PDA

View Full Version : Cheating on "your" discipline



xcpony
Jan. 18, 2011, 01:38 PM
Are there any riders that really compete seriously in at least 2 disciplines? Are there serious riders out there that "cheat" on your "assigned" discipline? Are there other riders who feel like you just can't seem to totally commit and stay 100% faithful to just dressage or just jumping or something else? And I don't mean your a dressage rider and like to jump once in awhile just for fun, etc, but I mean really pursuing two totally serious and competitive disciplines. I don't know what I am gonna do when that fork comes up, how will I decide? Also, I like eventing but couldn't ever see myself doing high level eventing, this mainly has to do with SJ and dressage.^^

Just to give you a bio: I am an American living permanently in Germany about to begin my 3 year apprenticeship program to become a Bereiter. This means learning to master both jumping and dressage... both of which I love equally. But I know when I finish it and start my career as a rider/trainer I will have to kinda decide which discipline to stick with if I want to be somewhat successful. Or do I?

scubed
Jan. 18, 2011, 01:41 PM
Several of the folks at my barn compete seriously at both dressage and eventing.

I have a young friend who competes seriously at both eventing and the hunter/jumpers

Gilbo
Jan. 18, 2011, 01:46 PM
Anky van Grunsven does international dressage and international reining. She is most well known for dressage, but for the World Equestrian Games 2010 didn't have a horse to compete on, so she represented her country in the reining discipline.

xcpony
Jan. 18, 2011, 01:48 PM
yeah, i think it is a bit easier for event riders, since they participate in 3 disciplines and sometimes they have to participate in USHJA or USDA competitions to buff up their horses weak spots. plus, i believe that usea members can participate in ushja and usda shows without a membership to the other associations? .

xcpony
Jan. 18, 2011, 01:51 PM
Anky van Grunsven does international dressage and international reining. She is most well known for dressage, but for the World Equestrian Games 2010 didn't have a horse to compete on, so she represented her country in the reining discipline.

Oh, yes, of course cowgirl Anky. I wonder how she handled that? And she is a deffintly one of the most famous multi-disciplined competitive riders out there.

Gilbo
Jan. 18, 2011, 02:03 PM
Oh, yes, of course cowgirl Anky. I wonder how she handled that? And she is a deffintly one of the most famous multi-disciplined competitive riders out there.

Well, I believe she had some issues at the WEG, didn't quite get the lead changes (go figure), but obviously she was considered good enough to compete at that level.

Sonoma City
Jan. 18, 2011, 02:43 PM
I only compete at the lower levels, but do dressage, eventing, and some jumpers. Of my two horses, one competes at 2nd level dressage and training level eventing. He foxhunts too on occation. The other is at 1st level and events just at beginner novice. During the nice weather, they both follow the same routing of 3 days of dressage work, 1 day of conditioning, and one day jumping, and we hack out on the trails for either warmup or cool down. I think it keeps all of us sharp and not bored with the same old routine! With the more competative guy, my goal is to take him to both the GAIGs and the American eventing championships this year. :) I think it's great whe people pursue more than one discipline! It gives you perspective that you might not have otherwise. You just have to map out your goals early in the season and plan your show schedule really well so you can fit everything in!

spirithorse
Jan. 18, 2011, 03:03 PM
My dressage horse also is working her way into being a cowhorse.

alibi_18
Jan. 18, 2011, 03:14 PM
I don't see why you couldn't do both, especially if you have more than one horse!!!

I believe it can become more difficult for one horse to be highly competitive up to a certain level in more than one discipline. And more than it would be for its rider.

I ride a mare who was supposed to only be doing dressage...but she prefers jumping! So I decided to go back to my hunter/jumper rooth and give it a try. I now compete in the hunter ring but since she became more happy at work, I'm pushing a bit on the dressage side and she'll do well in first level dressage this summer and will, hopefully be schooling more of the second/third level stuff by the end of the summer!

My goal? Doing 4' courses and PSG!!! (In a few years...but not so much as she is really talented!)

shawneeAcres
Jan. 18, 2011, 04:05 PM
I have, over the years, competed in dressage, eventing, hunters, some lower level jumpers, reining (a little bit) and western pleasure (a little bit). I still own a western saddle and did some western pleasure locally sumemr before last, jsut for something fun and low key to do. I see NOTHING wrong with crossing disciplines for training purposes and/or to show. I have learned something from all areas I have worked in, and I think keeping an open mind is VERY important and soemthing that the majority of riders cannot do!

I have never been at the "upper levels" of any discipline, having shown thru second level dressage and preliminary eventing. But have really spent more time bringing along younger, greener horses over the years.

Janet
Jan. 18, 2011, 04:18 PM
There have been a few at the upper levels.

Mark Todd was, I think, on the Olympic team for both Eventing and Show Jumping. Ingrid Klimke competes at the top levels in both Eventing and Dressage. Sandy Phleuger (sp?) (now Phillips) was on the long list for the US team in both Eventing and Dressage.

I can't think offhand of anyone who does top level Show Jumping and Dressage. But I would not be surprised

Tasker
Jan. 18, 2011, 04:24 PM
*waves hand*

I was planning on 2 more Training level events early this spring and then moving up to Prelim with my mare and then to bring out my gelding in the 7-9 Year Old PSG and the young stallion in the FEI 5 year Olds...but a car wreck in November has put those plans on hold. :sigh: I still am not able to trot but I have every intention of getting back to at least those levels in the next year. On the eventing front, I don't have a huge desire to go Advanced (at least right now :winkgrin: ) but Grand Prix is in the plans for the 2 boys...barring any further injuries, of course.

