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View Full Version : worth of a complicated grand prix horse



kip
Jan. 30, 2011, 09:51 PM
Hypothetically speaking what would a 9 year old horse confirmed to grand prix, very very very correct in training, nicely bred wb, gorgeous, 7/8s on gaits, but complicated ie. spooky/hot/opinionated be worth? as oppossed to a horse that isn't complicated.

springer
Jan. 30, 2011, 10:28 PM
I'm not claiming to be "in the know" here, but I would think it would depend alot on what part of the country you're in? For example, Wellington FL would be a way different figure than here in Montana:winkgrin:

Velvet
Jan. 30, 2011, 10:52 PM
Depends on if he's complicated for the person buying him. If that person is good, tactful, and maybe just the exact right rider to give the horse confidence, they might not see what the seller considers bad traits. Then he's worth the full asking price of any other confirmed GP horse of his age and talent.

dwblover
Jan. 30, 2011, 11:01 PM
I think it depends on just how complicated he is. Is the horse bucking off professional trainers? Or is he just too much for an amateur? I think a pro would still be super interested. Finding an amateur buyer might be very difficult though. Another very important question is has the horse shown at GP and what were the scores?

Petstorejunkie
Jan. 30, 2011, 11:20 PM
It really depends on the buyer.
I prefer a more complex individual over straight forward and simple, so if I were buying, I wouldn't be expecting a deal for a horse that takes talent to ride.

kip
Jan. 31, 2011, 08:12 AM
Interesting, thanks for the input. Let's say that the scores are in the mid 60s.

caddym
Jan. 31, 2011, 08:18 AM
If you have a NINE year old, georgeous, good gaits that can score mid 60's in the GP, that horse would be worth around 150-250k. I thnk all GP horses are complicated.

suzy
Jan. 31, 2011, 08:39 AM
You have to consider his resale value unless you plan to keep him forever. Only a handful of people might be interested in buying this horse sometime in the future.

Your description "spooky/hot/opinionated" is vague. Just how spooky, hot, and opinionated is he? A woman I train with occasionally was given for FREE a horse that sounds a lot like what you are describing because he was so difficult. And maybe this is the crux of it. Is the horse complicated or actually difficult? I think the complicated horse does have some resale value. The difficult horse is another kettle of fish and not something I would pay for. In fact, I would not even want him for free.

alibi_18
Jan. 31, 2011, 08:51 AM
I would be really impressed to find any 9 yrs old Confirmed GP, scoring in the mid 60's being quiet/easy ride/bomb proof type!
GP is difficult and 9 is quite young to be confirmed at GP so this horse is either showing 'normal' behavior (complicated) or is being asked too much and acts up in results (difficult)!

Lostboy
Jan. 31, 2011, 09:32 AM
Complicated horses are hard to peg value-wise. Look at Guenters horse..fabulous when he is good, just as likely to get pissy during a test and blow the whole thing. I am not even counting the bucking thing since I feel that was an accident . how many tests do you want to go through, along with the hour of training and expense then have your horse have an attitude during your event. Totally NOT worth it,imo for $250K or so I would keep on looking.

I do not think top GP horses are dead dogs at all but I do think most of them are fairly obediant and of course the riders as very good. To get the top marks you really need expressiveness and power but it had to be reliably managable

MysticOakRanch
Jan. 31, 2011, 10:19 AM
Depends on if someone else can actually ride him - how complicated? A plus that he is young (9), but without seeing how he does with different riders, hard to put a price on him. Spooky but rideable vs spooky and almost impossible are two very different sides of the spectrum... Sensitive but rideable vs "no-way-in-h#@L"? Without knowing more, price could be anywhere between $5,000 and $100,000 :lol:

Oh, and an easy, forgiving, good scoring GP horse - a schoolmaster type with nice gaits? Nine years old (or heck, 10, 11, or 12)? Easily $100k! Depending on how fancy, could be much more - the YR horses can be pricey, and that is what you are describing with your 2nd hypothetical horse!

siegi b.
Jan. 31, 2011, 02:25 PM
I am amazed at some of the low price tags suggested by some of you....

A 9-year old, gorgeous, well-trained WB gelding doing GP already and scoring in the mid-60's? I think you'd be lucky to touch him for under 250K....

How difficult can he be when he's managed to be trained to GP correctly by the age of 9? Whatever difficulties there are, they obviously didn't keep the horse from progressing faster than most, and that tells me something about his character and work ethic.

