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Hey Mickey
Dec. 18, 2005, 06:59 AM
Not that its really any of my bussiness.
eventing is pretty expensive, and I have no idea what I want to be when i "grow up" so any info about careers is great,
So if your bored or don't have anything else going on, Would you mind telling me what your job is and what you do?
thanks!

justblu
Dec. 18, 2005, 07:22 AM
Well, right now I'm a poor college student, but in two more semesters I will finish my degree and have my license to work as a registered nurse. The pay is good, you can find work anywhere (i.e. prime horse country), and many employers are very flexible with their scheduling.

53
Dec. 18, 2005, 07:50 AM
I'm in the military. And I DO NOT recommend it if you want consistancy in your riding. That being said, different services have different deployment schedules and different job within different services have different schedules too.
There are benefits to being in, for example, a constant paycheck, and as I've found, the military base here has a wonderful stable which fills all my needs.
That being said, the deployment schedule makes consistancy difficult.

Lily5453
Dec. 18, 2005, 07:50 AM
wildlife biologist here in maryland, then going back for my masters/ph.d in about a year and a half http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Bacchus
Dec. 18, 2005, 08:01 AM
I'm a writer. Used to be a technical writer, which paid more but can be a little dry. Now, I work in the communications department of a company in Lexington. Press releases, website content, etc. Sometimes more interesting than tech writing, but the pay is not great. If I weren't such a procrastinator, I'd freelance or get into grant writing.

goodymar1188
Dec. 18, 2005, 08:07 AM
I'm like to you Mickey... trying to figure out what I'm going to be doing once I get to college. I'm pretty sure I'm going into Nursing or Forsenic Medicine, I just haven't decided between the two yet.

Mrs. Smith
Dec. 18, 2005, 08:22 AM
I know that most people are going to groan but...

I must HIGHLY recommend a career in accounting. There are amazing prospects and job security, in my experience. I had a job before I completed my degree, and when I decided to move back to my home state (a week after 9/11/01, no less!), I had a job within days.

Most people are afraid of the "math" portion of accounting, but to be a corporate accountant, you need to be able to add and subtract using a calculator. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

I have found the pay to be above average for someone my age. I worked in "industry" rather than public accounting, so my job hours were steady and reasonable. Truly a 8-5 job, with no weekends. And you never really have accounting "emergencies" that require you to work late, etc. Also, these jobs pretty much always have full benefits, including 401(K) or a pension plan.

Drawbacks: It's an office job. If you can't sit at a desk all day, it's not for you! Most people purport to hate accountants. But I've found that it's just a stereotype. I always seem to get invited to office gatherings. http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/winkgrin.gif

There is currently a shortage of accountants in the midwest. If you take a few basic accounting classes at a community college, you can get a job as a clerk with a company. If you want to make the bigger bucks, though, it requires a bachelors degree and whatever other classes your state requires to become a CPA.

Good Luck!!! I think it's great that you're researching careers. I wish all my friends had done that before they took classes in school. So many are disappointed at how their job prospects line up with their lifestyle.

doctormolley
Dec. 18, 2005, 08:24 AM
I just started a job this past year working in a lab that makes allograft surgical implants from bone and soft tissue. The pay is pretty modest (the company is a non-profit organization), but it pays the bills and the benefits are great. Starting in January, my department is going to four 10-hour days a week, which means I'll be alternating between working Mon.-Thur. and Tues.-Fri. It's going to be great for my riding schedule! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

tarheelmd07
Dec. 18, 2005, 08:25 AM
I'm a 3rd year medical student right now -- struggling to find the time and finances to keep up with my riding. Definitely looking forward to being out of school -- having no student loans means that doctor's paycheck is definitely going to go towards the horses.

I'm not looking forward to the 3 years of residency where I'm not going to have much, if any, time to ride...but hopefully the plans will come through to get a yearling and put him in training -- by the time I finish I'd have a 4 or 5yo ready to go http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Reynard Ridge
Dec. 18, 2005, 08:36 AM
Before I retired to raise chickens and children, I was in corporate marketing working as a Product Manager. I do not have the MBA that is generally a prerequiste for this type of work, but I did have (a) a lot of chutzbah and (b) a social science Masters from a very fancy schmancy school.

In my past, I was brand manager for Milk-Bone, A.1. Steak Sauce and Grey Poupon to name a few that you would recognize.

The jobs paid a ton of money and I loved, loved, loved what I did for a living. I worked ridiculous, endless hours, travelled a lot and loved all of that, too.

I made time for the horses. And eventually to get married and have two children. At which time I collapsed in a heap, quit my job and took up raising chickens. I got lucky in the husband department, though. And did not have children until late 30s early 40s.

My point is that you can LOVE what you do, make a lot of money AND still have time for horses. Although, from my experience, once I added husband and children, well, something had to give http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif.

Good luck, young ones! The world is a very cool place and you can make it work! And while I think the accounting advice is very good - I would only recommend it if you at the very least LIKE accounting. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

ponygrl
Dec. 18, 2005, 08:51 AM
at the moment I'm a dirt poor pharmacy student. but in 3 1/2 more years plus 1 or 2 years of residency (depending on what specialty I decide on) I'll be done! and a pharmacist! It's another job where you can live where you want and there are so many options as far as hours go.

deltawave
Dec. 18, 2005, 08:52 AM
Cardiologist. I work "part time" so I can see my kid grow up, at least a little, and have time to ride. Part time means I have one day off a week, LOL! I work one weekend out of 4 and take call 2-3 nights a week.

Medicine is great IF you love it. The training is long and tough and often wrenching, but thrilling and rewarding at times, too. You will not make it out with your sanity and your "higher purposes" intact unless you really, really LIKE the training. Some go into it without any higher purpose at all, thinking they'll be "rich". http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif They're the ones I wouldn't send my family members to see. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

The job allows me to afford horses, but compromise is the name of the game: even working "part time" I rarely ride more than 3-4 days a week and never seem to be able to progress as fast as I'd like to. No complaints here, though--the job is amazing, my family still speaks to me, and hey, I always wanted to learn to juggle! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

rileyiscuter
Dec. 18, 2005, 09:03 AM
Vet school professor, researcher in infectious diseases and pony club vRS. Learned my limits early in the career and despite having horses most of the time (5 years off when my child came along), my personal competition career only just started as my available time and money went to my child's riding habit for many years! Life is great now as my home is 5 minutes from work and the horses are in the back yard. Since grad school I have had posted in my office a New Yorker cartoon that says "I just know I'm going to love horses all my life. That's why I'm planning to have a career in banking, insurance, and real estate." so you either need to be an equine professional or make enough money to enjoy being an amateur, so stay in school!

wanderlust
Dec. 18, 2005, 09:08 AM
I'm a business/marketing analytics manager for a Silicon Valley startup. Involves doing lots of complex quantitative analysis, and then putting the results into a format that the "lowest common denominator" can easily understand. I also frequently act as a bridge between engineering groups and the marketing folks, because they speak two different languages and usually need someone to translate in both directions. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

IMO, a tech career is the way to go if you have the aptitude for it- the pay is pretty darn good and the hours tend to be very flexible. I can show up whenever I want and leave whenever I want, provided I actually get some work done. What that mean is when the days get shorter, I ride in the mornings and go to the office around 9:30 or 10am, and in the summer I work from 7:30am to 5ish.

AllyCat
Dec. 18, 2005, 09:37 AM
I'm a registered nurse. My previous career (pharmaceutical testing chemist) didn't make me happy and didn't really provide the time and the funds needed to show.

I love nursing and it's easy to get time off to go to shows. While I'm certainly not rich, I can afford to go to shows and take lessons without feeling I'm reaching into the last coins in my piggybank.

Training was two additional years of nursing coursework to get a BSN to add to my previous BA/Biology.

copperdolly
Dec. 18, 2005, 09:53 AM
Vet student here. In a year and a half I will be unleashed on the unsuspecting animal population! I am currently only part boarding due to time. I am also worried about the all to commonly heard remark "if you want to work on them you can't ride them".

I would love to further my riding once I am done, but it will probably have to wait until I am finished my internship and maybe a residency.

south_pacific
Dec. 18, 2005, 10:07 AM
Originally posted by ponygrl:
at the moment I'm a dirt poor pharmacy student. but in 3 1/2 more years plus 1 or 2 years of residency (depending on what specialty I decide on) I'll be done! and a pharmacist! It's another job where you can live where you want and there are so many options as far as hours go.

I'm in pharmacy school too! Love the options I will have when I'm done (2.5 more years!). I basically just want to have the time to play with my horse and the $$$ to support my tack shopping addiction http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

It sucks right now because I'm 2.5 hours away from my horse and I'm living in the city (which I'm not a big fan of). I don't get to ride too often (just when I go home on weekends, which is rare because I'm just too darn busy), but once I get through my Pharmaceutics exam tomorrow at 1:30 (!!!) I'll have a whole 3 weeks off to see him http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

ThreeDays
Dec. 18, 2005, 10:14 AM
Another nurse over here! http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/winkgrin.gif

I love what I do. The profession is rewarding, flexible and financially stable. I apply a lot of my nursing and medical knowledge to my horses and their care.

I'll put a vote in for nursing for anyone who is considering the profession. It's a great career and we need more RN's out there!

cosmos mom
Dec. 18, 2005, 10:19 AM
I am a associate research scientist at J&J. It pays well, has flex time and is a very autonomous career. Also, the big companies will pay for (most or all) of your masters or PhD if you wish to continue you education!

fullmoon fever
Dec. 18, 2005, 10:23 AM
I work in a law firm. I was an executive legal assistant for many years. When my ex-husband stopped working (after the warranty, of course), I had to go back to work - after taking 5 yrs. off to run my boarding/training business.

I am currently working a weird night shift as a document specialist (fancy title for Word Processor) at another law firm.

After half my life had gone by, I finally figured out what I wanted to be when I grew up and I am starting college in January. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif

I am taking a 31 week accelerated course to become a Medical Laboratory Technician and will then go on to write my exam to specialize in phlebotomy. With a new cancer facility opening 10 mins. away from my home, job prospects are good. As well, an entry level position pays as much or more than I'm currently earning now.

glfprncs
Dec. 18, 2005, 11:01 AM
I am an 8th grade teacher. Last year, I taught 8th grade writing, and spent large portions of my weekends and evenings grading esssays. I had 150 students, and each time I assigned a 5 paragraph essay, it would take me over 8 hours of MY free time to grade it. I rarely left school before 4 or 4:30, and spent many hours during the evenings or on weekends grading. However, this year I'm teaching pre-Algebra. I have become quite adept at managing my time at school, and when I don't have meetings during my planning (which leaves only 2 days per week) I grade papers and try to write lesson plans. The 8th grade math teachers plan as a team, so we generally get together one afternoon per week and plan 2 weeks of lessons, which saves us SO much personal time.

Because of my newfound organization, I rarely bring work home to grade, which means I can leave school at 3:00 in the afternoon and I always have weekends off. Plus, I only work 190 days per year, so I get a week off in the fall, 2 1/2 off around Christmas, a week in the spring, all major holidays, and 8 weeks off in the summer. I am required to attain 10 PLU's (professional learning units) every 5 years in order to renew my teacher license, and I can do this in a variety of ways (college courses, coursework offered by my district, etc.). I had completed 4 PLU's in the past 2 years by taking a district offered course that meets one afternoon after school, twice a month. Thus, I don't have to take coursework during the summers.

The other positive is fairly good benefits (medical, dental, vision and long term disability), though this is changing dramatically year after year (and not for the better).

Now for the downside...even with my current gravy schedule, teaching middle school is not for the feint of heart, and with governmental requirements for public schools becoming more and more overwhelming, it appears that teachers responsibilities are increasing every year (the outside paperwork is getting absolutely ridiculous!). In addition, teacher's rights seem to be dwindling, while student's rights are increasing. Finally, even with my Master's degree, the salary isn't fantastic. If I can motivate myself, I may begin my specialist's degree (which will take about 2 years part-time) which will offer an immediate $5K pay raise. However, during those 2 years my riding time will diminish during the weekdays.

My spouse has a job he loves, however, it isn't high paying either. He is a caddie at the Augusta National Golf Club. So, between the two of us, we certainly are far from wealthy.

That said, if you live in certain parts of the U.S., the cost of living can allow you to live comfortably even with a modest income. For example, we live in North Augusta, SC, which is halfway between Augusta, GA and Aiken, SC. We have a 3 BR, 2 BA brand new home in a middle class suburb. Cost of said home was well under $130K. My husband desperately wanted to try to move back to his native Denver, Colorado at the beginning of this summer. He then went to caddie in Castle Rock for the summer, and came back with different ideas. Our home in Denver would be in excess of $250K, and the boost to our incomes (by moving to Denver) certainly can't offset that cost. I guess all I'm saying is that there are parts of the country where it is MUCH cheaper to live (and still quite horsey), without being in the 'high rent' district.

JackieBlue
Dec. 18, 2005, 11:02 AM
Oooo! Oooooo! I LOVE my job!
I'm a Veterinary Product Specialist with Dynasplint Systems, Inc. Dynasplint has been manufacturing dynamic splints for humans for about 30 years and has recently (just over a year ago) opened a veterinary division. Dynasplint's dynamic splints correct congential and aquired angular and flexural limb deformities (knock knees, bowed legs, contracted tendons, tendon laxity, fetlock deviations, etc...) and can even be adapted for many other uses, as well. Horses comprise the bulk of my patients, but I treat small animals, alpacas, llamas, camels, you name it! If it's got legs, there's a chance they might be crooked, contracted, suffering from laxity, and whatever else at some point in their lives! I've had great success treating all animals, especially horses since their owners tend to be uber-compliant, and their owners have all been extremely satisfied. I've even successfully straightened a yearling alpaca cria with profound bilateral valgus deformities of the carpal joints, drastically improved a 2 y.o. Hanoverian filly with a varus fetlock and corrected acquired flexural contractures in adult animals.
If anyone should read this and would like to see photos of Dynasplints and treatment results, just reply with your email address and I'll be happy to send you some photos.
Animals are surprisingly tolerant of the splints and are able to lay down, stand and move around fairly unencumbered ans since they only ewar the splints for 8-12 hours each day, they can be turned out when not wearing them.
When someone needs a Dynasplint they or their vet call me for a consultation and I carry out a custom fitting process at the farm or hospital where the horse is and then determine an appropriate treatment protocol and carry out any necessary follow up visits. I have met the most incredible people and animals and love seeing injured or unfortunate animals improve.

I am happy to answer any questions you may have after reading all of this. It's so rewarding everytime a Dynasplint improves an animal's quality of life that I can't help trying to spread the word and reach out to more critters in need.

Here are some photos of a few cases I'm currently working on:
MAJOR valgus alpaca (http://img5.ranchoweb.com/images/critteriffic/c2e.mollysmallest.jpg)
valgus alpaca in splint (http://img5.ranchoweb.com/images/critteriffic/november10-insplint528229.jpg)

valgus alpaca at 10 days (http://img5.ranchoweb.com/images/critteriffic/november10-text28229.jpg)

another valgus case (http://img5.ranchoweb.com/images/critteriffic/magic-day1front28229.jpg)

valgus splinted (http://img5.ranchoweb.com/images/critteriffic/magic-splinton28229.jpg)
1 week into treatment (http://img5.ranchoweb.com/images/critteriffic/magiconeweekrightfront228229.jpg)
equine fetlock laxity case (http://img5.ranchoweb.com/images/critteriffic/timmy-day1sideview28229.jpg)
1 fetlock splinted (http://img5.ranchoweb.com/images/critteriffic/timmy-day1insplint28229.jpg)
1 week later (http://img5.ranchoweb.com/images/critteriffic/timmy-oneweeklefthind28229.jpg)

Hey Mickey
Dec. 18, 2005, 12:13 PM
thanks guys!! you've given me alot to think about! like things i never thought of before.

all though im pretty sure accounting isn't for me, seeing as i can't sit still to save my life, hehehe but it could be a better fall back job then cutting hair, I was thinking of going to cosmatology school, cause people always need their hair cut, as a back up.

I have kinda wanted to be a pysichal therapist or chiropracter, cause i'm all about helping people.

HiJumpGrrl
Dec. 18, 2005, 12:17 PM
I'm a 4th year medical student, just 12 weeks of coursework away from my MD http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif (boy does deltawave have it right about the training--don't put yourself through it unless you're absolutely, positively SURE you're going to love it)

I go to the same school as tarheelmd07, but don't have the benefit of no student loans! i'm poor as dirt and have 6 figures to pay off, plus a mortgage. i do have the benefit of a wonderful husband who is gainfully employed and mostly understanding of my horse habit, if terrified of the animals. so i get to take lessons, ride and compete other people's horses at this point

next year i will be an intern in psychiatry on call every 4th night--i don't anticipate a lot of riding. after next year, however, i should be able to ride a lot more. psychiatry is great--i love the work, the hours are more reasonable than most everything else in medicine, and it's the most under-served specialty in medicine. if i do a fellowship (as is the plan at the moment), i'll be making 40-50k/yr for the next 5 years. most of that will go towards loans, as we hope to get them paid off quickly. after that, the pay increases, and i intend to event a lot! (if potential children will allow me, that is http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/winkgrin.gif)

JER
Dec. 18, 2005, 12:54 PM
Screenwriter.

