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OneonOne
Jan. 13, 2004, 01:58 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Kerby:
Why are horses measured in "hands"?
Who decided on "hands"?
Why four inches to a "hand"?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>Back in the "old days" someone could easily measure a horse by going "hand over hand" up their leg to their withers. On average, a person's (man's) hand was 4 inches wide.

Drakaina16
Jan. 13, 2004, 02:07 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>What is it when someone says an "out of hand" release?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

When someones says you are "jumping out of hand," you are giving what is called an automatic release. An automatic release maintains the straight bit-to-elbow line and is considered a more "advanced" release for when you no longer need to rely on the support of the neck.

Danya

spina
Jan. 13, 2004, 02:10 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by nollekins:
My farrier came and took my horse's shces off "because of the snow". I was too embarrassed to ask him: Why?
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I bet your farrier wouldn't mind at all if you asked "why?" to anything that they did, and would most likely respect you for wanting to learn. And besides, then you could tell us.

but also, posted by creseida:

"shoes cause snow to build up in the hoof to the point that the horse is tottering around on 3-4" snowballs. No fun for the horse, plus the potential for a twisted joint or fall is increased. The steel of the shoes attracts the snow and it builds up...ever tried shoevelling snow with a non-aluminum shovel? Bare feet don't have this problem.
[/QUOTE]

I understand the steel attracting or holding the snow theory, but I've seen a LOT of unshod horses with terrible snowballs under their hooves, so I still don't get why her farrier pulled the shoes instead of putting on pads or those new-fangled non-pad anti-snowball shoe-insert things - anyone know what they're called and how they work?

Janet
Jan. 13, 2004, 02:17 PM
Kels,

You were asking about the implications of having a family member who is a professional.

The amateur rules are section 808 of the rule book. If you are curious about the specifics of a given situation, read the rulebook.

There are two items in the list of things that "make you not an amateur" that relate to family members: <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> f) Rides, drives or shows in halter/in hand in competitions, any horse for which he/she or
a member of his/her family or a corporation which a member of his/her family controls,
receives remuneration for boarding, training, riding, driving or showing in halter/in hand.
g) Gives instruction to any person or rides, drives or shows in halter/in hand in
competitions any horse, for which activity another person in his/her family or corporation
which a member of his/her family controls will receive remuneration for the activity. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
So, in f, if I show a horse for which my mother is getting paid (boarding, training, showing, etc.), then I am not an amateur (more on this later).

And in g, if I give a lesson, but my mother gets paid for the lesson, then I am not an amateur.

But if my mother is a professional, and I have no contact with any of her students, boarders, or horses in training, then I can still be an amateur.

There is one slightly sticky bit in f. Taking the rule literally, if you pay board to your mother (for your own horse) and then take your horse to a show, them you are not technically an amateur. You are "rining in a show a horse for which a family member is paod board. I don't think this is the interpretation that was intended, and I have a proposed rule change to say it is OK if it is your own horse (or a horse yo lease).

Is it any clearer now?

The amateur rules are section 808 of the rule book. If you are curious about the specifics of a given situation, read the rulebook.

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain

Janet
Jan. 13, 2004, 02:24 PM
Kerby, you asked if there was a dollar limit on teaching.

No, there isn't. But you can be reimbursed for expenses (so, for instance, if you drove to someone's farm to teach them, they could pay you the mileage cost to get there, and you would still be an amateur). <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> b) Accepts remuneration for giving instructions in equitation or horse training. (Persons
acting as counselors at summer camps, who are not hired in the exclusive capacity of riding
instructors are excluded and persons giving instruction and training to the handicapped). <HR></BLOCKQUOTE> So if you get paid, no matter how little, you are not an amateur.

The $300 limit comes in somwhere else-

In the list of things that are "OK" it says
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> d) Accepting a token of appreciation, other than money, for riding, driving or showing in
halter/in hand. (Note: Horse board, prize money, partial support or objects of more than
$300. are considered remuneration, not small tokens of appreciation). (Also note: accepting any amount of money, whether more or less than $300., is considered remuneration.)<HR></BLOCKQUOTE> But you will note it doesn't refer to teaching here, only "riding, driving, or showing in hand".

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain

DraftHorsePower
Jan. 13, 2004, 02:26 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by spina:
or those new-fangled non-pad anti-snowball shoe-insert things - anyone know what they're called and how they work?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I posted a pic of one in my last reply, my horse wears them, and we just call them "snow poppers" i'm not sure as to the formal name, but when the snow builds up in the hoof, it pops the ice/snow build up out of the hoof in a little hoof shaped chunk. kinda cool.

*~Emilee~*

Janet
Jan. 13, 2004, 02:37 PM
Kels also asked <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>And if someone is cleaning stalls for money off of their board, are they still an ammy? <HR></BLOCKQUOTE> Cleaning stalls for money or board is OK.

Taking things literally, it is a little bit more questionable if you clean stalls for money off lessons on school horses in the same barn, or if you clean stalls for maney off your board, but ALSO ride (whether or not you are paid) other boarder's horses, or horses in training.

This comes under the "employee" restrictions (if you clean satlls, you are an employee, whether it is for money or for board). For this one, who yor family members are doesn't make any difference.<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> c) Accepts remuneration for employment in other capacity (e.g., secretary, bookkeeper,
veterinarian, groom, farrier) and gives instruction, rides, drives, shows in halter/in hand,
trains or schools horses, other than horses actually owned or leased by him/her, when
his/her employer or a member of the family of said employer or a corporation which a
member of his/her family controls, owns, boards or trains said horses. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain

C'est La Vie
Jan. 13, 2004, 03:53 PM
What does GPA stand for?

Sammy
*Just My Luck*
*C'est La Vie*

~Whoever said money can't buy happiness obviously didn't know where to buy a horse~

HFbellefille
Jan. 13, 2004, 04:33 PM
JSG, I've seen Short Stirrup both as 12 and under and as 18 and under. I suppose it would depend on the type and number of riders a show is expecting. However, I've never seen it as 14 and under, or any other break down. A regional thing maybe?

My question: What does IIRC stand for?

War Admiral
Jan. 13, 2004, 04:57 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by bigbay:
Who decided the cut-off for a pony was 14.2?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

LOL - Y'know... That's a REALLY good question! I don't know either. Anyone??

______________

Thoroughbreds! Everything else is just a horse. :-)

JusJumpIt
Jan. 13, 2004, 06:13 PM
RE: GPA- Grand Prix Association (I think) Goof Proof Appy
RE: Snow packed shoes- We used to put a heavy coat of PAM Spray on the soles of the pony's feet, worked best with those that were barefoot, but after a while they would still develop "snow-stilts" I used to use leather pads in the winter, and get everything drilled, but I hate the cold, so most of the time I like to have an excuse not to venture outside in the snow. I have been away for a few days and this is the first topic I like to go to when I get back. Always helps to start with a smile, thanks everyone.

Goldylox
Jan. 13, 2004, 06:41 PM
HFbellefille,
I did run one search on IIRC. It came back with topics on chivalry, hunting and jousting. I never really did find the exact meaning. Does anyone out there know?

Kerby
Jan. 13, 2004, 07:02 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by C'est La Vie:
What does GPA stand for?

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Great Pain (in the) A$$

Oh.. thats not right... http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/winkgrin.gif

Kerby
Jan. 13, 2004, 07:07 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by OneonOne:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Kerby:
Why are horses measured in "hands"?
Who decided on "hands"?
Why four inches to a "hand"?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>Back in the "old days" someone could easily measure a horse by going "hand over hand" up their leg to their withers. On average, a person's (man's) hand was 4 inches wide.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Thanks, it makes alot of sence now that you've said it like that. Seems alot of what we do stems from 'back in the old days'.

Kerby
Jan. 13, 2004, 07:17 PM
ok.. here is a dumb question..

Whats a Bull Snap? (I saw someone was a memeber of the hate bull snap clique, and have no cluw what they are hating!)

horse_poor
Jan. 13, 2004, 07:44 PM
a bull snap is a snapon a lead rope that you need 5 hands to open and another 5 hands to hold onto the horse and lead rope....at least, i do http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

http://www.valleyvet.com/product.html/prod30E075DE-7B6A-11D5-A192-00B0D0204AE5prod/cat230E08132-7B6A-11D5-A192-00B0D0204AE5/?ccd=INK001

Molly, Aristotle, and Brown Baggin' in MN
****************************
proud founder of:
~senior horse clique
~obsessed with clean/disinfected water bucket clique
~OMG i turned the wash stall into a laundromat clique

proud member of:
~i have no money but i still ride clique

"if ya aint got it on the flat, ya aint got it over the jumps....and dont let him use the wall as a crutch.." kristine pfister stephenson, 1992

CrossedWings
Jan. 13, 2004, 10:18 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by spina:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by nollekins:
My farrier came and took my horse's shces off "because of the snow". I was too embarrassed to ask him: Why?
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I bet your farrier wouldn't mind at all if you asked "why?" to anything that they did, and would most likely respect you for wanting to learn. And besides, then you could tell us.

but also, posted by creseida:

"shoes cause snow to build up in the hoof to the point that the horse is tottering around on 3-4" snowballs. No fun for the horse, plus the potential for a twisted joint or fall is increased. The steel of the shoes attracts the snow and it builds up...ever tried shoevelling snow with a non-aluminum shovel? Bare feet don't have this problem.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Snowballing isn't caused so much because of the attraction between it and the steel of the shoe; it's caused due to the "cup" a shoe around the hoof creates; (and also the depth of the horses sole; shallow soles horses rarely ball up as bad as deep soles horses). The shoe allows the snow to form in a protected "cup" slowly building up, and then packing quite solidly under the foot (and continuously building up/packing, etc); until, as mentioned, you have 4-5 inches of new "heels" on your horse. The reason pads work so well is because the pads reduce the depth of the sole; and less depth = less snow able to be held in = little or no snow balling.

It is for exactly this reason that many barns in winter-like climates have their horses shod only on the front feet.... It allows the horses to still walk (somewhat) because the hind legs are not usually snowballed up whilst trying navigating on heels!

If you look at a lot of horses feet/clean them often, you will tend to notice that barefoot horses with a more naturally "cupped" foot (deeper soled) will have more problems with snowballing despite no shoes, than those horses with a flatter soled foot.

Quote for the week:

"Never under-estimate the power of stupid people in large numbers." - Shirt Slogan

dior
Jan. 13, 2004, 10:35 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by HFbellefille:
JSG, I've seen Short Stirrup both as 12 and under and as 18 and under. I suppose it would depend on the type and number of riders a show is expecting. However, I've never seen it as 14 and under, or any other break down. A regional thing maybe?

My question: What does IIRC stand for?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

If I recall correctly.

Short-stirrup - I've only seen it as under 18 (for juniors only) and long stirrup as 18 and up, might be a regional thing.

OhioColleen
Jan. 13, 2004, 10:59 PM
Okay, as a continunuation of the last question I asked "If someone teaches 2 lessons a week can they be considered an amatuer" and the answer was "No", how long does someone have to NOT teach in order to get back into Amatuer status?
(this subject is awesome, btw)

To you, she's a horse. To me, she's a family member who is big, hairy, walks on all fours and is easily startled.
~Colleen

RumoursFollow
Jan. 14, 2004, 03:06 AM
ok.. I may be WAY out in left field on this one (like that would be anything new..)

But in terms of the what does GPA stand for?question...

I was of the understanding that GPA helmets were developed by people that make safety equipment for Formula 1 racecar drivers. GPA is the company that makes the stuff. GP= Gilles Villeneuve. Not sure what the A stands for, but I dont believe that the company is american (French?) so its probably not an english word if its not a name.

Then again, chances are I'm way off base. But I thought I'd give it a shot.

Lazy Palomino Hunter
Jan. 14, 2004, 04:26 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by RumoursFollow:
ok.. I may be WAY out in left field on this one (like that would be anything new..)

But in terms of the _what does GPA stand for?_question...

I was of the understanding that GPA helmets were developed by people that make safety equipment for Formula 1 racecar drivers. GPA is the company that makes the stuff. GP= Gilles Villeneuve. Not sure what the A stands for, but I dont believe that the company is american (French?) so its probably not an english word if its not a name.

Then again, chances are I'm way off base. But I thought I'd give it a shot.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I'm sticking with "gonna Pay A lot

Alison

Farriers are like cats. They don't like to go out in the rain and they don't come when you call them.

SillyHorse
Jan. 14, 2004, 05:51 AM
IIRC = if I remember correctly.

This (http://chronicleforums.com/groupee/forums?a=tpc&s=6656094911&f=6096094911&m=9186025321) thread in FAQs explains most, if not all, of the BB abbreviations.

SillyHorse
~ You can do anything if you want it bad enough. That is why we see so many people who can fly. ~

Janet
Jan. 14, 2004, 06:51 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> Since 4' = 14.2 hands... <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>But 4feet = 48 inches = 12 hands

14h2" = 58" = 4'10"

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain

Andie235
Jan. 14, 2004, 07:26 AM
Why do some people refer to their horse as "aged" in sale ads? Is there a certain age upon which all horses are considered aged? Why not just put the actual age?


