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View Full Version : Does one's riding style/practices affect where they can board?



katie+tru
Jan. 16, 2011, 02:05 PM
I'm just curious about this, as I never thought much about it until recently. My trainer/BO had a woman stop by the other month to get a tour of the place as she was looking for somewhere to board. She was a dressage rider. We are an event barn, but we have a full sized indoor and my trainer is very dressage based. We are all taught in classical seat, all old school dressage. No "modern dressage".

Well, my trainer told me, after the woman left, that she told her that she practices rollkur and asked if my trainer "had a problem with that". Trainer said that we do not practice rollkur but she is welcome to ride however she wants. The woman never came back or called.

While I can't be sure, I'm thinking that our approach to dressage was a turn-off for her. While I'm not trying to turn this into a another pro rollkur v. anti rollkur argument, I think this woman probably sensed that we really disapproved of her practice and thus she did not want to board with us.

Is this a common thing that people (riders and barn owners) have to deal with? Are their BO's that will tell rollkur users that they are not welcome? Have you ever been barred from boarding somewhere because of your riding technique?

Melyni
Jan. 16, 2011, 03:18 PM
rollkur vs non rollkur. The degree of low and round varies enormously anyway.
I don't mind what kind of riding someone does as long as they respect the premises, take care of their horse and respect others.

I do however draw the line at Western Pleasure, I won't have that on the my barn.
I can't stand to watch it, so I don't want it around.

Otherwise I really don't care.

MW

butlerfamilyzoo
Jan. 16, 2011, 05:29 PM
I was turned away from a barn recently because i drive as well. They said it would scare their horses.

I dont know that i feel the same as the above poster on WP, i grew up in arabs showing WP, reining, and working cow. You have no idea how badly i miss those super well trained horses. I will, however, admit that it is different than say QH WP and i do not condone tying a horse with its head up or down for hours or leaving it in a stall tied to its tail to teach the horse to give, and i despise four beat canters.

I worked for a barn that didnt let western people in because they trash the arenas, that i can semi agree with depending on what the person is doing. Reining and working cow stuff, that can kill your $30k footing in a heartbeat with those slides and rollbacks into the walls and such. Takes a lot more maintenance to keep those arenas pretty.

Also boarded in a barn that didnt allow natural horsemanship people in, and i agree with that one too, simply because i cant deal with the idiots that use and abuse it. Not saying it's wrong, but that it has no place to be abused in the manner people do these days and i dont want to be lectured about how your way is the only way to do it when you dont even ride.

Rollkur vs not, i dont care who you are, at some point in time your gosh darn horse is going to do rollkur himself just to evade or be silly. So no, it really doesnt bother me unless you abuse it. I can see if someone goes to shows and says to everyone you are their trainer and they use rollkur that it could maybe hurt the image... But a boarder? Boarders pay the bills, not hard to tell people you stay out of your boarders way when they are around because they are nuts, but it's a pay check!

Melyni
Jan. 16, 2011, 05:53 PM
which is what me mostly get around here.
All the Arabians I have seen in this locality do saddle seat or dressage, somehow I can't imagine you can get Arab to shuffle that badly, though what do I know, they might.

Driving is hard because some horses do get terrified at the sight of a wheeled vehicle for some reason.
And actually that is exactly the reason I would allow someone to do that here. The horses need to get used to it, and if they see it at home they won't be so scared when they encounter it at a show. So come on up here and drive all you want BFZ, though it'd be a long commute from GA to VA.

I have never been approached by a reiner for board, and they can't do cutting or roping cos we are not set up for cows.

I have no problem with natural horsemanship trainers either, we have a few of those around, some are better than others but none of them really bother me the way our local WP trainer does.

We have a real mixed bag in my barn, and that's the way I like with a mix of interests and styles.
Personality and good horse care are way more important for me than riding style.
Yours
MW

Stellar_moves
Jan. 16, 2011, 06:04 PM
That's a tough question! At my barn, we offer lessons for every style of riding, besides dressage (my trainers have a more western, HUS hunter background, not so much dressage) we are a QH barn, but the only horses that show currently are our hunters. We do allow any breed to come board, and take lessons. My trainers basically bend over backwards just to make sure people are happy, and want to stay.

We have a facility that is appropriate for hunters, cow horse events, western events etc. Dressage is not so popular in our area, so we don't give lessons for dressage. However, we would allow a dressage person to board here!