Pros: pay is great, provided you have a job and making up stories can be fun, at least the first few times.

Cons: it's really hard work, you have to deal with lots of rejection/criticism and get used to working for people who think nothing of ripping all the wires out repeatedly. And you're always chasing the next job and trying to think up novel ways to either (1) kill people or (2) make two unlikely souls have an unforgettable romance.

Hours are wildly varied -- usually from the time you wake up until when you can't stay awake any longer -- but theoretical flexibility makes it possible to ride.

canterlope
Dec. 18, 2005, 12:59 PM
Another CPA here, although I focus on the tax end of things. Right out of school I did a short stint with a public accounting firm, but found it just wasn't my cup of tea and it left absolutely no time for horses. For the last several years I've worked as an independent consultant specializing in representing equine and agricultural businesses in tax disputes with the IRS.

The pay is excellent, although very much dependent on your reputation and the outcome of cases handled in the past (much like a trial lawyer). Fortunately, I've been fairly successful and am at the point where I can pick my clients, set my own hours, and charge what I think are obscene amounts of money, but are actually low in comparison to others.

However, it is not a job for the faint of heart. You have to be tactful, think quickly on your feet, know the tax code like the back of your hand, and not be afraid to go toe-to-toe with an IRS agent. Good bargaining skills and the ability to put people at ease are also a plus.

baileygreyhorse
Dec. 18, 2005, 01:04 PM
Another teacher here! I teach HS English, mostly 9th grade. It's not an easy job, but it's fun. Never bored at school. Yep, there's lots of homework, but I can leave at 3pm. Snow days are fun, too. But, it's not a job for everyone. Every year it gets harder and the kids don't cut you any slack at all.

eventer_mi
Dec. 18, 2005, 02:53 PM
I'm a 9th grade English teacher. I used to be an educational software designer, which paid well but left me with some long hours. Since moving down to NC and marrying my husband, I find myself back in the classroom, due to lack of work opportunities in my former occupation.

Despite what people say, teaching does NOT let you out at 3 and give you the summers off. Most of the time, you are working tons of hours calling parents, doing lesson plans, grading paper, papers, and more papers (did I mention that you have a lot of papers to grade? http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/dead.gif). The summers are spent planning for the NEXT year, as well as going to conferences to continue your education, etc. Oh, and you have duties to perform, such as attending after school sports events, evening recitals, etc. In fact, I think I had more time for horses when I was in adult education. Oh, and there is no money in teaching. I am lucky in that I married a career military man, so he has job security (there is always a war going on somewhere in the world), and his salary allows me to keep two horses and go to the occasional show and bi-monthly lesson with a BNT. Of course, there are drawbacks to being married to military, such as the fact that he's in Kuwait/Iraq right now.

My dream job would be to be a professor at a university somewhere, where I could have a bit more flexibility in my hours and not have to deal with parents.

baileygreyhorse
Dec. 18, 2005, 03:03 PM
Eventer_mi-- I *used* to work in NC. Now I work in DE. After I got my National Board Cert., my salary DOUBLED from what I was getting in NC. And my workload seems about half. NC is a hard place to teach.

RunForIt
Dec. 18, 2005, 03:34 PM
http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif and yet ANOTHER teacher here...except that after 23 years in the classroom, this year I'm a "literacy coach" - trying to teach teachers all the stuff I know about how kids come to read and write really well. Kids are absolutely "easy" compared to adults! I'm in the middle of National Boards, Baileygreyhorse (in Literacy). The pay in Georgia is fairly good, but I'm at the top of my scale, have my reading specialist certification and Nat'l Boards will be it for major raises. No, we don't get off at 3, and summer vacation has dwindled to 2 months in most states, but I wouldn't trade my "work" for any amount of money. I love teaching; the thinking that goes with helping kids learn how to think about what they're doing has always fascinated me. The fact that our brains can take all those little squiggly marks on a page and recreate stories is simply amazing! My ponies live at home, I tutor for "horse money", and my house often has hay trails from one room to another, but I wouldn't have it any other way. Bet all of you feel the same. (yes, some of the parents are "difficult"; but not that many http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif )

Jleegriffith
Dec. 18, 2005, 03:40 PM
I work in human resources for the federal gov't. I have a degree in political science and wanted to make sure horses stayed a part of my life so I am just doing something that pays the bills. I really enjoy working with people so I enjoy part of the job. I work 7:30-4 M-F and have great benefits. On the side, I teach a lot of riding lessons to locals and do breaking and training of young horses. I love that http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

My husband is also career military so that is part of the reason why I have a gov't job..never know when you will have to relocate and I am trying to keep my pension plan if possible.

I am young 24yrs old so I wouldn't say I make a whole lot of money but we don't live above our means. We have used cars, a simple house, and budget very well. I also work at the barn to work off some board. Doesn't leave a lot of time but I love the horses so it's all worth it.

I would like to go back to school and get my master's but I am not sure in what. I just want a masters in case we move and I have to get another job.

maplebrook
Dec. 18, 2005, 03:48 PM
I'm a geologist, employed by my County government to oversee environmental management of landfills. This is not what I expected to be doing with my life when I went to school. But through a series of jobs, this is where I ended up, and I LOVE it!

My hours are not unreasonable (7am-4pm, M-F) with virtually no overtime. I'm paid well, have excellent benefits, good vacation time and best of all, my boss is a horse person. He is super lenient about letting me sneak out to the barn to meet the vet/farrier/chiropractor, etc, and is very understanding of my riding lifestyle.

I've worked at my job for 5 years. In 20 more years, I'll be 55 and able to retire with a very generous pension.

Angelina
Dec. 18, 2005, 04:35 PM
Remember, you can marry more in just five minutes than you can work out in a lifetime.

deltawave
Dec. 18, 2005, 04:54 PM
Ah yes, and be chattel to someone for the rest of your life, or at least until the pre-nup kicks in. An EXCELLENT thing to aspire to. If I had a daughter, that's what I'd tell her to do, for sure. Why bother with all that dreadful THINKING and STRIVING and WORKING? http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/dead.gif http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif Just let someone provide for you, don't worry your little head about that dreary career stuff.

Edited to say: Never mind, it sounds as if I am talking to a troll. Go away, troll! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_mad.gif

JackieBlue
Dec. 18, 2005, 05:09 PM
Maplebrook - Your post caught my eye - My Dad is an Environmental (and Civil and Chemical) Engineer and he specializes in solid waste disposal issues. He has his own consulting firm and is very well known in the industry. My brother (Civil Engineer) and my sister-in-law (hydrogeologist) work for him as well, or to be correct, I should say they work for my Mom, as she owns the company. There are some great tax breaks for woman-owned corporations, so my Dad gave the whole business to my Mom shortly before they incorporated.
There are so many LUCRATIVE things you can do in this field if you ever tire of the whole county thing. I'm not sure why I had to post this, but maybe it will interest you. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

south_pacific
Dec. 18, 2005, 05:10 PM
I hear stripping pays well http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif
I personally don't have the body for it (well, to work anywhere high class...) but I hear the pay is good and the hours are ummm..flexible. Plus you get to meet lots of interesting people http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

slp2
Dec. 18, 2005, 05:58 PM
South Pacific, you reminded me of a woman (who we found out later was a "sex-based worker", i.e. the politically correct term for strippers) that boarded at a place I used to board at. She had a horse there that was given to her as a gift, for ummmmm, "services rendered", so to speak. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif But that story is for another thread (or perhaps another type of forum) http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

Anyway--I work for the holding company of a bank/mortgage company as the Training Director. I do love my job although it is basically M-F, 8-5. I have some flexibility with my schedule and 4 weeks of vacation per year. I like training people and developing training materials--and it's a good contrast to spending time with horses. It gives me a good balance between doing cranial, people-oriented things to my hobby of more physical, active, outdoorsey, horse things. I really don't know if I could work with horses full-time--I like the variety of my worktime and my playtime (ie. horses!) The pay is good, although I didn't get a great salary right out of college. It took a few jobs and some work experience to build up to a better salary.

Gnep
Dec. 18, 2005, 06:48 PM
Self employed with a business.

A job I don't advice.

Responsebility is very often stunning, no job security, benefits suck, income varies, investment debt can be sacrry, work hours totally out of control and unpredictable.

Advantage, one can deside ( most of the time )how to spent the time and one learns to be driven, a leader, a negotiator, a doer.

A streak of rebellion, independency, I can do mentality and the ability to beleave in oneself no matter what is more important than education.

Education is good, I have a degree in engeneering and business, Universities of Cologne and Nuernberg, but neither prepared me for what it means to be Boss. Real live was a rather rud school.

For the younger ones, use your education to broaden your mind, make that gray matter flexibel, train it and never demand that what you are educated, trained in is what you have to do. Never allow live to put blinders on you.

CANTEREOIN
Dec. 18, 2005, 07:16 PM
An Insurance Consultant/Broker specializing in Employee Benefits for companies with 50 or more employees.

Pays great, stress high, lots of work, "flexible" hours. Although one boss told me years ago that "flexible hours" just means I'm free to come in early and leave late.

I kind of think of myself as a benefit therapist/problem solver.

Oh, I wanted to add that I was an Animal Science major in college. Really wanted to work with thoroughbred broodmares so my emphasis was animal reproduction.

Graduated, interviewed for positions at all sorts of horse related jobs. When I looked at the hours, pay, and then my debt load, I went for money. Thought that I could play at my passion rather than work at it.

Took my 24 years to get my first horse and really play.

You know, I don't regret it even though each spring (longing for the babies) I wonder where I would be today if I chose another path.

Lucky_shamrock
Dec. 18, 2005, 07:33 PM
I am one month away from being certified as a massage therapist. Love the work but it is tough on your body.

Otherwise I am in a similar situation as I lot of other horsie young people: How do I make enough money to ride but still have enough time to do it?????????????? http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_confused.gif http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif

Perfect Pony
Dec. 18, 2005, 08:23 PM
What do I do? Well simply put I build and then babysit servers. Technically I am a server engineer or administrator. It could be interesting work if I was the slightest bit interested in technology, but I'm really not. On the other hand it keeps me from getting wrapped up in things. I just build them and deploy applications and keep them up and running with the least amount of effort.

Pocket Pony
Dec. 18, 2005, 09:09 PM
I used to be an executive assistant for an investment banker-turned venture capitalist. The pay was great, the hours were great, and my boss was great. His daughter rode so he understood the passion I have for it and let me have a flexible schedule. In the winter I'd ride before work and shower there after quickly checking email and voicemail, and in the summer I'd get off at 3 p.m. so I could go ride. He was also very generous with bonuses and one year basically bought my horse for me! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif

Since getting divorced and moving to a rural area, I've been able to live off of some savings for a little while. I just started a part-time job last week working for a home-based catalog company doing orders and inventory. The pay is really good for up here, although it is a fraction of what I made before. We're lucky in that Mr. PP works from home and kept his same job, at the same salary, as when we lived in the Bay Area.

When I'm not doing my new job, I'm doing horse chores or riding, which is sadly sometimes a chore as well...

Peggy
Dec. 18, 2005, 09:09 PM
Community college teacher. More contact hours and grading than a 4-year college prof, but no research plus the opportunity for summers off. Can somewhat pick your schedule to facilitate riding, especially if you're willing to teach nights and/or have a fair amount of senority and/or are pickier about teaching times than courses. Better pay, on average, than K-12, but jobs generally harder to get (higher applicant to job ratio). Fall semester finishes up right before Christmas so you pretty much never get holiday stuff done on time.

buschkn
Dec. 18, 2005, 09:43 PM
I am a 3rd year resident in Emergency Medicine and when I finish in July I will have a great job as far as finances and number of shifts per month. I took a job that will have me working a little harder initially, but will make a lot more. I figure when I am first out I will work harder and then later slow down. There are a lot of options in medicine. I could have worked at a really slow ER and done one 24 hr shifts a week. So that is basically working 4 days a month and still making more than most people with "regular" jobs. Not the sort of money that would allow me to buy $50K horses every year and spend $30K every winter to go to WEF.

SO, I am excited to finish residency and start reaping some rewards, but as everyone else has said- being a doctor is a LONG road and while it will give me a lot of opportunities I am not sure I would do it again if I had the choice. I probably would, but it has been VERY hard, mostly emotionally, at least for me. I like my job, I work with great people and impact people's lives, but by the same token, I see a lot of terrible things on a daily basis and it has tainted my view of the world more than a little.

The extent of the education, training, life-long commitment, and countless sacrifices are things you don't really understand until it is "too late" and you are very much invested. It is all well and good to think "I want to HELP people!" but do your research if you think becoming a doctor is for you. I wish I had.

It is a great career, and if you want to keep riding and competing I would recommend ER, Dermatology, Radiology, and Anesthesia as the best options with flexibility and options when you get out. NOT any kind of surgery! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif That's what I started out in and quickly realized the errors of my ways! I am much happier now.

Good luck with whatever you decide. It is great you are researching options, you are very smart!

canadianbacon
Dec. 18, 2005, 10:28 PM
I work as a Station Attendant for one of the airlines. Most people call it baggage handing but we do a lot more than just load bags, although that is a large part of it... We take care of everything the aircraft needs from the time it lands to the time it departs, including hooking up the passenger bridge, assisting passengers in wheelchairs, taking care of housekeeping on the plane (aka grooming), unloading and loading baggage, cargo and mail, pushing the plane away from the gate and doing the de-icing.

It's tough work physically and mentally since there are a lot of dangerous things out on the ramp, but it is hands down the coolest job I have ever had. Seriously, they let me play with jumbo jets for a living http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Just some words of wisdom if you are flying over the holidays...

1. Two smaller bags are better than one big bag. Plus it may save you from having to pay for overweight baggage.

2. Make sure you have a name tag on all of your luggage that is easy to read. Sometimes the flight info tags get ripped off by the belts, and if we don't know who it belongs to, your luggage isn't going to be joining you on vacation...

3. Enjoy your vacation http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

CB

tbgurl
Dec. 18, 2005, 11:37 PM
Currently I'm a university student, training to be an equine professional. My husband is a Marine, for now. I graduate and he separates from the military at roughly the same time, and then we will use his benefits to buy a farm and start a boarding/training/breeding facility. We're young and willing to put hard work into the place, and I have the education and experience with horses.

He's also going into law enforcement (probably), and I plan to work also for a time, until the business is large enough that I can focus on it full time. So we'll have a steady income to keep us going.

I couldn't imagine struggling and working hard at a job that I didn't absolutely love. And horses are the one thing I absolutely love and will work my butt off for. We may never have a lot of money, but I'll be happy doing what I love.

bornfreenowexpensive
Dec. 19, 2005, 03:19 AM
Lawyer. Don't do it unless you are sure that is what you want to do. I have a very good paying job--but those are hard to get AND they DO expect you to work hard. I just pulled an all nighter--and am trying to catch my second wind to get back to work. These are my two worst weeks of the year--so my horses are getting more days off than normal. I did horses full time before law school--sometime I wish I had stayed with the horses but that is also a tough way to make a living. There are tons of interesting jobs out there. Just keep you mind open and your grades high.

Nexta
Dec. 19, 2005, 05:07 AM
Find you a wealthy significant other who is supportive of your horsey addiction. Then you can ride all you want and buy all you want whenever you want.
I do work as a school bus driver which is a split shift job with the same benefits as teachers and last year I made more than some teachers --not bad --and I rode all I wanted, when I wanted!

Hilary
Dec. 19, 2005, 05:34 AM
I have a funny job, one I never dreamed existed when I was in college (or graduate school).

I work for a community foundation and review grant and scholarship proposals and help people who have "philanthropic interests" find the best places to give.

I have a great boss, regular hours with a few evenings here and there for meetings, great benefits, and an office 5 minutes from home.

I've been here for nearly 8 years and still love coming to work every day.

luveventing
Dec. 19, 2005, 05:54 AM
Being a Medical Technologist works well. There are lots of fields you can go into-blood banking, microbiology, genetics, chemistries. You can often work 1st shift or 2nd shift or even 3rd if you wanted. I prefer 2nd shift plus I make an extra buck an hour for being able to ride in the daylight and go to work when its dark.

Some of them you work 1 weekend a month, some no weekends. Pay is decent enough to make it work if you budget yourself wisely and there are LOTS of jobs out there. 4 years in school and 1 year clinical. So its not a long haul either education wise.

tarheelmd07
Dec. 19, 2005, 06:13 AM
buschkn -- how've you been able to balance residency AND horses? Do you get any time to ride at all? Hijumpgrrl and I are very curious...

Ruth0552
Dec. 19, 2005, 06:20 AM
Well I graduated from college in May and promised myself that I would either:

a) get a job that pays lots of $$$ so I can pay for full board, etc, and afford my ponies

or

b) get a job that does not pay as much but provides lots of time to ride.

Fortunatly for me (sense sarcasm here) I have managed to find a job that pays little and takes a ton of time b/c my commute is over an hour. That being said, I am now looking for a new job closer to home with similar pay so I can find time to like, breathe, and maybe do some riding.

Have some friends that are nurses and accountants... all are doing +++++. Would def recommend it, don't know why I majored in Math and Literature... Should've done accounting or finance or something. Or just pursued a job with animals since that is what I really want to do, but was strongly discouraged by "other" parties.