An aged horse is a horse over 10 years old.

Pocket Pony
Jan. 14, 2004, 08:45 AM
Why are there small and large juniors, but not small and large A/Os or A/As?

"Both rider and horse must enjoy the work. This is the essence of success" - Reiner Klimke

CanadianPonyMom
Jan. 14, 2004, 09:02 AM
Exact purpose for 3 girth strap things on the saddle..

Why martingles, reasons to use a running martingale... and standing

Pocket Pony
Jan. 14, 2004, 09:20 AM
I always understood that a saddle has three billets in case one breaks while you are out riding - you have another to use.

I think a lot of people use standing martingales for show. But some people use them if they have a horse who throws his head up - to keep the rider from being bopped in the nose! The running martingale is also for a horse who throws his head up, but it works in conjunction with the bit and puts pressure on the bars of the mouth when the horse does that.

"Both rider and horse must enjoy the work. This is the essence of success" - Reiner Klimke

WhatzUp
Jan. 14, 2004, 10:29 AM
Here's something I have been wondering for a long while ...

I have seen people put on polos and they wrap the polo around the top, then cross and run a strip down the back of the leg (from the top so the strip is actually the other end of the polo) and then proceed to wrap around this strip (normally starting from the top, Xing at the bottom) and I wondered why this strip ? Does it provide more protection for the tendon ?

Thanks !!

Yours in sport,

Lynn

Founder of the Pinto Warmblood Clique

Nickelodian
Jan. 14, 2004, 11:15 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by batgirl:
Why are there small and large juniors, but not small and large A/Os or A/As?

"Both rider and horse must enjoy the work. This is the essence of success" - Reiner Klimke<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

A/Os are split by age already, and theoretically there aren't as many A/Os as juniors so no need for the split. Children's is not split so A/A's wouldn't be as well

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
www.scatteredoaksfarm.com (http://www.scatteredoaksfarm.com)

buryinghill1
Jan. 14, 2004, 11:25 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Bits and Pieces:
... Xing at the bottom) and I wondered why this strip ? Does it provide more protection for the tendon ?
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
I have put on rundowns and polo bandages this way for eons. Somebody taught me both ways, but I like the extra strip down the tendon.
A famous race horse trainer told me "wrapping wrong" was "all a bunch of bologna." "Too tight, too loose or binding a leg is really all that matters" - and in my experience he was right. I've seen polos put on all sorts of ways... and the ones that come off http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif during work are the only ones that ever caused a problem.
I don't think the "tail" adds extra protection, but it always makes me feel better http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

CanadianPonyMom
Jan. 14, 2004, 11:28 AM
Can I really put my chaps in the washer and dryer?
Is it really "unsafe" to wear full chaps and shorts?
Why do people bang thier horse's tail or for heaven's sake ... forelock...
Why fish oil in hoof dressing?

[This message was edited by Yo' Mama on Jan. 14, 2004 at 02:38 PM.]

Nickelodian
Jan. 14, 2004, 11:29 AM
From earlier in this very thread:

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Lord Helpus:
_The correct way to wrap polo wraps_ is to hold the tail of the wrap in one hand with about 6" - 7" sticking out. When you make your first circle, the polo should secure to itself with this tail sticking out.

The tail is then turned down so that it hangs down the back of the tendon and the rest of the polo is wrapped around both the leg and the tail of the wrap.

This is to give the tendon extra protection from a polo mallet or a flying ball or the horse's other leg in a quick stop and turn.

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
www.scatteredoaksfarm.com (http://www.scatteredoaksfarm.com)

buryinghill1
Jan. 14, 2004, 11:30 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by JSG:
Why do people bank thier horse's tail or for heaven's sake ... forelock... <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
BANGED tails look great! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif Never heard of a bank tail http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif
Forelocks I would pull, IMHO

Extra Ordinary
Jan. 14, 2004, 11:33 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by buryinghill1:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by JSG:
Why do people bank thier horse's tail or for heaven's sake ... forelock... <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
BANGED tails look great! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif Never heard of a bank tail http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif
Forelocks I would pull, IMHO

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I like banged tails on some horses - big warmbloods with long thick tails I think it looks great - I don't like when hunters tailed a chopped though.

As for forlocks, I would NEVER cut one unless you want your horse to look like an absolute FOOL!!! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Madie

*Bo Frost*
*American Voodoo*

CanadianPonyMom
Jan. 14, 2004, 11:42 AM
My friend's hubby was getting into her business and went into the barn... since been banned... and saw in the herd, a lonely Shetland... who was happliy chewing away... he looked up at Hubby... and walked over. Hubby saw that he "couldn't see" and feeling sorry for him... chopped bangs for him.

Fool is the word.

I have seen since then, a couple others and wondered... why?

Coffee while I hold the pony in the wee hours of morning... ahhhhh... That's the life....

eclipse
Jan. 14, 2004, 01:42 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Can I really put my chaps in the washer and dryer?
Is it really "unsafe" to wear full chaps and shorts?
Why do people bang thier horse's tail or for heaven's sake ... forelock...
Why fish oil in hoof dressing? <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I used to put my chaps in the washer on cool & then the dryer when they were almost dry. Worked great. I found if you don't put them in the dryer at all, they go like to pieces of cardboard. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

"somewhere in the world, my size is considered desirable!!"

aDoLeScEnCe
Jan. 14, 2004, 01:50 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by prider80:
O.K., I've got one...am I the only person who prefers traditional irons to the Sprenger irons?? Not trying to be a G.M. wannabe or anything like that, http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif but I honestly prefer how the traditional ones feel--so much more secure than the Sprengers. Anyone with me on this? http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
Wow!! I completely agree with you. I bought some Sprengers because everyone said how much they improved their leg position and riding; they were horrible. They did not support my leg at all, and overflexed my ankle even more than it already normally is. Because it did not support me, when I changed the weight in my stirrups, the stirrup unflexed and made it tougher to keep my position and tampered with my balance. Needless to say, I bought some regular irons and gave the sprengers away.

C'est La Vie
Jan. 14, 2004, 01:53 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Yo' Mama:
Exact purpose for 3 girth strap things on the saddle..

Why martingles, reasons to use a running martingale... and standing<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Finally a question I think that I can answer! The girth has three billet straps so that if one breaks you still have another. You should always keep your girth on the 1st and 2nd or the 1st and 3rd because the first one is attached to the saddle differently than the second and third (which are attached together). This way if your saddle breaks at one of those points, your girth will still kind of stay on.

And someone asked about washing chaps? Some company now makes washing machine stuff to use for leather things like chaps.

Sammy
*Just My Luck*
*C'est La Vie*

~Whoever said money can't buy happiness obviously didn't know where to buy a horse~

creseida
Jan. 14, 2004, 02:02 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Janet:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> Since 4' = 14.2 hands... <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>But 4feet = 48 inches = 12 hands

14h2" = 58" = 4'10"

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Duh, you're right. Bad math day. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

~<>~ COTHBB Leather Care Guru~<>~
~Member of the *Horse Vans* clique~

"Learn the rules so you may break them effectively"~Dalai Lama

harvestmoon
Jan. 14, 2004, 04:58 PM
I love banged tails on big warmbloods with thick tails http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/yes.gif, but I don't really enjoy seeing banged forelocks. http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/no.gif

Here's a question: why is Show Sheen not a good choice? I've heard that some people don't like to use it. Any reason in particular? Are there any other products out there that are better?

____________________________

Ipsa scientia potestas est...
Member of the Dutch Warmblood Clique!

J. Turner
Jan. 14, 2004, 05:42 PM
I haven't read the whole thread so this might've already been brought up, but do guys have to be taught to ride differently because of their anatomy? http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_redface.gif

My Photo Albums (http://community.webshots.com/user/jessicaseamus)

"When I bestride him, I soar, I am a hawk: he trots the air; the earth sings when he touches it; the basest horn of his hoof is more musical than the pipe of Hermes."
-- Shakespeare, Henry V

bigbay
Jan. 14, 2004, 05:52 PM
Washing your chaps is also a great way to regain a more "custom" fit, whether they've gotten too loose or too tight. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Add a 1/4 cup of vegetable oil to the wash water to keep the chaps from drying out too much. When they're done being washed, rather than put them in the dryer, put them on and wear them until they dry. Voila, instant fit. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Court@HJ-OH
Jan. 14, 2004, 06:22 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by J. Turner:
I haven't read the whole thread so this might've already been brought up, but do guys have to be taught to ride differently because of their anatomy? http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_redface.gif

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE> I have a couple guys friends that ride and my impression was that they don't get special instruction but that they kind of have to figure out themselves how to hold their bodies and that it takes a couple lessons and a couple bad blows.

**Courtney**

Janet
Jan. 14, 2004, 08:26 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> Here's a question: why is Show Sheen not a good choice? I've heard that some people don't like to use it. Any reason in particular? <HR></BLOCKQUOTE> It blocks sweating. Not a big deal for a horse showing on the line. But if the horse is working hard, it can make the horse overheat.

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain

noname
Jan. 14, 2004, 08:44 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by aDoLeScEnCe:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by prider80:
O.K., I've got one...am I the only person who prefers traditional irons to the Sprenger irons?? Not trying to be a G.M. wannabe or anything like that, http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif but I honestly prefer how the traditional ones feel--so much more secure than the Sprengers. Anyone with me on this? http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
Wow!! I completely agree with you. I bought some Sprengers because everyone said how much they improved their leg position and riding; they were horrible. They did not support my leg at all, and overflexed my ankle even more than it already normally is. Because it did not support me, when I changed the weight in my stirrups, the stirrup unflexed and made it tougher to keep my position and tampered with my balance. Needless to say, I bought some regular irons and gave the sprengers away.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

i agree with you guys too! i feel like when i step down in a sprenger stirrup there is no end to the "down". i like something that doesnt move under my foot. i too gave my sprengers away!

Court@HJ-OH
Jan. 14, 2004, 08:50 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Janet:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> Here's a question: why is Show Sheen not a good choice? I've heard that some people don't like to use it. Any reason in particular? <HR></BLOCKQUOTE> It blocks sweating. Not a big deal for a horse showing on the line. But if the horse is working hard, it can make the horse overheat.

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain<HR></BLOCKQUOTE> It also drys out the skin badly.

**Courtney**

dogchushu
Jan. 15, 2004, 06:59 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Court@HJ-OH:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Janet:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> Here's a question: why is Show Sheen not a good choice? I've heard that some people don't like to use it. Any reason in particular? <HR></BLOCKQUOTE> It blocks sweating. Not a big deal for a horse showing on the line. But if the horse is working hard, it can make the horse overheat.

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain<HR></BLOCKQUOTE> It also drys out the skin badly.

**Courtney**<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I've found it also dries out the coat. Plus, if you're a total dork like me, you end up getting it all over your hands (you pat the horse's rump or neck, getting showsheen on your hands and gloves). Then you drop stuff all day. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif



"Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work." -- Thomas A. Edison

[This message was edited by dogchushu on Jan. 15, 2004 at 10:07 AM.]

SargPepper
Jan. 15, 2004, 07:23 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by J. Turner:
I haven't read the whole thread so this might've already been brought up, but do guys have to be taught to ride differently because of their anatomy? http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_redface.gif
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I have introduced four of my male family members to riding (and on a very bouncy Arab... hehehehe http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif ). I always ask them what they do to--ahem--protect themselves. I actually got yelled at by my brother-in-law because I did not TELL him how to ride so that he would not get hurt. Well, excuse me!! I was only like 12 at the time... such things did not occur to me!

Oh well!

---Jen

"If the good Lord had intended us to walk, he wouldn't have invented rollerskates." --Willy Wonka & The Chocolate Factory

Gravie
Jan. 15, 2004, 04:55 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by SargPepper:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by J. Turner:
I haven't read the whole thread so this might've already been brought up, but do guys have to be taught to ride differently because of their anatomy? http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_redface.gif
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I have introduced four of my male family members to riding (and on a very bouncy Arab... hehehehe http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif ). I always ask them what they do to--ahem--protect themselves. I actually got yelled at by my brother-in-law because I did not TELL him how to ride so that he would not get hurt. Well, _excuse me!!_ I was only like 12 at the time... such things did not occur to me!

Oh well!

---Jen

"If the good Lord had intended us to walk, he wouldn't have invented rollerskates." --Willy Wonka & The Chocolate Factory<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


Don't they wear cups or something? Like football players, you know? I would think they'd have to... *cringe* Ouch. >:P

_____


oh-darling.net (http://oh-darling.net) my own domain, finally!

foursocks
Jan. 15, 2004, 05:26 PM
Hey, I've got one- when I eventually get my next horse (my first one in over 13 years!) and I want to put boots on him, will everyone laugh at me for using my old Hampa boots, which are still in perfect shape, provide good protection and look (I think) kinda cool? In other words, must I buy Eskadrons (which seem kind of cheap to me) in order that the other horse people don't call me crazy lady behind my back?

