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Hop On Pop
Jan. 8, 2004, 07:29 PM
Ok, I'll start.
On Eskadrons, does the velcro go on the inside of the leg or the outside? I've been putting it on the outside..Am I wrong?
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HuntRulz
Jan. 8, 2004, 07:33 PM
Velcro goes on the outside http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

MEH180
Jan. 8, 2004, 07:35 PM
you are correct they Go on the outside

Member of the paint hunter clique

Hop On Pop
Jan. 8, 2004, 07:38 PM
Ha! i was right! Lol I completely guessed..It just seemee right that they'd go the same way as shipping boots. lol
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Proud member of the Traffic Cone Preservation Society!!

dogchushu
Jan. 8, 2004, 07:41 PM
This is really silly.

Why in a hack or flat class do you always start out tracking left? Why not right?



"Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work." -- Thomas A. Edison

Baileybff
Jan. 8, 2004, 08:40 PM
I myself am a stickler about this...but why is the http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gifright side the right side http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif for the mane?
Nat http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_confused.gif

"Show with C.L.A.S.S."
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Celebrity
Jan. 8, 2004, 08:42 PM
OK I have a REAL dumb one here folks.. what are "TS breeches?" http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_redface.gif hehehe.. I feel stupid, but please enlighten me!!! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

Holsteiner Clique!!
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archieflies
Jan. 8, 2004, 08:48 PM
Tailored Sportsman breeches (aka, what I could never afford!)
Ha! Finally one I could answer!

Saw 'Em Off...
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SillyFilly
Jan. 8, 2004, 08:48 PM
Celeb - Tailored Sportsmans. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif Very expensive pants, IMO, but on some people, they look great. Height of fashion!

Amy
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horseless rider
Jan. 8, 2004, 08:49 PM
TS Breeches are Tailored Sportsmans. They are the breeches that everybody on the hunter circuit wears. They are the puke green colored ones, which I'm sure you'll hear about somewhere on this board. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

" A horse is the projection of people's dreams about themselves; strong, powerful, beautiful and it has the capability of giving us escape from our mundane existence" - Pam Brown -

mickey
Jan. 8, 2004, 08:51 PM
TS is Tailored Sportsmen, which is a brand. And the velcro goes on the outside so that the boot is being pulled across the bone rather than the tendon, and also so that they don't hit it and loosed it.

Risk-Averse Rider
Jan. 8, 2004, 08:54 PM
When spurs have one side longer than the other, which side goes against the horse?

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Celebrity
Jan. 8, 2004, 08:54 PM
puke green eh??? I think I will stick with my beige/sandy coloured breeches.. It looks better with my show coat/blouses... but thanks!! I thought it was Tailored Sportsmen when I was looking at the Dover Catalog but wasn't too sure..
THANKS! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Holsteiner Clique!!
http://home.cogeco.ca/~patm/NOVA2.htm

CrossedWings
Jan. 8, 2004, 09:08 PM
You are correct Hop On Pop! Always the outside; and, the way I always tell which boot is for which leg (regardless of type of boot) is that the velcro goes on the outside and the velcro "tabs" (Eskadrons have two of these) ALWAYS point TOWARDS the hind legs.

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CrossedWings
Jan. 8, 2004, 09:12 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Risk-Averse Rider:
When spurs have one side longer than the other, which side goes against the horse?

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

The shorter side goes against the horse. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Chanda
Jan. 8, 2004, 09:18 PM
I think the mane on the right side has something to do with war horses and swords not getting tangled in the mane. Is that right?

Spurs, short side goes on the inside of your boot and the long side on the outside of your boot. So the short side is next to the horse.

www.clospepe.com (http://www.clospepe.com)

Vandy
Jan. 8, 2004, 10:00 PM
What is <3 ?

I just keep seeing it as "less than 3" which doesn't seem right...

Vandy
Jan. 8, 2004, 10:01 PM
And also, I believe that hack/flat classes start to the left because most horses prefer their left lead.

Pirateer
Jan. 8, 2004, 10:10 PM
<3 is shorthand for love. Its like, a heart. But sideways.

Rebecca and Merritt's Crew (Cruiser)
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Dancing Lawn
Jan. 9, 2004, 02:30 AM
Now, I NEVER would have figured out <3. My brain doesn't work that way. What other weird icons are out there, that I generally just gaze at, blindly, having no clue as to their meaning?

less hard work, more fine dining.
www.dancinglawnhorses.com (http://www.dancinglawnhorses.com) updated Dec. 29/03

If guys can do it, how hard can it be?

LoriO
Jan. 9, 2004, 03:09 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by dancing lawn:
Now, I NEVER would have figured out <3. My brain doesn't work that way. What other weird icons are out there, that I generally just gaze at, blindly, having no clue as to their meaning?

less hard work, more fine dining.
http://www.dancinglawnhorses.com updated Dec. 29/03

If guys can do it, how hard can it be?

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I can never figure those out myself!!

AS to the question on manes, yes it is from medieval times, to prevent a knights armor and sword from getting tangled in it.

The knights are also responsible for us mounting from the left side of the horse. this was done because the majority of them were right handed and wore their swords on the left, by mounting from the left side, it is the right leg that swings over and the sword remains hanging down on the left side and out of the way.

__________________________________________________ __________
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Rifter
Jan. 9, 2004, 04:36 AM
This has really been bothering me and I've been too embarrassed to ask my trainer because I'm afraid she'll be like "You should've learned this already"... but will someone explain what, exactly, poultice is used for and how to properly poultice? Now I feel dumb... http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

*-Rifter-*
Proud Member of the Dirty Grey Horse and the Disgruntled College Student Cliques

Just My Style
Jan. 9, 2004, 04:54 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Originally posted by Risk-Averse Rider:
When spurs have one side longer than the other, which side goes against the horse?


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------



The shorter side goes against the horse. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I am so glad someone asked this. I haven't worn spurs since I showed the Eqs in the 80s and I totally couldn't remember the other day. http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/lol.gif

GA Clique/Drafties Clique
Live Large- Ride a Drafty!

Kels
Jan. 9, 2004, 05:05 AM
Okay...What Mikmar bit is everyone talking about? I went to the website but they have a few...And what does it accomplish?

-Kelsey-
It is so easy, in the presence of horses, to appear foolish or incompetent.
http://www.gottaride.net/forums

Nauset
Jan. 9, 2004, 05:40 AM
Okay... what is the "Mileage Rule" ?

..:*:..:*:..:*:.BAS.:*:..:*:..:*:..


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LH
Jan. 9, 2004, 06:33 AM
Poultice - usually a clay-like substance, comes in a tub. I use it on my older jumper after a day on hard ground. It can cool and tighten the legs, and the legs feel "fresher" the next day. You slather the stuff on their legs, then wrap a wet brown paper (I use grocery bags) cut into rectangles, dipped in water. Put that on (keeps the poultice wetter longer), then put on the wrap, then the track or flannel bandage. When you take them off in the morning, you have to hose off the poultice, scrub it away a little (then dry legs well!).


The Mikmar bit is seemingly the new trend for hunter training and in the jumper ring. It's very light weight, and there are a lot of options for 2 reins, etc., so you can get a bit of the effect that you would get with a gag bit that applies pressure at the poll. The bit is not severe, but works differently -- definitely should not be in the hands of anyone except for an experienced, sensitive rider.

The Mileage Rule is a system designed to prevent any decent show from getting off the ground because some show that has been around since the turn of the last century has "bought the dates" from the AHSA or USEF (whatever they call it today) since before dirt existed. Seriously, with the exception of a few states in the northeast, a horse show will not be granted recognized status from the USEF if it is within 250 miles (the way the crow flies -- which is a whole 'nother issue) of another recognized horse show. THAT is why there is competition for dates, and it's hard to start up a new recognized show. And, that is why we are starting to see big time unrecognized shows (like the one the Maddens did last year for jumpers only) sprouting up to give options. There will be more controversy and discussion about that in the coming years. I say eliminate the mileage rule, and let the competitors decide which horse show should be better attended because of its management, footing, and competitor-friendly atmosphere!

Rifter
Jan. 9, 2004, 06:36 AM
Thank you LH!! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

*-Rifter-*
Proud Member of the Dirty Grey Horse and the Disgruntled College Student Cliques

dressager
Jan. 9, 2004, 06:59 AM
What are these stripes I hear about that you put on your GPA and how do you put them on?

Dressager (http://www.geocities.com/lubenkafarm)
You don't throw a whole life away just because its a little banged up - Tom Smith

Kels
Jan. 9, 2004, 07:07 AM
When people say they've striped their GPA usually they mean they've decorated it even more. Some people use fancy colored tapes, some use glittery junk, and now the trend is rhinestones ;-) Thanks LH- did you get my email?

-Kelsey-
It is so easy, in the presence of horses, to appear foolish or incompetent.
http://www.gottaride.net/forums

easyjumper1
Jan. 9, 2004, 07:11 AM
What does "KUDO" or something mean? I never figured that out. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_confused.gif

HunterUnderSaddle
Jan. 9, 2004, 07:12 AM
oh my gosh. I can't beleive I'm asking this. Please excuse my totally dumb-blond moment.

What does BB stand for?

easyjumper1
Jan. 9, 2004, 07:14 AM
Bulletin Board http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Kels
Jan. 9, 2004, 07:23 AM
heh, that took me a bit, too!!!

What is PMU?

-Kelsey-
It is so easy, in the presence of horses, to appear foolish or incompetent.
http://www.gottaride.net/forums

RodeoHunter
Jan. 9, 2004, 07:23 AM
I'm confused about someone elses confusion but I've taken it a step more basic. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif What do you mean by spurs having a shorter side? I'm lost.

**Member of the Ocularly Challenged Equine Support Group**

dressager
Jan. 9, 2004, 07:23 AM
Kudos means good job...

PMU- pregnant mare's urine

Dressager (http://www.geocities.com/lubenkafarm)
You don't throw a whole life away just because its a little banged up - Tom Smith

hoopoe
Jan. 9, 2004, 07:26 AM
<3 )~~

I love mouses

http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

_\\]
-- * > hoopoe
The ancient Greeks did not write obituaries. They only wanted to know if you had a passion.

Linny
Jan. 9, 2004, 07:46 AM
PMU-Pregnant Mare Urine. It is used in the production of the drug Premarin (get it, PREgnantMAReurINe) which is used in hormone therapy for menopausal woman.
Its a hot topic as the foals produced are usually regarded as an "unwanted byproduct" of the system AND because recent studies have indicated that long term use of Premarin is harmful. As a result there are hundreds of "PMU Mares" flooding the market as farms decrease operation.

Resident racing historian
Founder of the Mighty Thoroughbred Clique

Kels
Jan. 9, 2004, 08:04 AM
Oh gosh. I did an article review of HRT (hormone replacement therapy) for my biology class- and I had no idea that is what they used. Wow- that's pretty sad. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif Thanks for the info.

-Kelsey-
It is so easy, in the presence of horses, to appear foolish or incompetent.
http://www.gottaride.net/forums

Chanda
Jan. 9, 2004, 08:18 AM
Some spurs, but not all of them, have different lengths to the part that your spur strap attaches to. I am not sure of the reason, maybe to keep them from rubbing your ankle area. All of my spurs and the same on both sides.

www.clospepe.com (http://www.clospepe.com)

eclipse
Jan. 9, 2004, 08:32 AM
Ok, why are they called "puke" green breeches. When I puke, it's never green!!????? http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

And on the subject of spurs, why do some spurs have one side shorter than the other?

"somewhere in the world, my size is considered desirable!!"

b328
Jan. 9, 2004, 08:35 AM
Okay, what are all of the aids? I can only think of 4, and I think there are 5. I can think of hands, seat, legs, and voice. Is there another?

Dancing Lawn
Jan. 9, 2004, 09:09 AM
Kels, Haven't you been reading my posts about the PMU mares? Look them up, and discover whole new world! Then, you can PT me, and I'll fill you in even more!

less hard work, more fine dining.
www.dancinglawnhorses.com (http://www.dancinglawnhorses.com) updated Dec. 29/03

If guys can do it, how hard can it be?

chrissy mackris
Jan. 9, 2004, 09:17 AM
why do we post when our horses outside leg goes forward?

and why are normal jumps called "verticals" instead of "horizontals?"

*Tipperary*

Court@HJ-OH
Jan. 9, 2004, 09:24 AM
Puke green because they are a brownish green. And I have been told that the posting on the outside leg is really a balance thing.

**Courtney**

Kels
Jan. 9, 2004, 09:24 AM
Eclipse- I puked green once, it wasn't pretty http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Dancing Lawn- Okay http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

The vertical question is a good one...

I may get it for this one, but it's a valid question, even though I've been riding forever, just never wanted to ask...
Why is the proper lead the inside leg? Does it have something to do with balance? http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/uhoh.gif

-Kelsey-
It is so easy, in the presence of horses, to appear foolish or incompetent.
http://www.gottaride.net/forums

sanctuary
Jan. 9, 2004, 09:26 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by chrissy mackris:
why do we post when our horses outside leg goes forward?

and why are normal jumps called "verticals" instead of "horizontals?"

*Tipperary*
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

We post to the outside leg so that when we sit, our weight is down when the horses inside front leg is down. That way when they make a turn and pivot on their front inside leg, our weight is in unison and we are balanced.

Verticals are called verticals because all the poles are on the same vertical plane....aka they all go up, one on top of the other. An oxer is more on the horizontal plane.

The reason the velcro goes on the outside of the leg on any boots is so that you are pulling the tension/pressure across the cannon bone and not the tendon. Anything you put on a horses leg should come from the inside to the outside.

