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MistyBlue
Jan. 9, 2011, 09:38 AM
I just realized this morning that I'm a tad overdue for new tires on my F250.

Before I head off to the tire store today any suggestions on a good all weather (snow country here, they need to handle snow) tire that's also decent off pavement?
Not necessary for serious off roading...just for picking up hay or dirt roads/across fields, etc.

17"...I'd love to go a bit bigger and do 18" all around to 'pimp it out a tad' without going into lifted ridiculousness but while I'm not cheap, I am frugal enough to not want to spend a billion dollars for looks. ;) :lol:

clanter
Jan. 9, 2011, 04:10 PM
Michelin LX M/S

We do not usually have any issues with snow down here so we just use the LX series, low road noisy, high milage tires

CatOnLap
Jan. 9, 2011, 05:08 PM
Second the Michelins. We have LTX-AT's which are a hybrid between a good road tire and an off road tire- plenty of grip for snow or mud, but quiet enough and long lasting for the highway.

SonnysMom
Jan. 9, 2011, 05:27 PM
I have used Goodyear All Terrain TA in the past. Pretty aggressive tire. Used that on a F-150. We got a lot of mileage out of those.

Currently am using General Tire- Grabber AT2.
http://www.generaltire.com/tires/TC3/Light-Truck

The Grabber is not quite as aggressive as the GY All Terrain TA's so there is less road noise. I hated them for the first week until I realized the tire place had them under inflated by about 20lbs. I have only had them since about July or August.
We have had a couple of snows and they have done well. No problem trailering in a wet field. Have not tried them in real deep mud.

I thought the Dueller Revos were overpriced and not great in the snow. I did not think they lasted that long- especially for the price.

Liberty
Jan. 9, 2011, 06:24 PM
Second the Michelins. We have LTX-AT's which are a hybrid between a good road tire and an off road tire- plenty of grip for snow or mud, but quiet enough and long lasting for the highway.

I third the Michelins and also have the LTX-AT's. My truck will always wear Michelins. :)

Wooly Wintertime
Jan. 9, 2011, 06:34 PM
I have the General Grabber AT 2's on my truck. They are a great tire for the money, and are affordable, especially in my case where I rarely drive the truck. The BF Goodrich All Terrain T/A KO's are similar and are also a good tire. If you can afford the Michelins though, you won't be disappointed!

monstrpony
Jan. 9, 2011, 07:17 PM
I recently put a set of Yokohama Geolanders on my F250 and am quite satisfied. I had Michelins on it, and I miss them now (40K miles, plenty of tread left, but they were 10 years old!), but they were so much more expensive, and tires on an F250 ain't cheap. But the Yokos have done a find job so far, including the current snow conditions we're having here in the south.

I used to think my F250 + Hawk 2-h DR BP was such a well balanced rig (which it is) and that is why I never felt big trucks passing me on the interstate. It IS a well balanced rig, but I can feel a difference since I no longer have my Michelins. It isn't dangerous or anything, really not a bother; just a difference; the Michelins were better.

MistyBlue
Jan. 9, 2011, 07:39 PM
Thanks guys!
I ended up with the Goodrich T/A KOs.
As aggressive as they made...I put pitiful mileage on my truck and the reason I got new ones wasn't loss of tread, it was age. 5.5 years, doesn't help that my truck is parked outside year round. Plus the dealer delivered them with parellis. :confused: Good tire for racing. I don't race all that much in the truck though. :lol:

Um, ouch on the price. But worth it, I hope.

Nice grab on the road on the way home...made sure to take all the roads not yet plowed or only semi-plowed and put it through it's paces. Much better traction.

So what's everyone use for bed weights for snow driving? Right now I had my old tires tossed in the bed and will stack them 2 high over each rear tire, chain them in place and then I'm thinking of sticking a 5 gallon paint bucket filled with 100# of concrete in the tire holes. Hoping that keeps the weight over the wheels without sliding around on the slippery bed liner. That should make it 150+ lbs over each tire.

I did find a flat bed weight that you tie down and fill with water that weighs 400# full. Nice option because it's flat and I can load hay on top without removing it. However it looks to be a heavy waterproof fabric online and not plastic, so not sure if the hay would puncture it. Plus it states you can load 500# on it, but I pick up 1/2 ton at a time. *sigh*

Any other suggestions for bed weights? Something I can remove every 3 weeks to pick up hay with...or something I can load hay on top of maybe?

CatOnLap
Jan. 9, 2011, 07:56 PM
on another thread there's a couple of dead alpacas...