You can take a line and say it isn't straight- but that wont change its shape. Jets to Brazil

foursocks
Jan. 15, 2004, 05:29 PM
There was a trainer who used to show in my zone when I was a kid who *never* wore underwear under his breeches. Aside from being sort of...well...show-y, it seemed to me that this might potentially allow certain things to fall into awkward spots. But I was a teenager and didn't think asking him about it would be appropriate. Now I would, without hesitation, but I doubt I'll run into him again...darn...

You can take a line and say it isn't straight- but that wont change its shape. Jets to Brazil

SargPepper
Jan. 15, 2004, 07:29 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Gravie:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by SargPepper:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by J. Turner:
I haven't read the whole thread so this might've already been brought up, but do guys have to be taught to ride differently because of their anatomy? http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_redface.gif
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I have introduced four of my male family members to riding (and on a very bouncy Arab... hehehehe http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif ). I always ask them what they do to--ahem--protect themselves. I actually got yelled at by my brother-in-law because I did not TELL him how to ride so that he would not get hurt. Well, _excuse me!!_ I was only like 12 at the time... such things did not occur to me!

Oh well!

---Jen
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


Don't they wear cups or something? Like football players, you know? I would think they'd have to... *cringe* Ouch. >:P
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Nope, apparently not... Especially since I never told them they should. http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/uhoh.gif
I asked my husband if he thought that would help, and he just said that he kind of stands up in the stirrups. He rides strictly western, though, and is not at all worried about becoming a serious rider. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

---Jen

"If the good Lord had intended us to walk, he wouldn't have invented rollerskates." --Willy Wonka & The Chocolate Factory

SargPepper
Jan. 15, 2004, 07:32 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by foursocks:
There was a trainer who used to show in my zone when I was a kid who *never* wore underwear under his breeches. Aside from being sort of...well...show-y, it seemed to me that this might potentially allow certain things to fall into awkward spots. But I was a teenager and didn't think asking him about it would be appropriate. Now I would, without hesitation, but I doubt I'll run into him again...darn...
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Good Lord!!!! If I had noticed that when I was younger, I'd probably have died of sheer horror (yeah, I was a pretty sheltered kid!)...

I've just heard from various guys that you just gotta let things pick their direction. Yipes!! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif

---Jen

"If the good Lord had intended us to walk, he wouldn't have invented rollerskates." --Willy Wonka & The Chocolate Factory

CrossedWings
Jan. 15, 2004, 09:32 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Janet:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> Here's a question: why is Show Sheen not a good choice? I've heard that some people don't like to use it. Any reason in particular? <HR></BLOCKQUOTE> It blocks sweating. Not a big deal for a horse showing on the line. But if the horse is working hard, it can make the horse overheat.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
I've never heard of the product blocking sweat; in fact I once sprayed some show sheen on my horses neck/shoulder area; he worked hard and was plenty sweaty in the areas sprayed (perhaps I did not spray a thick enough layer.... It does make sense, as it is somewhat of a repellant of dust/dirt, etc)..... Nonetheless, I do think show sheen is an amazing product for TAILS & horses that like to keep their white socks yellow and green.. It should not go on the mane, forelock, or any part of the body... The tails stay soft and groomed looking and easy to comb through without ripping hairs (also keeps the tail from getting caught on things as easily; and ripping).... The socks; I use it occasionally on in order to repel stains; it does in fact work quite well for this job!

OneonOne
Jan. 16, 2004, 05:24 AM
For those with male anatomy questions (http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif), there have been a couple of very informative threads on this.

Teaching men to ride... (http://chronicleforums.com/groupee/forums?a=tpc&s=6656094911&f=5566064631&m=165605521&r=867606521#867606521)
A Male Perspective (http://chronicleforums.com/groupee/forums?q=Y&a=tpc&s=6656094911&f=5566064631&m=3036041331&p=1)

dressager
Jan. 16, 2004, 06:48 AM
Huh? Show sheen 'blocks sweat'? Very often I use it for my lessons and my horse is ALWAYS sweating afterwards. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_confused.gif

Dressager (http://www.geocities.com/lubenkafarm)
You don't throw a whole life away just because its a little banged up - Tom Smith

Nickelodian
Jan. 16, 2004, 07:12 AM
I've never heard of the product blocking sweat; <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Nonetheless, I do think show sheen is an amazing product for TAILS & horses that like to keep their white socks yellow and green.. It should not go on the mane, forelock, or any part of the body... The tails stay soft and groomed looking and easy to comb through without ripping hairs (also keeps the tail from getting caught on things as easily; and ripping).... The socks; I use it occasionally on in order to repel stains; it does in fact work quite well for this job!<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

This is what I use show sheen for...good layer in the tail for brushing it out, and a good layer on the socks after scrubbing them to get them white. Works perfectly for me!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
www.scatteredoaksfarm.com (http://www.scatteredoaksfarm.com)

foursocks
Jan. 16, 2004, 07:41 AM
When I was a kid, I got a little overzealous with the Show Sheen and sprayed it liberally on every surface of my poor horse. So did my friend. We each had our own bottle, provided by our clueless moms, so it was really a *lot* of product in the hands of two 12 year olds. We were yelled at from here to Sunday since it was right before a show and then told to give our horses baths. I asked why, since they looked so nice and shiny, and my long-suffering trainer (he once told me that I was responsible for every other grey hair on his head) told me to go over to my horse and try to braid his mane. Ohhhh....I get it....

After that, I'd use it on tails (unless they needed to be braided) and socks. And once, I sprayed my own feet with it, thinking it would be easier to get my high arches into my dress boots. It worked, but I sweated like a linebacker in those boots (of course I chose to try this experiment in boiling-hot August). After that, I used baby powder!

You can take a line and say it isn't straight- but that wont change its shape. Jets to Brazil

sarah86
Jan. 16, 2004, 11:16 AM
How do you pronounce "Haflinger"? I've heard it said "half-flinger" and "haf-linjer"...

Janet
Jan. 16, 2004, 11:50 AM
Rephrase-
It blocks the sweat from evaporating as efficiently, so the sweat doesn't cool the horse as effectively as it would without show sheen.

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain

RedEqHunter
Jan. 16, 2004, 11:50 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by sarah86:
How do you pronounce "Haflinger"? I've heard it said "half-flinger" and "haf-linjer"...<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Everyone around here says "haf-linger".

"Living on Earth is expensive, but it does include a free trip around the sun."

Court@HJ-OH
Jan. 16, 2004, 03:18 PM
Someone explain to me the whole warmbloods are registries not breeds thing. Why then do stallions approved by a couple registries still claim one first? If a foal is born of to holstieners and is never approved is he a holstiener?

**Courtney**

dressager
Jan. 16, 2004, 07:08 PM
YES- the breed of the horse is what registry he was registered with or accepted at the inspection. Breeding stock can be APPROVED by other registries so THEIR offspring can be inspected/registered with that registry.

Ex. My Oldenburg Verband filly is actually half TB and half Hannoverian (which was actually Hannoverian/Selle Francise <sp?&gthttp://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif. Her dam was APPROVED into the Oldenburg Verband registry and her sire was too. Some breeds, I believe, are not allowed to be approved in some registries.

Dressager (http://www.geocities.com/lubenkafarm)
You don't throw a whole life away just because its a little banged up - Tom Smith

Prairie
Jan. 17, 2004, 07:45 AM
How do you know if your saddle has a wide or narrow twist? Is it the same as the tree width - like a wide saddle would have a wide twist, etc. ?

Horseshowaddict
Jan. 17, 2004, 02:31 PM
This is sort of an answer to the show sheen question.
Show Sheen is a silicone based product. Apparently, overuse will cause weakening and thinning of hair, so its not the best thing to be used for everyday grooming. I have also heard this from some of my dog showing friends (most of who show Goldens, so I trust them on hair coat issues).

For the twist question, I beleive the twist is the part of the saddle between the pommel and the seat, if its wide....well I wouldn't be very comfortable! :-D

~*~Rebecca~*~
**IHSA Clique**

Janet
Jan. 17, 2004, 03:43 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Prairie:
How do you know if your saddle has a wide or narrow twist? Is it the same as the tree width - like a wide saddle would have a wide twist, etc. ?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>To oversimplify a bit, the widdth of the tree refers to the profile of the UNDRERSIDE of the saddle, where the tree points are (very near the front). The twist refers to the TOPSIDE of the saddle, where your hips go (further back than the tree points). It is difficult to make a saddle with a narrow tree and a wide twist, but it can be done. But you can easily have a saddle with a narrow tree and a wide twist.


Typically, women ride with a wider twist (because their hips are wider), while men are more commfortable with a narrower twist (because they have narrow hips.
Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain

bailey07
Jan. 17, 2004, 03:51 PM
I dont know if this has already been asked but what is the purpose of a breastplate? I used to think I knew, until my sister asked why it was used, and I realized I wasnt too sure! Thanks!

~*Bailey*~

http://community.webshots.com/user/bailey1521

[This message was edited by goofygirl~seriousrider on Jan. 17, 2004 at 11:41 PM.]

harvestmoon
Jan. 17, 2004, 04:07 PM
A breastplate is used to keep the saddle from slipping back.

Thanks for answering my question regarding Show Sheen everyone! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

____________________________

Ipsa scientia potestas est...
Member of the Dutch Warmblood Clique!

CrossedWings
Jan. 17, 2004, 04:10 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by goofygirl~seriousrider:
I dont know if this has already been asked but what is the purpose of a brestplate?
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

A breastplate prevents the saddle from slipping back too far (some horses do not hold saddles very well, and before long, while you ride, the saddle is sitting too far back, on their back.). A breastplate keeps that saddle from doing so by attaching to the "D" rings on each side of your saddle, and then again @ the girth between the legs.

Prairie
Jan. 17, 2004, 06:57 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>It is difficult to make a saddle with a narrow tree and a wide twist, but it can be done. But you can easily have a saddle with a narrow tree and a wide twist. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I think you mean you can easily have a saddle with a wide tree and a narrow twist. Right?

horse_poor
Jan. 17, 2004, 07:01 PM
ok i am getting brave and asking my questions---

1) when i had my chaps made the gal who took the measurements said (when i asked about fringe) "oooo you dont fringe--trainers dont like fringe because they cant see the line of your leg) so i settled for purple with green puiping------and now i feel ROBBED! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif is there any truth to her statement

2) i always braid in mane colored yarn----but i know others do a certain numbered braid in a different color, sometimes referring to it as the "panic button" or something else---what number braid do you do this to and why?

Molly (aka MissNovember), Aristotle, and Brown Baggin' in MN
****************************
http://community.webshots.com/user/mavw1971
proud founder of:
~senior horse clique
~obsessed with clean/disinfected water bucket clique
~OMG i turned the wash stall into a laundromat clique

proud member of:
~i have no money but i still ride clique
~ i dress my horse in purple and am proud of it clique

"if ya aint got it on the flat, ya aint got it over the jumps....and dont let him use the wall as a crutch.." kristine pfister stephenson, 1992

hideyourheart03
Jan. 17, 2004, 07:06 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by horse_poor:
2) i always braid in mane colored yarn----but i know others do a certain numbered braid in a different color, sometimes referring to it as the "panic button" or something else---what number braid do you do this to and why?