I suppose is just depends on the person and their personal opinions(:

Kementari
Jan. 16, 2011, 06:29 PM
I once called a barn to inquire about board and was told, "Oh, we aren't set up for a Thoroughbred." :lol:

It ended up it was a saddle seat barn (they hadn't mentioned that - or even hinted at it - in their ad), though I did wonder what it was about TBs that they "weren't set up for."

Generally, though, the barns where I have boarded and worked have accepted everyone, though anyone using outright abusive or dangerous methods would have been asked to leave. So while WP would be just fine, tying horses' heads up for hours would not be, or while riding BTV would be OK (if looked poorly upon from a horsemanship standpoint), blue-tongue rollkur would be a no-go.

butlerfamilyzoo
Jan. 16, 2011, 06:29 PM
I have a pony that relishes his chance to scare the big horses with his cart... Seriously! He's rotten. But well behaved, we do our best to show the others it's ok. Took a week and the horses at the new barn dont even bat an eye lash at the cart now. I agree, it's good for them to see. My dressage mare blew up at a clinic once over a team of minis and carriage going down the road way off in the distance! That was part of the reason i started driving, she doesnt care now.

I've been in plenty of multi-discipline barns, i'm usually the only dressage girl and they think i'm snooty for months simply because i like dressage. That's annoying.

Twigster
Jan. 16, 2011, 06:59 PM
A couple years back, I was looking for a new barn. I found a decent one, dressage focus, large indoor, allowed my outside trainer, etc. Seemed like a great fit, until they told me that they didn't allow the use of cavaletti or "jumps of any kind"... that struck me as kinda weird.

teddygirl
Jan. 16, 2011, 07:19 PM
I looked at a hunter/jumper barn once that said they didn't allow dressage riders since they rode around the jumps(?). I think they didn't want anyone there they couldn't teach. I'm currently at a barn that accepts all riding and breeds, as long as they get along. Driving might be a problem due to the space issues, but I have seen a pony driving there a few times. I even once came up the driveway and a trick rider was standing on his horses as they galloped around the ring! I guess we have no limits.

aktill
Jan. 16, 2011, 09:38 PM
I board at a dressage-specialist type of barn, but have been schooling my horse as a western bridle horse for the last 6 months to a year or so. I've been there for four years already, which I'm sure helps, but I've never had anybody complain or worry that I'm not following the same pattern everyone else. A few folks keep a western saddle for trail work anyway, so the tack isn't an issue.

Since I'm the odd one out, I save the "different" sorts of things for when I have one of the arenas to myself. Those would be building up to being able to use a flag to work colts from horseback, swinging a rope, standing on a pedestal etc etc. I don't stop hard in the indoor footing (under footing watering system), and keep from constantly schooling turnarounds or spins in the same spot (like everyone else has to with lunging anyway). They had to get used to the jinglebobs on my spurs and the fact that I ride a gaited pony (Icelandic, which causes a few snorty stares from the big warmbloods), but everyone gets along fine after a short intro.

Other then that, the only big difference is in our schooling turning radius. Most everyone uses big sweeping lines for the most part except for schooling pirouettes, and my guy will turn around in his own length, so I just keep my eyes open when I ride. Even that works out fine, since I can usually school a whole ride without leaving the circles that would define the end of the arena if it's busy, and everyone else uses the outside tracks.

I suppose the other thing is that I'll use counterbends at walk and trot rather then just canter, which messes with people's minds a little, but I just make sure to keep my head up.

mickeydoodle
Jan. 16, 2011, 10:14 PM
oh come on, she really used the term "rollkur"?

BetterOffRed
Jan. 16, 2011, 10:51 PM
A couple years back, I was looking for a new barn. I found a decent one, dressage focus, large indoor, allowed my outside trainer, etc. Seemed like a great fit, until they told me that they didn't allow the use of cavaletti or "jumps of any kind"... that struck me as kinda weird.

TOTALLY WEIRD.:confused:

katie+tru
Jan. 17, 2011, 12:00 AM
oh come on, she really used the term "rollkur"?


Who? The women who was visiting? Apparently so. I did not speak with her. According to my trainer that is what she said.

Actually, come to think of it, I think my trainer may have asked her first, in passing, if she used rollkur. The women said that yes she did, and did she (my trainer) have a problem with that.