RAyers
Dec. 19, 2005, 06:52 AM
Hey Mickey,

I am a professor in Materials Science. I design materials and processes for the repair and replacement of bone. It is a wonderful job. It is always new and I am always learning. The downside is for all of the years in school, it pays not so well. Like others, I would say this is the type of job you do if you love it. At the same time graduate school, regardless of your chosen field, can open a lot of doors to neat jobs and higher pay that would not be there if you only did undergraduate work.

My advice is to do what you love and are interested in. It may not pay well but you need to be happy where you work since it becomes so much of who you are as a person. I know too many people and have had too many conversations with wealthy folks that have said that while having money was nice, it is not worth it. One friend of mine who owns his own multi-million dollar company told me outright to stay where I am because while I was never going to make as much as he did, I had a lot of freedom that he doesn't (and he is the boss). Anyway, if you love what you do and you are happy in you life it seems like the money you need comes along.

My other advice is to get as much education as you can. It gives you so MANY more options in life and nobody can ever take education away from you.

The other thing to realize, it is not what you know in life but what you do that makes a difference. All of my degrees are in Aerospace Engineering. I was literally a rocket scientist for the defense department. I can calulate interplanetry orbits and understand the thermodynamics of atmospheres and oceans, however my dissertation is on how porous materials interact with facial bone during craniofacial reconstruction. I am not a trained medical professional but that is where my career is. So, please realize that just because you go to school for one thing does not mean you have to do that for the rest of your life. You can always change.

Reed

Carried Away
Dec. 19, 2005, 06:56 AM
I'm a bartender/working student!

I graduated from college in May with a Mass Communication degree, but I decided to focus on my riding for a while, and bartending lets me do just that. I work 10-15 hours a week (mostly weekends), and I have some seniority so during event season I can get the weekends off that I need to travel to shows. I was also able to get 2 months off so I can finally go to Florida this winter and compete.

I know it sounds great, but it's not all fun and games when I have to go to work after being at the barn for 10 hours, get off work at 3am, and be back at the barn by 7 for the non-paying job. That being said, I will most likely have to get a "real job" when I get back from Florida in March (to start paying off debt and because I know I can't be a bartender foreverhttp://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

purplnurpl
Dec. 19, 2005, 07:17 AM
I am a Kinesiologist/Biomechanist. I work for a children's hospital in a Gait Mechanics Lab. We see special populations kiddos and evaluate their gait using those cool reflective markers and a motion caputer system...kind of the same system that Disney uses for their animated films.


Originally posted by Nexta:
Find you a wealthy significant other who is supportive of your horsey addiction.

Rock on Nexta! I am working on that right now.
I have a boy that turned out to love my horsie addiction and he comes from a bit of a horsie background.
the plus side...he's a Senior Programmer, with three incomes currently!! whoopie!
oo,oo, and the best part- He wants me to eventually quit my job, buy property, and resale horses!!

The bus driving sounds fun! I am all about finding a cool part time job.

I figured the best thing to do is get a part time job where I spend the most money...don't laugh...like Tractor Supply!!

slp2
Dec. 19, 2005, 07:36 AM
I work for a children's hospital in a Gait Mechanics Lab. We see special populations kiddos and evaluate their gait using those cool reflective markers and a motion caputer system...kind of the same system that Disney uses for their animated films.

Just a sidenote to Purplnurpl: They do this same type of gait analysis with horses at the McPhail Center at MSU Vet school. It's very neat!

Sorry to get "off task" --continue on with the thread!

texang73
Dec. 19, 2005, 07:44 AM
Another teacher here! I teach high school art. Not the greatest pay or benefits, but I enjoy it, and the time off is pretty good...

canterdeep
Dec. 19, 2005, 07:57 AM
we found out later she was a "sex-based worker"
I think it is more correctly and properly it is "sex industry" worker. The term has a more nuts and bolts feel to it, don't you think?

I'm a writer.

olympicprincess
Dec. 19, 2005, 08:08 AM
Until summer:
-full-time student at university.
-part-time trainer
-part-time at office.

After graduation:
-will continue on with p/t training/lessons at barn
-and will be f/t training here at father's company to be a public insurance adjuster...we're NOT an ins. co-- we FIGHT insurance companies on property losses: fire, flood, collapse, hurricane, earthquakes, etc. to get the property owners the money they deserve. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

BIG PLUS: get to take off work whenever I need to for events! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

mortly
Dec. 19, 2005, 08:17 AM
I'm a John Deere tractor salesperson!

Not that exciting, but a least I get to play with tractors all day and give the old boy farmers a shock when the little blonde girl knows more than they do about a tractor!!

slp2
Dec. 19, 2005, 08:27 AM
Canterdeep: Sorry about my poor wording choice! I heard the term "sex-based worker" on NPR (where I learn all the latest PC lingo!) Gosh, I certainly wouldn't want to offend someone who is ctually a "sex industry" worker! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

rebeginner
Dec. 19, 2005, 08:31 AM
Environmental lawyer in government service. On the one hand, it's depressing to think that after practicing law for more than 20 years, I make about 50% less than I did in private practice. On the other hand, I don't have to look for clients, my client won't move its operations to China, and I'll have a job even if the client goes into bankruptcy! Plus, I have very regular hours. (read: I can ride several nights during the week after work, and I've never had to give up my weekend for work.)

Government service has also been very gratifying, intellectually, spirtually, and ethically. Hey, I don't get paid much, but it's enough to feed the pony and keep a roof over my head, and I'll have a real pension if I live long enough to retire!

Aggie4Bar
Dec. 19, 2005, 09:00 AM
Engineer. Degree is Chemical, but I've never worked as one. I spent two years in the Civil Engr'ing field in public works hell designing large diameter water lines. Now I work for a company that designs deepwater pipelines for the offshore oil industry. I've been at the new job for only 2 months, and since we're in a slow period (translation: I have nothing to do), I couldn't actually say yet whether I like it or not. Pay is great though. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

If you can handle the math and science, engineering is a great field to get into to support a horse habit. I won't lie and say that I love it or anything, but it more than pays for the horses.

Painted Wings
Dec. 19, 2005, 09:08 AM
Another Engineer here. Degree is Mechanical. Worked for the same defense company for over 25 yrs. Am not director of the engineering dept. Challenging job, good pay, never boring but the hours can be tough. Pays for my six horses that I don't have time to ride though.

sunnycher
Dec. 19, 2005, 09:34 AM
Hello, I am a Future National Sales director with Mary Kay, Inc. GREAT job, total flexibility, set my own hours and determine my income. Also, all my horsey friends now look more beautiful, and are protecting their skin with all the "outside" activities!!! Love it, gina

tractor queen
Dec. 19, 2005, 10:29 AM
Another accountant here...I too chose to skip the 2 yrs "big four" route to save myself the maniacal schedule. I went straight into corporate accounting after college.

I like what I do, the pay is great and time off has never really been a problem. Pay at a public company is generally much higher than at a private.

If you like "helping people" you should look into nursing. They are in demand, have flexible schedules and make good money.

Hey Mickey
Dec. 19, 2005, 12:23 PM
thanks everyone!!
i have deifntlay not ever heard of most of this stuff! so thankyou!!
hehhehehe my momm y told me if i was goign to be a hooker to be a good one so i can support my horse habit.
Is that a "sex based worker" or a "sex industry worker"? hehehene

bovon
Dec. 19, 2005, 12:51 PM
I work in the radio industry..Yes I'm one of those "on-air" people,,fun job..start out pay is not much but after a few decades it's all good. http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/lol.gif My hours give me many free mornings to ride but sometimes hard to get to Saturday shows because of Work committments. Funny thing I'm usually off on Sundays, but alot of the barns here don't do "Sunday Shows' because of church schedules..???? Actually I've had more than a few of those "Coming to Jesus" meetings riding my horse on Cross country courses!! http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/lol.gif http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/lol.gif http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/lol.gif

NeverTime
Dec. 19, 2005, 01:25 PM
Newspaper editor -- but my secret desire always has been to be an on-air personality like Bovon! I would NOT recommend my career field to an aspiring rider. The hours are long and unpredictable, and the pay is not conducive to owning a horse. But when you love something, you love something, and this -- along with riding -- are my "somethings."

honeydoozy
Dec. 19, 2005, 01:47 PM
I'm a real estate developer (of sorts).

I buy properties below "market" and renovate them - then either sell them or keep them as rental properties (vacation or commercial rentals).

The upside: it's extremely creative, energizing, rewarding, and lucrative, if you do it right.

The downside: it's exhausting, risky, and you can't count on a steady income all the time - money can be an "issue" when you least expect it.

Timing is everything, and in my area right now, it's NOT the time to invest... so I'm starting to get more educated and involved in local sports/event photography, as well as virtual tour photography. It feeds my creative spirit, while paying some bills - can't complain about that!

JER
Dec. 19, 2005, 02:12 PM
South Pacific, you reminded me of a woman (who we found out later was a "sex-based worker", i.e. the politically correct term for strippers) that boarded at a place I used to board at. She had a horse there that was given to her as a gift, for ummmmm, "services rendered", so to speak.

I've been waiting for someone to ask the appropriate follow-up question but since no one stepped up to the plate, I'll ask it:

How nice was the horse?

gully's pilot
Dec. 19, 2005, 02:30 PM
I write children's books.

RAyers
Dec. 19, 2005, 02:38 PM
JER, that was the appropriate follow-up question? I was thnking more along the lines of what was her cummulative scores in dressage for "Rider?"

"Rider has relaxed hip and moves well with her horse."

Reed http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

clivers
Dec. 19, 2005, 02:57 PM
Originally posted by RAyers:
JER, that was the appropriate follow-up question? I was thnking more along the lines of what was her cummulative scores in dressage for "Rider?"

"Rider has relaxed hip and moves well with her horse."

Reed http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Funny http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif !!

...or the less positive but perhaps equally likely comment "rider should stop humping the saddle"!!

ss3777
Dec. 19, 2005, 03:41 PM
Real estate.....basically a matchmakerhttp://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

BarbB
Dec. 19, 2005, 03:46 PM
auto broker

in my previous life I worked for the government

harehound
Dec. 19, 2005, 03:46 PM
Farmer - hay & beef.
Horse sales - mostly draft cross field hunters.
On-call guard for Ontario Provincial Police. Farrier assistant to my husband, who is an AFA certifed farrier with a big client base.
Full time mom. ( my favorite "job" http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif)
All these things keep me very busy, but I also have a lot of flexibility in my schedule. I love farming, and I love being able to find, buy, train & sell good horses for a living. Being a police guard is a bit intense, but is a bit of a break from the horse world. I handle horses pretty much every day, all day long. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

fullmoon fever
Dec. 19, 2005, 04:02 PM
Originally posted by JER:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">South Pacific, you reminded me of a woman (who we found out later was a "sex-based worker", i.e. the politically correct term for strippers) that boarded at a place I used to board at. She had a horse there that was given to her as a gift, for ummmmm, "services rendered", so to speak.

I've been waiting for someone to ask the appropriate follow-up question but since no one stepped up to the plate, I'll ask it:

How nice was the horse? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I've been thinking of branching out into the "industry" as a P-T dominatrix. I'm just worried I'll meet a LOT of people that I know from the law firms I've worked at. It's very difficult to maintain your "top" status if you're laughing. http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/lol.gif

Lori T
Dec. 19, 2005, 05:23 PM
At age 40, went back to school to become a certified Vet Tech (shoulda listened to mom 20 years ago). Graduate hopefully next year. Work part time for a vet clinic, am a mom to 3 teens and have a barn to manage..4 are mine, 1 boarder. My dream is to write..am working on a pre-teen horse story.

Lori T
http://www.calypsofarm.piczo.com

circusponydreams
Dec. 19, 2005, 05:37 PM
You know how companies use phone numbers that spell things, like 1-800-COLLECT and 1-800-FLOWERS? I spell those numbers and reserve them for clients. It is the randomest job ever!

MCM
Dec. 19, 2005, 06:01 PM
I'm a biologist. I'm currently working on my master's in tropical ecology. So, I'm basically going to play in the rainforest. I love my work,and I love being a scientist, but there isn't much time for horses.

I don't have a horse right now, and with school, travel, and money I can't make the jump to buy one. So, even though I love biology, I'm still not sure how I'm going to work everything out.

I just remember that both horses and science are equal passions, so I will find a way to keep horses in my life.

Biology is not for the faint of heart, or for those who don't love the details of research. However, I get to play in the rainforest http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/winkgrin.gif, so it's all good.

Mystery
Dec. 19, 2005, 07:35 PM
I'm a 3rd year resident in OB/Gyn and do manage to find the time to ride & compete.
I'm in maryland & so have lots of events to choose from. Also, I can drive to an event, compete and be back to same day.
Of course I am hoping to do a fellowship after residency, to have a better lifestyle & more time for horses!

Tylexi
Dec. 19, 2005, 08:47 PM
I'm in public relations. I love it. The pay is decent with large raises and the hours tend to be great during the summer and a little heavy during the winter, which works out well with me, living in New England.

I actually graduated last year with my Master's in Broadcast Journalism and went the TV reporter route - but it didn't take long for me to realize that it wasn't for me. One piece of advice on getting your master's - make sure you are positive you are studying something you want to pursue as a career.

clivers
Dec. 19, 2005, 08:57 PM
I'm a resident in Psychiatry - doing a concurrent fellowship in child and adolescent psychiatry. Previously I did family medicine with lots of OB and ER.

I chose to do psychiatry for many reasons including "horsey" ones: the hours are reasonable, and I'll have lots of control over my schedule when I'm done, and I'll be fairly well paid.

Right now I own 2 horses and ride them both 5-6 days a week. It's a bit of a juggling act, but it's doable. I like my job, but what Deltawave and others have said is very true - it's a long haul and won't be worth it unless medicine is something you truly enjoy. It's also a lot of responsiblity...so it can be quite stressful even in specialities with reasonable hours.

Hey Mickey, Choosing a career is HARD WORK!!! Good luck!!! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

honeydoozy
Dec. 19, 2005, 11:02 PM
Originally posted by fullmoon fever:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by JER:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">South Pacific, you reminded me of a woman (who we found out later was a "sex-based worker", i.e. the politically correct term for strippers) that boarded at a place I used to board at. She had a horse there that was given to her as a gift, for ummmmm, "services rendered", so to speak.

I've been waiting for someone to ask the appropriate follow-up question but since no one stepped up to the plate, I'll ask it:

How nice was the horse? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I've been thinking of branching out into the "industry" as a P-T dominatrix. I'm just worried I'll meet a LOT of people that I know from the law firms I've worked at. It's very difficult to maintain your "top" status if you're laughing. http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/lol.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yeah..but wait.. let's get serious for a moment:

Talk about tax deductable perks! Boots, whips, tack, fine custom breeches....

Someone tell me why this isn't such a good idea?? http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

canterlope
Dec. 20, 2005, 02:12 AM
Originally posted by honeydoozy:
Yeah..but wait.. let's get serious for a moment:

Talk about tax deductable perks! Boots, whips, tack, fine custom breeches....

Someone tell me why this isn't such a good idea?? http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif Ah yes, a potential client! Although, I'm not quite sure her "business" could be classified as equine related, but, what the heck, I'm always up for a challenge. I'd even be willing to represent her for free just to see the look on the IRS Agent's face when it came time to describe what she did for a living. http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/winkgrin.gif http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/lol.gif

AM
Dec. 20, 2005, 06:15 AM
Another nurse here and a federal worker to boot. I actually learned to ride in England where I was a school nurse on an American military base.

Roney
Dec. 20, 2005, 07:58 AM
I'm a marketer. Right now I 'market' (i.e., do commercials, ads, PR, packaging, etc. for) vacuum cleaners. In the past, I've marketed canned fruit, dinners-in-a-box, Fruit Roll-Ups and a very strange kid's drink called "Squeezit".

It's great money once you get going, and fairly decent hours if you're in the right place.

But what I REALLY want to do is market horse products. Someday...

kcooper
Dec. 20, 2005, 09:50 AM
Aggie4Bar -- I'm with you. I used to be a trial lawyer; now I work for the government in an administrative law job. Better hours; worse money.

Dale Area 1
Dec. 20, 2005, 11:35 AM
Another Federal Gov employee here. Work for DoD, as a Congressional and Public Affairs Director for all military (and NASA) programs and weapons systems. Some days are slow, some days are crazy. Pay is not bad, hours are pretty good, travel is OK.

The key for me was to do what I enjoy and realize that sometimes the horses will not get ridden, I will nnot show this year, etc. I am lucky I have them and a small farm. Life is good.

The job is rewarding and I love what I do. I started my PR career in a NYC PR frim, almost drove myself crazy.

Dale Area 1
Dec. 20, 2005, 11:37 AM
Yes I know I have typos in my post. One of those days as I have 3 people hovering at my office door. ARGGGGGGGGG!

CluesGirl
Dec. 20, 2005, 11:54 AM
Electrical Engineer here. I spend my days (and most evenings!) designing electrical systems for schools, hospitals, airport terminals, etc.

Unfortunately two years ago my other "hobby" took over and I found myself with two fixer-upper rental properties. This forced me to sell pony (only to turn around and 1/2-lease him back!) to be able to pay bills.