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Well I know certain people do this as a lucky braid. Braid a certain number braid (could be their lucky number) in a different colr thread. Ive never heard the "Panic button" thing though.

~~~~~~~Samantha~~~~~~~

Hide Your Heart aka ELI

Junior Clique * Baby Greenie Support Group * MOOP Clique
Non-GPA Clique * NC Clique

"The real me is a Southern girl, with the Levi's on and an open heart" ~ Jessica Simpson

Janet
Jan. 17, 2004, 07:10 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Prairie:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>It is difficult to make a saddle with a narrow tree and a wide twist, but it can be done. But you can easily have a saddle with a narrow tree and a wide twist. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I think you mean you can easily have a saddle with a wide tree and a narrow twist. Right?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>Nope, I meant what I said. It is easy to add bulk to the saddle to put a wide twisnt on a narrow tree. But if the treee is already wide, it is difficult to make the twist narrow, without pinching the gullet.

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain

dior
Jan. 17, 2004, 07:23 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by horse_poor:
2) i always braid in mane colored yarn----but i know others do a certain numbered braid in a different color, sometimes referring to it as the "panic button" or something else---what number braid do you do this to and why?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
I've heard of lucky braids, which are about 4th-ish from the poll, or release braids - where your hands are supposed to be when you release over a jump, but not of the panic button. At easter one time, the braiders put in easter-coloured braids and little pom-poms.

horse_poor
Jan. 17, 2004, 07:47 PM
well i dunno maybe the panic button=where to put hands in case ya freak out and forget?????? it was always in red.......

Molly (aka MissNovember), Aristotle, and Brown Baggin' in MN
****************************
http://community.webshots.com/user/mavw1971
proud founder of:
~senior horse clique
~obsessed with clean/disinfected water bucket clique
~OMG i turned the wash stall into a laundromat clique

proud member of:
~i have no money but i still ride clique
~ i dress my horse in purple and am proud of it clique

"if ya aint got it on the flat, ya aint got it over the jumps....and dont let him use the wall as a crutch.." kristine pfister stephenson, 1992

Black Market Radio
Jan. 17, 2004, 08:24 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Yo' Mama:
My friend's hubby was getting into her business and went into the barn... since been banned... and saw in the herd, a lonely Shetland... who was happliy chewing away... he looked up at Hubby... and walked over. Hubby saw that he "couldn't see" and feeling sorry for him... chopped bangs for him.

Fool is the word.

I have seen since then, a couple others and wondered... why?

Coffee while I hold the pony in the wee hours of morning... ahhhhh... That's the life....<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I know some other people that did this to their poor horse. He lad a lovely, long and lush forelock. He was an older horse. The people were new to horses and thought the poor buuger couldn't see! They chopped it straight across right above eye-level. That poor horse skulked around after that! You could tell he was both mad and embarrassed! I kid you not he was!

Devilpups (http://f2.pg.photos.yahoo.com/angelgregory87)
I'm a Lumberjack and I'm Ok

bigbay
Jan. 17, 2004, 08:28 PM
Nobody's gonna take on my pony question, huh? http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/no.gif

Devildog, I LOL'd when I saw your new from line! http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/lol.gif If I may ask, how is he? http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/winkgrin.gif

Hop On Pop
Jan. 17, 2004, 11:06 PM
Bigbay-What's your pony question?

Proud member of the Traffic Cone Preservation Society

And the I loff Ponies clique
And the Pony riders clique!

!!!

Jewels
Jan. 17, 2004, 11:43 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by dab:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Okay, what are all of the aids? I can only think of 4, and I think there are 5. I can think of hands, seat, legs, and voice. Is there another? <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>Weight<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I've been taught at three barns there are only 4. That weight and seat are the same thing!? Anyone?!

"You could say I'm a few flakes short of a bale" http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/yes.gif
*Member of the Short Stubby Leg Clique* *Teen Clique* & The Riders of Rohan Clique*

Jewels
Jan. 17, 2004, 11:51 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by dab:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Okay, what are all of the aids? I can only think of 4, and I think there are 5. I can think of hands, seat, legs, and voice. Is there another? <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>Weight<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I've been taught at three barns there are only 4. That weight and seat are the same thing!? Anyone?! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_confused.gif

"You could say I'm a few flakes short of a bale" http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/yes.gif
*Member of the Short Stubby Leg Clique* *Teen Clique* & The Riders of Rohan Clique*

Nickelodian
Jan. 18, 2004, 04:44 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by horse_poor:
1) when i had my chaps made the gal who took the measurements said (when i asked about fringe) "oooo you dont fringe--trainers dont like fringe because they cant see the line of your leg) so i settled for purple with green puiping------and now i feel ROBBED! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif is there any truth to her statement

2) i always braid in mane colored yarn----but i know others do a certain numbered braid in a different color, sometimes referring to it as the "panic button" or something else---what number braid do you do this to and why?
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

1. Yes it is true, fringe can make your leg seem busy or like it moves more than it does. That said, most trainers can see past it, and since you're not showing in them, who cares?

2. Its to show the person where to release in a moment of panic (or its lucky either one).

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
www.scatteredoaksfarm.com (http://www.scatteredoaksfarm.com)

War Admiral
Jan. 18, 2004, 04:56 AM
The four natural aids: hands, seat, legs, VOICE.

My question, following on from this one - why does Dressage prohibit the use of a natural aid, the voice, in favor of artificial ones (whips, spurs, etc.)??

______________

"Those who use horses just for the business are crass, classless horsemen."
--George Morris

CrossedWings
Jan. 18, 2004, 06:11 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by War Admiral:
My question, following on from this one - why does Dressage prohibit the use of a natural aid, the voice, in favor of artificial ones (whips, spurs, etc.)??

______________

"Those who use horses just for the business are crass, classless horsemen."
--George Morris
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I do not know your answer, but I think this is an excellent question. I share it, and wonder why that same is acceptable in hunters (artificial aid is a lesser penalty, than the use of voice, a natural aid).

tardy
Jan. 18, 2004, 06:25 AM
I understand that in the old cavalry schools it was considered impolite to use voice because it influenced the other horses as well.

War Admiral
Jan. 18, 2004, 06:54 AM
Well, yeah, a bunch of cavalry guys BELLOWING at their horses (trust me - I rode under one for a decade), I can see that.

This question really bugs me b/c as a very cross-disciplinary person, one of the hardest things for me, for a long time, was remembering which disciplines/divisions I could use voice in and which I could not! Saddlebred classes - absolutely encouraged and a complete given; hunter classes - discouraged and counted against you but not prohibited; ridden dressage - absolutely prohibited; driven dressage - permitted; etc....

______________

"Those who use horses just for the business are crass, classless horsemen."
--George Morris

jvanrens
Jan. 18, 2004, 07:17 AM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Nickelodian:
As far as my understanding goes you may clean stalls, groom, judge etc etc for money and still be an amature. You ARE NOT an amature if you are paid to teach or paid to ride. [QUOTE]

Depends on which rule book you're showing by http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/yes.gif USEq allows ammys to judge, but AQHA, APHA etc., will "tear up" your ammy card if you do any judging. Just something to keep in mind.

Jo

~~Some days are a total waste of makeup.~~

wotan
Jan. 18, 2004, 07:48 AM
Show Sheen question ---

My trainer likes Laser Sheen better...not sure exactly why but it works great for taming tails and manes. I will check the ingredients next time I'm at the barn, if they are listed. I only use it on the body of the horse for shows. On a really hot day, I do think it mixed with sweat and left more marks on a dark horse. I can't wait 'til the weather warms up to try it on white socks! Thanks for that suggestion.

jvanrens
Jan. 18, 2004, 09:45 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by harvestmoon:
A breastplate is used to keep the saddle from slipping back.

Thanks for answering my question regarding Show Sheen everyone! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

____________________________

__Ipsa scientia potestas est...__
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Especially usefully for keeping your saddle from slipping if you've been over generous with the Show Sheen on your horse's back! http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/yes.gif http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/winkgrin.gif http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/lol.gif

Jo

~~Some days are a total waste of makeup.~~

bigbay
Jan. 18, 2004, 11:49 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by wotan:
Show Sheen question ---

My trainer likes Laser Sheen better...not sure exactly why but it works great for taming tails and manes. I will check the ingredients next time I'm at the barn, if they are listed. I only use it on the body of the horse for shows. On a really hot day, I do think it mixed with sweat and left more marks on a dark horse. I can't wait 'til the weather warms up to try it on white socks! Thanks for that suggestion.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

For some reason, and mind you I never asked for the science behind this, but when I was in Pony Club they told us if we had to use a detangling/shine product to use Laser Sheen instead of Show Sheen. My guess is that Laser Sheen isn't silicone based, but I don't know.

Personally, I use Vetrolin Shine. It works great, smells great, and doesn't make evertyhing else slick. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Horseshowaddict
Jan. 18, 2004, 12:33 PM
Heheh I love Vetrolin shine too http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif. I think the Horse Journal gave it best shine, and it just smells oh so nice!! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

~*~Rebecca~*~
**IHSA Clique**

Gravie
Jan. 18, 2004, 01:07 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by horse_poor:
ok i am getting brave and asking my questions---

1) when i had my chaps made the gal who took the measurements said (when i asked about fringe) "oooo you dont fringe--trainers dont like fringe because they cant see the line of your leg) so i settled for purple with green puiping------and now i feel ROBBED! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif is there any truth to her statement

2) i always braid in mane colored yarn----but i know others do a certain numbered braid in a different color, sometimes referring to it as the "panic button" or something else---what number braid do you do this to and why?
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I got a small fringe on my chaps, I think 1 & 1/2 inches or something. Western folk do like, 3-4 inches, but it's not uncommon to see hunters/english riders do a very short fringe. There's really no truth to the statement about not being able to see your leg, as a good trainer should be able to detect it regardless, and if the fringe is a reasonable size, there's nothing wrong with it.

I've never heard of the panic braid or anything. I'll have to read the other replies. ^_~

_____


oh-darling.net (http://oh-darling.net) my own domain, finally!

horse_poor
Jan. 18, 2004, 03:48 PM
i was robbed of fringe evidently by someone who knew nothing http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/sigh.gif

Molly (aka MissNovember), Aristotle, and Brown Baggin' in MN
****************************
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proud founder of:
~senior horse clique
~obsessed with clean/disinfected water bucket clique
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proud member of:
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"if ya aint got it on the flat, ya aint got it over the jumps....and dont let him use the wall as a crutch.." kristine pfister stephenson, 1992

Court@HJ-OH
Jan. 18, 2004, 04:00 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by horse_poor:
i was robbed of fringe evidently by someone who knew nothing http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/sigh.gif

Molly (aka MissNovember), Aristotle, and Brown Baggin' in MN
****************************
http://community.webshots.com/user/mavw1971
proud founder of:
~senior horse clique
~obsessed with clean/disinfected water bucket clique
~OMG i turned the wash stall into a laundromat clique

proud member of:
~i have no money but i still ride clique
~ i dress my horse in purple and am proud of it clique

"if ya aint got it on the flat, ya aint got it over the jumps....and dont let him use the wall as a crutch.." kristine pfister stephenson, 1992<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>Yes, I am sorry, but you can have it added for a small sum I know.


PS> Your signature is HUGE!!!!!!!!! and a little distracting you might want to tone it down to 3 lines or so.

**Courtney**

JuniorJumper01
Jan. 18, 2004, 05:13 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Janet:

It doesnt't make any difference on the buckle and the strap.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

My trainer, who is also an "R" rated judge, likes to see Eq. riders (especially) with the buckle on the outside of the boot so that the excess spur strap is also kept on the outside. Sorry if this has already been talked about.

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horse_poor
Jan. 18, 2004, 05:35 PM
PS> Your signature is HUGE!!!!!!!!! and a little distracting you might want to tone it down to 3 lines or so.

**Courtney**[/QUOTE]

LMAO-----me??? tone down----????evidently you have not read the calendar girls thread-----

but to tone it done so not to offend others, i will clean it up

Molly (aka MissNovember), Aristotle, and Brown Baggin' in MN
****************************
http://community.webshots.com/user/mavw1971
proud founder of:
~senior horse clique
~obsessed with clean/disinfected water bucket clique
~OMG i turned the wash stall into a laundromat clique

proud member of:
~i have no money but i still ride clique
~ i dress my horse in purple and am proud of it clique

"if ya aint got it on the flat, ya aint got it over the jumps....and dont let him use the wall as a crutch.." kristine pfister stephenson, 1992

horse_poor
Jan. 18, 2004, 05:38 PM
better?

signed---- ME
(toned down sig as to not offend others http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

JuniorJumper01
Jan. 18, 2004, 05:39 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by harvestmoon:
Here's a question: why is Show Sheen not a good choice? I've heard that some people don't like to use it. Any reason in particular? Are there any other products out there that are better?
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I heard that Show Sheen contains silicone which is pretty bad for the horse's mane/tail/coat. And it smells bad http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

Pictures (http://community.webshots.com/user/juniorjumper01)
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Janet
Jan. 18, 2004, 05:42 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by JuniorJumper01:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Janet:

It doesnt't make any difference on the buckle and the strap.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

My trainer, who is also an "R" rated judge, likes to see Eq. riders (especially) with the buckle on the outside of the boot so that the excess spur strap is also kept on the outside. Sorry if this has already been talked about.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE> Yes we are agreeing, I was responding to someone who seemed to think that putting the spurs on backwards (short side to the outside)had something to do with where the buckle went.

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain

Pigglet
Jan. 18, 2004, 05:54 PM
Hahaha this is a really stupid one, and I should definitely know this, but...

Does it hurt when you pull a horse's mane? I've heard it go both ways (it does and it doesn't) so many times I can't count. I've always thought that it must...

-Nicole-

Applesauce
Jan. 18, 2004, 05:55 PM
About the showsheen. It dries out the tail and mane. Plus, because it contains silicone NEVER put it where the saddle goes. Your saddle will slip right off. It's okay to use once in a blue moon but I wouldn't use it as a regular detangler and certainly never on the mane.

Support Wildlife...throw a party!

JuniorJumper01
Jan. 18, 2004, 06:06 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Janet:
Yes we are agreeing, I was responding to someone who seemed to think that putting the spurs on backwards (short side to the outside)had something to do with where the buckle went.

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Gotcha http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Pictures (http://community.webshots.com/user/juniorjumper01)
Split Creek Farm (http://www.splitcreekfarm)

Small Change
Jan. 18, 2004, 06:12 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Pigglet:
Does it hurt when you pull a horse's mane? I've heard it go both ways (it does and it doesn't) so many times I can't count. I've always thought that it must...<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I think it's like waxing your legs (or elsewhere). If you do it fast, there's no pain. If you take too much hair or do it slowly... YOUCH!

Half the failures in life arise from pulling in one's horse as he is leaping -Julius Hare

dbtoo
Jan. 18, 2004, 09:49 PM
In the 90's in Vermont we used to braid the 13th braid from the poll in a different color. We called it the "release braid". Could this be what you are talking about?

LargeJuniorHunter
Jan. 18, 2004, 10:03 PM
I know this is gong to sound very stupid - but that is the meaning of this thread.

What does it mean for a horse to be uphill or downhill? Which is better/worse for a hunter?

http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/uhoh.gif

Founder of: "Non-GPA owners" clique
Member of: "I got left out of the ponies" clique

DarkerHorse
Jan. 19, 2004, 12:36 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Pigglet:
Hahaha this is a really stupid one, and I should definitely know this, but...

Does it hurt when you pull a horse's mane? I've heard it go both ways (it does and it doesn't) so many times I can't count. I've always thought that it must...

-Nicole-<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


People say it doesn't, but I think it does. Kind of.

Some horses act like they feel it and it hurts. Hell, I know a few that have to be tranqed to pull their manes, and will stand with a leadrope around their necks while you clip them.

I think they feel it down by their withers and up by their polls a bit too.

But some don't care at all.

-----
Horsey E-bay! Check it out. (Still in beta stage, but it works)
http://classified.catchride.com

Janet
Jan. 19, 2004, 06:02 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by LargeJuniorHunter:
I know this is gong to sound very stupid - but that is the meaning of this thread.

What does it mean for a horse to be uphill or downhill? Which is better/worse for a hunter?
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
It refers to the relation between the front end and the back end.

If it is taller in front it is "uphill" If it is taller behind it is "downhill".

Uphill is good for dressage, eventing, and jumpers, but uphill horses also often have a higher head cariage (not always). Level, neither up hill nor downhill, is probably best for hunters.

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain

SargPepper
Jan. 19, 2004, 02:28 PM
Okay.... I've seen him mentioned elsewhere...

Who was Willem??

Thanks!

---Jen

"If the good Lord had intended us to walk, he wouldn't have invented rollerskates." --Willy Wonka & The Chocolate Factory

Janet
Jan. 19, 2004, 02:32 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by SargPepper:
Okay.... I've seen him mentioned elsewhere...

Who was Willem??

Thanks!

---Jen
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>If you go to
Favorites (http://chronicleforums.com/groupee/forums?a=frm&s=6656094911&f=5406055031)

You will see several threads about Willem.

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain

noname
Jan. 19, 2004, 02:35 PM
so can men do without stirrups work or would that just hurt?!

Small Change
Jan. 19, 2004, 03:03 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by noname:
