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IntegritySporthorses
Jan. 7, 2011, 02:18 PM
Can you repair waterproof blankets yourself?

Do you bother?

If so, where do you buy "patches" and how do they attach?

I have a couple that I was thinking about trying to fix myself but wonder if it's worth it.

TIA!

lisann
Jan. 7, 2011, 03:44 PM
http://www.sstack.com/horsewear_accessories/stormshield-repair-tape/
just stick it on

LSM1212
Jan. 7, 2011, 04:30 PM
Or you can go to any sporting goods store and they have patches for tents and such made of nylon and just stick on. I've used those and they hold up well. Even after being washed. :D

LauraKY
Jan. 7, 2011, 06:38 PM
I've used tent repair patches and Goop. Patches are still holding one year later.

vineyridge
Jan. 7, 2011, 08:11 PM
I have a Rambo of the old style. Somehow the horse it was on got the surcingle caught in a crack in the fence and ripped the whole thing off.

Is there any way to put it back on and still keep the blanket waterproof. To do a proper repair, I'd have to dissemble the blanket so the surcingle would only attach to the outer layer, but I'm wondering if just using an industrial machine to sew through the top and lining could work?

alabama
Jan. 7, 2011, 09:55 PM
http://www.sstack.com/horsewear_accessories/stormshield-repair-tape/
just stick it on
Ah! Thanks for that! My gelding bit my donkey's butt and ripped a hole in the donk's turnout. I temporarily repaired it with a sheet of duct tape (I love that duct tape comes in sheets!) so when my poor, boy donk is in his PINK turnout, he also has a big sheet of silver duct tape on his rear end. He's stylin'! :lol:

ladybugred
Jan. 7, 2011, 10:00 PM
viney- There is a wax for sealing seams on boots and things which would probably work on blankets, if you have to sew the surcingle on.

Thanx for this thread, my boy just ripped his blanket. How big of a hole in the blanket will those patches cover? The hole in my boy's looks like his mini buddy bit his butt.

Thanx!

LBR

Phaxxton
Jan. 7, 2011, 10:24 PM
I just repaired several myself using the Horseware Blanket Repair Kit (http://www.smartpakequine.com/ProductClass.aspx?productclassid=7483&cm_vc=Search). It comes with more than enough to fix several good-size rips. I would wear gloves when working with the glue, as it's a lot like airplane glue - SUPER sticky.

FWIW, none of the blankets I repaired were Horseware blankets, so it's not just for their brands.

LauraKY
Jan. 8, 2011, 09:55 AM
I just sewed a surcingle back on and repaired a big tear on a stable blanket, but I didn't have to worry about waterproofing.

I would recommend using an industrial machine. It was really tough trying to squeeze all that blanket through my regular home machine.

Walmart has tent seam waterproofing...I'm sure that sporting goods stores have it also.

MeghanDACVA
Jan. 8, 2011, 11:16 AM
My DH bought me an industrial sewing machine about 10 yrs ago. He sort of giggles about it though. For what he paid for it (new) I could by more blankets than I have repaired!!

I do sew surcingles and such back on, all the time :-(. Can you do it with a really tough regular machine? Yes. I have an OLD Singer (black, prob one of ot the orginal electric ones) that if you can get it under the pressure foot, it will sew it. But the industrial one is easier.

If you have a blanket repair person anywhere near you, just have them do it unless you happen to have an industrial machine. Or, some leather repair shops will do something like this too.

LauraKY
Jan. 8, 2011, 11:25 AM
My DH bought me an industrial sewing machine about 10 yrs ago. He sort of giggles about it though. For what he paid for it (new) I could by more blankets than I have repaired!!

I do sew surcingles and such back on, all the time :-(. Can you do it with a really tough regular machine? Yes. I have an OLD Singer (black, prob one of ot the orginal electric ones) that if you can get it under the pressure foot, it will sew it. But the industrial one is easier.

If you have a blanket repair person anywhere near you, just have them do it unless you happen to have an industrial machine. Or, some leather repair shops will do something like this too.

Those old Singers will sew through anything. Wish I had my Mom's...my brother took it! He does use it to repair tents and outdoors stuff, so it is being used, but still!

LauraKY
Jan. 8, 2011, 11:29 AM
I had a big tear on a turnout and none of the patches were large enough. I bought a pack of waterproof ditty bags at the sporting goods store and cut it to fit. Always round the corners. I then used Goop to seal it. It's not pretty, but it's held.

SeaPony
Jan. 13, 2011, 03:05 AM
I have fixed small holes in Rambos using just a little super glue. Hole was the size of a quarter. I wanted to keep the outer layer waterproof and didnt have another blanket handy to switch out and do a proper repair. It works great and the blanket is still waterproof three years later.

Good luck!

horsepoor
Jan. 13, 2011, 01:13 PM
For little holes, I've used the Stormshield patches from Schneider's and they seem to do all right.

On the ripped-off surcingle -- I think you would be fine just to sew it back on and not worry about the waterproofing. It is at the belly, right? Not really going to have much impact even if the stitching leaks a little water since it is under the horse. I have some of my blankets monogrammed at the bottom - on the belly wrap if they have them, or at the very bottom of the chest. That sews through all layers, compromising the waterproofing, but since it is down at the bottom, it really doesn't matter. Haven't had a problem.

Belg
Jan. 13, 2011, 01:23 PM
Wife does tons of blanket repairs. She's defintiely got a knack for taking a ripped, ratty, geldings-playing-wild-stallions blanket and making it warm and dry for winter. Of course, if we had to PAY for blanket repairs we'd be funding a small third world country....

+1 for self-repair.

Coanteen
Jan. 13, 2011, 01:30 PM
Haha, I just sutured mine. 2-0 silk! Wonder how long it'll hold.

Kementari
Jan. 13, 2011, 06:10 PM
I do all my own blanket repairs on my (nice) home machine. I use technical fabrics for the repairs (Gore Tex, Supplex, etc), which you can probably find in a good fabric store if you live near a city, or you can buy online - that way the patches themselves are waterproof. I do just sew through all the layers of the blanket, and have never had a problem with that creating "leaks" in the waterproofing. If I were to encounter such an issue, I'd go to an outdoor store and buy some seam seal in the tent section. :yes:

naturalequus
Jan. 13, 2011, 06:51 PM
Handy thread, I will have to keep it in mind for next time! One of my boys managed to rip his blanket in numerous spots last I was home from work but luckily none of the material was actually missing, all edges matched up. I sewed it all by hand (which took several hours, I can assure you, which I am sure the SO GREATLY appreciated since it meant his work jeans DIDN'T get sewn...hehehe ;)) but some patches from the outdoor store would have been better!

stilldreaming
Jan. 15, 2011, 10:49 AM
hi, a friend introduced me to a heavy needle & fishing line. I stiched a 6" rip on a seam; it's holding well. Definitely need a thimble for the tough material!!

wendybird
Jan. 15, 2011, 09:45 PM
For an emergency tear: go to a marine supply shop and buy some of the wide sticky tape they use for sail repairs.
I bought some and stuck a 6" square over the tear, as a temporary measure and promised to take the cover in for repair.

3 months later the tape is still sticking on!

Fairview Horse Center
Jan. 15, 2011, 09:58 PM
I just use dental floss to hand sew repairs. You can patch from an old turnout rug. so just save some material when you have one ready for the trash bin. I used to be able to just use an old pair of jeans to cut a patch, and then spray it with Scotchgard, but that is impossible to find.

If you have made a seam, rub a candle over it to waterproof it.