Just my 2 cents....

joiedevie99
Jan. 31, 2011, 02:36 PM
I agree with siegi. I'd think 200+. I know of one someone might be able to have closer to 150, but he doesn't vet and he's older than 9.

netg
Jan. 31, 2011, 03:03 PM
Worthless. I'll give you the barn address and you can ship him to me.


I am amazed at some of the low price tags suggested by some of you....

A 9-year old, gorgeous, well-trained WB gelding doing GP already and scoring in the mid-60's? I think you'd be lucky to touch him for under 250K....

How difficult can he be when he's managed to be trained to GP correctly by the age of 9? Whatever difficulties there are, they obviously didn't keep the horse from progressing faster than most, and that tells me something about his character and work ethic.

Just my 2 cents....

But actually, Siegi is right about where I was thinking.

mickeydoodle
Jan. 31, 2011, 03:44 PM
I agree with an over $200K price tag, lots more if an ammy could ride him. The one difficulty with the price, is finding a buyer however- someone with that much cash (or sponsor) who can ride the horse.

Kelly in NJ
Feb. 2, 2011, 06:46 AM
I am amazed at some of the low price tags suggested by some of you....

A 9-year old, gorgeous, well-trained WB gelding doing GP already and scoring in the mid-60's? I think you'd be lucky to touch him for under 250K....

How difficult can he be when he's managed to be trained to GP correctly by the age of 9? Whatever difficulties there are, they obviously didn't keep the horse from progressing faster than most, and that tells me something about his character and work ethic.

Just my 2 cents....


I agree with this.

Unless he is batsh*t crazy, frequently tosses professionals off rodeo-style, or is very dangerous/unsafe....Then somewhat less.

All the qualities you listed plus amateur friendly??? Over $300K. Easily.

meupatdoes
Feb. 2, 2011, 08:51 AM
Depends on if he's complicated for the person buying him. If that person is good, tactful, and maybe just the exact right rider to give the horse confidence, they might not see what the seller considers bad traits. Then he's worth the full asking price of any other confirmed GP horse of his age and talent.

I would not pay "full asking price of any other confirmed GP" horse for a particularly difficult GP horse, no matter how well I could ride it.

Because eventually, if you lose your job or decide you want to put money down on a house instead, you can't sell it if you're the only one who can ride it, and you certainly can't sell it for "full asking price of any other confirmed GP horse."

I can ride a hot horse very well and it fact it is my preferred ride, but I buy quiet ones with resale value in mind. An amateur friendly mind protects my investment. If I were to get a hot one I would expect the price to reflect the fact that it would be difficult to resell.

Speaking as someone who has given away a very talented horse, because I couldn't sell it since I was the only one who could ride it. Learned that one the hard way.

Donella
Feb. 2, 2011, 09:45 AM
A 9-year old, gorgeous, well-trained WB gelding doing GP already and scoring in the mid-60's? I think you'd be lucky to touch him for under 250K....

AMEN!

If a horse is already that advanced in his training he isn't THAT complicated.

mmt
Feb. 3, 2011, 03:50 AM
I also agree with what Siegi said. The only GP horse you would get that would score in the mid-60s for less than 200k is one that isn't a real GP horse so serious flaws in the training or abiity, or is much older in age - like 15 with some things that need to be managed.

No way would I sell my GP horse for such little money as some of those had posted about now that he is totally confirmed in the movements. It takes at least 25k every year in training and expenses besides to get them there, plus the purchase price if there was one.

thyrusyoumonster
Feb. 4, 2011, 06:10 AM
I was a bit surprised by the low prices posted here. I would think a 9 y.o. competing at that level would start at 300k.

Alpha Mare
Feb. 4, 2011, 10:16 AM
I think it depends upon the goals of the buyer and the potential for the horse. Is the buyer trying to get their scores for a Gold Medal (USDF) so low 60's are fine? Or is the buyer looking to compete top 10 nationally?

How long does the buyer want to compete the horse? or intend for resale?

I know of a terrific schoolmaster who got several folks their scores before he retired, but not flashy enough as an older teenager to go beyond the mid sixties. (which is still a great score for GP)

Agreed that Grand Prix level is 6 figure value - at age 9 I would just want to know he wasn't burnt out as that is fast to get there. ( think Matine).

'complicated' depends on what it is - just hot/spooky? or more resistant? If resistant could be a problem for a rider new to that level. And, it could have been a 'push' by the current owner/trainer to get him there (mentally).