PDA

View Full Version : Canter Cue



Samigator
Jan. 12, 2011, 11:10 AM
Please re-direct me if this has already been discussed, tried to find it on a search.

How do most dressage riders cue their horses for the canter?

I just started taking dressage lessons with my horse and I want to make sure that I won't be confusing him once we get to a lot of canter work. Right now to cue him, I've been doing a half halt, then kindof dropping a little more pressure on my outside seat bone/bringing my inside seat bone forward, using an outside leg just behind the girth, a kindof squeeze/push with my seat, and right now he still needs a kiss (vocal cue) as well.

I just wanted to see how different the cue might be so I can start preparing to make any changes necessary for our training down the road.

Thanks much! :)

Petstorejunkie
Jan. 12, 2011, 11:23 AM
can I tell you something funny? ;)
I've been cantering for so long that one day about a year ago I started to think about the mechanics of how I was asking my horse to canter, and couldn't figure out how I was consciously doing it. :lol: Whether or not it's correct, it works for my horse and my horses in training... at least this is what i *think* I'm doing.
swelling half halt, while in HH, put inside leg on, slide outside leg back 2" and lift inside trunk/frontline, release HH.
i think that's right.

Druid Acres
Jan. 12, 2011, 12:05 PM
Here's a thread (http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/showthread.php?t=283991&highlight=canter+depart)that discusses this. Also, if you search on "canter depart" some stuff will come up.

quietann
Jan. 12, 2011, 12:34 PM
That thread says it all, but just for the record: depends on the horse. Two I ride canter off the "outside leg windshield wiper" cue, and one by a slight shift forward of the inside seatbone, with ever so slight a movement of the outside leg back. If you don't do the seatbone thing, she won't canter!

carolprudm
Jan. 12, 2011, 01:36 PM
http://www.eqtrained.com/videos/view/canter-transitions_33.html?m=1

goeslikestink
Jan. 12, 2011, 04:27 PM
ask him on a corner easy for you and him sit to the trot then ask for canter just before the corner

kip
Jan. 12, 2011, 07:46 PM
Inside leg at the girth and slide the outside leg back then squeeze the inside leg ONLY. I used to squeeze with the outside as well until I had the chance to ride some really fantastic horses that were trained this way. They were so much more happy and willing to pick up the canter that I changed the way I asked my own horses, the results in my horses were fantastic. I have also found that it keeps the horses from swinging their haunches in their changes which has helped make some really nice straight tempis.

Sunsets
Jan. 12, 2011, 08:31 PM
I was always taught inside leg at the girth, outside leg back and cue with that.

However, my instructor tells me it's better to cue from the inside, as kip says, because once you get to tempis, it's easier to do it that way.

(not that I think I'm ever going to get good enough to be doing tempi changes)

Miss Mare is really really sensitive about cuing off the outside right leg, and generally expresses her discomfort with a cow kick, so I've had to learn to rest the outside leg gently behind the girth and cue with the inside leg. It feels weird, but I think I'm getting the hang of it.

tmlng
Jan. 12, 2011, 09:53 PM
I had a really good instructor tell me recently to simply shift my outside shoulder back a little----what does that do? It weights the outside seatbone while pushing the inside forward a bit.....my uber hot horse canters way more quietly with this aid than with any leg added at all. Another horse that I ride needs a little outer leg back, but she's trained to the inside leg pressure with that more than outer leg pressure.

Pocket Pony
Jan. 12, 2011, 11:10 PM
On Paddy I move my outside leg back and scoop with my butt from outside hip to inside hip.

thatmoody
Jan. 13, 2011, 09:05 AM
Also must ask when the correct hind leg is striking the ground, and must get an immediate reaction. I was working on the walk/canter transitions the other day and having difficulty, which is unusual for us now, and realizing that I was NOT being as careful as I should have been about my timing, thus confusing my horse. Once I started paying attention to his hind leg strike, the canter strikeoff was perfect, with no lead issues. That's something Jane doesn't talk about in that video, but it's something that's almost as important as bend. If you ask at the wrong time your horse will almost always pick up the wrong lead, or will struggle to understand what's going on. That's more a problem with a trained horse - in a greenie it's more about bend and asking consistently on the corner at first, but you also have to have good timing, and be able to tell when that inside hind is coming down for the strikeoff. And if the horse's response is delayed, then you won't get it either, so you have to work on that...

Velvet
Jan. 13, 2011, 09:37 AM
Also must ask when the correct hind leg is striking the ground, and must get an immediate reaction. I was working on the walk/canter transitions the other day and having difficulty, which is unusual for us now, and realizing that I was NOT being as careful as I should have been about my timing, thus confusing my horse. Once I started paying attention to his hind leg strike, the canter strikeoff was perfect, with no lead issues. That's something Jane doesn't talk about in that video, but it's something that's almost as important as bend. If you ask at the wrong time your horse will almost always pick up the wrong lead, or will struggle to understand what's going on. That's more a problem with a trained horse - in a greenie it's more about bend and asking consistently on the corner at first, but you also have to have good timing, and be able to tell when that inside hind is coming down for the strikeoff. And if the horse's response is delayed, then you won't get it either, so you have to work on that...

Well, most of us focus on which leg is about to come off the ground, or is off the ground, in dressage. We don't tend to focus on when it's fully weighted on the ground because when it is, you cannot ask the horse to do anything with that leg. You need to know the timing of when a leg will be coming off the ground and when it's in the air. That's when it can be influenced most directly by the aids.

thatmoody
Jan. 13, 2011, 11:27 AM
Well, most of us focus on which leg is about to come off the ground, or is off the ground, in dressage. We don't tend to focus on when it's fully weighted on the ground because when it is, you cannot ask the horse to do anything with that leg. You need to know the timing of when a leg will be coming off the ground and when it's in the air. That's when it can be influenced most directly by the aids.

Yes, former western person here (and I have a migraine today and don't know how to explain it). I can GET it, but can't explain it :). So if you ask when the inside hind is hitting the ground, would that make sense? Because that's when the outside hind is coming up? I think that I was explaining it backwards but doing it correctly, iykwim?