I just wait for the snow to fill up the bed of the truck, find that provides plenty of weight.

Zu Zu
Jan. 9, 2011, 09:18 PM
on another thread there's a couple of dead alpacas...


I just wait for the snow to fill up the bed of the truck, find that provides plenty of weight.


:lol::lol::lol:

ReSomething
Jan. 10, 2011, 02:14 AM
Well, we have bricks. DH bought a batch from a guy off Cragislist who wanted them GONE, like that day, he had his football playing high school aged son and friend there to help load if DH could get there so we have a layer or two of bricks in the truck bed, three stacks in the yard and some still in the stock trailer.

I suppose the water filled bag is the full length and width of the bed? If it were smaller you might be able to build a frame around it with heavy plywood on top, that'd add another 100# as well easily and support the hay on the plywood + frame, not so much the water bag.

Um, check Freecycle for weight machines and scavenge the weights? Build that frame + plywood thing and the weights shouldn't shift (much). You'd have a false floor in your truck all winter.

Heck, the lady down the road used to toss in a pile of rocks and junk.

Alpacas, well, that's just wrong. Deer OK, maybe.

Halt At X
Jan. 10, 2011, 10:51 AM
Ah, I haven't been on COTH recently and I would have added my suggestion. I bought tires for the Tundra the week before Christmas. I ended up (after MUCH research) with Firestone Destination A/T tires. They look nice on the truck, decent tread thickness, they look like they belong on a truck, but very quiet. They ride so much smoother than the BFG tires that the truck came with. The price was REALLY good- $760 for everything (no tax since I went to NH), and I got the 18" tires. Plus they are rated to get 50k miles so I won't have to buy new ones for another 3 years or so.

Is it really necessary to add weight to the bed? This will be my 3rd winter driving the Tundra (it is my everyday vehicle) and I have never noticed an issue.

Mudroom
Jan. 10, 2011, 11:59 AM
Around here Lowe's sells tubes of sand for weights. 60 pounds for $4.xx

if you get into stuck, you can open a tube and put it down for traction

MistyBlue
Jan. 10, 2011, 04:31 PM
The price was REALLY good- $760 for everything (no tax since I went to NH), and I got the 18" tires. Plus they are rated to get 50k miles so I won't have to buy new ones for another 3 years or so.

Is it really necessary to add weight to the bed? This will be my 3rd winter driving the Tundra (it is my everyday vehicle) and I have never noticed an issue.

That's a good price. I paid just about double that. And they're 17".

My truck does fishtail a bit on slippery surfaces if the bed is empty. Not horribly, but enough to want to put a little weight over the tires.

marta
Jan. 10, 2011, 04:38 PM
bought them w/ the truck (used truck, new tires).
i need to replace the fronts now and am getting the same tires.
they handle mud, grass and snow well but are pleasant on the highway as well. sure they're a bit louder than your usual street tire but i'm willing to compromise to ensure i don't get stuck when parking the trailer in grassy fields or going off for a little ride on the dirt roads.

fanfayre
Jan. 10, 2011, 07:43 PM
Second the Geolanders!!! BEST TIRES EVER!!! Though I see you've already made your purchase and switch. This is for future reference.
Had them on our '93 GMC 2500 TD. NEVER so much as a spin with those babies, in every condition. Quiet on the highway, gripped in mud and handled snow like a dream. Sold them with the truck a month ago, though we swore we'd keep them and switch with the new truck. It sold too fast to change them, though.

MistyBlue
Jan. 10, 2011, 09:04 PM
Oh I'm definitely making note of all the tire suggestions for future use. :yes:

appaloosalady
Jan. 10, 2011, 10:50 PM
Would have suggested Cooper tires. As for weight in the back of the truck - DH bought a 7' blade box drag (+/- 1000#) at the barn sale Saturday and when I asked him how we were getting it out of the back of the truck his response was " leave it there for weight". Yup, I'm now driving all over the place with a big honkin' drag in the bed of my truck!! Not convenient for removal purposes however, lol.

fanfayre
Jan. 11, 2011, 01:01 AM
As for rear weight, try firewood, especially if wet. We did this our last snowfall (1st of the season) in my dad's Dakota and he didn't have one problem. (Had to use the Dakota [with 280,000 miles] because we'd just sold my 3/4 ton[see above :winkgrin:]).
Haven't gotten around to putting any in the new 3/4 ton because we only just got 4 inches Saturday night and it's supposed to be gone by Thursday. Plus, give me a chance to discover its quirks.