I make great money, but paying three mortgages (two 2-fams and our own house) will do anyone in! Once I have the "newest" acquisition (it's already 2.5 years old!) in good enough shape to turn a profit, I will be in the market for a new eventer!

slp2
Dec. 20, 2005, 01:05 PM
OK, for those of you who have a need to know the rest of the story of the "sex-industry" worker . . . . http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

. . . the horse was not that nice. He was ok. http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/winkgrin.gif And apparently, the "client" did not receive the expected monthly installments from the aforementioned recipient of the gift (I mean, you have to pay board every month, don't you?) Soooo, one day someone came and loaded the horse in a trailer and took him. When the woman showed up to ride "her" horse--he was no longer in the pasture. So then the police were called into the matter. Unfortunately, since the woman had no bill of sale or papers for the horse--the police didn't take the situation too seriously. But it did add a bit of drama to our otherwise tame group of boarders. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

She did get to keep the squeaky new saddle though! That was probably worth something.

RAyers
Dec. 20, 2005, 01:14 PM
slp2,

4 words that should never be in the same post on this BB, "sex-industry worker" and "squeaky," especially as pertaining to new tack.

Reed

slp2
Dec. 20, 2005, 01:29 PM
RAyers: Thanks for alerting me of that BB rule. Won't happen again.

But dang, that was the squeakiest new saddle I have ever heard . . . .

Aggie4Bar
Dec. 20, 2005, 01:30 PM
Originally posted by kcooper:
Aggie4Bar -- I'm with you. I used to be a trial lawyer; now I work for the government in an administrative law job. Better hours; worse money. I think you may have me mixed up with rebeginner whose post was above mine. She's a lawyer; I'm an engineer.

JER
Dec. 20, 2005, 01:33 PM
And apparently, the "client" did not receive the expected monthly installments from the aforementioned recipient of the gift (I mean, you have to pay board every month, don't you?) Soooo, one day someone came and loaded the horse in a trailer and took him.

Sounds like the client was 'regifting'.

flypony74
Dec. 20, 2005, 01:47 PM
I publish a Southeast regional horse magazine, Horse-Exchange.com. We print 20,000 copies per month and distribute through over 800 locations in nine states, plus publish the magazine online, so it keeps me busy. I also do some additonal graphic design and website work as time allows. Being self-employed is nice, due to the flexibility (it is easy to schedule lessons!), but I do work a lot of hours. If I'm not at my desk, I'm not making money! It is a fun job, but can be pretty nerve-wracking at deadline.

I doubt I'll make my millions with this type of work, as I try to put a lot of money back into the business to make it better and better, but it affords me to do what I want to do with the ponies. Hubby has a good state job which helps with the financial stability on the homefront.

Lori B
Dec. 20, 2005, 03:25 PM
Hi folks. Web developer, right now contracting for the local utility co. (yawn. I know.) The hours are reasonably horse friendly, and the money definitely is. But sitting at a desk is hell on anyone who feels like they're getting older and need more and more activity to get and stay marginally fit.

With the decent money, hope to finish getting out of debt, buy a place to live in the coming year, and after that, a horse of my own. (shhhh. Don't tell Topper!)

airbornegirl
Dec. 20, 2005, 05:55 PM
I'm in the Army. Don't reccomend it unless you have an unreal supply of energy. It is a good Army job, however if I were doing the same job as a civilian I would make triple the money. Hours would still be crap though. I am a helicopter mechanic. I do all the avionics, electronics, and weapon systems. Almost became a pilot, but I'm ready to finish my time and start a new career. I'm in college right now too. Just getting an associates in general studies until I get out, then I'll try and decide what I want to be when I grow up. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif
Still find time to ride though. The barn owner put in arena lights just for me!! I manage to ride two client horses and one of my own. My little stud colt will be ready to train soon too! (yikes! 4 horses, looks like sleep will have to continue to wait).

Lots of great jobs out there though! Don't try to figure it all out right away and don't feel worried if you can't decide on a major, some people spend years in college until they really know what they want to do. Hell some don't ever figure it out.... http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_confused.gif but just always make sure you like what you are doing for the moment or that what you're doing will ultimately allow you to enjoy what you like to do, otherwise you'll go crazy!

IFG
Dec. 20, 2005, 08:33 PM
Research professor. I am an epidemiologist. Right now I am part of a large team running a very large cancer screening trial. Because the grant is long-term, I am not under immediate pressure to get grants (to pay my salary), but I do need to publish papers.

Again, only do this if you love it. Despite the craziness, I really do. I like the overall research questions, I like the day-to-day work, I like working with a team of professionals to make a study happen, I like having to think on my feet and being constantly challenged. I do wish that I got more time to do my own research and publish the papers, but that day will come... I think.

Getting the Ph.D. is a long haul, but again, if it is a subject you like, it could actually be fun.

I only teach if I want to since I am 100% grant funded. I taught half a course this year. It was fun, but lots of work.

IFG
Dec. 20, 2005, 08:37 PM
I realized that I forgot to address the money and riding. Money is OK, but not great. My husband is a teacher, and we just gawk at all of the $$$ that some people spend.

I have a horse and get to ride 5-6 days a week. I do travel to conferences which can cut into riding time, but is also intellectually stimulating.

My kids ride, and we just got approval to put a barn on our property. Very small scale- about 1 acre, but it will mean that we can afford more than one horse. And I don't want to share! Once it is up, I can start looking at those CANTER cuties.

subk
Dec. 21, 2005, 06:40 PM
I was really going to let this ride but I keep thinking about it.


Originally posted by deltawave:
Ah yes, and be chattel to someone for the rest of your life, or at least until the pre-nup kicks in. An EXCELLENT thing to aspire to. If I had a daughter, that's what I'd tell her to do, for sure. Why bother with all that dreadful THINKING and STRIVING and WORKING? http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/dead.gif http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif Just let someone provide for you, don't worry your little head about that dreary career stuff.

My line of work is "chattel."

I don't make any money and live off my husband who has a very good job. I keep wondering where I've gone wrong...every two weeks a handsome sum of money is deposited into an account with my (and his) name. From which I manage living expenses for four, investments (in both of our names) and the occasional charitable donation.

In addition to the obvious "human development" side of raising kids and riding I have a very intense involvement in volunteer and pro bono work. I even use his name (as in I'm Mrs. htok instead of Ms. subk) unless I'm pissing off state legislators which I seem to do a lot lately and then it's nice to keep his name out of the papers. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

If you can find the right relationship I HIGHLY recommend the job of "chattel," not only for the fulfillment, but also for the positives for having a riding life. And YES, I can't wish anything better for my daughters! Of course, like me, I'll do everything in my power to make sure they have an education that will provide a backup source of security.

Bensmom
Dec. 21, 2005, 07:15 PM
For "chattel," you sure do a good job of aggravating politicians! http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/lol.gif http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif From what I can tell, you are pretty busy for mere "chattel" http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

I'm an attorney with state government. Tried private practice, hated billable hours and didn't like practice in general. Now I write appellate briefs and have lots more leave time, though not as much $ as I could make in private.

I'd like to eventually have my own property with barn and critters at home, but for now I lease a barn about 20 mins north of town and do most of the care myself. Sort of like having an extra job! I like it though, and I'd never be able to have my four in town if I had to pay board on them -- some months I can barely struggle along just paying their expenses!! http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/lol.gif

If I ever get to build my barn, I've had two local vets suggest, unsolicited, that I take in post-surgical rehabs. Sad that the vets feel I've spent so much time nursing my own that I would be more than qualified to charge $ for it!

But, I can't afford that option yet, so for now, I just juggle the job and my own horses.

Works out well, most of the time!

Libby

kileyc
Dec. 21, 2005, 07:34 PM
Well after 15 years of hating all my IT sales jobs... I can finally say I LOVE my job! I sell medical equipment in the operating room. Mostly brain, spine and retina surgery. Everyday I wake up wondering what kind of unbelievable experience I will have--sometimes gets very intense, but always exciting. I am mostly done by 3:30 or so, so I can ride and do my office work in the evenings. Skipping out on a friday for a horse trial... no problem!

Straight commission is scary, sometimes painful, but it motivates me to work hard!

JER
Dec. 21, 2005, 07:40 PM
I sell medical equipment in the operating room.

Um, maybe I'm hopelessly dense but this sentence conjures up all sorts of strange ideas.

I haven't had surgery in a long time but I was under the impression that they had the necessary materials in place before surgery and weren't shopping around or receiving sales reps while a patient was on the table.

Could you explain how this works so I'm not terrified of any future surgery? http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/winkgrin.gif

oskaar
Dec. 21, 2005, 09:56 PM
kileyc, who do you work for?

I work in marketing for one of the biggest orthopaedic companies in the country (hip and knee implants, trauma products, etc). I am in charge of all med ed, speakers, meetings, pr, etc for both North and South Carolina. The other part of my job is that I am in charge of computer navigated surgery, so I get to show doctors how coputers can help them do surgery more accurately. I have a 4-year degree in psych, and really this part of my job has little to do with knowing a lot about computer/tech stuff.

My job has a lot of fun times, and I really like getting to work in the OR and teaching the residents. I actually just quit my job, as I don't feel like it's enough of a challenge, but I'm looking at a few positions in the same field. Right now the panic has started to set in, because I actually have (had?) a recent good job with good pay, solid benefits, and a gas card!

JER, I can't speak for kileyc, but selling medical equipment is very different from selling a saddle from Dover or a shirt at the Gap. When a surgeon decides he will use our product, we have to go in and make sure all instruments are shipped in, all implants are in place, orders are called in, etc. And then the surgery starts. We have to instruct the surgical techs on how to assemble instruments and when to hand them to the surgeons. We aslo do lots of inservicing so that the OR staff knows what to expect and how things work.

There are lots of times when I am teaching residents about the surgery they are doing and the various techniques. A little frightening, when you think about it, but we are very well trained http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

deltawave
Dec. 22, 2005, 05:20 AM
"Marrying money" is a whole lot different than marrying someone who winds up making a good living. As a primary goal to support one's habits, the former stinks, IMO. Just wanted to clarify. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

kileyc
Dec. 22, 2005, 06:30 AM
Well, JER... no need to worry. What I do is visit with the surgeon before the surgery to show him/her a new piece of equipment. Sometimes it is a whole new way of doing a procedure (very scary for me) but most of the time it is just a new twist on something they have always use. Most surgeons want the rep in the OR in case they have questions, we can't touch ANYTHING, we can't scrub in, we can only offer verbal assistance.

Most surgeons are pretty cool and will teach as they go along, get you pretty up close to the action so you can see everything, it blows my mind!!!

Oskaar, I work for a small distributer out of Houston... we sell for some big dogs like V. Mueller neuro/spine as well as very small start ups with unbelievable technology, mostly instruments, but I sell some bio-tissue, headlights, tables--the whole ball of wax! It is scary training surgeons isn't it? Do you get to go into the OR?

Angelina
Dec. 22, 2005, 05:59 PM
Hi there, original chattel here. I married the man I love; there is no prenup. I have a post graduate degree that I used to it's fullest for several years. I now have a very comfortable lifestyle that I do not wish to trade. I do not have any daughters but if I did I would encourage them to work hard after getting all of their education. I am not a pudgy or short as previously described. I hope you appreciate your life as much as I cherish mine.

Pocket Pony
Dec. 22, 2005, 06:46 PM
I'd like to be a chattel! I've been trying, but actually feel guilty letting Mr. PP pay for anything horse related. So I got a part-time job to help cover my horse expenses and hopefully horse shows also. When I wasn't working, I spent a lot of time on farm chores, and I also volunteered at the local animal shelter. Now that the rains are here, I'm happy to have something non-farm related to occupy a few hours of my day.

Speakeasy
Dec. 23, 2005, 10:42 AM
Small Animal Veterinarian, I work 3.5 days a week, I had the time and money to ride until my baby came along. With the barn 45 minutes away and my time with my baby already cut into by work, my riding is on hold until she wants to ride also. I never thought anything would make that happen, but having a baby can sure change things!

pony4me
Dec. 24, 2005, 04:38 PM
Another accountant here. And occasional "project manager" for my company. Basically, I get stuck with anything they want done right. New computer systems, Sarbanes-Oxley compliance, pre-audit department reviews.
Great pay, flexible hours, and it's kind of fun.

~ Adult Pony Riders' Clique ~

Lucassb
Dec. 24, 2005, 06:25 PM
Oskaar, did the company you worked for start with S? Their navigation product is pretty awesome.

I also work in medical device marketing, and like it very much. Interesting work, smart people, and at the end of the day, it's nice to know that the work you do improves patient care. Plus, it pays pretty well... always a good thing when one has horses to support!! My current pet project is a new imaging plate for pediatric use - it creates x rays with better resolution, while allowing a substantial reduction in dose to the patient. Good stuff.

oskaar
Dec. 28, 2005, 05:29 PM
Lucassb, I wish! It's starts with a Z actually (and an M too I suppose).

KileyC--going in to surgery is the fun part! My dad's a surgeon and my mom's a nurse, so I pretty much grew up inside a hospital. No icky white wall feelings here!

Hey Mickey, I got some good advice this past weekend from a friend of my dad's that I thought I'd pass on. He started off by saying that setting goals is the only way to get things done, and you have to set little goals to reach your big goals (well, duh). The hard part is getting started.

So, the first step is trying to figure out what you want and need in life. Do you want to drive nice cars and live in a big house with a barn full of fancy horses? Or are you content with an occasional show when you've got the money and a good friend to trim your hair? Will you have student loans to deal with when you're done with school? There's no right or wrong answer here, you just need to decide what you want. Then you can narrow down your job search and figure out what salary you need to get from your work.

It sounds totally shallow, I know, but when you think about it you really do need a starting point on your life search. Then you can start thinking about what you like to do. For instance, I really like teaching. I also like to travel a lot, go out with friends, buy the occasional pair of nice shoes. My job has many aspects to it, but one of them is medical education. I also teach the occasional riding lesson on the side. I make enough money to live comfortably, take care of my horse, and do the things I like to do. Now, I'm also single and I don't have any kids, so I have very little financial responsibility.

Because you're just starting school, you're in a similar spot, and you're very lucky. You don't have to try and build on what you've already accomplished. You can go anywhere and do anything you want. I think it's sort of liberating in a scary kind of way.

Anyway, I just wanted to add that. Good luck with your search!

E

hookedoneventing
Dec. 28, 2005, 05:48 PM
Clinical Research Coordinator here, but curious minds would love to hear more about your positions Oskaar and Lucassb.

Hey Mickey
Dec. 28, 2005, 06:14 PM
thanks! i do need to sit down and ask my self that kind of stuff, but not now cause i ate to much and im tired, lol

Mudroom
Dec. 28, 2005, 06:17 PM
General manager of a manufacturing company, we make automotive related textiles, primarily filter media. It is Japanese owned, fortunately my current Japanese boss used to ride so he is generally supportive of my habit and my schedule constraints.

I travel some and try to schedule it around competitions etc. The week after a HT is generally a road week for me. When I went to ATC's I even tacked a customer visit on the end of the trip!

physical.energy
Dec. 28, 2005, 06:19 PM
Just finished my masters in Oriental medicine and am studying for my national and state board. So if all goes as planned (ie. I pass the bloody tests) after march I will be a licensed acupuncturist.

Regal Grace
Dec. 29, 2005, 07:36 AM
Paralegal for NYC law firm. Pay is decent for the NYC area but cost of living is tough when combined with owning a horse in the NY Metro area. I work a lot more O/T as a result and it's virtually put a lock down on my traveling to Eurpoe and throughout the states. Also I don't get to ride as much. That being said I have no regrets taking on my TB. It certainly was a lifestyle change but I get a tremendous amount of satisfaction knowing I gave her a second chance instead of going to auction in New Holland, PA as well as proving the naysayers wrong.

DunBar
Dec. 29, 2005, 08:09 AM
I start my new job on Jan. 16th and I'll be in a call center environment, with a headset seemingly fixed to my head! I used to work in a call center for a multi-billion dollar company before getting laid off due to outsourcing. The work can be a bit repetitive but the hours are flexible and they get better as you gain seniority. Right now I'm going to have Fridays and Sundays off. The longer I'm there I should eventually move up to weekends off.

Since I'm not working yet I currently spend my time making halters and whatnot for model horses. I'm a big kid at heart! http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/yes.gif

arabhorse2
Dec. 29, 2005, 08:17 AM
Accountant. Very lucrative career, if it interests you.

Accounting is absolutely NOT for people who find desk jobs boring, or the idea of chasing down unbalanced entries horrifying.

I found that I had a knack for accounting, and wisely went to school for it. That God-given skill has allowed me to buy a house and keep two horses at home with me, as well as other assorted critters.

What I really wanted to do was be a fiction writer, but my more sane, practical side won out. I have some very bad habits that I can't seem to break: eating and living indoors! http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/lol.gif

tbeventer21
Dec. 29, 2005, 08:19 AM
I work for a performing arts theatre, and have a steady schedule and most weekends off. I am the school show coordinator so my main job is to organize with the local schools and get them to take field trips to the theatre. I am also currently learning grantwriting and after February take on the role of grantwriter for the theatre.

rttigrl
Dec. 29, 2005, 08:26 AM
I do the same thing that Reynard Ridge used to do--Product/Brand management for a consumer goods company. I did get my MBA first (but that was really no hardship---very fun degree). As RR metioned, the $$ is great, the hours can be overwhelming, but it's pretty interesting, and working for a beauty company I get to do some pretty glamorous stuff.