Perhaps that changes the perspective now. But I know my trainer did not mean it accusingly... just out of curiousity, as the woman had told her was dressage only and has cliniced with the likes of Anky.

shawneeAcres
Jan. 17, 2011, 09:11 AM
At my barn I won't say that we "turn peple away". Our focus is fairly wide, hunters, eventing, dressage and some QH hunter over fences. I have a couple kids that do some of the other QH stuff (not as "extreme" tho as many). I probably would not want the "show saddlebreds" here, just because I don't think we could manage them the way they need to be maintained. I wouldn't mind driving horses as it would be helpful to desenisitze our horses but I dont think we have good enough areas to really drive in. My stallion actually went out and learned to drive, but I haven't pursued it here at home. I think a lot of true dressage riders really don't want to be at a barn where there are a lot of other disciplines going on. We don't have a HUGE amount of boarders and everyone is pretty "OK" with everything around here. That is the main criteria, I run this barn, not the boarders. They have input but have never had anyone disagree with my management practices and would not take on a boarder that did. Pretty much tell people, "this is how it is here" take it or leave it!

oldpony66
Jan. 17, 2011, 09:39 AM
I once called a barn to inquire about board and was told, "Oh, we aren't set up for a Thoroughbred." :lol:

It ended up it was a saddle seat barn (they hadn't mentioned that - or even hinted at it - in their ad), though I did wonder what it was about TBs that they "weren't set up for."



I'm almost willing to bet that they thought you wanted a racetrack and a starting gate.

AlterBy
Jan. 17, 2011, 09:45 AM
Who? The women who was visiting? Apparently so. I did not speak with her. According to my trainer that is what she said.

Actually, come to think of it, I think my trainer may have asked her first, in passing, if she used rollkur. The women said that yes she did, and did she (my trainer) have a problem with that.

Perhaps that changes the perspective now. But I know my trainer did not mean it accusingly... just out of curiousity, as the woman had told her was dressage only and has cliniced with the likes of Anky.

Maybe the women didn't like the way your trainer was doing dressage, and not the reverse.

I wouldn't board in a place that has training philosophies/methods that go against my beliefs. Especially if owned by the trainer.

I would not go to a 'classsical dressage' barn as opposed to the modern dressage ones. As I neither wouldn't go to a Parelli barn.

But I don't mind a barn with a mixture of different cultures, I'm presently in a small private place with western, jumper, dressage and one driving person. Just recall, one does some sort of Parelli too! But the BO is not a trainer and mind his own business as we all do about everyone else's discipline. In a pleasant way, of course!

thatsnotme
Jan. 17, 2011, 10:03 AM
I am a dressage rider and curently board at a dressage barn. The BO is a trainer and I don't ride with her (anymore). There are so many ways to 'get it done' in all the disciplines, everyone is not always going to agree. I have in the past boarded at WP barns and wont again because a: the barn help was obviously afraid of my gentle giant and didn't deal with her well when cleaning pens, etc. & b: they don't know how much food a big horse needs. This was my experience in 2 different places and its something I won't try again. I have been turned away from boarding for driving, years ago. We have 1 driver where I board now & it can be difficult sometimes, but the horses are getting used to it.

red mares
Jan. 17, 2011, 11:41 AM
I once called a barn to inquire about board and was told, "Oh, we aren't set up for a Thoroughbred." :lol:

It ended up it was a saddle seat barn (they hadn't mentioned that - or even hinted at it - in their ad), though I did wonder what it was about TBs that they "weren't set up for."



I love it!

I'm a saddleseat/driving person usually trying to find a barn in sport horse hell. They probably didn't want to deal with the 23 hour turnout requirements or the possibility of jumps.

Velvet
Jan. 17, 2011, 11:57 AM
I was at a barn that allowed pretty everything...except warmbloods. :lol: She allowed trail riding weekend warriors, dressage, hunters (not many jumps so not many of them), saddleseat riders, driving, WP, etc. Years ago she'd had a woman with some idiot horses in the barn that were warmbloods and she decided she would never have another one in her barn. I felt she'd picked the wrong thing to not allow back in. The idiot owner was probably the root of the problem, not the horses on their own (if they'd had a different owner).

Zevida
Jan. 17, 2011, 12:49 PM
I think that often different disciplines have different philosophies towards horse keeping and arena maintenance. For example, I wouldn't have a problem with boarding at a barn primarily with reiners - except that they want their footing much deeper than is good for a dressage horse, so that might be a deal breaker. And I do think it is usually easier and more fun to be surrounded by like-minded people who share similar goals.


I wouldn't board in a place that has training philosophies/methods that go against my beliefs.

I definitely agree with this. Eventually I got tired of every horse in draw reins, learning lower level riders using three ring bits on the 2nd or 3rd ring for flat work and using multiple sedatives on a horse just so the owner can ride without getting bucked off and I realized that it is not worth being around a philosophy of horsemanship that so differs from my own.