Sleepy
Jan. 9, 2004, 09:29 AM
Fences are called verticals because they are straight up and down, i.e., they have no depth such as an oxer or even a coop would. (And ALL fences are horizontal. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif )

''Computers are useless. They can only give you answers.''
- Pablo Picasso

chrissy mackris
Jan. 9, 2004, 09:35 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by sanctuary:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by chrissy mackris:
why do we post when our horses outside leg goes forward?

and why are normal jumps called "verticals" instead of "horizontals?"

*Tipperary*
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

We post to the outside leg so that when we sit, our weight is down when the horses inside front leg is down. That way when they make a turn and pivot on their front inside leg, our weight is in unison and we are balanced.

Verticals are called verticals because all the poles are on the same vertical plane....aka they all go up, one on top of the other. An oxer is more on the horizontal plane.

The reason the velcro goes on the outside of the leg on any boots is so that you are pulling the tension/pressure across the cannon bone and not the tendon. Anything you put on a horses leg should come from the inside to the outside.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

that makes a lot of sense! thanks!

*Tipperary*

Blinky
Jan. 9, 2004, 09:36 AM
I thought fences were called verticals because we jumped them vertical.

chrissy mackris
Jan. 9, 2004, 09:36 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Kels:
Eclipse- I puked green once, it wasn't pretty http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Dancing Lawn- Okay http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

The vertical question is a good one...

I may get it for this one, but it's a valid question, even though I've been riding forever, just never wanted to ask...
Why is the proper lead the inside leg? Does it have something to do with balance? http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/uhoh.gif

-Kelsey-
It is so easy, in the presence of horses, to appear foolish or incompetent.
http://www.gottaride.net/forums<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

i cant give you a scientifically correct answer, but i know it has something to do with balance http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/yes.gif just think how much harder it is to get your horse around a turn when you are counter cantering without switching leads

*Tipperary*

Beethoven
Jan. 9, 2004, 09:40 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Sleepy:
Fences are called verticals because they are straight up and down, i.e., they have no depth such as an oxer or even a coop would. (And ALL fences are horizontal. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif )

_''Computers are useless. They can only give you answers.''
- Pablo Picasso_<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

WOW! that makes soo much sense!!

~Jenna & Beethoven~
http://community.webshots.com/user/jlm179

sweetnlo
Jan. 9, 2004, 09:45 AM
all this talk about diagnols and leads got me wondering how did the term "diagnol" become associated with "posting" and who thought of that term form going UP and DOWN as the horse trots. Who came up with "lead" for the canter, I mean calling the "rope" you use to show the horse where you want it to follow you a "lead" makes sense, but for canter???????

prider80
Jan. 9, 2004, 09:46 AM
O.K., I've got one...am I the only person who prefers traditional irons to the Sprenger irons?? Not trying to be a G.M. wannabe or anything like that, http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif but I honestly prefer how the traditional ones feel--so much more secure than the Sprengers. Anyone with me on this? http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

53
Jan. 9, 2004, 09:49 AM
Regarding the posting question - I was taught that we watch the shoulders (some are taught outside forward - some are taught to watch for the inside back) regardless - I was taught that while we are watching the shoulders - we are actually making sure that we are utilizing the correct hind leg - its the thrust of the hind leg that we are using to push us up and out of the saddle - also why sitting the trot can be hard - the hind legs are thrusting underneath us - so when we post we use the energy of the hind leg to 'boost' us out of the saddle, rise, and come back down again as the hind leg is moving back again - I've been taught that we utilize the inside hind leg for this thrust for balance - if you're tracking to the left, turning to the left, etc, the inside hind leg is the power house and we use it as the horse is using it. Try posting on the off diagonal - it can show a horse that is weak in its balance, but it should be able to show you the difference in how it affects your balance and how the power is coming from behind.

dab
Jan. 9, 2004, 09:50 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Okay, what are all of the aids? I can only think of 4, and I think there are 5. I can think of hands, seat, legs, and voice. Is there another? <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>Weight

53
Jan. 9, 2004, 09:52 AM
Ok - diagonal - is because we are moving in synch with a chosen set of a diagonal pair - either the left fore and the right hind, or the right fore and the left hind.
Lead - is because one of the fore legs always leads.

Hilary
Jan. 9, 2004, 09:56 AM
I have to answer the posting question - we rise with the outside shoulder going forward because that gets our weight off the back, and usualy also a stronger leg aid, when the inside HIND leg is off the ground so the horse is encouraged to take a bigger step. There are times in dressage when you want to post on the "wrong" diagonal when asking for lateral work or lengthenings.

I don't understand the "pivoting" answer = unless you're doing a turn on the forehand the horse does not pivot on any legs while turning.

As for leads - it is much easier for the horse to turn in the direction of the lead he's on due to balance.

snokat
Jan. 9, 2004, 09:56 AM
I'm so glad some people have asked about which way to put wraps, boots, etc. on a horses' legs. As the earlier poster said, you ALWAYS wrap from inside to outside across the front of the horses' leg where the cannon bone is. Also, watch to not pull too tightly across the back (where the tendon is) when using stretchy wraps. This is why I like to use flannel - it's really difficult to get them too tight.

Lots of folks have talked about lesson ideas, and I remember my trainer teaching me this 21 years ago when it rained during my lesson time. I practiced wrapping my horse for an hour... I also practiced rolling wraps! :-) Please teach your students or teach yourself how to put on boots, put on polos, and do both standing and shipping wraps - it's good to know!

eclipse
Jan. 9, 2004, 09:57 AM
Ok, on the subject of leads & diagnols: If you are trotting or cantering in a big open space (think 5 acre wheat field), what is the correct lead or diagnol??? http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif

"somewhere in the world, my size is considered desirable!!"

RodeoHunter
Jan. 9, 2004, 10:07 AM
Well when I used to ride out in fields, I would pick up a random lead or diagonal and switch sometimes to redistribute the weight. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif I don't really know!

**Member of the Ocularly Challenged Equine Support Group**

TC Manhattan
Jan. 9, 2004, 10:15 AM
If you're riding out in the open (probably "straight line" would be more accurate), there is no "correct" or "incorrect" lead or diagonal. In fact, doing straight line work (like roads and tracks) ideally one would switch leads/diagonals regularly in order to work both sides of the horse equally.

The issue of weight-bearing and correct diagonals/leads comes into play any time one is riding on an arc, curve, circle (whatever) rather than on a straight line. In an indoor, or any ring, obviously one spends a good deal of time on some sort of turn, curve, etc.

Any time a horse is travelling a curved line, his inside hind leg/hock does the most work, both in terms of weight bearing and in terms of engaging more under his center of gravity since it's inside on the short side of the curve. In order to lighten the load on that hard-working inside leg, one posts UP off their back when this leg is on it's weigh-bearing part of the cycle. That lines us up with rising on the outside fore going forward. (Does this make any sense?)

Some exercises do call for riding your horse for short bits on a circle and posting on the WRONG diagonal. This adds your body weight to the inside hind when it is in full weight-bearing mode...this exercise serves to work that hind leg even HARDER. Sort of like intermittent weight-training for that ever-important inside hind.

With canter leads, a horse's body naturally bends slightly in the same direction as the leading leg, which is why they feel more balanced when cantered on the "correct" lead. It takes alot of training and physical development for a horse's countercanter to become as balanced (and feel as balanced) as their regular canter. Hope this helps some! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

"Have no expectations, only abundant expectancy."

Tucked_Away
Jan. 9, 2004, 10:16 AM
The rise-and-fall-with-the-leg-on-the-wall thing also keeps you from always posting on the same diagonal, which I'm told could be hard on the horse.

There was a thread on the dressage forum a few months back about posting on the incorrect diagonal. Interesting reading.

SillyMillie
Jan. 9, 2004, 10:16 AM
Eclipse, there isnt a correct diagonal in that case but you should change it from time to time to give them a break.

Leads are the same thing, most horses will do a flying change when they are tired of a lead. If not, bring them down and switch them every so often. It's a good indicator of how tired your horse is, how often they opt to change leads in that situation.


Another reason the boots always close on the outside is that the horse doesn't undo them by accidentally interfering with them.

And since the inside legs come further forward at the canter...they "lead" the other legs.

&&&Natural Blonde, Please Speak Slowly&&&

sweetnlo
Jan. 9, 2004, 10:21 AM
53, I can now see some sense in the "terminology", wonder if my lil kiddeeez will????????

SillyMillie
Jan. 9, 2004, 10:26 AM
I actually get this one from my students a lot... and just think it's very funny.

"Why do you call it a ring, when it's square?"

&&&Natural Blonde, Please Speak Slowly&&&

WonderPony
Jan. 9, 2004, 10:34 AM
I believe the term "posting" comes from when there were postilion riders with carriages. It seems to me that the postilion riders rode one? two?? of the driven horse, and rather than sitting for the entire time, they would post to save their butts and the horses' backs.

Flash44
Jan. 9, 2004, 10:36 AM
I know which is the correct diagonal when I am on a horse; however, I don't know which is the "right" diagonal and which is the "left" diagonal.

Nickelodian
Jan. 9, 2004, 10:41 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Kels:

Why is the proper lead the inside leg? Does it have something to do with balance? http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/uhoh.gif
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Everything to do with balance. Watch a horse gallop around in a pasture sometimes. When they turn they will be on the correct lead (naturally), and when they change directions they will swap leads all by themselves. Assuming they don't have a physical limitation to doing the change.

Buuuuut..now I feel dumb, I've been wearing my spurs backwards for YEARS!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
www.scatteredoaksfarm.com (http://www.scatteredoaksfarm.com)

Kels
Jan. 9, 2004, 10:57 AM
LOLLLLLLLLLLL well hasn't this thread enlightened us all? Thanks for clearing things up...

Eclipse, I am with you on the leads! I can tell when I am riding, but which is which?!

-Kelsey-
It is so easy, in the presence of horses, to appear foolish or incompetent.
http://www.gottaride.net/forums

Janet
Jan. 9, 2004, 11:20 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Chanda:
Some spurs, but not all of them, have different lengths to the part that your spur strap attaches to. I am not sure of the reason, maybe to keep them from rubbing your ankle area. All of my spurs and the same on both sides.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>The "reason" is to make it easier to use the spur without having to point your toes out as much.

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain

JinxyFish313
Jan. 9, 2004, 11:24 AM
I've always wondered- is there any use for standing wraps other than over shipping cottons/quilts/etc?

'Saanb ke rakh ni ey jovan butri
Hun mur ke na aauni bahaar' -punjabi mc

HunterUnderSaddle
Jan. 9, 2004, 11:33 AM
BB = Bulletin Board. Thanks easyjumper1
http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/winkgrin.gif I'll never have to wonder any more.

mnolen9698
Jan. 9, 2004, 11:46 AM
prider80 -- I love my Spernger irons b/c I have bad needs and the flexing motion provides relief. But, I think they *look* awful (especially on jr eq and medal riders).

mnolen9698
Jan. 9, 2004, 11:52 AM
When should you wrap your horses legs (e.g., setting up)? Is there a certain fence height requirement? Horse age requirement? Stall size?

Janet
Jan. 9, 2004, 11:58 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by mnolen9698:
When should you wrap your horses legs (e.g., setting up)? Is there a certain fence height requirement? Horse age requirement? Stall size?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>Personal opinion. Some people wrap "every time the horse jumps". Others only wrap if there is an actual injury. Most fall somewhere in between.

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain

TC Manhattan
Jan. 9, 2004, 12:13 PM
As for how often or when to wrap your horses' legs, well, my vet (he is a real old-time leg man) told me that it all boils down to just how much the horse is worth to you. Cold hosing and wrapping cost NOTHING but your time/convenience. It's cheap insurance and it works. After all, once your guy has ever pulled a suspensory or the like, that's how you would treat that injury. He said there is no such thing as wrapping them too much. Any stress to the tissues, the cold treatments or wrapping minimize the swelling of the tissues which is what predisposes to inflammation or development of scar tissue. If they were wrapped but NOT overstressed, what have you hurt? Why wait till something does go wrong? Alot of these soft tissue injuries are a result of many frequent "micro-tears" that accumulate till you have a visible problem. Wrapping can only help. Watch the racetrack owners with the REALLY VALUABLE horses (provided they don't have a lazy trainer). They all get cold treatments every time and wrapping. It just can't hurt.

"Have no expectations, only abundant expectancy."

emcallaway
Jan. 9, 2004, 12:22 PM
I feel stupid for asking, but after the BB question this one doesn't seem so bad. What does FEI stand for? I see it all the time on the dressage forum and there's even a horse at one of the barns I ride at that's an FEI horse, but I have no idea what it means.
Also, I'm pretty new to the show world ( in fact I've never shown) can someone give me a quick rundown on the different levels/classes, etc,etc. Hence, what is "A" class, Juniors, schooling...

*"I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates when he said, I drank what?"

* "the suspense is terrible. I hope it lasts"

TC Manhattan
Jan. 9, 2004, 12:34 PM
FEI Federation Equestrienne Internationale (sp?) It refers to international level competitions.

"Have no expectations, only abundant expectancy."

TC Manhattan
Jan. 9, 2004, 12:43 PM
Okay, here's MY turn....what's a "bump"? As in soome of the posts where they just say "bump"? I am CLUELESS...

"Have no expectations, only abundant expectancy."

dab
Jan. 9, 2004, 12:43 PM
FEI = Federation Equestre Internationale -- It governs international competitions -- An FEI horse is a dressage horse that competes at Prix St. George, Intermediare I/II, or Grand Prix --

Hunter shows that are sanctioned by USEF, are rated 'A', 'B', or 'C' -- A shows offer the most prize money and are expected to be the most competitive -- Juniors is the most competitive level that riders under the age of 18 as of 12/1 of the previos year can compete in hunters or jumpers -- Junior hunters are divided into smalls (horses under 16 hands) and large (horses 16H and larger) sections -- They are also divided into younger (15 & under) and older (16-17 year old) age groups -- Junior jumpers aren't divided by age group --

dab
Jan. 9, 2004, 12:44 PM
'bump' means to bump the thread back to the top of the list --

Just My Style
Jan. 9, 2004, 12:48 PM
A "bump" is used to bump a post back up to the top of the threads. So, this thread will now get a "bump" from me and now go back to the top.