I had plenty of time to ride when I boarded my boy at a swanky barn with an indoor--now that I have my own farm (decidedly non-swanky), the riding is dicey in the winter, as it's dark and cold when I leave the house and dark and cold when I get home!

Great job for anyone trying to balance their analytical side with their creative side, but I think I may jump ship in the next few years and do like HoneyDoozy--I love working on houses!

Dr Al
Dec. 29, 2005, 11:05 AM
Veterinarian.. I think I'd like to do that about 6 months out of the year and then be chattel the other six. I think Angelina has it right.

Elaine Jadrich
Dec. 29, 2005, 11:51 AM
Great topic! I've been doing Marketing in the high-tech industry for almost 10 years (directly out of college - majored in Business w/ Marketing concentration)

It's a GREAT career. Pays very well, is interesting, fun - but is definitley hard work and can be long hours, lots of travel (tradeshows, seminars, etc) It's a bit high-techie (was in Product Marketing for a software development company) but that's okay.

I'm currently at networking company (Cisco competitor) with a HORSIE BOSS and her boss is ALSO a HORSE PERSON, so it's wonderful. Very flexible hours (work from home at least one day/week) and not too much travel at this job. LOVE IT!!!!

I really want to get my MBA - maybe a 2006 goal?

ottb dressage
Dec. 29, 2005, 12:55 PM
i teach english as a second language grades pre-k through 4. i teach at two schools on in the am and one inthe afternoon. i enjoy the kids and the holidays and summer vacations. horses are a maneagable hobby with this career, but you have to budget very wisely as the pay scale is not great. however, no overtime, no business traveling, no weekends. so you make your choices. i enjoy working with the children, another must for this career.

drjuliea
Dec. 29, 2005, 02:23 PM
I, too, am a veterinarian. My schedule is weird enough that I'm able to ride 5-6 days a week, and I save money doing a lot of my own vet work even though I do small animals, mostly surgery, at a great hospital in Alexandria, VA. For the serious equine vet stuff, I go to a equine vet!
Love the little critters, tho!

Colorado Eventer
Jan. 5, 2006, 02:07 PM
I multi-task....Real Estate Investments, bascially advise banks on houses the foreclose, best way to market them, sell them, price them, etc....Been doing it 13 years now and love it, flexible schedule, every day is different, downside...living on commission. I also just graduated from CSU in December as an equine homeoathic vet, it's a bit "sticky" here in the US, as there is no official regulation regarding homeopathic meds and horses, but I am confident we'll get there. On the side, I am an NRHA judge (reining horses) and that also allows me to indulge my new hobby of eventing.

Jen

TheJenners
Jan. 5, 2006, 03:12 PM
I'm an editor for two regional scuba diving magazines, and have begun some freelance writing for a regional horse magazine (Horses Inc, in the PNW). I also own a small boarding facility, but we all know that isn't a "living" by any means http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

ThreeHorseNight
Jan. 5, 2006, 03:53 PM
Originally posted by RAyers:

My other advice is to get as much education as you can. It gives you so MANY more options in life and nobody can ever take education away from you.

The other thing to realize, it is not what you know in life but what you do that makes a difference. All of my degrees are in Aerospace Engineering. I was literally a rocket scientist for the defense department. I can calulate interplanetry orbits and understand the thermodynamics of atmospheres and oceans, however my dissertation is on how porous materials interact with facial bone during craniofacial reconstruction. I am not a trained medical professional but that is where my career is. So, please realize that just because you go to school for one thing does not mean you have to do that for the rest of your life. You can always change.

Reed

Reed has given some really excellent advice (advice that I wished I'd received before I started college). I wonder how many people are actually doing the job they thought they'd be doing when they started college? You need to try to figure out what you want to do, and get that education, but don't stress if life takes you down a different path.

I started out as an engineering major and it just wasn't my thing. I don't even know that I wanted to be an engineer, but when I was 16 they told me to pick a career. Duh. How many 16-year-old *really* know what they want to do with their lives? I was good at math and science, they wanted to get more girls into the "technical" fields, and I had good enough grades to get into a good engineering school.

After giving up on engineering, I became a technical writing major, and eventually worked as a technical writer and manager for software companies. The pay was good, the working conditions in some ways were good (I had some flexibility in my hours and quite a bit of freedom in how I did my work), but there were a lot of hours. I worked a lot of nights and weekends when a project was "hot." I could afford to keep a horse and I usually had time to squeeze in a ride, but had I been competing or riding at a high level, I wouldn't have been able to keep up with that.

Now, to show you how life takes a turn and surprises the heck out of you.....I no longer work in the high tech industry, and am in the process of building a small boarding barn, which will not make any money, which will cause me stress and angst and keep me awake at night, and make me wonder if I wouldn't be better off working 60 hours a week in the high tech industry! But I've got a chance to pursue my horsey dream, and I'm going to do it.

If you had told me, when I graduated from college over 20 years ago, that I'd live on 85 acres of land, own horses, build a barn with an indoor arena, and spend more time in breeches than in business suits, I would have told you you were insane! I didn't even really start riding and own a horse until I was an adult. Life throws you lots of curves, and I'm fortunate to have been thrown a good curve!

This is a great topic by the way -- it's really interesting to see what other people do, and when I was in high school I would have really appreciated hearing about all these different careers that I knew nothing about. As a high school or college kid, how could you possibly imagine the thousands of different jobs out there?

Good luck with whatever you decide.

justjay
Jan. 5, 2006, 04:21 PM
heyy
im in high school and im really interested in becoming a business consultant- the kind that goes into failing businesses and makes reports and helps them get back on track again. i think it would be fun to do small businesses.
i would love to own a small private boarding barn but ive got to make money first i guess

Mozart
Jan. 5, 2006, 05:06 PM
I am an attorney, although isse@ssl doesn't believe me due to my atrocious grammatical skills. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif
I must say that the upside of law is that it does pay decently, the downside is that if you are in private practise you will have precious little time for your horse/s. I work for a government department and have recently changed from a very time consuming type of law to one that is less so. I also work 4 days a week so that I can do errands and "stuff" on that day and leave my weekends for my family.

FlightCheck
Jan. 5, 2006, 06:27 PM
Event announcer.

Upsides: You go to all the events!
Downsides: You go to all the events and ANNOUNCE, not ride.

Seriously, though, I love my job. I fly all over the country, meet tons of interesting people, and if I don't enjoy a particular place or person, I just don't work for them next year.

For "the season" (Jan-May 1) and fall (Aug-Nov), I can only count on being home Mon, Tues, and Wednesdays each week. During the summer I'm home a bit more, although This Year not as much. It works for Mr. FlightCheck and I because we have no children.

Babs
Jan. 5, 2006, 06:36 PM
Interesting thread, I have read all seven pages. After many years as a graphic designer, taking some time off to raise up some kids, I am getting ready to get back into the job market again, in a very different town, where my previous career really won't do much for me.

Have taken several science classes recently and am lovin' it. No, not interested in going back for another degree, but thinking I would love to veer in the direction of natural sciences, somehow. Oh, and, make a living at it, too.

TBJumper514
Jan. 6, 2006, 01:18 AM
Wow, some of you have some really interesting jobs. I am currently in school doing my pre-Pharmacy coursework...was supposed to apply to pharmacy school this past Fall, but Hurricane Katrina kinda ruined that! So, I will be applying this fall.

So, currently I am a vet tech at a small animal specialty (surgery & dermatology) and emergency clinic. I work nights right now (4-12 hour shifts per week), which is nice because it is pretty quiet and peaceful at night, and I have 3 days off to do what I want.

AmityBee
Jan. 6, 2006, 01:29 AM
Went back to school a couple of years ago to studie communications. Would LOVE to do PR/communication for the FN (national equestrian federation in Germany). Already did an internship with them and loved it. Now I just need to keep the contact till I'm done with school http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

I work as a lab tech in a research lab to pay for food an shelter... ...actually no! My parents pay food and shelter (god bless them) *I* work for food and shelter of my horse !

Dale Area 1
Jan. 6, 2006, 10:29 AM
ThreeHorseNight,

Excellent post! I moved from NYC to MA in 1990. Big city kid in a condo with a view. Always had a love of horses, but knew I could never afford or have one in NYC. Life does take interesting turns. My job was relocated to MA, cost of living was cheaper and I decided to get myself a horse and ride. Got one on my 30th birthday.

If you saw me 15 years ago in NYC, working at a Madison Ave PR firm you would http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/lol.gif Now I am a farm owner, muck stalls, plant pasture and even grew pumpkins in my manure pile, drive a Kubota and Dodge Truck. Goodbye to the 2 seater sports car and parking garage bill. When my family and friends from NYC visit once in a great while, they just stare with their mouths wide open. Be careful a bird or critter may fly in http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Another note, when I was in college I was pre-law, plannig to go to law school then to the big paying job. After 2 years of pre-law, I just could not do it. I switched to PR and found my true calling. Been doing PR for 20 years, I also do a ton Media training for DoD and now thinking, maybe I should go into teaching. I truly enjoy it also.

My point, life will always change and be prepared for change. Do what makes you happy and not for the money. Money will follow and you find a way to make it work. If you have money for horses, do you need money for anything else?

Great thread -- very interesting.

riveau
Jan. 6, 2006, 12:49 PM
I started out a vet. tech. and hated it, so back to school I went. Now I'm a pharmacist in a psych. hospital and-- guess what?---I actually like my job. The pay is sufficient enough to support myself and my equine addiction, and my horses live 1 mile from work (I've been known to redeem my comp-time by taking a mid-day ride).

Pharmacy is a decent career depending on where one practices. Hospital and long-term care are much more tolerable than retail. Retail requires 12 or more hours on your feet without breaks (I have a fabulous collection of varicose veins in my legs to remind me of an 8 year stint in a chain pharmacy).

Invested1
Jan. 6, 2006, 12:53 PM
I work for a Homeland Security think tank. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

momx3notime
Jan. 6, 2006, 01:22 PM
Army wife of an invisible husband who has been in Iraq for a year and will be returning to our house in NC while I stay here in MD with the kids (5,7,10) and horses. Who wants to trade?

TrotTrotPumpkn
Jan. 6, 2006, 01:51 PM
Estate planning attorney. Also a solo practitioner, which comes with it's own set of ups and downs.

But my not-so-secret desire is to become a fiction writer (currently working on a "romance"). I love happy endings. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

ThreeHorseNight
Jan. 6, 2006, 05:46 PM
Originally posted by Dale Area 1:
When my family and friends from NYC visit once in a great while, they just stare with their mouths wide open. Be careful a bird or critter may fly in http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Gee Dale, maybe we need a support group for children of the city who now live in rural areas that scare the be-jesus out of their relatives? Bear in mind that I live only 5 miles from the interstate, 7 miles from a town, and 30 miles from Denver, so we're not exactly talking Siberia here. But I grew up in the suburbs of New York City and then lived in the suburbs of Boston, so this is quite the change. When my husband's relatives and mine come visit, and you can see them thinking, "Why the h*ll would anybody want to live here????"

Hey, we're happy. When we're too old and frail to do the horse thing or live out here, we can move back to civilization, drive on paved roads, and have that great sports car. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

One Star
Jan. 6, 2006, 07:06 PM
Private tutor for middle- and high-school students on the HITS Ocala circuit and for Florida eventers down here training for the winter.

But I think momx3notime has one of the most difficult jobs I can imagine. May God keep him safe and return him to our shores.

hb
Jan. 6, 2006, 07:38 PM
Insurance Underwriter

Not thrilling, but it pays well enough that I was able to buy my dream farmette last year. I can work from home about 10% - 20% of the time. That means this time of year I can ride while it's light out and work on reports on my laptop after dark.

I have a boss who wholeheartedly believes that "happy employees are productive employees". Combine this with the fact that 80% of our policies renew January 1 so summer is my least busy time and I get a flexible schedule for shows and clinics.

Of course, this makes me work extra hard to avoid the guilt feelings.

azeventer
Jan. 6, 2006, 07:39 PM
Physician Assistant in Cardiovascular surgery.

Risk-Averse Rider
Jan. 6, 2006, 08:28 PM
WebGoddess ;-)

(Actually, I'm the corporate webmaster for a training & performance improvement company. I work (from home) for the VP of Marketing & Communications, can pretty much set my own hours, get to do all manner of interesting things, and get to learn all sorts of new things. I loff my job. I loff my boss.)

Dale Area 1
Jan. 7, 2006, 01:56 PM
ThreeHorseNight,

WOW! I live 60 miles outside Boston, 4 miles to my little town, 3 miles to a highway that leads to 146 and Mass pike. I love it! If I could get away with the commute to Boston or find a job, I would go further out.

When I left NYC and moved to Boston, the NYC folks act like I moved to China. "Oh that is a long drive --3 1/2hours. You may get snow. What if we see a deer? Is there a Starbucks?"

I meet a "county guy" in Virgina, works for the DoD, we were at some Executive Development course. Anyway, he hit it right on the nose when we were talking about how much we like living in rural areas. "Once you taste it, you can never go back." AMEN!

I not leaving or moving back to the city. Got a job offer with a promotion to DC, could live in VA, but why? Promotion brings more time and responsibility in the office, late hours, stress. My boss keeps asking me to come every 3 months. "Not that I pushing you." Decided I am staying in MA.

BTW -- when I am old, I am going to be that crazy lady in the barn, feeding the horses with the dogs and cats running around. Also, I purchased long term care health insurance, no one is putting me away.

Send me a PT, we can excahnge some good stories about former city living and visiting relatives http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

SR Rider
Jan. 7, 2006, 03:32 PM
real estate works well with the flexibility I need to get to the barn and go to shows

Simbalism
Jan. 8, 2006, 07:24 AM
I'm a registered nurse. Usually a decent paying job with decent benefits/vacation time. I have been lucky in my job that I have every weekend off. The plus side of nursing(at least where I work is disposable stuff that is not used up on patients. My horse doesn't care if a cast padding is clean rather than sterile or disposable scissors aren't surgically sharp.These things definitely save me some money.

pharmygirl
Jan. 8, 2006, 05:23 PM
Dale Area 1, I sent you a PT!

Hidden
Jan. 9, 2006, 06:50 AM
Finance with a large corporation... Don't get fooled about accounting/finance hours, they can be a bear. Especially at the end of the quarter/year etc. I make time for my horse.. especially in the winter when I have to go ride a lunch because my barn doesn't really have lights in the rings so I can't ride after work. I work from home since my job is mostly email and computer oriented, that gives me the lee way to ride.

Xctrygirl
Jan. 9, 2006, 09:44 AM
Wow such a great variety of careers here!! I agree with the nursing, teaching accounting being very lucrative and solid careers. However, I am a horsey chic!! Employed as a full time assistant trainer and ex. rider at the track. Benefits, I work 6 hours a day roughly and make more than the former office jobs I had, and 'work' is riding. Drawbacks, no time to event!! But then again I have included my horse in this journey and he is steeplechasing as a pre-career before he aims for events later in life.

I have to say that office jobs draw a lot of benefits and outdoor or horsey jobs can really rely on a person's dedication to being there and doing the job despite obstacles such as low pay, bad weather and just bad days.

For Mickey I'll add, I have done so many various jobs, offices and horses.

* Riding Instructor
* Intern at Radio Station
* Intern at TV station
* Eventing Correspondent for Internet site
* Office Manager at Insurance Office
* Subway Sandwich Artist
* Golf Course Cart girl
* Prep Cook
* Administrative assistant
* Pro Shop sales assoc
* Tack Shop sales Assoc
* Tack Shop Inventory Specialist
* Substitue teacher Middle School
* Barn manager
* Groom (Event, race, fox hunt, steeplechase, H/J)
* Waitress
* Writer
* Camp Counselor
* Working Student
* Catering

I have 6 yrs of college under my belt, but no degree. For me the experiences of my life have far outweighed the possibility of higher incomes. You however have to make your own choices for you.

~Emily

Dale Area 1
Jan. 9, 2006, 02:21 PM
pharmygirl,

Got your PT and replied http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif Send me a note. Dale

hb
Jan. 9, 2006, 04:23 PM
Dale Area 1, how long (time-wise) is your commute to Boston?

Samrdr1
Jan. 9, 2006, 05:21 PM
Mob Assassin

fullmoon fever
Jan. 9, 2006, 05:31 PM
Originally posted by Mozart:
I am an attorney, although isse@ssl doesn't believe me due to my atrocious grammatical skills. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

As a former executive legal assistant, I can safely say that is what I got paid for...making it all sensible and pretty. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

I've been working the past 12-13 years evenings at law firms, but just gave my notice.

I'm going back to school in two weeks http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif to become a medical lab tech. (I may have posted this before, but I'm not going back to look.)

CookiePony
Jan. 9, 2006, 05:47 PM
OK-- I'll chime in. I'm a historian/professor of African-American Studies. One major benefit-- flexible work schedule, especially in the late spring/summer for the season!