so can men do without stirrups work or would that just hurt?!<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Richard Spooner was able to jump a Grand Prix course without them... http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif (Or was it just without one? I can't remember now... But the point is that he did it with less than 2 stirrups!)

Half the failures in life arise from pulling in one's horse as he is leaping -Julius Hare

horse_poor
Jan. 19, 2004, 03:15 PM
oh yeah and why do jumpers where the ear bonnets during competition--i have one i use during the summer that my non horsey friends call a "doily" but why wear them during competition--all my non horsey friends ask me this when i drag them to jumper shows and i am always like uhhhhhhhhhhh i dunno

signed---- ME
(toned down sig as to not offend others http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Charisma
Jan. 19, 2004, 05:05 PM
I think that the jumpers wear the easter bonnets... http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif to help reduce sound. I know some people put cotton in horses ears and then the bonnet over it to help keep the cotton in and help reduce sound so the horse is less spooky to noises. I don't know if this is why they wear them or not,
it is just an ed-u-ma-cated guess!!

Drakaina16
Jan. 19, 2004, 06:20 PM
You're right, Charisma.

Danya

ATX
Jan. 19, 2004, 06:46 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Jewels:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by dab:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Okay, what are all of the aids? I can only think of 4, and I think there are 5. I can think of hands, seat, legs, and voice. Is there another? <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>Weight<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I've been taught at three barns there are only 4. That weight and seat are the same thing!? Anyone?!

"You could say I'm a few flakes short of a bale" http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/yes.gif
*Member of the Short Stubby Leg Clique* *Teen Clique* & The Riders of Rohan Clique* <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


War Admiral
Grand Prix
posted Jan. 18, 2004 07:56 AM
The four natural aids: hands, seat, legs, VOICE.





I really think we are all missing another very valuable ( sp? my mind isn't working right now) natural aid. i spent a while trying to figure out what another one could be and then it clicked and i was like duhh........ Eyes. maybe i'm just strange and its not really classified as an aid but my two trainers have told me its an aid. also, after having a jumping lesson the other day on my green horse and having two runouts at a gymnastic because my eye wasn't looking up and where i needed to go, i definately classify the use of my eyes as a very good aid. JMHO, http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Janet
Jan. 19, 2004, 09:11 PM
Seat and weight are definitely separate aids. I can perfectly well weight my RIGHT stirrup (weight aid) while using my LEFT seat bone (seat aid).

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain

[This message was edited by Janet on Jan. 20, 2004 at 10:05 AM.]

dior
Jan. 19, 2004, 09:49 PM
Why can't people over 18 jog jr horses?

SED
Jan. 20, 2004, 09:49 AM
Good one dior! If jogging is so all fired important (see the jogging at 3 ft thread), then why not make all the adult and trainer divisions do it as well!

RugBug
Jan. 20, 2004, 02:02 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Lord Helpus:
_The correct way to wrap polo wraps_ is to hold the tail of the wrap in one hand with about 6" - 7" sticking out. When you make your first circle, the polo should secure to itself with this tail sticking out.

The tail is then turned down so that it hangs down the back of the tendon and the rest of the polo is wrapped around both the leg and the tail of the wrap.

This is to give the tendon extra protection from a polo mallet or a flying ball or the horse's other leg in a quick stop and turn.

This is also the reason that polo wraps seem too long if wrapped like a standing bandage. Ideally, you should go down the leg and back up. But if a polo is not started with the tail hanging out, then, when you get back to the top of the leg, you still have a couple of more circuits of the leg to make.

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

So I'm not crazy. I was taught this way, but never really used polos so I only recall from the dim corners of my mind. That coupled with never wrapping on a regular basis has my quite petrified of the whole process. But the worst part is when I say something about the above method of wrapping, barnmates look at me like I've got two heads. They've apparently never heard of this method. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

My Pictures: http://community.webshots.com/user/slorugbug

CallieJump
Jan. 20, 2004, 02:08 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by RugBug:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Lord Helpus:
_The correct way to wrap polo wraps_ is to hold the tail of the wrap in one hand with about 6" - 7" sticking out. When you make your first circle, the polo should secure to itself with this tail sticking out.

The tail is then turned down so that it hangs down the back of the tendon and the rest of the polo is wrapped around both the leg and the tail of the wrap.

This is to give the tendon extra protection from a polo mallet or a flying ball or the horse's other leg in a quick stop and turn.

This is also the reason that polo wraps seem too long if wrapped like a standing bandage. Ideally, you should go down the leg and back up. But if a polo is not started with the tail hanging out, then, when you get back to the top of the leg, you still have a couple of more circuits of the leg to make.

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

So I'm not crazy. I was taught this way, but never really used polos so I only recall from the dim corners of my mind. That coupled with never wrapping on a regular basis has my quite petrified of the whole process. But the worst part is when I say something about the above method of wrapping, barnmates look at me like I've got two heads. They've apparently never heard of this method. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

My Pictures: http://community.webshots.com/user/slorugbug<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I have never heard of that way of wrapping. (if i am imagining it right!?)

Page and Callie

mnolen9698
Jan. 20, 2004, 02:26 PM
For the jumper bonnet (or "doily") question -- I use one for two purposes:

1) To keep ear stuffings in ears

2) To keep flies and whatnot out of their ears in buggy places.

For what it's worth, I think they look uber lame (but I use one anyway).


FYI: The Dressage folks have a "Things you've always wanted to know..." topic going too. It's worth checking out!

harvestmoon
Jan. 20, 2004, 03:30 PM
Speaking of ear bonnets, where can you purchase them? I'm thinking of the kind that most Grand Prix riders use (not the kind with the tassels). http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

____________________________

Ipsa scientia potestas est...
Member of the Dutch Warmblood Clique!

smalls
Jan. 20, 2004, 06:45 PM
i have a grass/turf ring and i wont ride if it is under 35 degrees because i am afraid of bruising my horses' feet. but don't people fox hunt when it is colder than that? Don't their horses' feet hurt?

-Bailey-
Jan. 20, 2004, 06:52 PM
great post!! http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/yes.gif

http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/winkgrin.gif Love you all-

**Formerly known as Elijah**
Founder of Spooky Horses Clique
Appaloosa Clique * Mare TB Clique
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Hop On Pop
Jan. 20, 2004, 07:49 PM
Haha look how long this thread is! And I started it myself! Wow, I'm talented. http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/lol.gif

Proud member of the Traffic Cone Preservation society!!!

Court@HJ-OH
Jan. 20, 2004, 08:29 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by LargeJuniorHunter:
I know this is gong to sound very stupid - but that is the meaning of this thread.

What does it mean for a horse to be uphill or downhill? Which is better/worse for a hunter?


<HR></BLOCKQUOTE> People always talk about how wonderfully uphill this or that horse is but I have always been taught that nothing is better than a level horse!

**Courtney**

dior
Jan. 20, 2004, 09:32 PM
Where did 'jingles' come from? Is it horse-related?

mnolen9698
Jan. 20, 2004, 10:48 PM
Harvestmoon -- You can buy bonnets at english tack stores but you'll probably be more successful at the horse show tack stores (e.g., the big rigs like Hatfields, Beval, B&B Saddlery). There's a lady who does the AZ shows and she's a distributer for them (w/o tassels). PT me and I'll get you her info.

Janet
Jan. 21, 2004, 07:55 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by smalls:
i have a grass/turf ring and i wont ride if it is under 35 degrees because i am afraid of bruising my horses' feet. but don't people fox hunt when it is colder than that? Don't their horses' feet hurt?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>The ground is a LOT harder in the middle of a July drought than it is at 20 degrees in the winter.

No, the horse's feet will NOT be hurt by the hard ground (though I wouldn't jump every day on turf in either a Jully drought or a January freze).

The issue is more likely to be that the ground is slippery.

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain

Blinky
Jan. 21, 2004, 07:59 AM
I was taught to wrap the way LH mentioned as well. Though I don't see the girls at the barn doing it that way.

Vandy
Jan. 21, 2004, 10:34 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> Originally posted by Lord Helpus:
_The correct way to wrap polo wraps_ is to hold the tail of the wrap in one hand with about 6" - 7" sticking out. When you make your first circle, the polo should secure to itself with this tail sticking out. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I too was taught to wrap this way, but I have found that there are subtle differences between different trainers I respect & how they wrap not only for polos but for standing/shipping wraps. For example I worked for one barn with high standards of care, BNT etc, that insisted on only using flannel bandages for shipping wraps - no elastic ones. IMHO just a matter of personal preference, as are the 2 ways of doing polo wraps.

Nix
Jan. 21, 2004, 10:46 AM
dior -

"jingles" is in reference to curb chains... see this thread in the FAQ forum -

http://chronicleforums.com/groupee/forums?a=tpc&s=6656094911&f=6096094911&m=3276010321

We "jingle" curb chains as a good luck or blessing type of thing. Say if someone has a sick horse or something.

My webshots page!! http://community.webshots.com/user/hunterridernix

BB
Jan. 21, 2004, 01:15 PM
OK...here goes...

What does it mean when a seller puts "Private Treaty" under sale price? http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_confused.gif

Kels
Jan. 21, 2004, 01:21 PM
I believe that is a fancy way to say call for the price...

-Kelsey-
And though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I shall fear no evil.

Tory Relic
Jan. 21, 2004, 04:00 PM
It means call and ask for price. Suggests there may be some negotiation; also suggests if you have to ask, you can't afford it (just kidding). With breeding, it can suggest a breeder may get a reduced stud fee for a nicer mare. It's also a way (in breeding) to raise the cost beyond the means of the owner of an inferior mare.

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by BB:
_OK...here goes..._

What does it mean when a seller puts "Private Treaty" under sale price? http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_confused.gif<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

harvestmoon
Jan. 21, 2004, 04:01 PM
Mnolen9698, thanks! I just send you a PT. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

____________________________

Ipsa scientia potestas est...
Member of the Dutch Warmblood Clique!

CanadianPonyMom
Jan. 23, 2004, 09:10 AM
How do you groom a shetland's mane? They are so very thick and full... How much do you pull, how short should it be?
Does a shetland ever win in the hunter classes?

Coffee while I hold the pony in the wee hours of morning... ahhhhh... That's the life....

haybrook
Jan. 24, 2004, 08:45 PM
Would some of you be so kind as to let me know how you refer to this board when you are talking about it? Do you call it "Coth", which rhymes with "moth"? Do you call it by its letters "C-O-T-H"? Or do you go all the way with "Chronicle of the Horse Bulletin Board"? Thanks!

dior
Jan. 24, 2004, 10:47 PM
Nix - thank you for the information.

Another question: Can a horse that is not showing, but on the show grounds, be drug tested?

Court@HJ-OH
Jan. 24, 2004, 11:40 PM
Haybrook: I say "COTH"

Yo Mama: Lots of pulling and cursing. And I have seen a couple nice shetland hunters.

**Courtney**

Dancing Lawn
Jan. 25, 2004, 03:38 AM
What does PITA stand for? Is it being mixed up with PETA? I know it has nothing to do with bread.

less hard work, more fine dining.
www.dancinglawnhorses.com (http://www.dancinglawnhorses.com) updated Dec. 29/03

If guys can do it, how hard can it be?

Jsalem
Jan. 25, 2004, 05:11 AM
What does it mean in Western type Stallion ads when they say, "Own" son of "Whatever". That's always puzzled me.

"Everyone has special circumstances. Trot on....."

Small Change
Jan. 25, 2004, 06:46 AM
Pain In The Patootie (but not patootie) http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Half the failures in life arise from pulling in one's horse as he is leaping -Julius Hare

Dancing Lawn
Jan. 25, 2004, 07:27 AM
Ahhhh. All is clear to me, now.

less hard work, more fine dining.
www.dancinglawnhorses.com (http://www.dancinglawnhorses.com) updated Dec. 29/03

If guys can do it, how hard can it be?

GatoGordo
Jan. 25, 2004, 10:11 AM
I used to say Chronicle Forums. Now I just say Coth -- rhymes w/ moth. Hey, what can I say, moths are those things that I used to find in vials in the fridge when my dad was still doing field work! http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/winkgrin.gif

The Law of Unintended Consequences is a brutal law, and you should at least know when you are going to piss her off. -- the wise DMK
Eventing Yahoo In Training http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

haybrook
Jan. 25, 2004, 10:42 AM
Thanks. You all respond a lot quicker than my husband and children do!

Roanponerider
Jan. 25, 2004, 04:04 PM
HAHAHA small change! Anyways..another ?...like some peoples status is Greenie or Working Hunter and so on and so on..i was wondering how that changes or how you move up levels

~C~
"Sometimes, when the little guy doesn't know he's the little guy, he can do great big things!" -Charles Howard "SeaBiscuit"

horsegirl33
Jan. 25, 2004, 06:43 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Roanponerider:
HAHAHA small change! Anyways..another ?...like some peoples status is Greenie or Working Hunter and so on and so on..i was wondering how that changes or how you move up levels

~C~
"Sometimes, when the little guy doesn't know he's the little guy, he can do great big things!" -Charles Howard "SeaBiscuit"<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

the more you post, your title changes....i think after 100 you go to...hmm...whatever i am...lol... then it's 1000, etc....

***God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses***

~~member of the Chicken Jumper Clique (AND PROUD OF IT!!) http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif, IHSA clique & only child clique~~

Sudley4me
Jan. 25, 2004, 07:32 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by jsalem:
What does it mean in Western type Stallion ads when they say, "Own" son of "Whatever". That's always puzzled me.

"Everyone has special circumstances. Trot on....."<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I am pretty sure that it means that it is just the son of that horse, instead of just putting the horse's bloodline. I am not sure, though ... or maybe it means that the owner of the stud also bred the son.

-Natalie

proud member of the MOOP clique (although I am now positive that I have a pony in my 15.3hh bodied horse)

"All horses deserve, at least once in their lives, to be loved by a little girl."

Sudley4me
Jan. 25, 2004, 07:44 PM
OK, so here is another wrapping related question. When is it time to retire your polos? When they stop being so stretchy? worn out? When?

I am still confused as to what/if any leg protection is the best. I personally have SMB and polos. I just got the SMBs and use them when doing strenuous work or on iffy ground. I relate the polos to ace bandages ... is that a good assumption on how much support they give?

My horse is 19 now, and the only thing he has done was slightly pulled a back tendon a few years ago, but was barely off (only in one direction at the canter). But, I would like to keep his legs in good working condition, but I have also heard the whole thing on using wraps make them dependant and weaker.

-Natalie

proud member of the MOOP clique (although I am now positive that I have a pony in my 15.3hh bodied horse)

"All horses deserve, at least once in their lives, to be loved by a little girl."

Horsepower
Jan. 25, 2004, 08:22 PM
In what order are you suposed to unhook the hooks on your horses blanket. I seem to remember reading somewhere that you are supposed to unhook the leg straps before the front. And in what order is it safest to hook them up (all in case a horse gets away I guess). Also, do you cross the legs straps in back or not? One barn I was at did and one did not.

"The older I get the harder the ground hits."

dior
Jan. 25, 2004, 08:37 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by TBMare:
In what order are you suposed to unhook the hooks on your horses blanket. I seem to remember reading somewhere that you are supposed to unhook the leg straps before the front. And in what order is it safest to hook them up (all in case a horse gets away I guess). Also, do you cross the legs straps in back or not? One barn I was at did and one did not.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I undo blanket straps back to front, and put them on front to back - this way the front part is done up and if the horse were to get away the blanket hopefully wouldn't slide off. If the belly and leg straps were done up first, there would be a greater chance of them getting caught in their legs, IMO. I also cross the leg straps.

Whiskey Lullaby
Jan. 25, 2004, 08:41 PM
In jumpoffs (I have been a dressage/reigning person), do lead matter after each jump?

Speak kindly to your little horse,
And soothe him when he wheezes,
Or he may turn his back on you,
And kick you where he pleases.


Member of the Teen Clique!

Envision
Jan. 25, 2004, 08:44 PM
I have never done this because I always thought it was not polite, but could a trainer or rider ask the judge to see their card at the end of a show?

dior
Jan. 25, 2004, 08:50 PM
DS_Hunter_Jumper: no - in that it doesn't affect your score (like it would in the hunters), unless it causes you to have a rail or a slower time. But you can be on the wrong lead or even cross cantering and it wouldn't affect your placing (assuming the jumps are left up and you can still go fast).

Envision: Yes, you can ask to see your card, but I think you have to go through a show official and not directly to the judge.

[This message was edited by dior on Jan. 26, 2004 at 12:03 AM.]

BLBGP
Jan. 25, 2004, 08:57 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by DS_Hunter_Jumper:
In jumpoffs (I have been a dressage/reigning person), do lead matter after each jump?
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yes, very much, since it helps to be balanced and ready for agile turns.

Just My Style
Jan. 25, 2004, 09:38 PM
OK- I can't stand it any longer and I need to know: Why are some types of spurs called "Prince of Wales"? What did the Prince of Wales have to do with spurs?

Also, why is it called a Tom Thumb Pelham? I know what it is by why "Tom Thumb"? Why isn't it just a short shanked pelham?

And these are the things that keep my up at night... http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

GA Clique/Drafties Clique
Live Large- Ride a Drafty!

daytimedrama
Jan. 25, 2004, 09:40 PM
I don't know if this has been asked yet but.........Does the snaffle rein or the draw rein(or curb) go on the outside?

~Christina~
"I find that smuggling is the life for me, and would be delighted to kill your friend the maggot!" -Count Of Monte Cristo

dior
Jan. 25, 2004, 09:49 PM
Snaffle rein on the outside - through the pinky and the fourth finger.

Freebird!
Jan. 25, 2004, 10:31 PM
I'm thinking maybe its personal prefrence? I always ride with the snaffle rein to the inside, and the draw rein or curb rein in between my pinky and ring finger. That way the curb rein stays looser, but I can still tweak it by moving my wrists.

HUKT ON FONIX WURKT FUR ME!

dior
Jan. 25, 2004, 10:53 PM
I was always taught that the curb rein had to be under the snaffle rein (and that the other way was wrong), so that meant that the snaffle rein was on the outside, which is also the way you'd hold it if you didn't have a second set of reins.

lilponygrl
Jan. 26, 2004, 05:57 AM
How do you start or join a Clique?

Anyplace Farm
Jan. 26, 2004, 06:53 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by CrossedWings:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Risk-Averse Rider:
When spurs have one side longer than the other, which side goes against the horse?

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

The shorter side goes against the horse. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I always understood that the long side goes towards the horse. The shorter branch is supposed to go to the outside to allow the ankle to break correctly. The longer branch would make this less easy/comfortable.