BUMP!

GA Clique/Drafties Clique
Live Large- Ride a Drafty!

snokat
Jan. 9, 2004, 01:11 PM
For those with questions regarding "correct" leads when traveling in a straight line, next time you watch a horse race, notice how racehorses swap leads after exiting the turn. There's actually a pretty cool slow-mo segment in Seabiscuit that shows the swap at full speed. Pretty cool stuff! I used to wonder why race horses weren't all muscled up from constantly traveling on the left-lead, but then I learned that they swap to the right for the straight-aways. It makes sense to keep them balanced and evenly muscled - I just never thought of it before!

horsegirl33
Jan. 9, 2004, 01:30 PM
right lead and left lead...let's see how i can explain this...and if i'm even right!! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Right lead is when you're tracking right in the ring and the horses right leg is leading (the correct lead when tracking right). Left is when you're tracking left... right? http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

***God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses***

~~member of the Chicken Jumper Clique (AND PROUD OF IT!!) http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif, IHSA clique & only child clique~~

mnolen9698
Jan. 9, 2004, 01:30 PM
TCManhattan -- Thanks for the wrapping advise. We always wrap at shows but rarely do at home b/c the horse have huge indoor stalls with big runs attached. I didn't know if you could over-wrap. Now I need to be less lazy on the matter!

Court@HJ-OH
Jan. 9, 2004, 01:52 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by JinxyFish313:
I've always wondered- is there any use for standing wraps other than over shipping cottons/quilts/etc?

'Saanb ke rakh ni ey jovan butri
Hun mur ke na aauni bahaar' -punjabi mc<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>No, and never ever ever wrap in standing wraps with out quilts or pillows.

My question...as someone that has actually done polo. How many of you think that you really are supporting tendons with polos?

**Courtney**

Heinz 57
Jan. 9, 2004, 01:59 PM
I think that, whether or not polos really DO provide support... if done correctly, whatever they may provide whether it be small amounts of support or protection, it doesn't hurt anything. Its kind of like wrapping after a ride... even if there wasn't any stress, it doesn't hurt as long as you do it right.

I had a TB gelding who worked better(read: sounder, less ouchiness) in polos. Go figure.

Dé Chéadaoin Iolar
*Is minic a rinne bromach gioblach capall cumasach.*

KtDid
Jan. 9, 2004, 02:13 PM
ok i have two really stupid questions.

1. what exactly is the A/O division?
2. this goes along with the wrapping questions, when exactly should you use polo wraps when riding?

*Finding my way back to sanity again, though i don't really know what im gonna do when i get there.*
~Katie

prider80
Jan. 9, 2004, 02:21 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by KtDid:
ok i have two really stupid questions.

1. what exactly is the A/O division?
2. this goes along with the wrapping questions, when exactly should you use polo wraps when riding?

*Finding my way back to sanity again, though i don't really know what im gonna do when i get there.*
~Katie<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

The A/O hunter division is for amateurs (riders who have aged out of juniors) who own the horse they're competing on

Janet
Jan. 9, 2004, 02:22 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by KtDid:
ok i have two really stupid questions.

1. what exactly is the A/O division?
2. this goes along with the wrapping questions, when exactly should you use polo wraps when riding?

~Katie<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>A/O = Amateur Owner. the rider must be an amateur (according to 808), and must own the horse.

Polo wraps are used to look spiffy at awards presentations. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain

glfprncs
Jan. 9, 2004, 02:42 PM
Back to the velco on boots...yet another reason why the velcro goes on the outside is because if you put it on the inside of the leg, the horse would have ample opportunity to knock the velcro loose, thus allowing the boot to shift, twist, or fall.

Another silly question....whoever thought it was a good idea for female riders to pull their hair back so that if covered the top half of your ear perfectly?

Lord Helpus
Jan. 9, 2004, 02:51 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by dab:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Okay, what are all of the aids? I can only think of 4, and I think there are 5. I can think of hands, seat, legs, and voice. Is there another? <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>Weight<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

LOL, For me, it used to be "elbows" because I used to flap them when I saw a honking long spot... http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/winkgrin.gif

LoLoN425
Jan. 9, 2004, 03:03 PM
Court, I was gonna ask the same thing! A lot of polo players wrap the same direction on all four legs....how can the horse feel balanced and even like this? And can't it cause more harm then good?? Whenever I played I'd always to make sure to wrap them the correct way and they just looked at me like a dumb hunter/jumper rider... http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_confused.gif

*Lauren*

*Willie's Way*
*Trinity*

http://community.webshots.com/user/lolon425

Hopeful Hunter
Jan. 9, 2004, 03:04 PM
"LOL, For me, it used to be "elbows" because I used to flap them when I saw a honking long spot... "

Hey, I Do That!

But I don't think the aid is elbows....I think it's vocabulary....for the amazing permutations of language possible when you see that honking long spot....

HopelessHunter
Jan. 9, 2004, 03:05 PM
I have a pretty stupid question too.. kudos to whoever started this thread (look at my new word use! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif)

In my situation, last year I only showed in a Schooling Show once. Is that considered a full show "year", or can I go back and show in long stirrup (Long Stirrup rules say that it is for riders 12 and over who have shown for 1 or 2 years).

TIA! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Gravie
Jan. 9, 2004, 03:16 PM
Re: A/Os.

So what do you compete in if you're over 18 but don't own the horse you're competing on?

I have jillions of other questions, but I can't seem to think of them at the moment. Fear not! I will be back. ^_~

_____


oh-darling.net (http://oh-darling.net) my own domain, finally!

GatoGordo
Jan. 9, 2004, 03:28 PM
Hopeful Hunter, I agree completely. Vocabulary, like any other aid, must be used judiciously and with respect to the individual horse. It is versatile and can be used on or off of the horse. For instance, when Phinny dumped me and I cursed at him, he was depressed and (I hope) penitent the rest of the day, according to Allie. When I said the s*** word at Mark's departing behind the other day, all he did was make me short of breath trying to find him. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_mad.gif

When used while still in the saddle, "s***" means to Phinny, "Take off from here and fly."
Goodbye, Herndon, Hello, Culpeper! (http://www.fairweather-farm.com/randompics/frying%20pan%20083103/3440058-R1-006-1A.jpg)

There are only two types of eventers out there: Those who have fallen in the water jump and those that will. -- subk
Founding Member, Bird Nerd Clique; Eventing Yahoo In Training; formerly known as BostonGold

hideyourheart03
Jan. 9, 2004, 03:28 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Gravie:
Re: A/Os.

So what do you compete in if you're over 18 but _don't_ own the horse you're competing on?

I have jillions of other questions, but I can't seem to think of them at the moment. Fear not! I will be back. ^_~
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

If you do not own the horse or are not related to the owners (aka they are your parents, grandparents, etc.) then you must show in the Adult Amateur Division (well that is if you are not a pro). It is 6" shorter than that A/O division.

~~~~~~~Samantha~~~~~~~

Hide Your Heart aka ELI

Junior Clique
Baby Greenie Support Group
MOOP Clique
Non-GPA Clique
NC Clique

"The real me is a Southern girl, with the Levi's on and an open heart" ~ Jessica Simpson

HuntJumpSC
Jan. 9, 2004, 03:42 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by TC Manhattan:
Okay, here's MY turn....what's a "bump"? As in soome of the posts where they just say "bump"? I am CLUELESS...

"Have no expectations, only abundant expectancy."<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

It's something that gets used (or abused) wayyyy too much by some BB members, like within on hour of posting a topic, they "bump" it back to the top with a couple of these http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif because no one has replied yet. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

II===II SUZ II===II
"On second thought, let's not go to Camelot, 'tis a silly place"
*No Regrets, Sentimental Journey, & Miz Scarlett*
http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/yes.gifSCer's Clique*http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/yes.gif*Group W Bench Clique*http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/yes.gif*Packrats Anonymous Clique*http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/yes.gif*Flying Horsewomen Clique*http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/yes.gif

SCAllstarzHntrRyder
Jan. 9, 2004, 03:57 PM
Okay this may sound really really stupid... but i have heard such stories that at sum nice shows a person can be hacking around on their hunter and maybe pop over sum fences.. Pros see them... like them.. then offer crazy high prices.. we are talking like $50,000-150,000... does this ACCUALLY happen? If so WHERE???

~Mirage~
~Miss Money Penny~
~Foot Note~
Heidi S AKA Evil Twin

Melzy
Jan. 9, 2004, 04:09 PM
I always thought <3 meant under 3 feet. http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/lol.gif

Kerby
Jan. 9, 2004, 04:55 PM
ok, my question:

Why is western riding called western, and english called english. Why not western and eastern? or English and _______ (Insert country)?

And on the issue of aids those are natural aids, there are of course artificial aids including spurs, whip, martingale etc.

Hopeless hunter: I think rules such as those apply to recognized shows, and not schooling shows. At our barn we don't usually count it if you did one or two shows (unless you won absolutly everything).

KtDid: I use polo wraps if I have a horse with iffy tendons and need that extra support. I don't think boots that velcro on add the same kind of support.

On the wraping horse after jumping question: if you wrap it (stable bandage) every time after you jump, do you make your horses legs weaker from so much (too much) support?

Smithereens
Jan. 9, 2004, 05:04 PM
Here's my question-
Is Scott Stewart related to Don Jr. and Erin?

MAD
Jan. 9, 2004, 05:18 PM
Lots of questions on leads and diagonals. I found this on the Web and for the most part I didn't think it is too confusing. No one seemed to mention before that the gallop is actually a 4beat gait -similar to the walk- while the canter is a 3beat gait.

Gaits of a Horse
WALK
The walk is a four-beat gait in an order such as near (left) hind, near fore, off (right) hind, off fore. Alternately two or three feet may be touching the ground simultaneously.

TROT
The trot is a two-beat gait, the fore and hind diagonal pairs of legs following each other almost simultaneously--near fore, off hind, off fore, and near hind.

CANTER
The canter is a three-beat gait characterized by one or the other of the forelegs and both hindlegs leading--near hind, off hind, and near fore practically together, then off fore, followed briefly by complete suspension. Cantering can be on the near lead or the off, depending on which is the last foot to leave the ground.

GALLOP
An accelerated canter becomes the gallop, as the horse reaches speeds up to 30 miles an hour. The horse's movements are the same as in the canter and to most authorities, the gallop is a four-beat gait.
Â*


Â*

BybeeGirl
Jan. 9, 2004, 05:52 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by hideyourheart03:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Gravie:
Re: A/Os.

So what do you compete in if you're over 18 but _don't_ own the horse you're competing on?

I have jillions of other questions, but I can't seem to think of them at the moment. Fear not! I will be back. ^_~
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

If you do not own the horse or are not related to the owners (aka they are your parents, grandparents, etc.) then you must show in the Adult Amateur Division (well that is if you are not a pro). It is 6" shorter than that A/O division.

~~~~~~~Samantha~~~~~~~

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

So this isn't something I've always wanted to know, but your answer prompted the asking:
If you own the horse and you're an amateur can you still show in the Adult/Am. division, or do you have to do the A/0?
just a thought..

Kestrel
Jan. 9, 2004, 06:38 PM
Yes, an owner may show their own horse in the Adult Amateur division, and that is the case for the majority of the horse/rider pairs.

[This message was edited by Kestrel on Jan. 09, 2004 at 09:51 PM.]

Beethoven
Jan. 9, 2004, 06:49 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Court@HJ-OH:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by JinxyFish313:
I've always wondered- is there any use for standing wraps other than over shipping cottons/quilts/etc?

'Saanb ke rakh ni ey jovan butri
Hun mur ke na aauni bahaar' -punjabi mc<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>No, and never ever ever wrap in standing wraps with out quilts or pillows.

My question...as someone that has actually done polo. How many of you think that you really are supporting tendons with polos?

**Courtney**<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Well medicine boots are put over the polo wraps where I play for protection and support. http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/winkgrin.gif

~Jenna & Beethoven~
http://community.webshots.com/user/jlm179

Beethoven
Jan. 9, 2004, 06:53 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by LoLoN425:
Court, I was gonna ask the same thing! A lot of polo players wrap the same direction on all four legs....how can the horse feel balanced and even like this? And can't it cause more harm then good?? Whenever I played I'd always to make sure to wrap them the correct way and they just looked at me like a dumb hunter/jumper rider... http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_confused.gif

*Lauren*

*Willie's Way*
*Trinity*

http://community.webshots.com/user/lolon425
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yea, at the place where I play polo we wrap them the correct way on each, but I noticed some of the "real" ie experinced polo players wraped them all the same way(read two wrong), so I don't know whats up with that.

~Jenna & Beethoven~
http://community.webshots.com/user/jlm179

Janet
Jan. 9, 2004, 07:34 PM
Wrapping-
I also know some (reputable) people (in other countries) who consistently wrap "bakwards"- going forward on the outside and back along the inside.

What is really important is that you apply tension to the bandage when going back (so you "pull against the front of the cannon bone), and simply wrap (without tension) when going forward, to avoid putting pressure on the tendon.

The other important things are to make sure there are no wrinkles, and that you wrap evenly, with the same tension along the leg.

Which direction you wrap seems to be largely a question of how/where you were taught.

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain

Hop On Pop
Jan. 9, 2004, 07:53 PM
Haha I started such a long thread! I feel so proud. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif
________________________________________________
Proud member of the Traffic Cone Preservation Society!!!

JusJumpIt
Jan. 9, 2004, 08:09 PM
TO HOP ON POP- What a great question, I loved reading through all of these posts. Thank you!

Coca-Cola
Jan. 9, 2004, 08:16 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Kerby:
ok, my question:

Why is western riding called western, and english called english. Why not western and eastern? or English and _______ (Insert country)?