Dale Area 1
Jan. 9, 2006, 05:48 PM
hb,

I leave at 5:15 - 5:30 am, so I get up at 4:30 am, that way traffic is not that bad, so going in, I can make it in an hour, hour and 15 minutes. I try to get to the office by 6:30 - 7:00am. That way I can leave at 3:00 - 3:45 if there is no crisis, but I do have a blackberry and cell phone so they can reach me. I get home by 5:00pm. The evening commute is longer. Miles I think about 60, but I take back roads to 495, then to the Mass pike.

Since the horses are home, I can feed, then get on, by 5:45, 6:00pm. PT if you need more information.

Some days the commute is great, others it stinks. The price you pay. I am lucky, my office starts early, rarely have meetings scheduled after 4:00. Must be the Military http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif Works for me.

WinInk
Jan. 9, 2006, 06:28 PM
I am a freelance writer which is great for crafting your own time, but there are lots of very odd hours in the mix. Whatever you decided, NEVER do it for the money, do it because you love it. Then you'll find a way to make things work out. It's all good.

INoMrEd
Jan. 10, 2006, 02:31 PM
I've been in Human Resources now for 17 years. I’ve been Director of Human Resources in the past, although right now I’m working as a Human Resources Manager.

I currently work for a very popular beauty products company that has been in the news lately because of objections to a sign in Tennessee advertising our products as the company name contains the word “sexy.” I’ll be here until we move to our farm in Georgetown Kentucky in 2007. The countdown to our move has started and my hubby and I can hardly wait to get the h$%* out of Los Angeles.

The job is good because the people I work with are great but my boss redefines the term jerk with his personality or lack thereof. Sorry to say he is a horseperson, too. When I interviewed for this position, my heart sank when he told me the hours where 9 to 6, but I make do by riding my horse Sir Knowzalot a.k.a. Knowz early in the morning. Most days I’m up and riding by 6:45 AM at the local college where I board.

For the last two years we put our eventing fun on hold so I could go back to school and finish my bachelors degree in business/H.R. Now that I’m finished with that I’ll be calling Gina my eventing coach and scheduling some lessons, so I can once again pray to our Lady of Perpetual Novice!

EventingJ
Jan. 10, 2006, 04:19 PM
another med tech here. I find my job stressful at times if a machine goes down and doctors and nurses are calling screaming for results :\ not to mention the random residents calling to ask the oddest questions about abstract tests that I have NO clue about. You need to be able to multi task, trouble shoot, and have great attention to detail.

I have to work every other weekend, I have 6 paid holidays which I have to work 2 of and 2 weeks of vacation. I chose to work 3rd shift for $2.50 extra an hour, i sleep during the day and ride in the late afternoon. The pay is decent, I have a lot of options to go to if i decide to leave and I have time for riding!

There are many different areas too, Blood Bank, Chemistry, Hematology, Microbiology, Histology, being involoved with clinical trials, etc. Definatly not boring in the least. I'm a generalist in a stat hospital lab and do BB, Chem, Hemo, and a little Micro

ThreeHorseNight
Jan. 10, 2006, 08:46 PM
Originally posted by Dale Area 1:
ThreeHorseNight,

Send me a PT, we can excahnge some good stories about former city living and visiting relatives http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

PT sent!

Meredith Clark
Jan. 10, 2006, 09:22 PM
Oh! I just got a job! I am the assistant to the maryland 4-H horse program director! How fun does that sound? heheh

Basically i help Dr Amy Burk run the horse programs for the 4-H kiddies.

Horses+kids+getting paid= http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Judi
Jan. 10, 2006, 11:00 PM
Originally posted by Reynard Ridge:
Before I retired to raise chickens and children, I was in corporate marketing working as a Product Manager. I do not have the MBA that is generally a prerequiste for this type of work, but I did have (a) a lot of chutzbah and (b) a social science Masters from a very fancy schmancy school.

In my past, I was brand manager for Milk-Bone, A.1. Steak Sauce and Grey Poupon to name a few that you would recognize.

The jobs paid a ton of money and I loved, loved, loved what I did for a living. I worked ridiculous, endless hours, travelled a lot and loved all of that, too.

I made time for the horses. And eventually to get married and have two children. At which time I collapsed in a heap, quit my job and took up raising chickens. I got lucky in the husband department, though. And did not have children until late 30s early 40s.

My point is that you can LOVE what you do, make a lot of money AND still have time for horses. Although, from my experience, once I added husband and children, well, something had to give http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif.

Good luck, young ones! The world is a very cool place and you can make it work! And while I think the accounting advice is very good - I would only recommend it if you at the very least LIKE accounting. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Oh my gosh RR. I work in the Corp. Marketing World. I'm the Sr. Group Director/Creative Director for a major ISP. And I'll take a Product Manager with good common sense over an MBA any day. As a matter of fact.. I find the MBA to be a bit over rated as it seems to give those who have earned one a sense of entitlement. And as we both know... experience is key in the Marketing World. You don't just come out of college with the Strategy, Vision and ability to create good marketing tactics for new products. Oh.. and could they teach a course in school on how to write a freakin creative brief. You wouldn't believe how many MBA's can't write a decent brief now a days.

Okay.. done with the vent... I bet I would have loved working with you... and I bet you write one hell of an entertaining creative brief. (Your writing skills are superb)

: )

judi

Fence2Fence
Jan. 11, 2006, 07:06 AM
I push paper...lots and lots of paper.

I negotiate research grants and contracts and deal with the assorted heart ache that involves. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Dale Area 1
Jan. 11, 2006, 09:06 AM
ThreeHorseNight and Pharmygirl,

Got the PT's and replied http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif Also gave you both my e-mail - write back. Dale

AKM
Jan. 11, 2006, 12:04 PM
Just in case anyone really wants to know, the term most commonly used in scholarly circles is "commercial sex worker".

Susie Q
Feb. 4, 2006, 03:41 PM
Originally posted by Colorado Eventer:
I multi-task....Real Estate Investments, bascially advise banks on houses the foreclose, best way to market them, sell them, price them, etc....Been doing it 13 years now and love it, flexible schedule, every day is different, downside...living on commission. I also just graduated from CSU in December as an equine homeoathic vet, it's a bit "sticky" here in the US, as there is no official regulation regarding homeopathic meds and horses, but I am confident we'll get there. On the side, I am an NRHA judge (reining horses) and that also allows me to indulge my new hobby of eventing.

Jen

Hi!

Can you tell me about your homeopathic vet program?? That sounds great? I'm in school (in Canada) to become a homeopathic physician, I would love to hear more!

I'm not quite sure how the whole PM thing works, but if you would like to email me, my address is: abamlett@uoguelph.ca

Thanks!

Oh, and as for what I do for a living: I'm finishing up my university degree, I'm going to school to become a homeopathic doctor, I'm an Independent Beauty Consultant with Mary Kay, I tutor math, I do chores at the barn where I keep my horses, and in the summer I manage a busy ice cream shop! Needless to say, I'm busy, but I love it! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

amandasnowy
Feb. 4, 2006, 05:58 PM
Just found this thread - what a neat idea =)

I'm a full-time grad student getting my MBA.

Before this little sidetrack I was in sales & marketing for a medical software company, followed by sales & marketing for a radiology firm. (I was tempted to abbreviate that as S&M, but decided against it given the thread above!)

They were both fun, interesting jobs, and paid pretty well - I was a little bummed to quit to go back to school!

I found that whether the hours allowed for riding depended a great deal on company culture & my boss' attitude towards work-life balance. Sales was nice because I did a lot of my own scheduling, but I also travelled quite a bit.

When I finish in August I'll either look for a position in biotech/medical device marketing, or go on for a PhD in marketing & organizational behavior.

zagafi
Feb. 4, 2006, 07:20 PM
I'm a Goddess. People worship me. Then I wake up. http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/lol.gif

When I'm awake I'm a technology specialist for a school district (used to teach HS English--now I train teachers to use technology and fix the stuff when it breaks).

kookicat
Feb. 5, 2006, 09:53 AM
I work with horses for a living. Starting babies, re-training problem horses, just riding client's horses to keep them fit.

I also run a small livery yard as an off shoot of my business.

Do ya all hate me now? http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif :P

flyingtails
May. 7, 2007, 04:20 PM
I'm a professional bartender (for now). In the fall I'm going back to school for communications and eventually my MBA.

I work in a very busy, upscale Italian restaurant tending bar. Its wonderful and fun most of the time, but can be very very stressful. You always have to be nice, even when you shoulnd have to be in the "real" world, or even when the problem is not your fault at all. The pay is decent. I have one horse, board her at a very mom n pop barn but in a pretty good location.

Because I mostly work nights, I can ride/train during the day. And while most restuarants offer few benefits unless you're at a big corporate chain or part of a hotel) I do have HEALTH INS. Another must for riding. And I'm able to request off for weekends when I compete

My advice if you go this route. Its hard as life career, hours and hour on your feet, carrying cases of wine up and down stairs, and working evenings and lots of weekends, most holidays starts to take a toll on your body and family, unless they're also in the biz. But you take advantage of the connections you make and use them to network once you are out. Some of my regulars will come out on occasion to watch my events and are always asking if I have any new pictures. I often get tickets to events an invitations to great parties. You will learn basic accounting, inventory, lots of diplomacy and people skills.

Overall, try to get a great education. The more you know, the more valuable you become to employers. When they need you, they tend to offers flexible schedules or work at home programs. Having a flexible employer/job is key to being able to event. So do everything you can to be attain that "we really want you and can be very felxible" status as an employee. Try to find something you are passionate about, and you can't help but succeed. Best of luck

IfWishesWereHorses
May. 7, 2007, 07:34 PM
great thread...

This is quite old...so I'd be interested to hear from some of the people at the beginning of it, who were still studying etc. What are you doing now?

Love to hear ;-)

Me, Im self employed ;-)

Lori T
May. 7, 2007, 07:40 PM
I started my own business:
www.stallcalls.piczo.com
I love the flexibility!

drjuliea
May. 7, 2007, 07:53 PM
I'm a veterinarian, small animal surgery and ER, and my schedule is weird enough that I can ride 5-6 days a week. I also work one day a week for an equine surgeon, and I work several events in Area II including the training 3 day. I did mixed practice (dog, cat, horse, cow, pig, llama, etc) for 2 years when I first got out of school, but horrible hours and bad pay and a crazy boss is not a good equation. I switched over to all SA, the hospital I'm at ROCKS, and I don't have to pull calves at 2 am in Feburary!

I was a certified athletic training dealing with sports injuries before I had an epiphany at 28 and went back to school for my DVM. Also a very cool job, worked at a university with all of their sports teams and had the best seat in the house (the sidelines), but really long hours and not great pay but summers off!

cllane1
May. 7, 2007, 08:04 PM
I'm a publicist at a small publishing company specializing in beautifully illustrated lifestyle books: lots of interior design books, nice cookbooks, some children's titles, etc. No horse books yet, but I'm working on it!

bornfreenowexpensive
May. 7, 2007, 08:13 PM
wow...old thread...I made partner at my law firm since this started. Now working MORE hours...but getting paid a whole lot more....and of course promptly bought another horse that I don't have time for;) Now back to work so I can get home before midnight!!!

HiJumpGrrl
May. 7, 2007, 08:27 PM
i finished medical school and started my residency in psychiatry. there is a not-so-surprising number of horse people to be met in my field ;)! I am 7 weeks and 4 days away from completing year #1 of what will likely be 5 (as I plan to tack a fellowship in the child/adolsecent specialty on the end). Dear God, the end of training cannot come fast enough...

having said that, I've had time to do 2 events so far this spring, and restart a young horse off the track (with some help). Didnt get down to see Denny as often as I would have liked this winter, but you win some and lose some. I have a good life, a great dog, and a wonderful very tolerant husband.

tbgurl
May. 7, 2007, 08:37 PM
I don't remember if I originally responded to this thread or not, but I'll give an update. :)

I went to college and got my BS in Animal Science (Equine Industry option). I had fully planned to become a professional rider/trainer. Then I realized that I don't want to kill my passion by turning it into work. So instead I got pregnant. :lol:

I'm working for one of the local school districts as a part time instructional assistant. I work about 20 hours per week, and split that time between helping kids use the computers at the student computer lab at the public library and setting up various other programs for the students. For example, right now we just finished setting up a volunteer tutoring program where high school students can volunteer to tutor on certain days of the week in exchange for community service hours (required for graduation) and kids can come in and get tutoring from these high school students for free. We're still working out the kinks in the program but so far it's been pretty successful and rewarding to set up!

I really like this job, however it won't be ideal when the baby comes along in December (late nights at the computer lab). So I'll probably go into substitute teaching after the baby is born and then get into a credential program next fall to become a HS biology teacher.

Right now I would have tons of time to ride if morning sickness wasn't knocking me on my butt! I haven't ridden in about 3 or 4 weeks. I haven't evented in many years (first college, and then lack of money). I suspect being a mommy will leave me even less time to ride but I've accepted that fact. :)

DH was a Marine but now is a civilian diesel mechanic for a cement company. He makes less than he did in the military and works 10-12 hours days and every other Saturday. But after two stints in Iraq, he's happy not to have to go overseas anymore.

Neither of our jobs is conducive to owning and competing event horses, so don't take this as a suggestion! :D

stbgirl
May. 7, 2007, 09:03 PM
Im a riding instructor/ trainer.

I ABSOLUTELY love it in the warm weather and just regular love it in the winter. I enjoy most of it right to throwing hay and mucking stalls. My favorite is working with problem horses and getting the most out of them. I have a few sales horses at a time too. Also help with my BF's STB racing barn.

Pay can be iffy, body can hurt and unless you're digging in your pocket for them benefits are nonexistent. BUt I'd rather do this than anything.

ToucheToujour
May. 7, 2007, 09:14 PM
I am a student. Thus, negative income.

Sonic Boom
May. 7, 2007, 10:05 PM
I'm in IT, network/security engineering. I love it - it is totally not what I went to school for (my BA is in Criminal Justice), but once I discovered it, I couldn't get enough.

The pay has been absolutely excellent, especially for my age/experience, and it does allow me time to ride 4-6 days/week. I am on call 24/7 so that gets a bit old (as does toting around two blackberries and my regular cell), but as a single 20-something, it provides a very comfortable living for my horse and me. As someone with a lot of student debt, that's also pretty great.

I do highly recommend IT if you're into technology. Particularly routing/switching/firewalls/general security. Security is especially a great place to be right now. Alas, not a lot of colleges provide very much training in this - for me it was all self-taught after hours, and on the job experience with some very kind and tolerant mentors. ;)

I work a LOT, and take phone calls at very strange hours, but if you can put up with that, you can find time with your horse, it's a challenging career, and you make a good living too.

KatieE
May. 7, 2007, 10:45 PM
Hey Chelsie,
you mentioned somewhere in around page 4 or 5 that you were thinking about being a chiropractor?? I am about half way through my chiro degree right now and I am loving it, its very challenging, but I know it will be an extremley rewarding career... pm me if you want to talk further. Another interesting angle- with more specialized training you are able (under vet referral and in certain states) to treat horses too : ) Good luck!

gr8fulrider
May. 7, 2007, 11:41 PM
I'm legal director for a national civil rights advocacy organization. I have to be available on cell and Blackberry pretty much around the clock. I am passionate about what I do, but I do NOT recommend most law jobs unless you (a) love the law; and (b) don't have kids or other major responsibilities. Law is just too 24/7 unless you can find a job in-house at a corporation or certain non-litigation government positions.

My cousin became a dentist. Very rigorous academic program, but short residency followed by good pay, ability to work anywhere, and very flexible hours. Smart choice.

Either that or a plumber or electrician. Everyone needs them, good pay, make your own hours. And if you're a contractor, you have all of the above and can mess with people by deciding when to show up. :)

Accounting sounds like another profession where there is always a demand.

catknsn
May. 8, 2007, 12:05 AM
Well, I'm a paralegal and while I'll second your vote that in-house positions rock (I've done both and it's so nice not to have to think about billing), I think if you aren't actually the lawyer, being a paralegal or a legal assistant is a great career choice. If you can type up a storm, you're a good writer, enjoy research and pay attention to detail, this is a field that I'm convinced is almost totally recession-proof. If you're good, you'll always be in demand. Finding a job in a new town? A snap. I moved up here and got the first one I interviewed for, for the money I asked for.

Especially if you get into certain specialties, you can write your own ticket. I have a recruiter in L.A. e-mailing me offering me money to find him intellectual property paralegals. I personally can't go back to I.P. because it was like watching paint dry and made me want to hang myself ;) but if you're technical minded or into science and engineering, you'd love it and it pays up the wa-zoo (as jobs not requiring graduate school go...you can easily make $70K and some people make $90+).