PNWjumper
Jan. 18, 2011, 04:26 PM
I compete in the jumpers with my guys through the upper levels, but the only regular (weekly) lessons I take are dressage lessons. So I guess I feel like a "dressage poser" :lol: My instructor's been trying to get me to show my mare, but I barely have time to make it to my h/j shows. Definitely no time to add another show schedule!

But I'm definitely not on the same level in my discipline(s) as Anky, and I don't consider dressage and show jumping to be at odds in any way. Just kind of a natural extension (ha ha, pun intended) of what's needed to make it around the big sticks in the most efficient way possible.

hntrjmprpro45
Jan. 18, 2011, 04:40 PM
I have always done hunter/jumper shows but this year I plan on seriously showing in dressage as well. It is something I have always wanted to do but haven't gotten around to it and now I have a few youngsters who would do really well. I even got my USDF membership so no turning back this time! Luckily the USDF shows I am going to go to do not overlap with any of the hunter/jumper shows.

As for other disciplines... I did reining, trail classes, speed events and western riding all the way up to the world show level. It felt very odd wearing western clothes and I HATED riding in western saddles. I always felt like I was cheating on hunter/jumper shows but hey, my horse was good at it and we won a few belt buckles. By the way, reining is a BLAST and if you get the opportunity, go for it!

I think its good to try new disciplines- it makes you a more well rounded rider. After I master dressage, I want to dabble in side saddle and fox hunting.

xcpony
Jan. 18, 2011, 05:44 PM
*waves hand*

I was planning on 2 more Training level events early this spring and then moving up to Prelim with my mare and then to bring out my gelding in the 7-9 Year Old PSG and the young stallion in the FEI 5 year Olds...but a car wreck in November has put those plans on hold. :sigh: I still am not able to trot but I have every intention of getting back to at least those levels in the next year. On the eventing front, I don't have a huge desire to go Advanced (at least right now :winkgrin: ) but Grand Prix is in the plans for the 2 boys...barring any further injuries, of course.

:D:D:D

Tasker
Jan. 18, 2011, 06:01 PM
XCP - I did a 12 year hiatus from eventing and am so glad to have gone back in the fall of '09. In that span I did get my Gold & Silver medals and 'refined' my skills a good bit - learned to stick & ball (for polo), did a bit of roping (I'm terrible) but my main focus was bringing youngstock from greenbroke to FEI with a smidgeon of jumping thrown in.

I am lucky enough that my mare is a XC machine (loves every second of it) and that we breed what I get to ride...so while I will always focus on getting the 'kids' to PSG at least...I will have a toy (or 2) to indulge my need for speed and adrenalin! :D

The photos from L - R
The 2006 stallion in a stampede class (oops I mean a Materiale class)
The 2004 schooling
The brown mare being patient and then...
Doing what she does best! :D
and then the 06 at a jumping lesson at True Prospect Farm

(and sorry to post photos and be slightly annoying - I'm cooped up in the house for 2nd full month and a bit stir crazy with not being able to ride)

Mickey the Marcher
Jan. 18, 2011, 10:00 PM
There have been a few at the upper levels.

Mark Todd was, I think, on the Olympic team for both Eventing and Show Jumping. Ingrid Klimke competes at the top levels in both Eventing and Dressage. Sandy Phleuger (sp?) (now Phillips) was on the long list for the US team in both Eventing and Dressage.

I can't think offhand of anyone who does top level Show Jumping and Dressage. But I would not be surprised

Mark Todd did indeed represent NZ in both Show Jumping and Eventing.
Of course Ingrid Klimke's dad won a European team medal in Eventing, before his better known career in Dressage. He also Show Jumped at the GP level.
Henri Van Schaik won a Show Jumping silver medal medal at the Olympics. He is however probably best known as an upper level Dressage teacher/trainer/author.
Chris Bartle placed 6th in Dressage at the Los Angeles Olympics. He went on to win Badminton 14 years later.
Vicki Roycroft has represented Australia at the Olympics in both Show Jumping and Eventing.
The Ryan brothers Matt and Heath are both accomplished Dressage riders and Eventers, the former winning Gold in Eventing in 1992.

Janet
Jan. 20, 2011, 02:27 PM
plus, i believe that usea members can participate in ushja and usda shows without a membership to the other associations? .
I assume you mean USDF (not USDA which is Dept. Ag.).

Used to be true, but it has not been true for several years. I think 2008 was the last year.

ThreeFigs
Jan. 21, 2011, 10:03 PM
I've done H/J, eventing (lower level stuff) and dressage. I know and rode with two Hungarian trainers who were genuine all-around horsemen. I started out Western. Several of my dressage horses were cowponies before their dressage careers, and periodically would go back to the ranch for cattle work.

baymare
Jan. 21, 2011, 10:16 PM
Bernie Traurig rode hunters and jumpers at the highest level of national competition, and grand prix dressage as well.

not again
Jan. 22, 2011, 01:17 PM
Back in the dark ages I competed at Intermediate three day and grand prix dressage (same horse) as well at 4' 6" jumpers. Decades and many horses later that is still an attainable goal for my students and horses. For me, I keep hoping to get out there and do it again.;)http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/images/smilies/yes.gif