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

It is called English because it is the style that predominates in England. It is called Western because it is a style that developed in the Western hemisphere (both North and South America). English is not called Eastern because the English style does not predominate the Eastern hemisphere, but it does in England.

CuriousGeorge
Jan. 9, 2004, 08:18 PM
Smithereens, NO, Scott Stewart is not related to Don and Erin. Kim Stewart is not related to either Scott or Don/Erin, either.

Rest assured, however, that you are not the first person to wonder about this. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Downpour
Jan. 9, 2004, 08:26 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Court@HJ-OH:

How many of you think that you really are supporting tendons with polos?

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Not me, they are simply protection against the elements/themselves. (Kind of like knee guards or elbow pads roller-bladers might use; they serve only as protection against abrasions/minor bruising, they are CUSHION between the horses leg and whatever they try to hit it with, they do not offer support.)

As my vet once put it: "Do YOUR socks support your legs???" My point exactly. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif



***Founder of the T.A.B Clique; THINK positive. ACT positive. BE positive.

Kerby
Jan. 9, 2004, 08:33 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Downpour:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Court@HJ-OH:

How many of you think that you really are supporting tendons with polos?

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Not me, they are simply protection against the elements/themselves. (Kind of like knee guards or elbow pads roller-bladers might use; they serve only as protection against abrasions/minor bruising, they are CUSHION between the horses leg and whatever they try to hit it with, they do not offer support.)

As my vet once put it: "Do YOUR socks support your legs???" My point exactly. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Question is.. how many of us coil our socks around our legs and make it snug and tight? (I personally find socks very uncomfortable when worn in such a manner http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif) I like to compare polo to tensor bandages, which do offer protection, and support. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Downpour
Jan. 9, 2004, 08:33 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Janet:
Wrapping-
I also know some (reputable) people (in other countries) who consistently wrap "bakwards"- going forward on the outside and back along the inside.

What is really important is that you apply tension to the bandage when going back (so you "pull against the front of the cannon bone), and simply wrap (without tension) when going forward, to avoid putting pressure on the tendon.

The other important things are to make sure there are no wrinkles, and that you wrap evenly, with the same tension along the leg.

Which direction you wrap seems to be largely a question of how/where you were taught.

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Just wanted to add that no matter which "direction" you wrap you run the risk of pulling the tendons; doesn't matter which way, based on my vet (yes a lengthy discussion on wraps/polos), either way is just as likely to cause the same problem with the tendons!

My vet did say there are two important things one must do in order to avoid tension on the tendon, the first is to NOT wrap too tightly, and the second is to maintain consistent wrap tension

Cheers http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

mnolen9698
Jan. 9, 2004, 09:15 PM
MAD -- I'm glad you pointed out the difference b/w the canter and gallop. I'm amazed at how many eq and medal riders don't know the difference (something they demonstrate when asked to "hand gallop").

NEW QUESTION -- What is the purpose of the throat latch? How tight/loose should it be?

horsegirl33
Jan. 9, 2004, 09:18 PM
ok...here's my question...

can someone please explain to me the CORRECT way to wrap with polos? how do I start? which direction (the most general direction...I know a lot of people do it different)? etc? I think i've honestly only done it right about 5 times in my life (we don't usually wrap so I don't have that much practice...http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif )

edited to ask..... so here's what I THINK it is....start with the polo on the inside...work to the front and then back? (that's where I'm a little iffy!), make the polo tight in the front, NOT on the tendon in the back...no wrinkles... even pressure... that's all i know... http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

***God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses***

~~member of the Chicken Jumper Clique (AND PROUD OF IT!!) http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif, IHSA clique & only child clique~~

[This message was edited by horsegirl33 on Jan. 10, 2004 at 12:31 AM.]

Kopeck
Jan. 9, 2004, 09:21 PM
The rules on wrapping were put into Rules and Regs of Horsemanship long before we had nice, soft fluffy, multi-directional polyester with not too much bias tension. Racetracks are still quite strict about wrapping in that the fabric they use is still much like the old linens. Polo wraps used in today's era are a god-send to those people who like to give a little protection and minor support to their horse's legs, and with just a little know-how and careful attention truyly minimize the risk of hurting tendons and ligaments. But do be careful about being smooth and even!
And to answer one of the questions from way earlier...Flat classes and hacks are run tracking to the left first to help judges remember which way they have seen the performance! Think of it this way...if you are judging a show which consists of 28 flat classes straight...and you are on Class #26 - will you remember if you already had them change direction...? We see problem with the Intercollegiate Horse Shows or the Western classes where there are A LOT of classes 'round and 'round the outside track!

Suzeee
Jan. 9, 2004, 09:57 PM
To whomever said they liked their traditional irons over the Sprengers: Me too! Those jointed irons just feel weird to me.

Here's my question: Anyone know why the horse business attracts so many women who are just psycho? The resident nut job at our barn just got kicked out (finally!) and it seems at all the stables I've ridden at in the last 20+ years, there have been at least one or more women who were just absolutely obsessed and unrealistic when it came to their horse. It is mind boggling just how lacking these women are when it comes to common sense. (OK, mini rant over now). ;-)

"A horse, a horse, my kingdom for a horse!" Shakespeare's Richard III

dior
Jan. 9, 2004, 10:27 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Kerby:
On the wraping horse after jumping question: if you wrap it (stable bandage) every time after you jump, do you make your horses legs weaker from so much (too much) support?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

That's what I've heard. I only wrap if they have worked and jumped really hard or if they are injured and have to be wrapped. I personally think that walking them for a long time after works better to keep their legs tight and them sound.

mnolen9698
Jan. 9, 2004, 11:11 PM
Thanks Kerby and dior -- this is one of the reasons why I posted the question to begin with. I'm afraid to wrap to the point my horses' legs are weaker.

Dancing Lawn
Jan. 10, 2004, 02:46 AM
For anyone wondering about racehorses and left leads, if the trainer and exercise rider have done their jobs right, The horse will be taught to change leads, while galloping. Races have been lost due to poor ability to change leads. I used to gallop for a trainer who once was a show-jumper, and I would go out on the track and just work on lead changes, with longer sirrups. As the horse learned, we would bump up the pace, until the horse would give me a change whenever I asked (by shifting my weight slightly, with my irons jacked up). a well schooled horse should be able to change whenever required by the jockey.
And yes, the gallop is a four-beat gait. There's no feeling like being by yourself, galloping flat out down the backstretch! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

less hard work, more fine dining.
www.dancinglawnhorses.com (http://www.dancinglawnhorses.com) updated Dec. 29/03

If guys can do it, how hard can it be?

MAD
Jan. 10, 2004, 02:52 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by dancing lawn:
And yes, the gallop is a four-beat gait. There's no feeling like being by yourself, galloping flat out <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

DITTO! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Lord Helpus
Jan. 10, 2004, 05:31 AM
The correct way to wrap polo wraps is to hold the tail of the wrap in one hand with about 6" - 7" sticking out. When you make your first circle, the polo should secure to itself with this tail sticking out.

The tail is then turned down so that it hangs down the back of the tendon and the rest of the polo is wrapped around both the leg and the tail of the wrap.

This is to give the tendon extra protection from a polo mallet or a flying ball or the horse's other leg in a quick stop and turn.

This is also the reason that polo wraps seem too long if wrapped like a standing bandage. Ideally, you should go down the leg and back up. But if a polo is not started with the tail hanging out, then, when you get back to the top of the leg, you still have a couple of more circuits of the leg to make.

Why there are so many whacko people in the horse business. I realize that this question may have been asked fascetiously, but I will answer it anyway, because I agree that there are, and I have thought about it...

Many children who do not have good social skills with their peers often turn to animals as their friends. Or, conversely, many children who love animals, never develop good social skills. These children grow into adults whose lives revolve around animals, and who may have real trouble relating to other people.

And experienced horse people (read: people who have been involved with horses from childhood) end up owning barns or managing barns. They are not crazy so much as they just plain have never really learned to get along with people as well as they get along with the horses.

Suzeee
Jan. 10, 2004, 07:18 AM
Thanks, LH! Good explanation! That is what I see as the common denominator in all the crazies I encounter: lack of social skills!

Now for my next question: Do you think that judges take into account the color of a horse when pinning a class? My handsome chestnut has been beaten by ho-hum bays on several occasions when I KNOW he has had better trips than them.

"A horse, a horse, my kingdom for a horse!" Shakespeare's Richard III

Hop On Pop
Jan. 10, 2004, 07:32 AM
Suzeee..I think that there are certain judges who favour certain colours of horses, ie.bays. I have an POA (A flashy one may I add) who has been pinned lower than bays and greys who had awful trips. At one particular show, we had a great trip: Great spots, great corners, good pace, etc, and my coach and I were very happy about how well we had done, seeing as it was my pony's second show. We watched the rest of the horses and riders go, and knew we were pretty much gauranteed a 1st. Everyone else who ahd gone had some major faults, ie. Super long spots, adding strides, even a horse who tried to refuse a fence then jumped it from a standstill pinned above us. What a suprise too: They were all bays that placed above us. needless to say, it was only a schooling show, but I have no desire to show under that judge again. For me, showing is more for riding than winning, but still, it's only fair that every horse is judges the same way, regardless of the colour of their coat. At another show, in a hunter under saddle class, all greys placed. (Some with really terrible movement and not well turned out either) http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/sigh.gif
________________________________________________
Proud member of the Traffic Cone Preservation Society!!!

SquishTheBunny
Jan. 10, 2004, 07:46 AM
QUESTION:
The proper way to wrap for shipping is
a.) shipping wraps that lie just above the coronet band (ankle area).
(like this (http://www.toklat.com/images/glc_wrap_nobow.jpg)) (and this) (http://www.riovistaproducts.com/problems/travel/wrap2.gif)

b.) shipping wraps that cover the coronet band and ball of hoof.
(like this (http://www.equusbloc.com/equusbloc5e.jpg)) (obviously with wraps over top)

c.) shipping wraps like (a) but with bell boots.
d.) other.

"There was a point to this story, but it has temporarily escaped the chronicler's mind."
- Douglas Adams

Coca-Cola
Jan. 10, 2004, 07:49 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by mnolen9698:

NEW QUESTION -- What is the purpose of the throat latch? How tight/loose should it be?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

The purpose of the throat latch is to keep the bridle on the horse should the rider dismount prematurely over the horse's head and pull on the reins. The thorat latch should be adjusted loose enough so that the horse can flex at the poll and not get strangled, but tight enough that if you try to remove the bridle without undoing the throat latch, you can't pull it over the horse's ears. Typically this would mean you could fit 3-4 fingers sideways between the throat latch and the jowl.

Gravie
Jan. 10, 2004, 08:45 AM
A little OT, but what does "OTOH" stand for?

Man, I love this thread. ^_~

_____


oh-darling.net (http://oh-darling.net) my own domain, finally!

ExRacer
Jan. 10, 2004, 08:47 AM
Gravie - "on the other hand" http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

I love this topic - fun and informational! now I need to think of a question...

~Shanon~
"Don't talk about what you have done or what you are going to do--do it and let it speak for itself." --Martin Vanbee

EventerAJ
Jan. 10, 2004, 08:54 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by SquishTheBunny:
QUESTION:
The proper way to wrap for shipping is
a.) shipping wraps that lie just above the coronet band (ankle area).
(http://www.toklat.com/images/glc_wrap_nobow.jpg) http://www.riovistaproducts.com/problems/travel/wrap2.gif

b.) shipping wraps that cover the coronet band and ball of hoof.
(http://www.equusbloc.com/equusbloc5e.jpg) (obviously with wraps over top)

c.) shipping wraps like (a) but with bell boots.
d.) other.

"There was a point to this story, but it has temporarily escaped the chronicler's mind."
- Douglas Adams<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

b.) is the proper PC answer, but the pic you posted is a little strange. ? In PC we were taught to use sheet cottons, cut to go from the bottom of knee/hock all the way to the ground. Usually you needed 2 flannels/standing wraps, sewn end-to-end. You should wrap around the bulbs of the heels and ends of the shoe, to prevent the wrap from creeping up. (Stand the horse's toe on a block or your A Manual for this http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif)

Horses most often step on their coronet bands, so it makes sense to have them protected. When I trailer horses in support/standing wraps, I always add bellboots. So "c" is also appropriate, and more convenient because then your wraps don't get so nasty. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Most of the time I use Dover's shipping boots. They're thick, they cover from knee/hock to the ground. They wash well and still look great after 4 years. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

~AJ~
If you're big-star bound let me warn ya it's a long hard ride.

C'est La Vie
Jan. 10, 2004, 08:57 AM
This is a great topic http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

My question: Someone told me that in 4H the horse's mane is supposed to be on the left side. In hunter/jumpers/dressage/etc. the horse's mane goes on the right. What if you were in 4H and wanted to do hunters? What side do you pull your horse's mane on?
(BTW someone just told me about the 4H thing so it may not be entirely correct.

Sammy

Extra Ordinary
Jan. 10, 2004, 09:26 AM
Another question regarding the throatlatch that Coca Cola sort of answered: I've heard that if you make it too tight a horse can't flex it's head - TRUE/FALSE

*Bo Frost*
*American Voodoo*

Extra Ordinary
Jan. 10, 2004, 09:30 AM
Okay - and I have another question:

HOW, in this crazy Hunter/Jumper world, can I keep myself from constantly being jealous - I try not to be - but there will ALWAYS be someone with more nice stuff, nicer horses, who gets to go to more shows, etc., etc.

I mean, when the kids at my barn left for a horseshow last summer and I couldn't go - I WAS SO DEPRESSED!!! Like, I seriously cried as I watched the trailer pull away!!! Then I pouted for 3 days - I'm asking in this thread to try not to sound like a TOTAL BRAT cause I know I'm really lucky for what I do have - but I GET SO FREAKIN JEALOUS!!!!