`````````````````````````````````````````
"I NOW INFORM YOU THAT YOU ARE TOO FAR FROM REALITY."
Mohammed Saeed al-Sahaf, Iraqi Minister of Information

"Life ain't certain...ride your best horse first." Unknown

Anyplace Farm
Jan. 26, 2004, 06:57 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by dior:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by TBMare:
In what order are you suposed to unhook the hooks on your horses blanket. I seem to remember reading somewhere that you are supposed to unhook the leg straps before the front. And in what order is it safest to hook them up (all in case a horse gets away I guess). Also, do you cross the legs straps in back or not? One barn I was at did and one did not.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I undo blanket straps back to front, and put them on front to back - this way the front part is done up and if the horse were to get away the blanket hopefully wouldn't slide off. If the belly and leg straps were done up first, there would be a greater chance of them getting caught in their legs, IMO. I also cross the leg straps.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yes, back to front when taking off. Why? Because if you took the front off first and your horse started to dance around or get loose, the blanket could end up between its legs.

Also, when you take the blanket off, it wouldn't make sense to undo the front, then go to the back and then go back to the front to pull the blanket off.

Start at the back and work your way to the front, ending at the front, then pulling the blanket off front to back, with the growth of the hair.

`````````````````````````````````````````
"I NOW INFORM YOU THAT YOU ARE TOO FAR FROM REALITY."
Mohammed Saeed al-Sahaf, Iraqi Minister of Information

"Life ain't certain...ride your best horse first." Unknown

Nickelodian
Jan. 26, 2004, 06:57 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Envision:
I have never done this because I always thought it was not polite, but could a trainer or rider ask the judge to see their card at the end of a show?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I'm pretty sure, according to the rules, that you may not approach any judge at a H/J show directly, nor can you look at the cards without the judge there. If you'd like to discuss your round with a judge, approach the steward who can then approach the judge. The judge may or may not agree to talk to you or show you his/her cards.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
www.scatteredoaksfarm.com (http://www.scatteredoaksfarm.com)

Nickelodian
Jan. 26, 2004, 06:59 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Freebird:
I'm thinking maybe its personal prefrence? I always ride with the snaffle rein to the inside, and the draw rein or curb rein in between my pinky and ring finger. That way the curb rein stays looser, but I can still tweak it by moving my wrists.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

This is the way it seemed natural to me as well, but after clinicing with a pelham a few times (with some BNTs) I can tell you that they perfered the reins to be crossed, with snaffle through the pinky and the curb through the middle.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
www.scatteredoaksfarm.com (http://www.scatteredoaksfarm.com)

Anyplace Farm
Jan. 26, 2004, 07:02 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Court@HJ-OH:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by LargeJuniorHunter:
I know this is gong to sound very stupid - but that is the meaning of this thread.

What does it mean for a horse to be uphill or downhill? Which is better/worse for a hunter?


<HR></BLOCKQUOTE> People always talk about how wonderfully uphill this or that horse is but I have always been taught that nothing is better than a level horse!

**Courtney**<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Dressage people typically like horses that are uphill because they automatically carry themselves on their haunches. Downhill horses are heavier on the forehand.

`````````````````````````````````````````
"I NOW INFORM YOU THAT YOU ARE TOO FAR FROM REALITY."
Mohammed Saeed al-Sahaf, Iraqi Minister of Information

"Life ain't certain...ride your best horse first." Unknown

Gravie
Jan. 26, 2004, 09:36 AM
Regarding blankets. I was always taught that the safest way to put it on is to hook up the front straps first, then the ones around the girth and legs. For undoing the blanket, it's best to do the legs and girth first, then the front. That way, if the horse were to shy or bolt or whatever, it's the front that's hooked on, instead of just the back and then the front would fall and that would be an ugly mess. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_redface.gif

And Envision -- yes, you can. And actually, it's not polite at all, I was told that, while not "encouraged," per se, it's very acceptable. As long as you don't go up and harrass the poor judge, you can request to see the card, and ask why you placed the way you did, ask for some suggestions for improvement, etc.

_____


oh-darling.net (http://oh-darling.net) my own domain, finally!

tardy
Jan. 26, 2004, 09:44 AM
I like my jumpers slightly uphill. Downhill is generally undesirable (unless it is just a growing stage of a young horse).

Small Change
Jan. 26, 2004, 10:21 AM
So, I hear the word "colic-ed" all the time, as in, "My horse had colic. He colic-ed!" How do you actually spell it? The same goes for "clinic-ed."

I know it's not a horsey question entirely, but it does involve horsey words. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Half the failures in life arise from pulling in one's horse as he is leaping -Julius Hare

Hilary
Jan. 26, 2004, 10:25 AM
Leg strap crossing is personal (and horse) preference. My gelding gets himself a wedgie when I cross them, and some people attach them same-side but only after looping them through one another.