Yes, at some firms you will work a lot of overtime. But at others, you'll leave every day at 6, no problem. Transactional law (contracts, patent prosecution, real estate, etc.) typically has shorter hours than litigation. (But litigation is a helluva lot more fun, at least IMHO).

azeventer
May. 8, 2007, 12:48 AM
I'm a Physician Assistant in cardiac surgery. Crazy, unpredictable hours, but mostly (mostly) pays the bills......the docs I work for, however, would probably suggest a career as a dentist......we often talk about how we should have gone to dental school.....when we are doing another emergency surgery in the middle of the night......we think of our dentists....who work from 8am to 2:30, 3pm......with Fridays off....cash only.....no on call.....relatively little blood.....no one dying.....ahhh, that would be the life!....we think anyway. The grass is always greener....I'm sure dentists have their own problems......they may wish they worked in cardiac surgery, for all we know! :)

upnoverfarm
May. 8, 2007, 08:36 AM
Wow, such great professions! I'm just your typical Welder. (Yes I am a girl) I work night shift so that I have the daytime to work my horses. When I'm not welding or at a horse show I do belly dancing gigs with a group near me. I also sell bits of metal sculpture to anyone williing to buy something along with charcoal sketches and such. Gosh I sound busy! YIKES! :eek:

PiedPiper
May. 8, 2007, 08:52 AM
I am the head of Human Resources and Payroll for an up and coming burger joint/fast food company here on the east coast.

I really enjoy my work though things can be really stressful with the amount of growth we are having. For example, in the last 3 months we have increased by 150 employee and are now topping the scales at almost 500 employees in the mid-Atlantic area. :eek:

Pay is good, pay will be getting even better, and the skies the limit on this position. I will be going back to school for my Masters so I can keep said job ;) and earn the paycheck but am having lots of fun. It is family owned which can make things interesting but they do make wonderful owners who really care about their employees which makes my job easier and more rewarding.

I have 2 1/2 horses now. One is retired, one is going full time, and then other is a half lease that is a becoming a full lease. :)

Definitely recc the HR field to those interested. I am thrilled I found it.

FoxChaser
May. 8, 2007, 09:12 AM
In my mid-thirties, I am "retired" from managing a research laboratory (Ob/Gyn) and am now taking on the job of "chattel" while raising our one year old son. In my former single days, I was forever skimping and scraping to keep one horse boarded while going to as many cheap CTs as I could catch rides to and saving up for one horse trial a year. I got into foxhunting, riding second horses for the masters of one of the local hunts, then bringing along their green beans. I loved it all, though found myself either at work or on a horse (no social life whatsoever). Thank God for Match.com and meeting the man of my dreams (no, really!). My husband is a software developer for a major company and is the most supportive, loving, caring soul I've ever met. I LOVE being a stay-at-home mom, though I had always thought it would drive me crazy. I cannot imagine going back to work at this point. I had set out from high school planning to be a veterinarian and here I am. It's amazing the roads that life takes you down. You're very wise to read into what everyone else is doing ;)

TBROCKS
May. 8, 2007, 09:14 AM
I'm a registered nurse, I have a Bachelor's degree in nursing, and I work as a manager with a community hospice. I really love my job. I supervise a great group of people, I get great benefits, I earn a decent salary, and I'm able to get time off for shows when I need to. :)

olympicprincess
May. 8, 2007, 09:45 AM
Well from my post #59:
I did exactly what I said I would! Yea! :D That was quite cool to look back & read. :cool:

LisaB
May. 8, 2007, 09:59 AM
I'm a database engineer/administrator. The pay is great, hours can REALLY suck. But it depends on the 'flavor' of the company. Last year was horrid, I didn't have one full weekend for 6 months. Right now, the hours are regular and I get to ride.
My location really sucks for up and coming career types. There are very few job opportunities and the pay is less than what you would get elsewhere. Would I trade it? Hell no, I'm like a pig in sh- in this area. I have a house, nice horse, I get to event with a budget in mind of course.
I don't love my job but it's challenging and I like the people I work with. I love Charlottesville!
Tech careers are the way to go. It's ever evolving and is never stagnant. If you're artsy fartsy, you can do application design. If you're logical, you can be a programmer. If you're more of an accountant with logic, database admin. If you're a mother hen who's good at organizing, adminstrator or project management.
Regardless of career, take as many computer classes as possible.
And I thought I married a potential money bags but alas, even with his brilliant brain, he wanted to be a cop. Wait until they decide on a career and once they get some money, THEN marry them. I wouldn't trade him in for the world either but I do bust my ass on a daily basis. And there's no way we could have kids and still play like we do.

Invested1
May. 8, 2007, 10:10 AM
I work for a "think tank" focusing on Homeland Security. I have a Bachelor's in International Relations (unfortunately not using it right now though) from UVa (Go Hoos!!), and a Master's in Government/Homeland Security from Johns Hopkins.

Pay is good, benefits are good and work hours are (generally) good (and when they're not, we get comp time. I also get every other Friday off). :D

goodymar1188
May. 8, 2007, 10:15 AM
I am doing what I thought I was going to be doing back when I posted on the first page of this thread... study to be a nurse!! :) I am going to school in the fall to get my ADN (Associates Degree in Nursing) and in two years I will be an RN!! YAY!!

I hope after I get on my feet, pay off student loans, get a new car, etc. that I will be able to get back into riding. My dad couldn't pay for it anymore, so I haven't ridden in nearly three seasons... ah ay ay. I miss it, let's hope the nursing career path I am headed down will pay off and I will be able to afford riding and eventing again!! :)

FrittSkritt
May. 8, 2007, 10:16 AM
I'm a consultant for a global defense firm... consultant being a general job title, I work on the user interface for web applications. It's boring as all hell, but it pays the bills. I got my bachelor's in Computer Science, I'm not sure whether I'll go to grad school or not, but if I do, it definitely won't be in comp sci! ;)

Interesting to read page 1 with catknsn's description of her job... I love writing and researching and have always been interested in law, just don't think I'm dedicated enough to be a full blown lawyer that sleeps in the office. :winkgrin:

NaturalSelection
May. 8, 2007, 10:21 AM
I'm just finishing up school...my second time around. I started w/ a BS in Biochem but couldn't make much $$ and didn't like the work. After trying to use my Biochem degree for four years I headed back to school to be a Chemical Engineer. If only someone had told me about this when I was 18! If you love math, physics, chemistry and problem solving, this is the career for you! I just accepted a position w/ Marathon Petroleum in MN -- perfect location for my husband and I, lots of opportunity to be outside at the refinery looking for ways to optimize efficiency and production, excellent $$, hours and benefits. Now I'll be helping to make the gasoline and diesel we all use when we haul our horses to HTs! I'm really looking forward to finishing this semester and paying more attention to my beastie.

ToucheToujour
May. 8, 2007, 10:31 AM
I work for a "think tank" focusing on Homeland Security. I have a Bachelor's in International Relations (unfortunately not using it right now though) from UVa (Go Hoos!!), and a Master's in Government/Homeland Security from Johns Hopkins.

Pay is good, benefits are good and work hours are (generally) good (and when they're not, we get comp time. I also get every other Friday off). :D

Want to give me an internship? haha I'm a Poli Sci major with a concentration in Central and Eastern Europe. Haven't decided if I want to look at int'l health, or national security. One will send me abroad a lot more often than then other, which is a big thing. I'm doing an off campus study to American University this fall. In two weeks, I leave for Nicaragua. I'm in the former Yugoslavia this fall for a few weeks, India in the spring for a few weeks, and Ukraine all summer. *is very busy traveling* That latter trip is dependent upon whether Ukraine can keep its pants up and hold its parliament together. Parents won't fund the trip if there are 5,000 people sitting in Independence Square in blue and orange.

Invested1
May. 8, 2007, 10:35 AM
Want to give me an internship? haha I'm a Poli Sci major with a concentration in Central and Eastern Europe. Haven't decided if I want to look at int'l health, or national security. One will send me abroad a lot more often than then other, which is a big thing. I'm doing an off campus study to American University this fall. In two weeks, I leave for Nicaragua. I'm in the former Yugoslavia this fall for a few weeks, India in the spring for a few weeks, and Ukraine all summer. *is very busy traveling* That latter trip is dependent upon whether Ukraine can keep its pants up and hold its parliament together. Parents won't fund the trip if there are 5,000 people sitting in Independence Square in blue and orange.

We do hire interns. If you're interested, shoot me an email (BDun03@hotmail.com) and I can tell you who to get in touch with. :D

pvcjumper
May. 8, 2007, 10:35 AM
Me: 21 (in the midst of being a "grown-up"...regretfully)

What I do NOW: I have been in real estate since I was 16, I transferred from Residential to construction real estate business and am currently a construction lending portfolio administrator... and it can get dull at times, but for not having my degrees yet, I make more than most college kids right out of college.

What I am going to school for: double major in Business Management and Marketing

What I would WANT to do: Be a small animal veterinarian...but I dont think that will EVER happen. After looking at tuition expenses, it looks like roughly 80,000 in the hole by the time i completed school... and as of now I am half way through my 2 degrees completely DEBT FREE, and I would like to keep it that way. There is no way i could support 15k per semester my last 2 years of vet school. :no: Looks like I will end up with a job a dont love, but pays the bills... and this is part of why growing up sucks, you realize exactly just what the rest of your life is gonna look like...BORING...

sidepasser
May. 8, 2007, 10:45 AM
I was really going to let this ride but I keep thinking about it.



My line of work is "chattel."

I don't make any money and live off my husband who has a very good job. I keep wondering where I've gone wrong...every two weeks a handsome sum of money is deposited into an account with my (and his) name. From which I manage living expenses for four, investments (in both of our names) and the occasional charitable donation.

In addition to the obvious "human development" side of raising kids and riding I have a very intense involvement in volunteer and pro bono work. I even use his name (as in I'm Mrs. htok instead of Ms. subk) unless I'm pissing off state legislators which I seem to do a lot lately and then it's nice to keep his name out of the papers. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

If you can find the right relationship I HIGHLY recommend the job of "chattel," not only for the fulfillment, but also for the positives for having a riding life. And YES, I can't wish anything better for my daughters! Of course, like me, I'll do everything in my power to make sure they have an education that will provide a backup source of security.

I believe I just read last week that a SAHM (stay at home Mom) is worth approximately 138,000. Quite a good amount of money...for a "chattel"..lol..

wannabegifted
May. 8, 2007, 10:49 AM
I am an environmental scientist, I teach lessons on the weekends (and some week days) and I get OTTB, retrain them and sell them (one at a time).

SophieGirl23
May. 8, 2007, 11:23 AM
I don't remember if I originally responded to this thread or not, but I'll give an update. :)

I went to college and got my BS in Animal Science (Equine Industry option). I had fully planned to become a professional rider/trainer. Then I realized that I don't want to kill my passion by turning it into work. So instead I got pregnant. :lol:

I'm working for one of the local school districts as a part time instructional assistant. I work about 20 hours per week, and split that time between helping kids use the computers at the student computer lab at the public library and setting up various other programs for the students. For example, right now we just finished setting up a volunteer tutoring program where high school students can volunteer to tutor on certain days of the week in exchange for community service hours (required for graduation) and kids can come in and get tutoring from these high school students for free. We're still working out the kinks in the program but so far it's been pretty successful and rewarding to set up!

I really like this job, however it won't be ideal when the baby comes along in December (late nights at the computer lab). So I'll probably go into substitute teaching after the baby is born and then get into a credential program next fall to become a HS biology teacher.

Right now I would have tons of time to ride if morning sickness wasn't knocking me on my butt! I haven't ridden in about 3 or 4 weeks. I haven't evented in many years (first college, and then lack of money). I suspect being a mommy will leave me even less time to ride but I've accepted that fact. :)

DH was a Marine but now is a civilian diesel mechanic for a cement company. He makes less than he did in the military and works 10-12 hours days and every other Saturday. But after two stints in Iraq, he's happy not to have to go overseas anymore.

Neither of our jobs is conducive to owning and competing event horses, so don't take this as a suggestion! :D

Hey, tbgurl....I just sent you a PM (before I even realized how old the thread was). My DH is now working for Lockheed Martin in security. Money is good and definatly conducive to owning ponies;)

OneDaySoon
May. 8, 2007, 12:32 PM
Another one in real estate development. We see the horizon change before the shovel goes in the ground. Lots of variety and flexibility - currently few women of any profession! Lots of skilled contractors who jump at the chance to help with the farm. Great pay and bonuses for being passionate, organized, focussed, determined and confident - natural skills for most eventers. Must get along well with people...as well as horses.

The Pie
May. 8, 2007, 01:11 PM
Remember, you can marry more in just five minutes than you can work out in a lifetime.
Please please PLEASE tell me that was a joke!

roughinit
May. 8, 2007, 01:14 PM
school psychologist...can you say SUMMERS OFF?!?!?!?!?!?!

pays darn well too

time for horsey, time for kiddies, time for shows...

missamandarose
May. 8, 2007, 02:30 PM
I'm an assistant to a CFO and associate director of a non-profit. I am also the meeting/events coordinator for the organization. The pay is pretty good, seeing as its a non-profit, the bennies arent so bad either. My bosses are pretty cool and let me work a somewhat flexible schedule so I can leave early one day during the week to go and ride. But the commute is a PITA

Im considering going to work in my hubby's office (though not working for or with him) as the pay is better and I'd be able to work from home one or two days a week. Hooray.

My hubby is pretty understanding of the horsey stuff. His goal is to get to the point where some day we can live off his salary and I can "work for pony", meaning the money I make doing whatever will be for a horse and all it entails. Of course, thats a ways off, but its a nice goal :)

grzywinskia
May. 8, 2007, 02:45 PM
I teach and train. My students are mostly comprised of young kids and adult ammies. I break young horses and fix problem horses, I have everything in my barn from racehorses, to roping horses, to a few cuttin horses. I would love to be able to just do eventers but heck, they pay the bills and are a TON of fun so I can't complain!!! I have always worked in the horse business in many capacities from Head groom for international rider, supervising vet tech at major equine hospital, yearling handler at a TB breeding farm, to an administrative "person" at another breeding farm...so really I don't know much outside of horses!

tbgurl
May. 8, 2007, 04:27 PM
Hey, tbgurl....I just sent you a PM (before I even realized how old the thread was). My DH is now working for Lockheed Martin in security. Money is good and definatly conducive to owning ponies;)

Sent you one back. Thanks for the tip!

nrg
May. 8, 2007, 04:40 PM
[quote=Mrs. Smith;989574]I know that most people are going to groan but...

I must HIGHLY recommend a career in accounting. There are amazing prospects and job security, in my experience. I had a job before I completed my degree, and when I decided to move back to my home state (a week after 9/11/01, no less!), I had a job within days.

Most people are afraid of the "math" portion of accounting, but to be a corporate accountant, you need to be able to add and subtract using a calculator. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

I have found the pay to be above average for someone my age. I worked in "industry" rather than public accounting, so my job hours were steady and reasonable. Truly a 8-5 job, with no weekends. And you never really have accounting "emergencies" that require you to work late, etc. Also, these jobs pretty much always have full benefits, including 401(K) or a pension plan.

Drawbacks: It's an office job. If you can't sit at a desk all day, it's not for you! Most people purport to hate accountants. But I've found that it's just a stereotype. I always seem to get invited to office gatherings. http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/winkgrin.gif
quote]

I must agree, I work in accounting, too (although I am not a CPA). I am a project accountant for an envirnomental engineering firm, so I track the budgets and spending of our projects, do our invoices, and the monthly performance stuff for our office. I admit, it is not always the most exciting job in the world, but I work for a really cool company (we regularly have "meetings" during worjk hours with food and drink) and everyone here is really into sports and outdoor stuff, so they are flexible with my riding/competing time. Not to mention that the pay is pretty darn good! :D

savvy
May. 8, 2007, 05:50 PM
Wonderful thread. And as some have said before get as much education as possible. You often have know idea what you will end up doing - no matter how sure you are right now about your future career. Don't be afraid to change directions if you aren't happy. Really, the money (IMO) doesn't begin to make up for job satisfaction.

I have had too many short term jobs to list but have mainly been a fisheries biologist, high school teacher and now a university lecturer. Teaching can be grueling, often doesn't pay well but for me (most of the time) it has been incredibly rewarding. You get lots of time off and the job is different everyday. When I was getting my degrees in biology I would often have people tell me I would make a great teacher. My reply was always "I would never want to teach". Silly me!

ToucheToujour
May. 8, 2007, 06:00 PM
I have had too many short term jobs to list but have mainly been a fisheries biologist, high school teacher and now a university lecturer. Teaching can be grueling, often doesn't pay well but for me (most of the time) it has been incredibly rewarding. You get lots of time off and the job is different everyday. When I was getting my degrees in biology I would often have people tell me I would make a great teacher. My reply was always "I would never want to teach". Silly me!

Oh no...I say the same thing... :o

sprite
May. 8, 2007, 06:52 PM
I'm a...(wait for it)...

pig farmer. LOL. Well, I manage the facility for a smallish farm that does genetic research. Lots of cool stuff going on! I have to say, I really have grown to love the pigs. Very neat animals. I have a BS in Animal Science with an Equine specialty, and have worked at breeding farms, was a working student etc. Never really earned enough to have a life, and benefits etc were pretty much nonexistent. Now I've got vacation time, a 401k, profit sharing, health insurance...and it pays a lot better! I also work part time for the Girl Scouts, running their riding program- which leaves me pretty much no time for my own horse unfortunately (she is happily leased out) but plenty of ponies to ride :) Between the 2, I work about 70 hours a week, but I love both jobs so its all good.

If you had told me when I graduated from college that in 10 years I'd be raising pigs, I would have laughed in your face :)

Tom King
May. 8, 2007, 07:28 PM
Decending income wise and ascending time wise.