Anyone else!? And don't say I'm being a brat CAUSE I KNOW I AM BUT I CAN"T HELP HOW I FEEL, LOL!!! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif

Madison

*Bo Frost*
*American Voodoo*

TC Manhattan
Jan. 10, 2004, 09:58 AM
In reference to the correct side for the mane to lie, I believe that in western disciplines, it is the LEFT side that the mane lies on, rather than on the right. Had a horse once who had been shown in western before I got him and he came with his mane perfectly trained to lie on the left. Spent lots of time fiddling over the years to try and re-train it. Yes, I know all the suggestions, and they would work for a little while then (flip) back to the left it would go. Well, I finally just plain up and gave UP on it and showed him with mane on the left (braided) in hunters and eventually dressage. Never had a complaint from a judge, etc. (Maybe they were just laughing amongst themselves? Who knows.) But we always looked well-groomed and I might say downright "cute" and, well for me anyways, it worked.

"Have no expectations, only abundant expectancy."

Cognac
Jan. 10, 2004, 10:05 AM
lol, I have one. What is a baby pad's actual intended use? We bought a pack, and my daughter uses them with her thin/sensitive skinned tb under her half pad. That way she can wash them easily and always have a clean pad on her. But are they for 'babies'? lol, or what.

Recently on another forum, someone did a critique of her jumping, she had the baby pad on her horse. She got blasted about the 'hideously large' pad. The irony of that with a pad called a 'baby pad'.

???????

Thank you http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

jvanrens
Jan. 10, 2004, 10:37 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Hilary:

I don't understand the "pivoting" answer = unless you're doing a turn on the forehand the horse does not pivot on any legs while turning.

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Ever watch Showmanship, Horsemanship or Reining? A properly executed pivot (on the hind) is definately done on one leg, which leg depends on which way you're pivoting. To the right should be done on the right hind, to the left, on the left hind.

Jo

~~Some days are a total waste of makeup.~~

Fullilove
Jan. 10, 2004, 10:40 AM
In regards to wrapping:

I have a horse that is recovering from a right hind torn suspensory ligamnet. After recovery(we are in mo 6) would the recommendation be to poultic/wrap after a moderate at home workout over fences (lets say 2 courses)or wrap w just a ligament? or ligament & no wrap.

Extra Ordinary
Jan. 10, 2004, 10:41 AM
Why don't you see hoods anymore - like in Dover and Stateline they have those neck things, but never real hoods? HOW COME?!?!?! Did someone decide they are bad?

Madie

*Bo Frost*
*American Voodoo*

Finicky Filly
Jan. 10, 2004, 10:58 AM
The hood question...I've read and also believe that kept in their natural state as much as possible.(that sounds kind of weird). But you know, they should wear as little clothing as possible without the risk of them catching cold. My horses are clipped and have blankets that cover their necks, but sometimes I think that even that is too much. It's restricting and its just not what their used to.

"If you don't ride the way that you believe you should, you end up by believing that you should ride the way you do."

jvanrens
Jan. 10, 2004, 11:03 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by TC Manhattan:
In reference to the correct side for the mane to lie, I believe that in western disciplines, it is the LEFT side that the mane lies on, rather than on the right. "<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

IME, most western riders don't care which side the mane lies on. The left side thing is more of a roping thing. Since your rope with your right hand and dismount from the right side (in calf roping anyway) you didn't want your rope (or yourself I guess) getting tangled in the mane.

Personally, in showing in WP, Showmanship and Horsemanship, I've never had a judge hold it against me that my horses manes have been on the right (since I ride hunter as well as western). The thinking that a horse ridden western must have its mane on the left is pretty old fashioned thinking. Of course that being said, I know some people who show strictly in halter prefer their horses manes on the left since the judge is usually getting their last look of the horses right side, and they want the cleanest possible line of the horses neck visible (that last profile look).

Hope this helps & makes some sense http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif,

Jo

~~Some days are a total waste of makeup.~~

Gravie
Jan. 10, 2004, 11:19 AM
ExRacer -- thanks. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

I know we've talked about wraps a lot on this thread. And here I thought I had them down, but you guys just confuse me more. ^_~

But what's the difference between standing wraps & polos? When do you use which ones? What's the kind that you put on when jumping?

_____


oh-darling.net (http://oh-darling.net) my own domain, finally!

Lord Helpus
Jan. 10, 2004, 11:55 AM
Standing Wraps are pillow or No Bow or Cotton underneath a flannel (my fave) bandage (some people use "track" bandages which are colored and have the smallest bit of stretch in them). They are what is used for a horse standing still, in a stall or van.

Polos are placed directly on the leg and are used for exercise. They are fuzzy and slightly stretchy and should not be used over wraps, since they are too stretchy and may cause a bow.

Coca-Cola
Jan. 10, 2004, 11:57 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Madie & Frostie:
Another question regarding the throatlatch that Coca Cola sort of answered: I've heard that if you make it too tight a horse can't flex it's head - TRUE/FALSE

*Bo Frost*
*American Voodoo*<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

True...well, sort of. The horse CAN still flex its poll, but won't WANT to because the throat latch is choking it. When the poll flexes, the throatlatch area becomes thicker. If the bridle throatlatch is adjusted too tight to begin with, as the horse flexes, the bridle throatlatch digs into the horse.

Coca-Cola
Jan. 10, 2004, 12:00 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by bayloverrrrr:
lol, I have one. What is a _baby pad's_ actual intended use? We bought a pack, and my daughter uses them with her thin/sensitive skinned tb under her half pad. That way she can wash them easily and always have a clean pad on her. But are they for 'babies'? lol, or what.

Recently on another forum, someone did a critique of her jumping, she had the baby pad on her horse. She got blasted about the 'hideously large' pad. The irony of that with a pad called a 'baby pad'.

???????

Thank you http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Baby pads are called that because they are the same type of quilted material that is used as a pad in a baby's crib. Their intended use is purely convenience for the rider, to keep a fleece pad cleaner longer, or for those who prefer minimal padding so as not to interfere with saddle fit, but still want to keep their saddles clean

Dancing Lawn
Jan. 10, 2004, 12:14 PM
A little off topic, but can someone please enlighten this uneducated Canadian. What is "Aunt Esther's Purse"?No one up here has ever heard that expression.

less hard work, more fine dining.
www.dancinglawnhorses.com (http://www.dancinglawnhorses.com) updated Dec. 29/03

If guys can do it, how hard can it be?

VivaDusty
Jan. 10, 2004, 12:28 PM
Three Questions:

* As a member of USEF, I have recently changed my last name and does this alter anything besides I will have to put a different name on the new membership, 2004?

*My friend and I were talking, and what is the "proper" use for quarter sheets? (Those half/or quarter fleece that go
underneath the saddle?)

*Where can I find info on the new USEF? besides the website, i mean critiques and stuff. Clear cut differences between USAEq. and now. And is there a big diff. between Federation and Association?

~Hakunah Matatah!!!

VivaDusty
Jan. 10, 2004, 12:31 PM
Also, underneath your name, <<<< it says "working hunter" or "training level". What are these and can you change them to like "junior jumper" or something?

~Hakunah Matatah!!!

TC Manhattan
Jan. 10, 2004, 01:06 PM
JESSEY, here's what my vet instructed be to do when my "boy" pulled his suspensory (and it wasn't a bad one, as he was never really too off on it, only swollen.) First 6 mos., after EACH workout: cold hose for 20 minutes, then rub with rubbing alcohol, then standing wraps overnight. Once he was cleared for jumping (with a re-do ultrasound), was told to repeat this same treatment "forever" every time I jumped him. Did it and he's still sound after 6 years. But then I was a fanatic about it.

"Have no expectations, only abundant expectancy."

TC Manhattan
Jan. 10, 2004, 01:08 PM
New question: What is a TROLL? And what is the Boogerboard?

"Have no expectations, only abundant expectancy."

glfprncs
Jan. 10, 2004, 01:15 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Madie & Frostie:
Why don't you see hoods anymore - like in Dover and Stateline they have those neck things, but never real hoods? HOW COME?!?!?! Did someone decide they are bad?

Madie

*Bo Frost*

I have no idea, just an unwanted opinion, but....if you were a horse, would YOU want to wear one??????
*American Voodoo*<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

budman
Jan. 10, 2004, 01:29 PM
How come on Pony bridles (not really nice ones, but the cheaper kind) the throatlatch hangs down past the noseband?
How come some people have pretty lines above and below quotes and I don't?

"There are friends and faces that may be forgotten, but there are horses that never will be." Andy Adams
Gold Chips (http://www.marylandponybreeders.org/item.jhtml?UCIDs=546415%7C560127&PRID=394805)
Blondie (http://www.marylandponybreeders.org/item.jhtml?UCIDs=546415%7C560127&PRID=394809)

LegalEase
Jan. 10, 2004, 01:33 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Why don't you see hoods anymore - like in Dover and Stateline they have those neck things, but never real hoods? HOW COME?!?!?! Did someone decide they are bad?
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

The horses decided they were bad, and tore them all up the first time they had to wear them. They're 'way less successful in their attacks on neck collars, which are almost as warm as full hoods. The neck collars I use are all converted from full hoods: various horses tore the top part to shreds, so I just lopped off the torn pieces.

*****
Everything changes. Everything is connected. Pay attention.

budman
Jan. 10, 2004, 01:39 PM
Trolls are people who post deliberately nasty things to get people stirred up and start or escalate an argument. Don't feed the trolls.
And what it says under your name--greenie, working hunter, etc., is related to the number of times you've posted.

"There are friends and faces that may be forgotten, but there are horses that never will be." Andy Adams
Gold Chips (http://www.marylandponybreeders.org/item.jhtml?UCIDs=546415%7C560127&PRID=394805)
Blondie (http://www.marylandponybreeders.org/item.jhtml?UCIDs=546415%7C560127&PRID=394809)

Fullilove
Jan. 10, 2004, 01:56 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by TC Manhattan:
JESSEY, here's what my vet instructed be to do when my "boy" pulled his suspensory (and it wasn't a bad one, as he was never really too off on it, only swollen.) First 6 mos., after EACH workout: cold hose for 20 minutes, then rub with rubbing alcohol, then standing wraps overnight. Once he was cleared for jumping (with a re-do ultrasound), was told to repeat this same treatment "forever" every time I jumped him. Did it and he's still sound after 6 years. But then I was a fanatic about it.

"Have no expectations, only abundant expectancy."<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

TC:
Thanks for the reply.
My horses injury was a grade 5. I hope he recovers bc i just love him. He is sound now, however it is a second injury to the same spot. We will probably keep him in rehab for another 4 months. Today there is no sign of injury in the ultra sound- however, i am skeptical bc of the first injury- which was minor like your horses. Glad you had such success.

creseida
Jan. 10, 2004, 02:12 PM
Aunt Esther's Purse...
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by dancing lawn:
A little off topic, but can someone please enlighten this uneducated Canadian. What is "Aunt Esther's Purse"?No one up here has ever heard that expression.

less hard work, more fine dining.
http://www.dancinglawnhorses.com updated Dec. 29/03

If guys can do it, how hard can it be?

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Back in the 70's there was a sitcom called "Sandford & Son" starring Redd Foxx, about a guy and his son who ran a junkyard. LaWanda Page was a regular on this comedy series and played Aunt Esther Anderson. She did not "suffer fools gladly", and she was a wicked shot when hitting said "fools" with her purse to knock some sense into them.

When people on the BB get too out of control, they neet a whack upside the head with Aunt Esther's purse to straighten them out. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif Since Aunt Esther died in Sept 2002, her purse has been passed around to those in need. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

~<>~ COTHBB Leather Care Guru~<>~
~Member of the *Horse Vans* clique~

"Learn the rules so you may break them effectively"~Dalai Lama

Lord Helpus
Jan. 10, 2004, 03:54 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by budman:
How come on Pony bridles (not really nice ones, but the cheaper kind) the throatlatch hangs down past the noseband?
How come some people have pretty lines above and below quotes and I don't?

"There are friends and faces that may be forgotten, but there are horses that never will be." Andy Adams<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Any bridle can have too long a throat latch. But it does seem that cheaper bridles are less well proportioned and the throat latch strap is extra long. But I have found that it is hard to find a bridle at any price that really fits well. SO I have all the straps taken in after I buy a bridle. As I am sure many people who show also do.

You, too, can have pretty lines around quotes. Just click on the " icon on the bottom right of the post you want to quote from. That post will then come up and you can delete extranneous verbiage from it so that only the part you want to discuss is left (I just deleted your signature line from your post before replying to the rest of it.)

Imaginagent
Jan. 10, 2004, 04:03 PM
In regards to which side of the neck the mane is suppose to lay on, it does not matter for western horses. No one way is proper. I show in Palomino shows, and people just let the mane fall where it will, whether they ride english, western, or both. Being a stickler for proper grooming, mine is on the right, and I know a few people who changed theirs when they learned this, but for the most part, no one cares, as long as it is neat.

"I never play horseshoes 'cause Mother taught us not to throw our clothes around," ~ Mr. Ed

CoconutGrrl
Jan. 10, 2004, 04:29 PM
Ok, will someone explain "medals" classes to me?

Thanks!!

hoopoe
Jan. 10, 2004, 04:47 PM
It is important to note that the Aunt Esther Purse Whomp is accompanied with the standard line

"Shut up fool!"

And the purse is what I call a "Sunday go to Meeting Purse". Someone else here refered to it as a Queen Elizabeth Purse.

The Booger Borad arose from an old version of a BB that evolved after a change at the USDF dressage board in the Y2K era.

Members are boogerly and do not suffer fools. They speak their mind and while horses are the common bond, they are often, more or less , behind the scenes.

There are several boogers here under their non-booger name. There are boogers there who have been here in the past.