Due to his preference, I don't cross or loop through and the blanket doesn't move.
The curb rein goes on the inside b/c you want it to be a more subtle motion to use it. You have less leverage when it's on the inside.

HFbellefille
Jan. 26, 2004, 11:19 AM
Wow, I've been blanketing in the wrong order for 10 years! I guess you learn something new everyday. Question though, do you all just through the blanket to the correct place. I generally put it on too far up the neck, do up the front straps and then slide in back (to avoid hair lying the wrong way). Do I just need to improve my aim?

buryinghill1
Jan. 26, 2004, 11:21 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by lilponygrl:
How do you start or join a Clique?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

http://chronicleforums.com/groupee/forums?a=tpc&s=6656094911&f=6096094911&m=1286025321

mnolen9698
Jan. 26, 2004, 11:35 AM
Envision [Seeing judge's card] -- I too think you have to go through the steward to see a judge's card. It may depend on the situation.

I've asked/petitioned three times at A shows. (1) A judge pinned a girl who went off course (a dozen or so people saw it and she accecpted the ribbon).

(2) My trainer, family and I were flabbergasted by a score I got in a Jr Htr Classic. We waited until after the class and show to discuss with the steward/judge. Nothing came of it but I felt better for at least asking.

(3) I really respected a judge and wanted to know what I could do better. Again, I waited until the end of the show and it was very amicable. I'm glad I did it.

Anyplace Farm
Jan. 26, 2004, 11:51 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by HFbellefille:
Wow, I've been blanketing in the wrong order for 10 years! I guess you learn something new everyday. Question though, do you all just through the blanket to the correct place. I generally put it on too far up the neck, do up the front straps and then slide in back (to avoid hair lying the wrong way). Do I just need to improve my aim?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

No, you have it right. I throw it on (I hate when people 'smear' it on or 'shimmy' it or 'scooch' it on piece by piece. Fling the damn thing over (I find it scares horses more if you stalk up to them and act like you are trying to trap a raccoon with the thing) and have it land up high on their necks. Secure front, then belly and legs if you can, then slide it into place.

