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View Full Version : Don Sachey Clinic - Opinions?



Mtn trails
Jan. 24, 2011, 04:18 PM
I'm planning on participating in a Don Sachey clinic next month and wondering if anyone has attended a clinic with him before and what your thoughts are. Is it worth it? The cost is VERY reasonable and my sometimes trainer thinks a lot of him but I'd like the CoTH view also. Thanks.

Interesting sidebar: His parents owned the farm where I boarded my first OTTB back in the early 80's.

easykeeper
Jan. 24, 2011, 06:37 PM
Well worth it! Don Sachey is great...he used to come to our barn on a regular basis (in the late 80's and early 90's) and give clinics. I pretty much attribute my passing my B & A Pony Club ratings to him. He has a lot to say, soak it up! He's a really nice guy too!

Lucassb
Jan. 24, 2011, 06:40 PM
Don is a phenomenal clinician. I have ridden with him several times and think he offers a lot more value than many of the "bigger name trainers" that I have paid substantially more to clinic with.

He has a great eye, is very articulate and offers a ton of great exercises... I highly recommend him, and am very envious of your opportunity. I can't wait to ride with him again.

INoMrEd
Jan. 24, 2011, 06:40 PM
Don is a wonderful clinician. Highly recommend him!

cindywilson
Jan. 24, 2011, 06:43 PM
I give Don four stars. Have trained/ridden w/ him for many years (tho not recently as I've moved). He trained me for the LF's I did. Very cerebral & analytical & a stickler for correctness & classical training. Rode on the World Championship team in the 60's.

BTW, re another thread, also a student of Jimmy Wofford's, along w/ Derek diGrazia.

Mtn trails
Jan. 24, 2011, 06:55 PM
Great! Thanks for the replies and endorsements. Definitely looking forward to riding with him.

IFG
Jan. 24, 2011, 07:19 PM
I loved the clinic that I took with him. He was old school, caring about the horse, and about doing it right. Very nice and fun to ride with.

Enjoy!

NRB
Jan. 24, 2011, 08:29 PM
Well it's been almost 30 years since I rode in clinic with him, but it was great and I'd do it again if given the opportunity.

whicker
Jan. 25, 2011, 12:33 AM
Oh WoW! What an opportunity! Do it and tell me about it, promise?!

Don is much younger than you think. He was on the U.S. 1974 world championship team, along with Denny, Mike Plumb, Jimmy W., Bruce, and Beth Perkins. They won team gold. Don rode with a freshly broken thumb taped to his rein on a horse, Plain Sailing, that was famous for pulling like a train and running off with riders. He made it look easy over the huge drop known as the Dairy Rails.

He is a beautifully trained, educated rider that was polished by Le Goff. He knows the why and the theory behind what he teaches and can explain it in many ways. He was soft and kind to the horses, and a gentleman who tailored the amount of push and style of encouragement each student needed.

I was a student of his for 7 years, and was sad when he stopped teaching.at that time. I learned how to ride and make the best choices for my horses. He helped me understand what Le Goff was teaching and the nuggets that Le Goff would impart to me.

I'm sending you a p.m.

wanderlust
Jan. 25, 2011, 03:15 AM
Love, love, love Don. Super nice man, in addition to being a fantastic teacher.

LAZ
Jan. 25, 2011, 09:17 PM
He just agreed to be one of the clinicians at my August Event camp! I'm looking forward to having him here for 4 days!

Peggy
Jan. 26, 2011, 12:51 AM
Great clinician. Very articulate.

SevenDogs
Jan. 26, 2011, 01:10 AM
Top notch!

LAZ: Sounds like the Aug Camp is going to be outstanding!! Glad you decided to go for second session. :)

purplnurpl
Jan. 26, 2011, 11:45 AM
Mixed feelings.

I prefer the clinicians that have you leave your horse alone.

again, praises for Will Coleman.

goodmorning
Jan. 26, 2011, 04:23 PM
I prefer the clinicians that have you leave your horse alone.


Can you elaborate? I have no *beef* in your opinion, but I like to keep track of the clinician reviews so that I may or may-not ride with them in the future :) One of my favorite recent clinicians observed how my horse naturally went on the lunge - and put an emphasis on using that natural way of going & 'enhancing' it for XC/jumping - but I guess that is somewhat reliant upon having a horse you don't need to manipulate, too much, for positive results. As in - your horse is comfortable jumping like this, so lets let him jump like that and tweek the little things. If that makes any sense?

purplnurpl
Jan. 26, 2011, 04:34 PM
Can you elaborate? I have no *beef* in your opinion, but I like to keep track of the clinician reviews so that I may or may-not ride with them in the future :) One of my favorite recent clinicians observed how my horse naturally went on the lunge - and put an emphasis on using that natural way of going & 'enhancing' it for XC/jumping - but I guess that is somewhat reliant upon having a horse you don't need to manipulate, too much, for positive results. As in - your horse is comfortable jumping like this, so lets let him jump like that and tweek the little things. If that makes any sense?

exactly.
I have narrowed my teachings down to a few clinicians. And those are the clinicians that don't bug my horse's (any horse that I ride) way of going.
Mary D'Arcy
Carsten Meyer
Will Coleman

With one particular horse: Don, and several other clinicians, kept trying to make him speed up his steps as in a increasing the drum roll on the way to a fence. Don even used the example of watching TV SJ and how the horses carry their neck at a so and so % angle and speed up their steps on the way to the fence.

My particular horse (is what would have been a very fancy show hunter if I had pursued) can walk down the lines and jump 4' with his eyes closed and little impulsion. He also preferred to go with a lower neck.

My issue was the horse didn't NEED that extra umph and he is a horse that gets quite per-turbbed when his rider tries to mess up his naturally perfect rhythm.

We spent 1 hur burring him in front of 4' verticals. It was mean. Got to where I could put a 10 in a 5 stride and made him go with his neck pointing straight up but still, why? What was the point?

So, clinics in which I work hard in, and then go home and do the exact opposite of what I learned I put in the "moot" bucket.
Teachings that I will not forget but *most likely* never pull out of the hat again.

I'm the type of rider that lets my horse be themselves and learn on their own. Rather then crank his neck up and put him on his butt I'd rather just let him canter up to a 4' fence on the forehand and learn that maybe that wasn't such a good idea.

Horses learn by making their own mistakes. If you try to help them and they mess up then they think it's your fault. : )