_\\]
-- * > hoopoe
The ancient Greeks did not write obituaries. They only wanted to know if you had a passion.

Chanda
Jan. 10, 2004, 05:08 PM
I am still really curious who started the hair over the ears trend. I personally love the look and have always kept my hair long enough to get it looking perfect (basically for the last 20 years). I just want to know where it started and why!

www.clospepe.com (http://www.clospepe.com)

HarleyBarley
Jan. 10, 2004, 05:18 PM
Okay, here's my question. What does BNT stand for?

Nothing clears the mind like a trail ride on a warm spring day.

Finicky Filly
Jan. 10, 2004, 05:46 PM
BNT = big name trainer

"If you don't ride the way that you believe you should, you end up by believing that you should ride the way you do."

Rocky
Jan. 10, 2004, 06:22 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Chanda:
I am still really curious who started the hair over the ears trend. I personally love the look and have always kept my hair long enough to get it looking perfect (basically for the last 20 years). I just want to know where it started and why!

http://www.clospepe.com<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I could be wrong but I was told that the hair over the ears thing comes from Foxhunting....the ladies "styled" their hair over their ears in order to keep their ears warm while hunting....it carried over to the show ring, in the days when show hunters were horses who could actually foxhunt, and because it looks better than "sticky out" ears, the tradition has continued.

Keeping the hair in a net tucked neatly under the hat (in the old hunting days, a derby or top hat might be worn by the ladies, depending on how formal the habit was) was part of the proper turnout as well....it was a safety issue so that lady's hair didn't become tangled in the brush, briars, trees, or whatever terrain the hounds took to.

Neatly contained hair....thank godness....has also carried over from the huntfield.

Question #2

BNT=Big Name Trainer

My new barn mantra...MYOB MYOB

HarleyBarley
Jan. 10, 2004, 06:46 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Rocky:

My new barn mantra...MYOB MYOB<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


My new barn mantra.....MMOB.MMOB (Mind My Own Business)

Nothing clears the mind like a trail ride on a warm spring day.

Duramax
Jan. 10, 2004, 07:12 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by sweetnlo:
all this talk about diagnols and leads got me wondering how did the term "diagnol" become associated with "posting" and who thought of that term form going UP and DOWN as the horse trots. Who came up with "lead" for the canter, I mean calling the "rope" you use to show the horse where you want it to follow you a "lead" makes sense, but for canter???????<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

This has probably been answered already, but I'd assume that diagnol came about b/c at the trot, diagnol pairs of the horses' legs move together, therefore you have one "diagnol" or the other that you are posting on.

Posting, I believe, came about from "post boys" back in the day that delivered mail and rode long hours and developed a more comfortable way to deal with the trot instead of sitting it.

I would assume that the term "leads" come from the fact that in the canter, one front (as well as one hind) "leads" aka is in front of the other front or hind leg.

dior
Jan. 10, 2004, 08:09 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by CoconutGrrl:
Ok, will someone explain "medals" classes to me?

Thanks!!<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Medals are the 3' and 3'6 equitation classes (but not the eq divisions) such as, the Stateline (3'), USA Equestrian (formerly the AHSA 3'6), ASPCA Maclay (3'6), Washington (3'6)USET (3'6-3'9) and there are a few more. Those mentioned have national finals every year that run with the Indoor horse shows, with the exception of the USET.

PaintedWhisper
Jan. 11, 2004, 06:43 AM
Someone asked about hoods...

I personally HATE hoods, my ponies always end up with them over their eyes and no matter how much we fix them, to the point of making them custom (cutting the eyes more), they always end up over their eyes, which results in swollen pony eyes http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif.
The Neck things are so much better, and dont even touch their faces, and are equally as warm which leaves a happy pony http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

-Emily-
"Nothing Takes the taste out of peanut butter quite like unrequited love"-Charlie Brown
http://community.webshots.com/user/uvgot2whisper
http://community.webshots.com/user/uvgot2whisper

Zonked
Jan. 11, 2004, 08:04 AM
my trainer said the reason a regular straight rail is called a vertical, is because it it vertical to the horizon. It took me a minute to acually get it.. but it does make sence. but it would make even more if we would just call it a horizontal..

_____________________
R.I.P Dublin <<3
_____________________

http://community.webshots.com/user/critter1112488

Linny
Jan. 11, 2004, 09:41 AM
Since this is a current hot topic this is embarrassing, but is the USEF the organization I used to know as the AHSA, then the USAEq? I'm out if the showing loop and feel like a moron for asking.

Resident racing historian
Founder of the Mighty Thoroughbred Clique

Roanponerider
Jan. 11, 2004, 10:05 AM
What does:
OTTB
IMO
etc etc mean?

???

~C~

Sonesta
Jan. 11, 2004, 10:23 AM
OTTB = Off track Thoroughbred horse

IMO = In My Opinion

IMHO = In my honest opinion

OMGiH = Oh, mine Gott in Himmel (coined by our beloved, late Willem)



Sonesta Farms (http://www.sonestafarms.com) - breeding Hanoverian, Knabstrupper and Arabian sport horses.<BR>
"Find something you love & call it work."

Andie235
Jan. 11, 2004, 10:26 AM
OTTB- Off the track thoroughbred.
IMO- In my opinion

diffuse01
Jan. 11, 2004, 10:26 AM
ottb: off the track thoroughbred
imo: in my opinion

-kady-
-my webshots album (http://community.webshots.com/user/diffuse01)-
-diffusion, my pet site (http://www.diffuse01.cjb.net)-

Janet
Jan. 11, 2004, 03:19 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Linny:
Since this is a current hot topic this is embarrassing, but is the USEF the organization I used to know as the AHSA, then the USAEq? I'm out if the showing loop and feel like a moron for asking.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>USEF is the result of the merger of USAEq (formerly known as AHSA) and USET.

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain

Janet
Jan. 11, 2004, 03:21 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> IMHO = In my honest opinion<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>Or In My Humble Opinion.
with the companion
IMNSHO = In My Not So Humble Opinion

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain

Janet
Jan. 11, 2004, 03:28 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Zonked:
my trainer said the reason a regular straight rail is called a vertical, is because it it vertical to the horizon. It took me a minute to acually get it.. but it does make sence. but it would make even more if we would just call it a horizontal.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

But it isn't "vertical to the horizon". It is parallel to the horizon.

A vertical fence is an "up and down" fence, without spread. "Up and down" is also known as "vertical".

A vertical fence has a vertical dimension (height) but no horizontal dimension (width).

A spread fence has a vertical dimension (height) AND a horizontal dimension (width).

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain

Dancing Lawn
Jan. 11, 2004, 05:49 PM
Zonk, That makes absolutely no sense to me, whatesoever.

less hard work, more fine dining.
www.dancinglawnhorses.com (http://www.dancinglawnhorses.com) updated Dec. 29/03

If guys can do it, how hard can it be?

Zonked
Jan. 11, 2004, 06:51 PM
WAIT i didnt even write it out right... haha
Dancing Lawn-- thats why u dont get it. i dont know what my trainer said then i mixed everything up and im makin myself confused. haha how dumb can i be.. sry for the mix up ya'all

_____________________
R.I.P Dublin <<3
_____________________

http://community.webshots.com/user/critter1112488

*Next*Star*To*Shine*
Jan. 11, 2004, 06:54 PM
Is there such thing as a horse that is mentally retarded (I don't know if that is the correct term to describe those type of illnesses so please don't think I'm rude if it's wrong)? I mean it could happen couldn't it - if there were mutations in the genes etc. We are studying genetics in biology hence the reason I am asking.

Grab a chance and you won't be sorry for what might have been.

Goldylox
Jan. 11, 2004, 07:15 PM
Does anyone know why we pass left side to left side? Does it have to do with the knights and their swords or is there another reason?

Moxie
Jan. 11, 2004, 07:20 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Artemis:
Is there such thing as a horse that is mentally retarded (I don't know if that is the correct term to describe those type of illnesses so please don't think I'm rude if it's wrong)? I mean it could happen couldn't it - if there were mutations in the genes etc. We are studying genetics in biology hence the reason I am asking.

_Grab a chance and you won't be sorry for what might have been._ <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I don't know if a horse can be born that way, but one of the horses at my barn had a stroke and was never safe to ride again... she just didn't think fast enough! So I suppose it's possible. It'd probably be scary to ride one, though! http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/uhoh.gif

Edited to say: Yes, I heard that you pass left-to-left because knights carried their swords on the right, so it'd be harder to suddenly leap on someone and kill them if your sword was on the opposite side they were on. A politeness thing, I suppose.

Janet
Jan. 11, 2004, 07:27 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> Edited to say: Yes, I heard that you pass left-to-left because knights carried their swords on the right, so it'd be harder to suddenly leap on someone and kill them if your sword was on the opposite side they were on. A politeness thing, I suppose. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>Except for two things.

First, knights carry the sword on the LEFT side.

Second "passing left hand to left hand" is a US thing. In some other countries the convention is to pass "right hand to right hand". I think it is more related to the fact that you pass "left hand to left hand" on the road.

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain

dior
Jan. 11, 2004, 07:28 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Zonked:
my trainer said the reason a regular straight rail is called a vertical, is because it it vertical to the horizon. It took me a minute to acually get it.. but it does make sence. but it would make even more if we would just call it a horizontal..<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Did she/he mean parallel to the horizon? I think it's called vertical because the jump is perpendicular to the ground, which makes it vertical, like we humans are when we stand up. Oxers are horizontal because they're parallel to the ground. Did that make sense?

Moxie
Jan. 11, 2004, 07:35 PM
Sorry Janet! My medieval knowledge is a bit lacking! Maybe I should make sure I actually know what I'm talking about before I post. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Goldylox
Jan. 11, 2004, 07:39 PM
so, Janet, at the large International shows do they call out right side to right side, or left side to left side? Or being pros, do they all know which way the others are going and don't call out anything at all? This is truly a question I have always wanted to know!

dior
Jan. 11, 2004, 07:52 PM
I thought the left-to-left passing (and mounting - because they can swing the right leg over without a sword in the way) came from the knights too. The swords were on the left side, but they used their right hand to draw the sword, which meant that the sword would be on the opposite side of their opponent if they passed left-to-left; if they passed right-to-right, then their swords, if drawn, would be next to each other...but the car thing makes sense too.

*Next*Star*To*Shine*
Jan. 11, 2004, 08:22 PM
This is how I understand left-to-left passing - I heard this somewhere. When horse carriages were used, the drivers used whips. Since most drivers would have been right handed, they would have held their whip in their right hand. The reason for passing left-to-left was so that the whips would not become tangled as the carriages passed.

Grab a chance and you won't be sorry for what might have been.

Janet
Jan. 11, 2004, 08:46 PM
In Roman times, all of Europe passed "right hand to right hand".

When Napoleon took over most of Europe, he mandated passing "left hand to left hand".

That is why the British Isles, and the Scandianvian coutries drove on the left while most of the rest of Europe drove on the right. (The Scandinavian countries have switched to driving on the right, but the British Isles still drive on the left.)

One "practical" theory is that, in Roman times, you were most likely to be attacked by someone on the road- therfore you needed to be able to use your sword (carried on the left, but wielded in the right hand) in the center on the road.

The theory continues that, in Napoleonic times, you were more likely to be attacked by an ambush off the side of the road, and thus needed to have your right hand on the sied of the road.

But I am not sure whether or not to believe it.

But arena etiquette doesn't always match the "rule of the road". For instance, in France, where passing "left to left" on the road started, arena etiquette is "right hand to right hand".

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain

[This message was edited by Janet on Jan. 12, 2004 at 12:08 AM.]

mnolen9698
Jan. 11, 2004, 09:46 PM
Great thread!

Thanks Coca Cola for answering my question about the throat latch.

NEW QUESTIONS:
Is the U.S.A. the only country that shows Hunters? If so, why [doesn't any other country have Hunters]?

Is the U.S.A. the only country that has equitation and medal classes? If so, why?

dior
Jan. 11, 2004, 10:02 PM
Well, there's always CANADA http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif .

The hunters - don't know how it evolved from fox hunting to what it is know.

Equitation/medals - was supposed to be a stepping stone between the hunters and the jumpers, and in some ways it is - technical courses, jumper fences - but I think some people see it as an end goal (to win the medal finals).

mnolen9698
Jan. 11, 2004, 10:17 PM
Dior -- Sorry I left out Canada. All the Canadian (and Mexican) riders I've seen at US shows did jumpers only so I assumed Hunters were a US thing. Plus, I'm pretty sure (but could certainly be wrong) hunters don't exist in Europe. Do Canadian shows offer eq/medal classes?

dior
Jan. 11, 2004, 10:38 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by mnolen9698:
Dior -- Sorry I left out Canada. All the Canadian (and Mexican) riders I've seen at US shows did jumpers only so I assumed Hunters were a US thing. Plus, I'm pretty sure (but could certainly be wrong) hunters don't exist in Europe. Do Canadian shows offer eq/medal classes?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Hunters like we have in North America, I'm pretty sure don't exist in Europe, which is why buying 'hunter types' over there used to be less expensive (not so much now that they've caught on). We've had some great hunters (Overdressed, Popeye K, The Winning Edge to name a few), unfortunately most get sold to the USA.

Canadian shows have eq/medal classes too - we have the EC and the CET (national medals, which IMO, don't compare to the US ones, in overall quality - once again, there are exceptions - and quantity, but we're trying) and some that are provincial only, as well as the American ones as qualifying classes.

Midge
Jan. 12, 2004, 06:02 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Madie & Frostie:
Okay - and I have another question:

HOW, in this crazy Hunter/Jumper world, can I keep myself from constantly being jealous - I try not to be - but there will ALWAYS be someone with more nice stuff, nicer horses, who gets to go to more shows, etc., etc.
*<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

If you are jealous of everyone who has 'more' than you, you will be one busy girl. Here's a good life lesson and one you should learn early. There will always be someone richer, better looking, smarter, luckier, happier, healthier and more talented than you. The reverse holds true, as well. The best thing you can do to have a happy life is to work hard on the things you can control and let go of the things you can't.