Everyone has a bar of standards and they can accept everything up to that bar but there is a tipping point for most people. Better to get it out of the way up front before you arrive. If you think the barn owner/trainer/manager is going to be opposed to your training style or vice versa, better to not board there at all.

ACP
Jan. 17, 2011, 01:20 PM
I think that often different disciplines have different philosophies towards horse keeping and arena maintenance. For example, I wouldn't have a problem with boarding at a barn primarily with reiners - except that they want their footing much deeper than is good for a dressage horse, so that might be a deal breaker. And I do think it is usually easier and more fun to be surrounded by like-minded people who share similar goals.

I realized that it is not worth being around a philosophy of horsemanship that so differs from my own.

Everyone has a bar of standards and they can accept everything up to that bar but there is a tipping point for most people. Better to get it out of the way up front before you arrive. If you think the barn owner/trainer/manager is going to be opposed to your training style or vice versa, better to not board there at all.

What she said! I so agree, on all three points.

Also - Speaking as a former BO/BM, it is very difficult to have a large, mixed group and cater to all of them. Who gets the small amount of 'back into the business money', the people who want new jumps or new trail horse obstacles or a better dressage arena? Who gets to decide about the footing?

Jane Honda
Jan. 17, 2011, 01:36 PM
The barn I left last August (when I sold my mare) knew about me riding both English(dressage/jumping) and western (trails) when I joined them. I was doing a bit of both when I started, and when I switched to mainly english, the BO turned on me. Even when I brought horses in to train(her permission was granted of course) she got even testier. The snarky comments ensued, as well as my training horses becomming headshy.


I do believe that your riding style affects where you can board. I would gladly pay the extra to board at a place that is all in all, the same discipline that I ride. The peace of mind and lack of drama are all worth it to me. Especially when it comes to clients horses staying safe.

MaximumChrome
Jan. 18, 2011, 09:25 AM
A couple years back, I was looking for a new barn. I found a decent one, dressage focus, large indoor, allowed my outside trainer, etc. Seemed like a great fit, until they told me that they didn't allow the use of cavaletti or "jumps of any kind"... that struck me as kinda weird.

Actually, that is probably driven by their liability insurance. Some insurance companies provide a discount if no jumping occurs.

Timex
Jan. 18, 2011, 11:36 AM
as a BM, i have no problem with any breed or discipline coming into our barn. Right now we have driving horses (draft and stdb), racehorses, broodmares (tb), pleasure horses (tb, qh, paint, tb, various crosses) and a few that show lightly (morgan, tb, paint, qh). We have trail riders, folks that do dressage and hunters, those that want to chase cows and those that want to try thier hand at eventing. if a saddle seat rider wanted to board here, cool. but what ANY boarder has to understand before coming here, is that THESE are the facilities. i'm not going to add/take away footing because it's what YOU want. we have a hunt course, and a couple of pole standards in the sand ring for schooling. don't like jumps in the way, don't ride on the hunt course, which is the only place where jumps are left up and aren't moved. don't want to share the ring with riders practicing thier circles or serpentines, then go ride on the trails or in the field. we don't have cows, so that's not an issue. that sort of thing really just boils down to common courtesy and open communication. i've yet to have someone not board here because of the discipline they ride. i've had people pass because they want an indoor, or they don't have the $, or it was decided that personality-wise they weren't a good 'fit' here, but it's never been based on someone's riding style or preference.

whitewolfe001
Jan. 18, 2011, 09:18 PM
I agree that it's certainly easier to be around people who understand your discipline and with whom you share basic philosophies of horsecare and treatment. It's not at all fun to be in a place where you're constantly cringing at the training methods. Or where the BO/trainer tries to befriend you by offering you illegal drugs for your horse for that extra "competitive edge" at your next show. Thanks, but no thanks...

It's also little tiresome to be the lone dressage rider in a barn of another discipline. "Why don't you jump? Are you afraid?" "Don't you get bored just going around in circles?" Western riders wondering why you've always got such a "tight grip" on the reins.... etc etc etc

I've also had a hard time with barn owners/trainers who seem offended that I'm not training with them. There are some barns where they require you to take lessons from the resident trainer. I get it - they want to give stalls to the people who want to train there. But if it's a boarding barn and it's not required - don't give me attitude about it. Just because I like the facilities/price/care, does not neccessarily mean that I want to train with the resident instructor. I've gotten some pretty cold treatment after having to say "no" as politely as I could to repeated solicitation for instruction. I need to save my money so I can take lessons with my preferred (and much more expensive) trainer. It's not a personal affront, nor do I think "I'm too good" for so-and-so.

mrsbradbury
Jan. 18, 2011, 09:36 PM
I am visiting from the H/J side and found this thread interesting. I think there are training barns, and then there are boarding barns.

