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ctanner
Feb. 6, 2011, 05:45 PM
Who on this board re-trains OTTB for new careers as dressage horses?

dwblover
Feb. 6, 2011, 08:29 PM
Do you mean professionally as sales horses? Or just in general?

Petstorejunkie
Feb. 6, 2011, 09:48 PM
*raises hand*
Not "professionally" (as my full time job is in managment), but for extra ride time my boarding barn gets in OTTB's and glass minded rehab projects, and I bring them along into new careers. My strongest background is in dressage, so that's what their education is in.

TKR
Feb. 6, 2011, 10:25 PM
I've done it for years, but covered up with all my own right now. LOVE OTTB's and any Thoroughbred, have bred them for 30+ years and done the track as well as the sport disciplines. They are special and the best thing you can do is give them the time they need and get them to relax and understand/enjoy their new career.
PennyG

netg
Feb. 7, 2011, 01:16 AM
They are special and the best thing you can do is give them the time they need and get them to relax and understand/enjoy their new career.

And once that happens, they will put their entire being into doing it to the best of their ability.

My OTTB is the first I've worked with, and he is by FAR the easiest horse I have ever worked with regularly. He has his quirks and occasional bucking sprees when he hasn't gotten enough turnout, which makes things interesting, but he learns so well and so quickly that he's deluding me into thinking I really know what I'm doing.

My horse is the only horse I've ever known to practice what he does under saddle when turned out. He used to just run, but now he does leg yield-h/i-s/i sequences and transitions from working to extended to collected trot, etc.

kdow
Feb. 7, 2011, 02:14 AM
My horse is the only horse I've ever known to practice what he does under saddle when turned out. He used to just run, but now he does leg yield-h/i-s/i sequences and transitions from working to extended to collected trot, etc.

I can't decide if that scares me or if I want to run out and get an OTTB Right This Minute...

(Actually, who am I kidding? When I can reasonably get a horse, it's totally going to be an OTTB if I can find someone to help with training who isn't convinced all TBs are insane.)

LookmaNohands
Feb. 7, 2011, 07:02 AM
I retrain OTTBs for what ever sport they seem suited for then keep or sell them. For me it is usually eventing in which case I do a lot of dressage.

More info here: www.theexcellenthorse.com

netg
Feb. 7, 2011, 08:27 AM
I can't decide if that scares me or if I want to run out and get an OTTB Right This Minute...

(Actually, who am I kidding? When I can reasonably get a horse, it's totally going to be an OTTB if I can find someone to help with training who isn't convinced all TBs are insane.)

Oh, he's insane... an insanely hard worker who loves his job. :)

I didn't expect to get an OTTB, but he and I are a perfect personality match, and he learns so quickly and easily he makes it appear I'm a good trainer, when I'm really fairly clueless about things. I keep trying to remind myself our progress is because he's awesome, not because I am... and that I have much more to work on than he does, too!

merrygoround
Feb. 7, 2011, 09:28 AM
OK Here I go again!

Back in the good old days...................:lol:, WB's were things you read about, seldom saw,and couldn't possibly afford if you did see one.

Most everyone started with an OTTB, or a never made it to the track TB, or a QH, (there weren't as many Appendix QH's then).

We got 'em, rode 'em, figured out what they were best at, dressage, dressage & CC, or just plain jumping. Some wanted to be field hunters.

First and foremost they were horses.

They still are just horses.

TKR
Feb. 7, 2011, 09:43 AM
Alot of OTTB's are body sore coming off the track, so you might ask a good equine masseuse to go over your new horse. They are usually long in the toes and the shoeing is not at all what you want in a sporthorse, so you will need a good farrier to start that process. Ulcers are another issue also common that should be addressed. Check teeth and vax. Just allowing some turnout is such a good thing mentally for these young horses! It's like getting out of prison! Good luck, worth everything you do for them.
PennyG

luckydragon
Feb. 7, 2011, 11:00 AM
I have worked with a few OTTBs, and just love them. I'm hoping to be able to do it more in the future. I currently own 3 OTTBs, all of them are in training as Eventers, doing mainly Dressage work now though. They are athletic and very hard workers. I couldn't ask for better horses! :)

ctanner
Feb. 7, 2011, 11:03 AM
Merrygoround,I'm with you!I started riding in the Dark Ages and most of my teachers were OTTBs.I just love them.
Since then I ridden a lot of very fancy WB,none of them were mine.They were wonderful horses,but at the end of the day I love an OTTB.
Not quite ready for my next horse,but I sure it will be a TB when I am.

GallantGesture
Feb. 7, 2011, 12:52 PM
I'm on my 4th ottb dressage horse right now, and I just love them! They have a work ethic and desire to please like no other horse. They will put in a hard days work, then offer that little bit more. My current baby is stabled right next to the arena, and he will walk away from dinner to watch me work another horse... he watches so intently and studies what we are doing, then the next time I ride him it's like he's trying to do what he watched! It's amazing, I've never known another horse to try to figure it out like he does :)

These horses I think can take a little bit longer at the beginning to earn their trust and help them understand they have a new job after racing, but if that part is done right you really have a partner for life. Some of them I get the feeling have never really just "been loved" or had a person of their own or treats or that little extra time scratching behind the ears... and once they figure that out, they are like big dogs! They have already been trailered and exposed to all sorts of stuff, so contrary to popular belief, I find them less spooky and more sensible and experienced. Like all breeds, some have trickier temperaments or are hotter, and some are so laid back they are lazy! But in all, the desire to please seems to override whatever personality or conformational quirks they may be starting with. WB's are lovely horses, but I love the heart and mind of a TB!

Velvet
Feb. 7, 2011, 02:11 PM
Me! Love OTTBs.

dwblover
Feb. 7, 2011, 04:28 PM
Absolutely agree, I have never met a smarter or kinder horse than an OTTB! It may take a few months to bring them around, but when they are on your side, they have your back for life!!!

vbunny
Feb. 7, 2011, 06:29 PM
Beautifully written GG- "They have already been trailered and exposed to all sorts of stuff, so contrary to popular belief, I find them less spooky and more sensible and experienced. Like all breeds, some have trickier temperaments or are hotter, and some are so laid back they are lazy! But in all, the desire to please seems to override whatever personality or conformational quirks they may be starting with. WB's are lovely horses, but I love the heart and mind of a TB!

Gestalt
Feb. 7, 2011, 08:00 PM
I love TB's, off-trackers or never-made-its. For sure they can work all day and half the night. :)

As for the comment about trailer loading, I've had 3 ottb's and none of them were good at trailering. Maybe if I had a horse van, but straight-load trailer not so good. We had to start from scratch on learning how to load (and haul). And also not so good with being tied. Really cool that I could clean their hooves from one side!