If you don't, in addition to being poor, ugly, stupid, luckless, unhappy, sick and talentless, you will be bitter and nothing ruins you life more than being bitter.

Janet
Jan. 12, 2004, 06:17 AM
They have hunter classes in the UK and (I am pretty sure ) Ireland. But they are very different from the American style hunters. I have neveer seen them, so this from reading, but I think they are show in a double bridle, in a flat saddle (more like a saddle seat saddle than any jumping or dressage saddle), on the flat. The judge RIDES each horse as part of the class.

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain

spina
Jan. 12, 2004, 06:41 AM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Janet:

First, knights carry the sword on the LEFT side.



...except, of course, those poor misfit left-handed knights (or soldiers) who carry their swords on the right side.

creseida
Jan. 12, 2004, 08:49 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by spina:
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Janet:

First, knights carry the sword on the LEFT side.



...except, of course, those poor misfit left-handed knights (or soldiers) who carry their swords on the right side.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Except that was not permitted. Left-handedness was not tolerated (lefties learned to do things right-handed so they'd not be thought of as "different", "weak" or "inferior"), so if one wanted to be a knight, one had to learn to wield the sword the same way as any "normal" right-handed person. To have one left-handed and the rest right-handed would allow for a weakness (hole) in a defense.

~<>~ COTHBB Leather Care Guru~<>~
~Member of the *Horse Vans* clique~

"Learn the rules so you may break them effectively"~Dalai Lama

Arabbreeder
Jan. 12, 2004, 11:12 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by eclipse:
Ok, why are they called "puke" green breeches. When I puke, it's never green!!????? http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

And on the subject of spurs, why do some spurs have one side shorter than the other?

_"somewhere in the world, my size is considered desirable!!"_<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Well... maybe cause when you look at that color it makes you WANt to puke? http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

www.blackvistaarabians.com (http://www.blackvistaarabians.com)

Goldylox
Jan. 12, 2004, 01:16 PM
Now I have some idea why we pass left side to left side! This thread is great!

TC Manhattan
Jan. 12, 2004, 05:18 PM
Here's the REAL reason they're called "puke" green. If you get really sick and especially if you've not been eating for awhile so your stomach is pretty much empty, and you get to puking, what comes up is just the pure bile acids from your gut, and THAT is puke green in color...No, I am NOT kidding. It is the color of bile. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif (We need a "puke" graemlin!)

"Have no expectations, only abundant expectancy."

Duramax
Jan. 12, 2004, 05:35 PM
Why are french link training snaffles named that? Did the French invent that bit? Were they only intended to be used for training? http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_confused.gif

Duramax
Jan. 12, 2004, 05:36 PM
Why do most hunter horses go in D-ring bits as opposed to loose rings, eggbutts, full cheeks, etc.?

Roanponerider
Jan. 12, 2004, 05:38 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Arabbreeder:


Well... maybe cause when you look at that color it makes you WANt to puke? http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

http://www.blackvistaarabians.com<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

hahahah

~C~
"Sometimes, when the little guy doesn't know he's the little guy, he can do great big things!" -Charles Howard "SeaBiscuit"

maclaydreams
Jan. 12, 2004, 06:23 PM
I cannot believe I'm asking this, but I have a ton...

What are Eskadrons and why are they so good?

------
Melodramatic "Melody" in the larges

DMK
Jan. 12, 2004, 06:30 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Duramax:
Why do most hunter horses go in D-ring bits as opposed to loose rings, eggbutts, full cheeks, etc.?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Oh that one is easy. Because I am a slave to bit fashion, Someone figured out that I had every available mouthpiece in a full cheek model, so it was time to change fashion trends so I had to repurchase all those different mouthpieces in a Big Dversion. But I showed them! I only have EIGHT different Big Ds. So there. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

"I used to care, but things have changed..." Bob Dylan

bigbay
Jan. 12, 2004, 06:32 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by CrossedWings:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Risk-Averse Rider:
When spurs have one side longer than the other, which side goes against the horse?

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

The shorter side goes against the horse. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Sorry for coming in late here, because this was originally posted on the first page and I didn't have the energy to read through all 11 pages looking for a correction, but..

I was always taught that the long branch went on the inside (against the horse) and the short branch went on the outside. The reasons being, (1) if, like Janet said, you don't want to have to turn your toe out as much to use your spur, this makes it come into contact sooner, and (2) the buckle is supposed to be onthe outside of your foot, and putting the shorter branch on the outside keeps the buckle down and back by your ankle bone (and hence out of the way) instead of further forward on your foot.

Rosalie
Jan. 12, 2004, 06:50 PM
so i have been wearing my spurs incorrectly my entire life... wow.

LargeJuniorHunter
Jan. 12, 2004, 06:54 PM
Now this is probably TOTALLY false:
Is it really true that riders in parts of Europe post on the opposite diagonal that we do?

Are bays really more popular than other colors in the show ring?

Founder of: "Non-GPA owners" clique
Member of: "I got left out of the ponies" clique

Janet
Jan. 12, 2004, 08:30 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by LargeJuniorHunter:
Now this is probably TOTALLY false:
Is it really true that riders in parts of Europe post on the opposite diagonal that we do?
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>YES. Or more correctly, they post on different diaginals, depending on what they are working on. But I know that in Russia, in particular, the "default" is to post on the other diagonal.

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain

Janet
Jan. 12, 2004, 08:35 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>
I was always taught that the long branch went on the inside (against the horse) and the short branch went on the outside. The reasons being, (1) if, like Janet said, you don't want to have to turn your toe out as much to use your spur, this makes it come into contact sooner, and (2) the buckle is supposed to be onthe outside of your foot, and putting the shorter branch on the outside keeps the buckle down and back by your ankle bone (and hence out of the way) instead of further forward on your foot.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>Either you made a typo, or you are confused. If you put the long side against the horse, you will have to turn your toe out FURTHER to use the spur- the opposite of what you want.

It doesnt't make any difference on the buckle and the strap.

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain

[This message was edited by Janet on Jan. 12, 2004 at 11:47 PM.]

onelanerode
Jan. 12, 2004, 08:53 PM
OK. I've got one. What's the difference between collected, working, extended, medium and free?
I know the first three, at least, I think I do. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif
And I've always thought that free referred to a horse working at a particular gait on a loose rein. Medium ... not so sure about that but I thought it fell somewhere in between collected and working.
Are these differences solely in impulsion, or are we talking stride length and speed as well?
Thanks http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Be careful to whom you lend your shirt if you have a tendency to wear your heart upon your sleeve.

Rocky
Jan. 12, 2004, 09:11 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by TC Manhattan:
Here's the REAL reason they're called "puke" green. If you get really sick and especially if you've not been eating for awhile so your stomach is pretty much empty, and you get to puking, what comes up is just the pure bile acids from your gut, and THAT is puke green in color...No, I am NOT kidding. It is the color of bile. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif (We need a "puke" graemlin!)

"Have no expectations, only abundant expectancy."<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

______________

I always thought that Puke Green was from the "Pea Soup" that Linda Blair ejected from her spinning head in "The Exorcist" (sp?) movie.... http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/winkgrin.gif

My new barn mantra...has changed to when the h@!! is it going to warm up?

CrossedWings
Jan. 12, 2004, 09:34 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Janet:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by LargeJuniorHunter:
Now this is probably TOTALLY false:
Is it really true that riders in parts of Europe post on the opposite diagonal that we do?
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>YES. Or more correctly, they post on different diaginals, depending on what they are working on. But I know that in Russia, in particular, the "default" is to post on the other diagonal.

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I'd like to add: The reason many of the Europeans are often seen posting on what, "North America" would insist is the incorrect diagonal, is actually for beneficial reasons to the horse. By posting on the incorrect diagonal the rider is able to increase strength, and stride on the weaker limb (e.i - a horse that trots unevenly, 1 leg reaches further than the other....); ultimately ending up with a more balanced mover. By continuously posting on the incorrect diagonal the "weak" leg(s) will eventually even out or come very close to even with the stronger side, and the horse will appear like a much more even mover...

(I also read in a Judges book for the North American 'A' shows that in HUS classes riders ARE permitted to post on the incorrect diagonal if they wish.....).

Just thought I'd add that.

CrossedWings
Jan. 12, 2004, 09:43 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by bigbay:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by CrossedWings:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Risk-Averse Rider:
When spurs have one side longer than the other, which side goes against the horse?

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

The shorter side goes against the horse. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Sorry for coming in late here, because this was originally posted on the first page and I didn't have the energy to read through all 11 pages looking for a correction, but..

I was always taught that the long branch went on the inside (against the horse) and the short branch went on the outside. The reasons being, (1) if, like Janet said, you don't want to have to turn your toe out as much to use your spur, this makes it come into contact sooner, and (2) the buckle is supposed to be onthe outside of your foot, and putting the shorter branch on the outside keeps the buckle down and back by your ankle bone (and hence out of the way) instead of further forward on your foot.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Funny, I used to think that too (for exactly your reasons) until I attended a weekend clinic with an 'A' trainer/coach (who did regularly compete or had kids competing at major stuff like Madison Square, Devon, WIHS, etc); she told me to go change my spurs for the next riding session (shorter side inside). The buckle IS supposed to be on the outside of your foot and still is even with shorter side to the inside (that's how I wear my spurs at least; and the buckles are on the outside.) ...... http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Janet
Jan. 12, 2004, 10:18 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by miss annie:
OK. I've got one. What's the difference between collected, working, extended, medium and free?
I know the first three, at least, I think I do. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif
And I've always thought that free referred to a horse working at a particular gait on a loose rein. Medium ... not so sure about that but I thought it fell somewhere in between collected and working.
Are these differences solely in impulsion, or are we talking stride length and speed as well?
Thanks http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif<HR></BLOCKQUOTE> Almost. Medium is between working and extended.

You can get the official descriptions in the dressage section of the rule book (available on line), but I'll tey to give you a simplified version.

First, "free" only applies to the walk, never any other gait. It can be either on a loose rein or a long rein. The important thing is that the horse stretches the head and neck down, while rounding teh back, with a "marching" stride, and lots of overstep.

There is a somewhat similar exercise at the trot and canter, performed on the circle, which is colloquially called the "stretchy chewy circle".

We are mostly talking about stride length, and degree of engagement and elevation. The speed (hoofbeats per second) should be exctly the same. In principle, the impulsion should be the same. But because the working gaits (amd the lengthenings, which you did not mention) do not require as much engagement and elevation as the collected, medium, and extended gaits, you can get away with a bit less impulsion in the working gaits.

Working and lengthening appear only at Training and First level. Once you hit Second Level, you never see "working" again.

There is no "Working Walk". It is "Medium Walk" from Training Level on up. But at trot and canter, you don't see "Medium" until second Level.

"Extended" gaits (W,t and c) appear at third level.

Thus there is more too it than just stirde length.

The working gaits require the horse to be balanced (not on the forehand), and working of the hind end, but they don't require a lot of engagement and elevation.

The lengthenings (trot and canter) require a longer stride than working. you need more engagement to generate the longer stride without falling on the forehand, but you don't need a lot of elevation.

The collected trot or canter, when it is first introduced at second Level) is only a liitle bit shorter stride than working, but with a lot more engagement and elevation. The collected walk is shorter stride than the medium walk, but with a LOT more impulsion (as well as more engagement and elevation). A collected walk is the kind of walk you could jump a 3 foot fence from.

The medium trot or canter has a lot longer stride than the working gait, and a bit longer than a lengthening. But you need to do that with engagement and elevation. The medium is the longest stride you can produce while keeping the balance, engagement, and elevation.

The extended gaits don't appear until third level. If the medium is "the longest you can produce", the extended is "even longer". The frame does not need to be as "round" in the extended gait as in the medium, and you can have a bit less elevation (without leaning on the reins), but you need even MOREimpulsion.

Have I helped, or have I made you even more confused?

The progression for walk is collected, medium, extended, with "free" between the stride length for medium and extended, but in a totally different frame and balance.

The progression for trot and canter, in terms of stride length, is collected, working (lengthening) medium, extended. Lengthening is in parenthesis because it is officially a variation of the working trot or canter, rather than being described as a separate trot or canter.

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain

Peggy
Jan. 12, 2004, 10:20 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Janet:
That is why the British Isles, and the Scandianvian coutries drove on the left while most of the rest of Europe drove on the right. (The Scandinavian countries have switched to driving on the right, but the British Isles still drive on the left.)
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
Yet another mystery solved by COTH. One of our Scandinavian working students said that they passed right to right on horses, but not in cars.

OhioColleen
Jan. 12, 2004, 10:36 PM
If someone teaches 2 lessons a week, can they still show as an amatuer?

To you, she's a horse. To me, she's a family member who is big, hairy, walks on all fours and is easily startled.
~Colleen

Dry Clean Only
Jan. 13, 2004, 05:22 AM
What is the 'hunter gap"? Is it just another way of saying that the horse got to the base and jumped well, or some other type of distance?

eclipse
Jan. 13, 2004, 06:29 AM
Stupid Question: Why is it there are way more women than men at the lower levels, but at the International Levels the men totally outnumber the women? Where are all these men at younger ages?

"somewhere in the world, my size is considered desirable!!"

DraftHorsePower
Jan. 13, 2004, 06:42 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by melodramaticpony:
I cannot believe I'm asking this, but I have a ton...

_What_ are Eskadrons and why are they so good?

------
_Melodramatic "Melody" in the larges_<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

They are like, plastic type open front boots for your horse to wear. I have never understood why they are so cool. I'll just stick to my leather open fronts thank you very much. hehe.