As a BO/trainer, I perfer boarders who want to be in our program as we have a limited number of stalls, but I would not deny you the option to join us if you would like. We would be amicable to your choices in riding, at our barn we just love horses.

I recently had a barrel racer come by to see our facility, she was pleased we had barrels, but irritated we had jumps set up. She wondered if there were always jumps. Regardless, she did not join us.

I think for a lot of people, the issue can be with the jumps. They're stinking heavy,and they are in the way for people who don't use them. I can also understand the leeriness of some "Natural Horsemanship" people too, though some it makes sense and isn't too far off traditional handling. But... we've all met that boarder with the crabby horse, and it just can't go in there... so on and so on.

BetterOffRed
Jan. 19, 2011, 02:32 PM
I definitely agree with this. Eventually I got tired of every horse in draw reins, learning lower level riders using three ring bits on the 2nd or 3rd ring for flat work and using multiple sedatives on a horse just so the owner can ride without getting bucked off and I realized that it is not worth being around a philosophy of horsemanship that so differs from my own.


Zevida, if this is the place that I am thinking of....I saw this for myself, and I refused to step onto the property ever again...even when it is 5 minutes from my house. (okay, I stepped onto the property 1 more time under duress).

Thoroughbred1201
Jan. 19, 2011, 03:41 PM
I once called a barn to inquire about board and was told, "Oh, we aren't set up for a Thoroughbred." :lol:

It ended up it was a saddle seat barn (they hadn't mentioned that - or even hinted at it - in their ad), though I did wonder what it was about TBs that they "weren't set up for."


Either they are idiots, or possibly they are worried about the feeding requirements. TBs can be hard keepers. I know one barn owner who was frustrated at how much it costs to feed the tbs. They are used to quarter horses, appys, warmbloods, etc, feeding the tbs was easily double. Our warmlood lives on air, but our tbs? We were always having to shove food at them. Clearly a generalization, but often times it is the case.

Turnout can be an issue as well. A cooler blooded horses can be easier to maintain in that manner as well. Of course it all depends on the individual horse, but this barn may have been eaten out of house & home, LOL.

Thoroughbred1201
Jan. 19, 2011, 03:42 PM
Whoops! I missed the fact it was a saddle seat barn. If they can feed a saddle bred, they should be able to feed a tb! Good grief.

Kementari
Jan. 19, 2011, 04:37 PM
Whoops! I missed the fact it was a saddle seat barn. If they can feed a saddle bred, they should be able to feed a tb! Good grief.

Amen! :lol:

Honestly, I think it was shorthand for "We don't want YOUR kind around here" (the tone of voice pretty much said that). What cracked me up was that instead of just saying, "We really only take boarders who do our discipline," which is not abnormal by any means (and, really, I wouldn't want to be at a saddle seat Saddlebred (this was both ;)) barn, anyway - nothing against them, just that eventing and saddle seat are pretty dramatic extremes!) , she picked the "Thoroughbred" angle!

For all she knew (as she stopped me before I identified my own discipline), maybe I had a park TB. :eek: OK, maybe not... :lol:

purplnurpl
Jan. 20, 2011, 01:32 PM
Driving is hard because some horses do get terrified at the sight of a wheeled vehicle for some reason.


It;s not the "wheeled vehicle" per say but the

"OMG OMG OMG WHAT is chasing that other horse!! It's going to come get me I just KNOW it!!!!"

Can you imagine being a horse and seeing your buddy being chased?

mand_asbfan
Jan. 20, 2011, 05:00 PM
For the saddleseat barn that wasn't set up for a TB, they may not have had turnout. My old ASB barn literally had one outdoor arena that some of the lessons would get turned out in for a few hours and that was it.

I would be very particular about where I would board and I would understand if barn owners would not want to deal with my horse (provided it is for reasons other than "all ASBS are crazy":rolleyes:). My horse doesn't get turned out with show shoes on unless he is turned out by himself in a small area (round pen). Those shoes would do a lot of damage to another horse and when they come off they cost a ton of $$$ to put back on. On occasion, I will want to ground/ear up (make noises) my horse and I drive (jog) him frequently. These things can freak out other horses but if you want a bomb proof horse starting boarding at an ASB/saddleseat barn :D

Once I was at a barn that had ASBs and hunter/jumpers. It actually worked out quite well because the ASBs rode the outside of the ring and the h/j jumped in the middle of the ring.