Buy low-sell high, develop waterfront real estate, raise pine trees and little fluffy dogs.

4Martini
May. 8, 2007, 08:54 PM
I work as a program manager on a team that develops Hard Drives. So, please down load some music, photos and esp. Video so I can afford a second horse!!!

It's very fast paced - very interesting technology and I have gotten to travel to lots of exotic places! The hours can be rough - I'm on a conference call tonight and didn't get to ride yesterday either... But, I usually only have two days I really can't get to the barn (unless I'm in China :) )

I have a BA and MA in Econ. (But did 2 years in EE before getting lost in a foreign contry and forgetting to return to school...)

There are lots of opportunities in Tech!

ROB
May. 8, 2007, 09:39 PM
I'm in the military. And I DO NOT recommend it if you want consistancy in your riding. That being said, different services have different deployment schedules and different job within different services have different schedules too.
There are benefits to being in, for example, a constant paycheck, and as I've found, the military base here has a wonderful stable which fills all my needs.
That being said, the deployment schedule makes consistancy difficult.


Does 53 stand for CH-53? If so, I worked on them for four years. Stationed in MCAS Tustin and MCAS New River. Nice horse facility in New River back in '97 when I left.

I'll second the sediment that the military is no place for a horse lover.

ROB

ponygrl
May. 9, 2007, 12:26 AM
funny to see this thread again. I finish my 2nd year of pharmacy school on Friday. I'm thinking I want to specialize in Infectious Disease or Critical Care. I'm another one whose parents work in medicine so I grew up in hospitals - I'd rather be there than Walgreen's!

And don't forget the national shortage. The vast majority of our class who graduates Saturday already have contracts and sign-on bonuses even though they won't take their boards until June at the earliest (and results in July...)

Rainier
May. 9, 2007, 02:20 AM
I am an Open Space and Trails Planner for the Town of Breckenridge (CO). I buy land to preserve it as open space and then manage it. In Breck, this often involves planning and constructing non-motorized trails, including trails for mountain biking, nordic skiing, hiking/running, and equestrian use.

My husband is an avalanche forecaster. Unfortunately, neither of us make loads of money, so my eventing habit is somewhat restricted. I do love my job though, which makes it all worthwhile. I went to a forestry school out east and got my masters in wildlife ecology. My only gripe is that its hard to find the time for work, riding and training our 2 horses, and doing those other activities that I love as well (mtn biking, skiing, etc.).

vali
May. 9, 2007, 02:35 AM
I work 3 days a week as an attorney for the EPA. I worked fulltime for many years but went part-time when I had children. I also spend a significant amount of time chicken wrangling and taking care of horses.

pegasusmom
May. 9, 2007, 07:05 AM
I was really going to let this ride but I keep thinking about it.

My line of work is "chattel."



Another vote for "chattel". Sometimes I double as a soccer mom with a truck and horse trailer. In my spare time I organize two USEA horse trials which pays me enough over the course of a year to keep my grey roots colored. Although I don't compete, I do ride. Quite a bit. Especially when the academic and atheletic schedule of the YP gets tight.

In a past life I managed to complete a B.S. in Biomedicine, and was a Med Tech with a specialty in Hematology. Have also worked as an office assistant to an architect, ran a business office for a rest home, worked for an independant insurance adjuster and my last position was as a legal assistant for a local law firm. I loved that - as I am OCD about organization. As the YP will attest.

Chattel is a great position if you can get it. I am incredibly fortunate to be heading toward 30 years of "chattelness" with one of the most fantastic guys in the world. Mr. Peg is heading toward the end of a 30+ year career in the military, most of it in Special Forces and is currently serving in Iraq overseeing all counterinsurgency training for US troops.

Middlebrook
May. 9, 2007, 08:25 AM
I've been an engineer for 30 years...mostly MIL ammunition (large caliber) and F-18 designer of the generating systems but for the past 18 years I've been in the medical device and drug business(No, I mean approving drugs not selling them:eek: ) trying to keep the FDA off the backs of my clients.
I was full time but, when I moved to the country and had to drive 65 miles to work (one-way), I contracted my time.
Appears as though I may go full time again and this will cut into my time to train in dressage:cry:
Hey, the $$$ isn't bad but I'm still trying to figure out how to retire (with dignity) and still pay the bills.

Colorado Eventer
May. 9, 2007, 01:27 PM
I was in Real Estate for over 10 years, not a bad industry for horse lovers:

Pros: Ulimited income potential, make your own hours
Cons: Paydays can be weeks (or even months) apart and most clients like to look at houses on weekend

I've always trained horses on the side. Finally gave up the RE career and got certified in Accupuncture and do horses and small animals.

Pros: work with horses and animals all day long, making a difference, set my own days and hours
Cons:Builging up a clientel takes a while and the risk of getting injured is more ready than I first realized. (not everyones horse knows the meaning of whoa, much to my dismay).

Jen

Amchara
May. 9, 2007, 04:32 PM
Funny, I was thinking of looking it up again because soon I'll be starting my next life of school. I figure I'll get all the basic stuff over with first, taking time to see what I'd be interested in doing for the majority of my life. I too have the aspirations to be able to afford riding, horses and eventually a farm or some size.

So far I have discovered that I like to write (which doesn't mean I am terrific in the grammar/spelling department) and I like 'studying' people, so some line of therapy/psychology/counseling. I have no idea if I'll end up doing anything like that, but they're ideas.

LisaB
May. 10, 2007, 09:52 AM
Armchara, you might want to try becoming a business analyst. They write up requirements, beat the programmers up for not adhering to the requirements, train users and control all project documentation. If you can talk to users as well as geeks, then it's a really good career. It pays for the ponies!

Jump2high
May. 10, 2007, 01:04 PM
Currently I am a bar tender, but I just finished air traffic control school and will be off to training this summer and will begin working at my assigned facility (near home, yeah!) this fall. I love love love love love ATC and the pay and benefits will be great so with any luck I will be able to support my horsey habit. Hubby is an electrician, so while the earning potential in our house is good we are young and only starting out...

Definately have to say it is important to love what you do. I had a degree in psychology (very interesting, liked it a lot, nothing wrong with that degree) but I just didn't feel passionately about it, so I went for something else that I did.

And JER, if you need any help with the screenplays, the bar job has caused me to dream up with many inventive ways to kill people. :)

criss
May. 10, 2007, 01:16 PM
Wow, the resurrection of this thread was timely (I opened it in a tab a few days ago, and have been reading as I get a chance). I am trying to figure out where I went wrong, I guess. I have a BA in art history from a very, very good school and am currently taking classes in, and deciding whether to continue with, an MA program in historic preservation (that is, the preservation of historic buildings). I love school, and I love art and architecture. I'm a good student, a good writer, and I think I'm reasonably intelligent. I'm certainly well-educated, thoguh we all know smart and educated are totally different...

But anyway...I kinda feel like I got sold a bill of goods. I, and everyone I knew growing up, thought that a good education was the ticket to a good career, and that it didn't matter that much what the education was in, that it was better to be well-rounded.

Let me tell you, that just isn't true.

Since I graduated from college six years ago (it's been that long?! :eek: ), I have worked as a barn manager; as a working student to a relatively BNT; as a salesperson in a handcrafted tile and lighting store; and as executive director of a horse rescue.

Most of those jobs were mostly fun, but if I'd wanted to stay in them, I wouldn't have left in the first place. That's oversimplifying, sure, but basically when they stopped being satisfying or stopped giving me enough time to ride or otherwise stopped working out for me, I stopped wanting to do them. None of them paid well enough that I could have afforded to stay in the really long-term anyway.

So my problem is: What the heck will I want to do for long enough to make it worth really starting a serious career? Preservation is a lot of fun, but job-wise a lot of it tends to be nonprofit, and therefore likely not something I could afford to do long-term (especially once I rack up $50K worth of education). Other things I think sound interesting often involve either scientific ability/degrees, or more people skills than I have, or both.

Part of me wants to just say to hell with it all and become a potter, enabling me to stay home with the horsies all day and get my hands dirty, and part of me feels like that's (a) a waste of an expensive education, (b) something I'm not motivated enough to do well in the long run with no boss to make sure I get work done, and (c) again with the not being able to afford it in the long run.

I'd kind of like to have a regular job with an office and a boss, but I also find that I have a hard time keeping my mouth shut when people are doing things I care about in ways I think are wrong. So I could take a job that was boring and therefore where I could keep my mouth shut and not get in trouble, make money, maybe have time to ride, but be really bored...but I'm still young enough for the idea of signing onto a lifetime of boredom to be really unappealing.

If only it were really true that you could get paid well just for being smart, educated, and "well-rounded" (whatever the heck that means). :sigh:

Anyone have any ideas as to what kind of career I'd be perfect for? :confused:

saratoga
May. 10, 2007, 01:21 PM
But anyway...I kinda feel like I got sold a bill of goods. I, and everyone I knew growing up, thought that a good education was the ticket to a good career, and that it didn't matter that much what the education was in, that it was better to be well-rounded.

Let me tell you, that just isn't true.

:

I dont really have any advice- but I definitely agree with you. When it came to careers, the guidance counselors always told me to do what I enjoy and the money will come. I think this is seriously BAD advice, unless you happen to be a person who happens to like a career path that acutally pays. I got a degree in Equine Studies. Anyhow, am now going back to school for nursing, dont know if I will necessarily like it but am interested in the money, the flexible hours and the huge demand.

LisaB
May. 10, 2007, 01:45 PM
Criss, have you tried marketing? They are a flamboyant bunch who all chatter away with really good opinions. It seems to be neverending because they have to anticipate the future of a business. It will be boring at first because you have to gather data and do menial stuff but once you start getting ideas, then it all starts to go flying.
Also, you won't have to go back to school really. I know lots of BA's who do marketing.
As far as voicing opinions, I too have that problem. Just stay on the COTH boards and opinion away. Work is work and nobody is dying because a wrong decision is made at work. I now bide my time and mention something at the r ight time to the right person in the right way(well, I seem to think so)

Ponyclubrocks
May. 10, 2007, 02:01 PM
Not that I practice what I preach...I have 30 years in the chemical industry, many positions, currently sales management...looking forward to retirement next year..yippee! Have always had horses, but often travel interferes with the schedule. I look forward to unrestricted time at the barn!!:D

snoopy
May. 10, 2007, 02:07 PM
I told a friend about this thread....

She responded as follows:

She has many regular clients

Makes her own hours

Wears form fitting clothing

Gets paid by the hour

And she has to spread her legs


Now before anyone gets offended.....she is a professional dressage trainer!!:winkgrin:


I thought this was too funny...and not all together scary concidering it sounds very similar to another rather less respectable profession...;)

onelanerode
May. 10, 2007, 03:02 PM
I've been the copy editor for a small magazine publishing company for the last two years. I like what I do, but I don't always like the working environment. How fantastic it would be if I could work from home or even just make my own schedule a few days a week! :p

There are times when I envy my trainer, who's at the barn most of the day. We joke about me quitting my job and coming on as her BM, but I know that's a tough life as well. So for now I work my day job and do freelance copy editing on the side, which helps a bit with the horse expenses. Eventually I'd love to freelance full time.

Having this job has let me learn a lot about a number of random things that I never would have known about otherwise, so that's been kind of fun. :) I've also found it's hard to read the text on everyday items (like shampoo bottles and coffeepots) without slipping into professional mode. :lol:

I wouldn't recommend this career to anyone who wants to have a horse and show ... the pay isn't that great, but then again, this area is not exactly a publishing mecca. It is fairly horsey, however. My husband has an IT job, which pays pretty well, and job prospects for him in this area are pretty good.

linquest
May. 10, 2007, 04:05 PM
Currently a law student. I help pay for lessons by doing barn chores and working as a paralegal on a project basis.

Before I went back to school, I worked as an HR Specialist. I enjoyed many aspects of the job (esp. the pay), but unfortunately, they were a bit outweighed by office politics and the inability to move up in my organization. I knew it was time to get out when the number of employees I had to fire hit 3 digits (mostly thanks to 2 layoffs in 2 years) and even my friends outside of work started calling me "the Hatchet".

So now I'm back in school, racking up what will be close to $160K of debt by the time I get out, and will probably begin my legal career making about the same salary as I did coming straight out of undergrad. I'm hoping to do civil rights litigation for several years before I start a family (fully aware that I can't plan/time that perfectly ;) Eventually, I'd like to hang my own shingle as an employment mediator.

My advice? Don't take your first (or any) job based on which is going to be the highest salary or what your parents think will be the most "prestigious". Find something that makes you want to get up in the morning and not dread going to work every day. Also, don't be afraid to try an off-the-beat job (equine masseuse, professional juggler, etc) for 1-3 years even when the pay is minimal or knowing that it's not likely you'll do it for the rest of your life if you think it's going to be a fun or challenging experience. As long as you have a good education and know how to market your past experience to any other kind of job, you can always pursue that high-paying, "normal" job later down the road.

InVA
May. 10, 2007, 04:12 PM
I'm independently wealthy...

(just kidding..)

bip
May. 10, 2007, 04:15 PM
I'm independently wealthy...

Me too, I'm a thousandaire :)

InVA
May. 10, 2007, 04:23 PM
Me too, I'm a thousandaire :)

HA! I'm saving up to be a thousandaire!

bip
May. 10, 2007, 04:32 PM
HA! I'm saving up to be a thousandaire!

You have to pull yourself up from your very old, well-worn boot straps! Careful, pull gently or they break :)

tbgurl
May. 10, 2007, 08:01 PM
I'm a...(wait for it)...

pig farmer. LOL. Well, I manage the facility for a smallish farm that does genetic research. Lots of cool stuff going on! I have to say, I really have grown to love the pigs. Very neat animals. I have a BS in Animal Science with an Equine specialty, and have worked at breeding farms, was a working student etc. Never really earned enough to have a life, and benefits etc were pretty much nonexistent. Now I've got vacation time, a 401k, profit sharing, health insurance...and it pays a lot better! I also work part time for the Girl Scouts, running their riding program- which leaves me pretty much no time for my own horse unfortunately (she is happily leased out) but plenty of ponies to ride :) Between the 2, I work about 70 hours a week, but I love both jobs so its all good.

If you had told me when I graduated from college that in 10 years I'd be raising pigs, I would have laughed in your face :)

Oh good Lord! I naively volunteered to help collect a boar for one of my repro classes in college. I thought, hey, it's got to be easier than collecting a stallion--they're not nearly as big.

I'll just say that it took 3 days for the smell to come off my hands. From that point on I've had a dislike for pigs.

JER
May. 10, 2007, 08:51 PM
And JER, if you need any help with the screenplays, the bar job has caused me to dream up with many inventive ways to kill people.

Ah! Back before I had anything resembling a career, I worked in a bar. For four years. To this day, I don't drink alcohol, I don't like drunks and I really hate the smell of stale beer and cigarettes.

criss
May. 10, 2007, 08:56 PM
LisaB,
That might be a stroke of genius. I should definitely learn more about the field. It might be the closest thing I can think of to actually getting paid to be smart. :)

The fly in the ointment: As an environmentalist, I am often quite opposed to promoting consumerism, so I'd have to work only for companies that were selling intangible or actively environmentally friendly stuff, because otherwise the unable-to-keep-my-mouth-shut thing would come in in a huge way...

Onelanerode,
I'm sorry to hear that about copyediting. I had sort of toyed with the idea, because I am actually quite a good editor in a non-professional sense, and I think I could become professionally good with a little effort (like, for instance, finally committing to memory all the silly rules about punctuation inside or outside quotes, etc...). I had thought maybe in this digital age that would be a job I could get that would involve both working for someone else and working from home, the best of all worlds for me...but it sounds like maybe not, unless there are better jobs out there and you just don't know about them. :)

AmericaRunsOnDunkin
May. 10, 2007, 10:27 PM
I was a business consultant, now I am raising my son. When I was a consultant, I had plenty of money, but no time for my horse. Now I am a stay at home mom with a son that goes to pre-school a couple of times a week and no money! Oh well, I love my rides when I can get them in and I try and hit 1 horse event a month. I love it! Seems like a good balance to me.

hey101
May. 10, 2007, 10:35 PM
working in the pharm industry. Currently I help run Merck's clinical drug supply facility (for new drugs in development- not on the market yet), but b/c we are moving to California in a month, trying to decide if I'll stay with Merck (only option would be sales- could be fun), or get another engineer/ technical job at a biotech or pharm company. Or sit on the beach for a few months and consider my options! :D

Mudroom
May. 10, 2007, 11:00 PM
I work for an industrial textile company, many supplying automotive. Japanese owned. The company is a 5/24 operation. My work is general management, combination of sales, operations, financial you name it. When I joined them I negotiated a fairly hefty vacation package which I mainly use one Friday at a time for events etc.

At my level and breadth of responsibility, I can never really get away from it, at events you will see me on my cell phone or I am at the hotel late at night responding to e-mails.

My Japanese colleagues and boss can't really relate to somebody who doesn't live for work and work 12+ hours per day, but I am well enough established and try hard to keep all the balls in the air so they put up with me :-)

There are usually two evenings a week that I have to do work stuff (video conferences with Japan etc.) but I usually know when they will be and can schedule horse training around them.

And then there's the fact that my sales trips almost always seem to get scheduled the first few days after a competition when my horse has a few days off :-)