling the entire structure of the horse.
Podhajsky said it could only be done from wall, however, it can be done at the canter.

purplnurpl
Feb. 8, 2011, 03:49 PM
circus trick.

Petstorejunkie
Feb. 8, 2011, 03:56 PM
I'm going to go one more and say over exaggerated lateral walk
it's crap, useless, and imho, ugly
to me, for it to be dressage it must have:
1. a battlefield purpose
2. be a natural posture or movement for a horse

princessfluffybritches
Feb. 8, 2011, 08:18 PM
I'm going to go one more and say over exaggerated lateral walk
it's crap, useless, and imho, ugly
to me, for it to be dressage it must have:
1. a battlefield purpose
2. be a natural posture or movement for a horse


Ditto on that!

EqTrainer
Feb. 8, 2011, 08:29 PM
Trick. I have a horse who does it naturally, I think he likes to show off his ridiculously free shoulder.. And not use his butt LOL

cute_lil_fancy_pants_pony
Feb. 8, 2011, 10:40 PM
I don't care what you call it, but it is a valuable gymnastic all horses should learn how to do.:)

spirithorse
Feb. 8, 2011, 10:45 PM
Its fine for the unridden horse, however, the back of the ridden horse actually hollows, so it is not good for the health and welfare of the ridden horse.

cedressagehorses
Feb. 8, 2011, 11:38 PM
I believe that if you watch several horses perform the spanish walk that you will see some perform it in a true four beat walk while others will perform the spanish walk in an actual two beat trot type movement only without the moment of suspension. Truely the spanish walk should be performed maintaining the squence and rhythm of a four beat walk in order to be correct by definition. To say that the movement is high school would indicate that the horse is able to and often does replicate the movement while at liberty. I have seen horses lift their leg high from the shoulder but I have never seen a horse actually walk a complete stride doing this so I would have to think that it is a circus trick. The spanish walk is often used to help some horses with weak trot extensions ad more lift and reach to their extended trots, but this too is a trick that leaves the hindleg less active and unable to match the same degree of extension as the front legs. While it may be a good exercise for obedience and to develop range of motion, I think in the end it is just an exercise and belongs in that catagory as a training exercise and at best would be a circus trick if it were performed in exhibition.

ideayoda
Feb. 9, 2011, 01:09 AM
SW (esp as shown by Marduck) has value, and is not a trick (although it can be done badly as one). However, the purity of the walk must be kept which is difficult. It must no be introduced until the horse is well schooled. It definitely help with the development of better passage.

wehrlegirl
Feb. 9, 2011, 01:51 AM
ok, bummer - I lost then. Hate it when the kid is right.

wehrlegirl
Feb. 9, 2011, 01:53 AM
SW (esp as shown by Marduck) has value, and is not a trick (although it can be done badly as one). However, the purity of the walk must be kept which is difficult. It must no be introduced until the horse is well schooled. It definitely help with the development of better passage.

ok- wait , see-- I think that video proves me right..of course there is bad/good examples, but when it is done right, keeping the walk pure, then is it a true hs movement?

SmartAlex
Feb. 9, 2011, 09:37 AM
It's "High School". In the past, horse shows offered a High School class. Basically advanced trick training. Some champion Saddlebred show horses of the late 19th century also exhibited in High School classes. One of the most famous trainers of his day was Tom Bass (http://www.audrain.org/irwin/achs.htm). Very interesting person and very interesting horses. He was known to have trained a mule to canter backwards while still a young slave child.

shea'smom
Feb. 9, 2011, 09:41 AM
I have a vague recollection of Podhajsky talking about it in My Horses My Teachers. Of course, that was a long time ago ... I could be wrong.

Janet
Feb. 9, 2011, 10:01 AM
Neither. It is a Baroque movement.

wehrlegirl
Feb. 9, 2011, 09:04 PM
Neither. It is a Baroque movement.

Could you elaborate on this?

spirithorse
Feb. 9, 2011, 10:33 PM
1: of, relating to, or having the characteristics of a style of artistic expression prevalent especially in the 17th century that is marked generally by use of complex forms, bold ornamentation, and the juxtaposition of contrasting elements often conveying a sense of drama, movement, and tension

2: characterized by grotesqueness, extravagance, complexity, or flamboyance