*~Emilee~*

Janet
Jan. 13, 2004, 06:44 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by OhioColleen:
If someone teaches 2 lessons a week, can they still show as an amatuer?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE> If she gets PAID for teaching, even just ONE lesson in the whole year, she is NOT an amateur.

If she teaches without getting paid, and is neither an employee nor a family member to anyone that is getting paid (for anything horse related)by the studenta, then she could still be an amateur.

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain

Kels
Jan. 13, 2004, 06:52 AM
So if the "ammy's" mother teaches lessons- she is no longer an ammy?

And if someone is cleaning stalls for money off of their board, are they still an ammy?

-Kelsey-
It is so easy, in the presence of horses, to appear foolish or incompetent.
http://www.gottaride.net/forums

Nickelodian
Jan. 13, 2004, 07:16 AM
As far as my understanding goes you may clean stalls, groom, judge etc etc for money and still be an amature. You ARE NOT an amature if you are paid to teach or paid to ride.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
www.scatteredoaksfarm.com (http://www.scatteredoaksfarm.com)

Gravie
Jan. 13, 2004, 07:16 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by CrossedWings:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Janet:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by LargeJuniorHunter:
Now this is probably TOTALLY false:
Is it really true that riders in parts of Europe post on the opposite diagonal that we do?
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>YES. Or more correctly, they post on different diaginals, depending on what they are working on. But I know that in Russia, in particular, the "default" is to post on the other diagonal.

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I'd like to add: The reason many of the Europeans are often seen posting on what, "North America" would insist is the incorrect diagonal, is actually for beneficial reasons to the horse. By posting on the incorrect diagonal the rider is able to increase strength, and stride on the weaker limb (e.i - a horse that trots unevenly, 1 leg reaches further than the other....); ultimately ending up with a more balanced mover. By continuously posting on the incorrect diagonal the "weak" leg(s) will eventually even out or come very close to even with the stronger side, and the horse will appear like a much more even mover...

(I also read in a Judges book for the North American 'A' shows that in HUS classes riders ARE permitted to post on the incorrect diagonal if they wish.....).

Just thought I'd add that.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


Well. If they drive on the other side of the road, I guess posting on the other diagonal isn't that far of a leap. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

_____


oh-darling.net (http://oh-darling.net) my own domain, finally!

mnolen9698
Jan. 13, 2004, 07:23 AM
Teaching 2 lessons a week and being an amateur -- It is my understanding that there are two types of lessons you can give and retain your amateur status. The first type is at therapudic riding programs. The second type is training family members. My recommendation: err on the side of caution when dealing with your amateur status. As an amateur, you are not to receive renumeration in any way for training, lessons, etc. (Renumeration includes trade for board.) When in doubt, contact USAE and get it in writing!

Greater proportion of women to men at lower levels but not at upper levels -- I've spent a lot of time thinking about this observation (which is generally true in the Corporate world too).

Here is my theory: females (in general) are more interested in building relationships -- with their ponies/horses, other barn buddies and in the equine world. (I'd be willing to guess over 90% of the people posting on the COTH BB are women.) Women are network and relationship builders. We have been for over 3000 years. We do not exert significant energy in determining heirarchy. (I think this is still true, we are simply more comfortable in being openly agressive in getting what we want.) Look at your group of women friends. [If it is a functional group] Each woman probably plays a role w/in the group, but no one is necessarily the leader or domineering one.

Men, on the other hand, build heirarchies. Being on top is very important. They focus more on results than being nice. (I realize I'm making huge generalizations here, but work with me.)

So my theory is women spend more time with their horse and are very loving. Because we're not as hard on them, we may not ask as much of them (or from ourselves). In addition, women don't want to get hurt (not that men do, we're just more aware of it); were more risk averse if you will. We don't need to jump high, be the best, etc. to be happy.

Men, with their subconscience drive to be on top work toward moving up the ranks (and divisions). Their focus is on where they are within the horse world, not their relationship with their horse. They either move through divisions quickly or drop out. I've never seen a man spend a lot of time in the AA hunter division (at least not any more time than he needs to). But there are women who have been riding in the AA hunter division since I was in short stirrup (a long time ago).

The short version of my theory is that man have to compete at the Grand Prix level to be happy where as women want their horse to whinny at them when they arrive at the barn. (I know I'd be far more crushed if my horse wouldn't come to me when he's out in the big turnout than if I never make it to the G.P.) What do you think?

slp
Jan. 13, 2004, 07:38 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by eclipse:
Stupid Question: Why is it there are way more women than men at the lower levels, but at the International Levels the men totally outnumber the women? Where are all these men at younger ages?

_"somewhere in the world, my size is considered desirable!!"_

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Out playing football, baseball, ice hockey, basketball, soccer, etc.
Back in the day when all of these sports were "seasonal", guys could participate in several sports (like riding) in addition to the typical guy sports. Today, if a guy wants to excell in any of them (I'm talking at the under 18 level here) they pretty much have to train year round for that specific sport, which doesn't leave a lot of time for something like serious horseback riding and competition. http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/no.gif
My 14 year old son plays ice hockey; fall season goes from September through March, spring is April through June, and there are now summer leagues. You can bet if he wants to make the HS team, he had better be playing everything that is available to him so his game is at a peak level. He probably will give up football this fall so he can concentrate on the hockey. http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/sigh.gif
As for the international levels, I'll let someone else answer that 'cause I don't know. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif
Susan

Celebrity
Jan. 13, 2004, 07:48 AM
At the international levels I think we see more men because generally men are more aggressive riders. Now I don't want to be flamed here, as we all know there are MANY aggressive women riders. But 'in general' men are more aggressive over a course.. therefore when riding well + aggressive, they win more, move up to higher levels, etc.. and I would think that companies with top international horses would want these aggressive, winning riders to campaign their mounts. I would not have had an answer for this question.. but it came up during a grand prix a few months ago and the commentators were talking about it, and that's what they had to say. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Holsteiner Clique!!
http://home.cogeco.ca/~patm/NOVA2.htm

Kels
Jan. 13, 2004, 07:57 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Nickelodian:
As far as my understanding goes you may clean stalls, groom, judge etc etc for money and still be an amature. You ARE NOT an amature if you are paid to teach or paid to ride.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
http://www.scatteredoaksfarm.com<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

What about those whose mothers are trainers? Or fathers, aunts, or uncles? She said related to...Those whose husbands or wives are trainers?

-Kelsey-
It is so easy, in the presence of horses, to appear foolish or incompetent.
http://www.gottaride.net/forums

Kels
Jan. 13, 2004, 08:02 AM
My theory on the international riders thing is that (from what I know, and I am just guess, generalizing) in other countries riding is considered more of a SPORT by the outside world. It is more recognized, and therefore more popular with both sexes.

Here, riding is not really considered a MANLY sport by most outsiders, although put any of them on a horse and watch them walk bow-legged for the next week or two!!!! (Not to mention complain more than the whiniest woman on earth!)

-Kelsey-
It is so easy, in the presence of horses, to appear foolish or incompetent.
http://www.gottaride.net/forums

DMK
Jan. 13, 2004, 08:05 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Dry Clean Only:
What is the 'hunter gap"? Is it just another way of saying that the horse got to the base and jumped well, or some other type of distance?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Let's put it this way, if a jumper and a hunter both jumped a 4'0 oxer, and both caught that "hunter gap", the jumper rider's coach would spend the next 15 minutes screaming at the jumper rider for getting the "long one" and then proceed to drill that rider as to the importance of getting CLOSER to the base, especially as it relates to oxers.

Meanwhile the hunter rider's trainer would give that rider a cookie. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Mind you the "hunter gap" isn't the long spot, it's just the slightly "gappier" distance that results from a horse on light contact as he flows freely down the line.

"I used to care, but things have changed..." Bob Dylan

nollekins
Jan. 13, 2004, 09:49 AM
This is a great thread!

My farrier came and took my horse's shces off "because of the snow". I was too embarrassed to ask him: Why?

What, exactly, is getting cast?

Why is it that I FINALLY have horses in the backyard, and now I feel as though riding is an obligation rather than a treat?

nollekins
Jan. 13, 2004, 09:52 AM
I meant shoes, not shces http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_redface.gif

Drakaina16
Jan. 13, 2004, 10:10 AM
Supposedly, horses have better traction when they're barefoot, but the horse I ride that's barefoot always seems to have a tougher time when the ring is a little hard from snow or ice.

Getting cast is when a horse gets its foot caught under the partition of their stall, a fence, etc.

As for why riding has become a chore for you, I can't answer that.

Danya

Vandy
Jan. 13, 2004, 10:17 AM
re: Getting cast-
they don't actually have to get a foot stuck under anything - if they lie down too close to the wall (or roll over while down so they are positioned too close to wall) they don't have room to stretch their legs as needed to stand up, and they are basically stuck or "cast" until they figure out how to maneuver themselves away from wall or until people intervene & help.

Kels
Jan. 13, 2004, 10:20 AM
I remember when one of the horses in my barn did this once...Or was it twice? Oh NOW I remember- he does it ALL THE TIME!!!

-Kelsey-
It is so easy, in the presence of horses, to appear foolish or incompetent.
http://www.gottaride.net/forums

DraftHorsePower
Jan. 13, 2004, 10:21 AM
My horse wears snow pads and borium shoes in the wintertime (we have snow all winter long). Great stuff. http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/yes.gif

*~Emilee~*

MEH180
Jan. 13, 2004, 11:05 AM
What is the difference between a hammerhead spur, and a prince of wales style spur? I have always wondered what the difference other then the look was.

Member of the paint hunter clique

DreamBigEq37
Jan. 13, 2004, 11:16 AM
Hammerheads are a big square spur, whereas the POW is more of an oval shape.

*~*~Lauryn*~*~*~
<3 Justice Served <3
<3 Nip N Tuck <3


"Success is not the result of spontaneous combustion. You must set yourself on fire." -Reggie Leach

creseida
Jan. 13, 2004, 11:20 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by nollekins:
This is a great thread!

My farrier came and took my horse's shces off "because of the snow". I was too embarrassed to ask him: Why?

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Unless your horse wears snowpads (which prevents you from cleaning the hoof at all) shoes cause snow to build up in the hoof to the point that the horse is tottering around on 3-4" snowballs. No fun for the horse, plus the potential for a twisted joint or fall is increased. The steel of the shoes attracts the snow and it builds up...ever tried shoevelling snow with a non-aluminum shovel? Bare feet don't have this problem.

~<>~ COTHBB Leather Care Guru~<>~
~Member of the *Horse Vans* clique~

"Learn the rules so you may break them effectively"~Dalai Lama

DraftHorsePower
Jan. 13, 2004, 11:38 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by creseida:
Unless your horse wears snowpads (which prevents you from cleaning the hoof at all)<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Apparently no one has enlightened you to the new (well not really so new at all) snow pad technology! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif The pad barley covers any of the hoof at all! Here is a pic of the bottom of my horse's hoof (the little black ridge running along the inside of the shoe is the pad): Click me! (http://www.evansplumbinginc.com/snowpad.JPG)

*~Emilee~*

411
Jan. 13, 2004, 11:45 AM
Why do some people refer to their horse as "aged" in sale ads? Is there a certain age upon which all horses are considered aged? Why not just put the actual age?

(Sorry if anyone already asked this, I haven't had a chance to read all 13 pages of this thread!)

Vandy
Jan. 13, 2004, 12:22 PM
hehe I have advertised horses as "aged" because I have assumed no one would call about a "20-year-old" horse http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Technically I believe aged is 12+

Dry Clean Only
Jan. 13, 2004, 12:37 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by DMK:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Dry Clean Only:
What is the 'hunter gap"? Is it just another way of saying that the horse got to the base and jumped well, or some other type of distance?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Let's put it this way, if a jumper and a hunter both jumped a 4'0 oxer, and both caught that "hunter gap", the jumper rider's coach would spend the next 15 minutes screaming at the jumper rider for getting the "long one" and then proceed to drill that rider as to the importance of getting CLOSER to the base, especially as it relates to oxers.

Meanwhile the hunter rider's trainer would give that rider a cookie. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Mind you the "hunter gap" isn't the long spot, it's just the slightly "gappier" distance that results from a horse on light contact as he flows freely down the line.

_"I used to care, but things have changed..."_ Bob Dylan<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


Ahh yes, I know that spot well. Thats the one that I keep getting yelled at for taking with my coming five year old by my event coaches! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif Well he was bred to be a hunter so I guess it only makes sense that he wants to jump like one http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/lol.gif

bigbay
Jan. 13, 2004, 12:43 PM
Who decided the cut-off for a pony was 14.2?

CanadianPonyMom
Jan. 13, 2004, 12:51 PM
Why is short stirrup 12 and under specifically?

Kerby
Jan. 13, 2004, 01:01 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Janet:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by OhioColleen:
If someone teaches 2 lessons a week, can they still show as an amatuer?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE> If she gets PAID for teaching, even just ONE lesson in the whole year, she is NOT an amateur.

If she teaches without getting paid, and is neither an employee nor a family member to anyone that is getting paid (for anything horse related)by the studenta, then she could still be an amateur.

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


Actually I thought you had to make over XX dollars per year on an equestrian activity to be disqualified as a ammy. You'd have to check with the rule books for the exact amount. I'm not sure what it is.

Kerby
Jan. 13, 2004, 01:03 PM
Why are horses measured in "hands"?
Who decided on "hands"?
Why four inches to a "hand"?

TC Manhattan
Jan. 13, 2004, 01:13 PM
I think the dollar amount comes in when accepting a "non-monetary" gift of appreciation for your riding effort/s. I think you are permitted to accept such a gift provided that it is valued at under $300. You are NOT permitted to receive ANYTHING for teaching a lesson or training/riding a horse.

"Have no expectations, only abundant expectancy."

Goldylox
Jan. 13, 2004, 01:52 PM
What is it when someone says an "out of hand" release?