It's amazing how many people you see that pull them forward to position them. Most horses just hate having their hair smashed forward.

`````````````````````````````````````````
"I NOW INFORM YOU THAT YOU ARE TOO FAR FROM REALITY."
Mohammed Saeed al-Sahaf, Iraqi Minister of Information

"Life ain't certain...ride your best horse first." Unknown

Lord Helpus
Jan. 26, 2004, 12:12 PM
Re; Leg straps on a blanket:

I cannot see how X'ing the straps, or figure eight'ing (each strap attaches to its own side, but only after the second strap is looped around the first one) can give a horse a wedgie if the blanket fits and the straps are adjusted properly.

I used to have a horse (and now RioTex has him) who loved to GIVE himself wedgies by hooking his bottom teeth through the front hooks and PULLING the blanket forward. The jerkhead would stand out in the field, doing this over and over.

But a normal horse cannot get wedgies if the leg straps are long enough and connected properly.

If the straps are NOT put through each other or X'd, then the straps can rub the inside of their gaskin. And that skin is tender.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"When I die, I want to die like my grandfather-who died peacefully in his sleep. Not screaming like all the passengers in his car."

Nickelodian
Jan. 26, 2004, 01:47 PM
I thought of a dumb question...why do we call the height of a fence in the singular?

IE: That is a 3 foot jump over there.

or

I did the 3 foot stuff at the horse show.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
www.scatteredoaksfarm.com (http://www.scatteredoaksfarm.com)

RioTex
Jan. 26, 2004, 01:59 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Lord Helpus:
Re; Leg straps on a blanket:

I used to have a horse (and now RioTex has him) who loved to GIVE himself wedgies by hooking his bottom teeth through the front hooks and PULLING the blanket forward. The jerkhead would stand out in the field, doing this over and over.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I can't believe you called my precious baby a jerkhead. But I have not seen him do that. Of course, if he is too rough on his blanket, I take it off and he has to stand around with his really bad hair do. I am so glad that my horses are starting to shed out as he and I are both embarrassed that I practiced body clipping on him.

Trinity Hill Farm (http://www.trinityhillfarm.com)

Applesauce
Jan. 27, 2004, 09:42 AM
I have a stupid question. How long does it take to get the results back from a vetting when buying a horse? How much do they generally run?

Support Wildlife...throw a party!

Vandy
Jan. 27, 2004, 10:21 AM
What does "Hakunah Matatah" mean?

LargeJuniorHunter
Jan. 27, 2004, 10:27 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Vandy:
What does "Hakunah Matatah" mean?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

It means "NO Worries" - for the rest of your days! Its a problem-free philosophy - Hakunah Matatah...and YES the Lion King was my favorite Disney movie. Keep it on the down low.

Darn it - now you went and got that song stuck in my head. http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/winkgrin.gif

Founder of: "Non-GPA owners" clique
Member of: "I got left out of the ponies" clique

mnolen9698
Jan. 27, 2004, 10:30 AM
Question: What is a CANTER horse? I see it in various COTH Forums but have no idea what it is. It is a COTH thing or did I miss a meeting? THANKS!

Lazy Palomino Hunter
Jan. 27, 2004, 10:35 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by mnolen9698:
Question: What is a CANTER horse? I see it in various COTH Forums but have no idea what it is. It is a COTH thing or did I miss a meeting? THANKS!<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

its the Communication Alliance to Network Thoroughbred Ex-Racehorses- CANTER (http://www.canterusa.org/). Basically its a program through which you can look at and purchase racehorses off the track. Its a good program to get nice horses... CHEAP!

Alison

Farriers are like cats. They don't like to go out in the rain and they don't come when you call them.

Janet
Jan. 27, 2004, 10:42 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Applesauce:
I have a stupid question. How long does it take to get the results back from a vetting when buying a horse? How much do they generally run?

Support Wildlife...throw a party!<HR></BLOCKQUOTE> Depends on what tests you have done.

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain

Saddith
Jan. 27, 2004, 10:52 AM
I have a question about blood tests...

is there a website or book that covers what normal ranges are? And if the result is out of range, what could be causing it?

I know that the horse magazine had started to run a series on it, but I never saw the follow up articles on it... anybody have any ideas?

Tory Relic
Jan. 27, 2004, 07:02 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Small Change:
So, I hear the word "colic-ed" all the time, as in, "My horse had colic. He colic-ed!" How do you actually spell it? The same goes for "clinic-ed."

I know it's not a horsey question entirely, but it does involve horsey words. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

_Half the failures in life arise from pulling in one's horse as he is leaping -Julius Hare_<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Colicked.

Tory Relic
Jan. 27, 2004, 07:07 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Applesauce:
I have a stupid question. How long does it take to get the results back from a vetting when buying a horse? How much do they generally run?

S<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I was recently told that vetting is over-rated and that it only proves a horse is sound on any given day. Any opinions on this?

Hop On Pop
Jan. 27, 2004, 07:07 PM
I never thought I'd live to see the day when a thread I started had 433 replies...lol..
Ok, one more..Why is a german martingale called a german martingale..A girl i knew went to Germany for a year to ride, and said they didn't have them there...Is this true? http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/winkgrin.gif

Janet
Jan. 27, 2004, 07:28 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Tory Relic:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Applesauce:
I have a stupid question. How long does it take to get the results back from a vetting when buying a horse? How much do they generally run?

S<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I was recently told that vetting is over-rated and that it only proves a horse is sound on any given day. Any opinions on this?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>Of course all it tells you is how sound and healthy the horse is on the day of the vetting. But that is very valuable information. You would be surprised how many horses are NOT sound on the "given day".

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain

Madison
Jan. 27, 2004, 07:35 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Tory Relic:
I was recently told that vetting is over-rated and that it only proves a horse is sound on any given day. Any opinions on this?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

IMO it totally depends on what they find, and what tests/x-rays you have done. And, a prepurchase is also affected by how good and thorough the vet is who performs it. JMO.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
http://community.webshots.com/user/madisonav

Court@HJ-OH
Jan. 27, 2004, 08:21 PM
Some one explain the whole race horse leads thing. They only go one direction, why would they change leads? Do they really do it?

**Courtney**

dogchushu
Jan. 27, 2004, 08:55 PM
When my horse was vetted, I was told the results of each test (flexing etc.) immediately afterwards. The X-rays took a day or two to come back, and the blood work took about a week. I purchased the horse right after getting the report on the X-rays with the caveat that the purchase was pending a clean result on the blood tests.



"Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work." -- Thomas A. Edison

dogchushu
Jan. 27, 2004, 08:57 PM
I always blanket front to back and unblanket back to front. Very important to unblanket back to front if you're absent minded like me!

No, I never forgot that I hadn't untied the belly straps and tried to pull the horse's blanket off. Not me. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif She didn't end up bucking in her stall when I created "bucking straps" out of her blanket ties. Not her. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif



"Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work." -- Thomas A. Edison

Tory Relic
Jan. 27, 2004, 08:59 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Janet:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Tory Relic:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Applesauce:
I have a stupid question. How long does it take to get the results back from a vetting when buying a horse? How much do they generally run?

S<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I was recently told that vetting is over-rated and that it only proves a horse is sound on any given day. Any opinions on this?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>Of course all it tells you is how sound and healthy the horse is on the day of the vetting. But that is very valuable information. You would be surprised how many horses are NOT sound on the "given day".

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Thanks, Janet. That was my take on it, too, that it was a little short sighted. This came up in a conversation about adopting race horses and how some of them purportedly "go lame" after you get them even if vetted and found sound. My thought is that any horse with strenous training/competition could possibly go lame but a pre-existing injury should show up in vetting, if done properly. And Madison -- yes, I agree with you, too. What you have done and who does it makes it a "mileage may vary" proposition.

nightsong
Jan. 27, 2004, 09:19 PM
We call it "posting" to the trot because on the old English mail ("post", like post office) coaches had riders on one or two of the horses pulling them. These riders got bounced around unmercifully until they figured out "posting."

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Love is all there is

MistyBlue
Jan. 27, 2004, 09:20 PM
Court@HJ-OH
Grand Prix

posted Jan. 27, 2004 11:21 PM
"Some one explain the whole race horse leads thing. They only go one direction, why would they change leads? Do they really do it?"

Lateral movement for passing requires one or the other lead depending on which way you are moving sideways. Also, many horses have stronger leads. (like being right or left handed) These have to change to corner, then swap back on the straightaway. They also change leads to avoid tiring one side too much or to kick it up another gear. I've noticed many horses in races on TV swap a lead when given the loose rein and urged faster.
But then...I'm not a jockey. I'm sure there are other reasons, probably more informative. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Okay...my most embarassing question was answered shortly after I joined COTH...and I never even knew it had a name. Apparently it's called The Inverness Problem. http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/winkgrin.gif

Equine Crash Test Dummy
Member of: Non-GPA Clique
Auto Release Clique
Connecticut Clique
Helmet Nazi Clique

Dancing Lawn
Jan. 28, 2004, 04:42 AM
The Inverness Problem? I think I need an explanation, here.

less hard work, more fine dining.
www.dancinglawnhorses.com (http://www.dancinglawnhorses.com) updated Dec. 29/03

If guys can do it, how hard can it be?

dogchushu
Jan. 28, 2004, 05:18 AM
You don't know about The Inverness Problem! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif Oh-ho-ho-ho! Are you in for a treat!

It's over in the favorites section. Read and enjoy!

The Inverness Problem explained (http://chronicleforums.com/groupee/forums?a=tpc&s=6656094911&f=5406055031&m=2896066031)



"Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work." -- Thomas A. Edison

Lord Helpus
Jan. 28, 2004, 05:36 AM
Race horses change leads to keep from tiring. The go around the turns at each end of the track on their left (inside) lead because it is most efficient, and the ends of the track are banked, like a car race track. So it would be awkward to go around on the outside lead.

Then, when they get to a straight-away, they are taught to change to the outside lead to give their inside legs a rest. Since jockeys do not have the ability to give leg cues, racehorses are taught to change leads with a weight shift and a rein tug. If that fails the jockey will hit the horse on the side of the lead he is on to try to get him to shift away from the whip and on to the other lead.

It is easy to get a horse to shift to the inside lead around the turns. It is harder to get a horse to change onto the outside lead on the straight aways. But you often can see a horse give a burst of speed when he changes to his right lead coming down the home stretch.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"When I die, I want to die like my grandfather-who died peacefully in his sleep. Not screaming like all the passengers in his car."

MistyBlue
Jan. 28, 2004, 08:05 AM
Dancing Lawn...you REALLY don't want the Inverness problem. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif
When I first started posting on here, I had also just started learning dressage and noticed a whole new "issue" I seemed to be having. I came on here and noticed someone had referred to The Inverness Problem in a thread and posted the link to favorites. I looked it up out of curiosity and lo and behold...my problem had a NAME! *snork* The sad thing is, I actually refer to it as The Inverness Problem at the barn with my instructor now. She had to come on here and read the Favorites section and laughs hysterically now when referring to it...she also uses the term too.

Sooo Inverness...a former Olympian is using your screen name to describe THAT problem, LOL! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Equine Crash Test Dummy
Member of: Non-GPA Clique
Auto Release Clique
Connecticut Clique
Helmet Nazi Clique

mnolen9698
Jan. 28, 2004, 01:10 PM
hmmm... the "Inverness problem"...

Well, I just reviewed the classic topic and cannot completely relate to the jeans component. But, it does lead me to another "things you've always wanted to know but were too embarassed to ask..."

Does anyone else find riding sans undergarments MORE comfortable than with? I have too much trouble keeping said garmets in place when I ride (especially when I'm doing a lot of flat work). I know I'm already a freak, but does my freakness extend to this subject too?

Gravie
Jan. 28, 2004, 03:08 PM
Why do dressage riders wrap their horses' legs? Even when not in a show ring I see them wrapped.

What kinds of wraps are these and why do they do it?

_____


oh-darling.net (http://oh-darling.net) my own domain, finally!

sonomacounty
Jan. 28, 2004, 04:58 PM
mnolen9698: Buy much larger undies. This will prevent them from creeping into unwanted areas.

Q: Why can't we wear black jackets ??? Black is a great & elegant color !!

* lost tb *

Vandy
Jan. 28, 2004, 05:03 PM
Not so long ago (late 80's) I rode with a BNT who liked her eq riders to wear black jackets for the finals, as they were more formal than navy or hunter (which were the other 2 popular eq colors then, LOL). I think it's just a trend and black will be back.

Krystan
Jan. 28, 2004, 05:47 PM
What does it mean for a colt to drop. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_redface.gif http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_redface.gif http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_redface.gif

Sparky22
Jan. 28, 2004, 06:40 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Gravie:
Why do dressage riders wrap their horses' legs? Even when not in a show ring I see them wrapped.

What kinds of wraps are these and why do they do it?

_____


http://oh-darling.net my own domain, finally!<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

My favorite DQ does it so you can see her horse's legs better against the background. White polos for her!

--------------------------
I would sooner fail than not be among the greatest
-- John Keats

MistyBlue
Jan. 28, 2004, 09:02 PM
By Krystyn:
"What does it mean for a colt to drop."

When born, a colt's testicles aren't visible yet..or dropped. They're up inside the body, and drop as time goes by. Castration happens after the testicles have dropped.

Equine Crash Test Dummy
Member of: Non-GPA Clique
Auto Release Clique
Connecticut Clique
Helmet Nazi Clique

Janet
Jan. 28, 2004, 10:30 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Gravie:
Why do dressage riders wrap their horses' legs? Even when not in a show ring I see them wrapped.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>ONLY when not in the show ring. Boots and bandages are stricltly forbidden in the show ring.

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain

Dancing Lawn
Jan. 29, 2004, 05:00 AM
I'm now Au Courant, having read the entire "Inverness" thread. It certainly explains why truck salesmen react the way they do. And I thought it was just my radiant beauty and overall charm! http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/lol.gif
Some colts are born with their testicals up inside, and others, have them already, as in my colt Steve, who was "born with balls!" Sometimes they retract again, in a day or so.

less hard work, more fine dining.
www.dancinglawnhorses.com (http://www.dancinglawnhorses.com) updated Dec. 29/03

If guys can do it, how hard can it be?

tosca4711
Jan. 29, 2004, 05:35 AM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by MistyBlue:
By Krystyn:
"What does it mean for a colt to drop."

When born, a colt's testicles aren't visible yet..or dropped. They're up inside the body, and drop as time goes by.

Human boys go through this process as well. If the testicles don't descend into scrotum, the animal is called a cryptorchid.

Tosca

Krystan
Jan. 29, 2004, 05:38 AM
Ok thanks. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_redface.gif

dressager
Jan. 29, 2004, 06:00 AM
The thong threads... to ride in? Just read in USA Today (I think) that thongs are OUT, little short shorts underwear is in (whatever the term for it is now). Any changes to be made, riders?

Dressager (http://www.geocities.com/lubenkafarm)
You don't throw a whole life away just because its a little banged up - Tom Smith

Gravie
Jan. 29, 2004, 07:11 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Janet:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Gravie:
Why do dressage riders wrap their horses' legs? Even when not in a show ring I see them wrapped.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>ONLY when not in the show ring. Boots and bandages are stricltly forbidden in the show ring.

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Why do they do it? I see horses at shows with white bandages around their legs, but I know that's for visability, but why would they wrap them when just schooling at home? I've seen quite a few people do this.

_____


oh-darling.net (http://oh-darling.net) my own domain, finally!

Linny
Jan. 29, 2004, 07:51 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by dressager:
The thong threads... to ride in? Just read in USA Today (I think) that thongs are OUT, little short shorts underwear is in (whatever the term for it is now). Any changes to be made, riders?

http://www.geocities.com/lubenkafarm
_You don't throw a whole life away just because its a little banged up - Tom Smith_<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/uhoh.gif I tried those little shorties and ended up with a thong anyhow. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif OUCH. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_mad.gif

Resident racing historian
Founder of the Mighty Thoroughbred Clique

bigbay
Jan. 29, 2004, 08:53 AM
Gravie- my friend wraps her dressage horse for support and protection. Dressage riders will often do a lot more lateral work than the average rider when schooling, which places the legs in close proximity to each other and increases the chances of a horse knocking himself. The was my friend puts it, if she's teaching her horse half pass and he's just starting to wrap his mind around it and then knocks into himself and it hurts, he's not going to be as thrilled to try half pass next time. Take it for what it's worth.

The way I figure it, if you have the wraps, and if you can do a good job, there's nothing to be lost by putting them on whenever you ride. They provide more support than boots, and someday something might happen and you'll be glad you had them on. Like a seatbelt. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

"The acoustics at Tanglewood in Lenox, MA, are so good that when Bob Dylan plays here you can understand every word he sings." -Garrison Keillor

mnolen9698
Jan. 29, 2004, 08:59 AM
Linny -- Yeah, I've tried a number of undergarmets underneath my britches and I have a problem with all of them (including bigger undies). The closest thing that works are tights (when it's cold) or control top pantyhose, but that's not an option when it's 80+ degrees outside (per my girl dr.). Hmmm... http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

Gravie
Jan. 29, 2004, 11:17 AM
Thanks, BigBay!

Those silly dressage riders just confuse me sometimes. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

_____


oh-darling.net (http://oh-darling.net) my own domain, finally!

RugBug
Jan. 30, 2004, 09:05 AM
My question:

Bell boots: Why are some ribbed and some plain? Are they ribbed for her pleasure? http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

My Pictures: http://community.webshots.com/user/slorugbug

sidesaddle
Jan. 30, 2004, 12:18 PM
What are eskadons?

Think I voted on another thread but wasn't sure what it was I have or don't have.

Janet
Jan. 30, 2004, 12:36 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by sidesaddle:
What are eskadons?

Think I voted on another thread but wasn't sure what it was I have or don't have.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>Eskadron is a manufacturer (and/or brand name) of (horse) boots.

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain

-Bailey-
Feb. 4, 2004, 05:48 PM
what does BNT stand for?

http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/winkgrin.gif Love you all-

**Formerly known as Elijah**
Founder of Spooky Horses Clique
Appaloosa Clique * Mare TB Clique
Arabian Clique * Paint Clique
http://community.webshots.com/user/baileyjump1118

WhatzUp
Feb. 4, 2004, 05:55 PM
BNT - big name trainer


Yours in sport,

Lynn

Founder of the Pinto Warmblood Clique

Linny
Feb. 4, 2004, 05:56 PM
BNT=Big Name Trainer

Resident racing historian
Founder of the Mighty Thoroughbred Clique

creseida
Feb. 4, 2004, 06:02 PM
What is the "Group W" bench I've seen referenced in several signatures?

~<>~ COTHBB Leather Care Guru~<>~
~Member of the *Horse Vans* clique~

"Learn the rules so you may break them effectively"~Dalai Lama

hoopoe
Feb. 4, 2004, 06:24 PM
http://www.mountainx.com/ae/2002/1127guthrie.php

Line reference from Alice's Restaurant where "hardened criminals" were set to ponder their awfulness in the draft office

_\\]
-- * > hoopoe
The ancient Greeks did not write obituaries. They only wanted to know if you had a passion.

Gravie
Feb. 4, 2004, 06:28 PM
Woah. This thread has over 21,000 votes. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif

_____


oh-darling.net (http://oh-darling.net) my own domain, finally!

dogchushu
Feb. 5, 2004, 04:27 AM
What is "free lunging?" The image I have in my mind is just chasing your horse around the ring with a lunge whip--but I'm sure there's more to it than that!



"Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work." -- Thomas A. Edison

Vandy
Feb. 5, 2004, 08:30 AM
How do you do that rolling eye smiley? There are lots of times I'd like to use one!!

re: free lunging - I do it in a round pen, using a lunge whip to keep the horse out on the rail. I imagine there are others who do it in a larger ring, and I too am unclear on how to keep it under control?

Woodsperson
Feb. 5, 2004, 10:03 AM
There is not round pen where I board so I'm afraid that my free lunging of my ISH who is a bit on the lazy side has deteriorated into chasing with a whip. Most of the time I just jog to the inside of him and we both get our exercise. Our QH, on the other hand goes to the rail and trots and canters to voice commands.

Some people actually use a surcingle and side reins to free lunge and get some sort of training benefit. I've mostly seen it is used to burn energy off the horse.

SillyHorse
Feb. 5, 2004, 10:24 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Gravie:
Those silly dressage riders just confuse me sometimes. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
Me, too, and I am one.

SillyHorse
~ You can do anything if you want it bad enough. That is why we see so many people who can fly. ~

fourmares
Feb. 5, 2004, 10:48 PM
Bell boots are ribbed tokeep them from turning inside out.

I don't wear underwear... well, ever (except under a skirt). Originally I didn't wear them when I showed, opting for nylons instead to prevent VPU (visible panty lines). Underwear give me sores.

dior
Feb. 5, 2004, 11:13 PM
free-lunging: I just turn my horse loose in a large area (outdoor ring in this case) and let them do whatever they want - rolling, bucking, galloping madly, etc (some of them have to get chased or they won't do anything). But other people probably have a different method.

CluesGirl
Feb. 6, 2004, 03:54 AM
I've always wanted to know how to pronounce "ermine"....
I have heard it pronounced three different ways, which is the right one?

http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_confused.gif

Dancing Lawn
Feb. 6, 2004, 05:35 AM
urmin. Kind of like "Herman", only without the H.

less hard work, more fine dining.
www.dancinglawnhorses.com (http://www.dancinglawnhorses.com) updated Dec. 29/03

If guys can do it, how hard can it be?

Horsepower
Feb. 6, 2004, 08:25 AM
Didn't go through the whole thread (too long) so I don't know if this was asked. Does anyone use those neck sweats? When are they used and for what purpose? I've never seen anyone use them but see them in the catalogues like crazy. Would using one in the winter as a mane tamer do damage to the horse?

"The older I get the harder the ground hits."

budman
Feb. 6, 2004, 08:31 AM
I used neck sweats for years on POA halter ponies. They work quite well to tighten a neck up before a show, but they are just sweating out water weight, there's not much permanent effect. However, my experience has been that a riding horse who is using his front end correctly will naturally shape his neck better than any artificial device. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif I save the neck sweats for the ones we can't ride.

"There are friends and faces that may be forgotten, but there are horses that never will be." Andy Adams
Gold Chips (http://www.marylandponybreeders.org/item.jhtml?UCIDs=546415%7C560127&PRID=394805)
Blondie (http://www.marylandponybreeders.org/item.jhtml?UCIDs=546415%7C560127&PRID=394809)

wendy
Feb. 6, 2004, 10:53 AM
my horse was trained to free-lunge in a round pen, and I can now free-lunge him without a line in a larger arena. He makes a normal sized lunging circle around me, just without a lunge line; I control him with voice, whip, and body language. I think it's great because I have trouble handling both a lunge line and whip without getting hopelessly entangled.

Hop On Pop
Feb. 6, 2004, 01:39 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Gravie:
Woah. This thread has over 21,000 votes. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
And guess who started it?! lol....I'm so proud of myself http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/yes.gif :d:

Therese
Feb. 6, 2004, 05:22 PM
I just finished reading this thread and I've got to say I've learned quite a bit.

Saw the link to the Inverness thread and had to read it again. Tears are pouring down my face. Husband is just shaking his head at me http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/lol.gif (I kept quoting the thread to him.)

...and I for one would still like to know why the cut off for Pony/Horse is 14.2...or did someone answer and I missed it? http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_confused.gif

- Therese

"Ford grabbed him by the lapels of his dressing gown and spoke to him as slowly and distinctly and patiently as if he were somebody from a telephone company accounts department." - Ford Prefect in Life the Universe and Everything

budman
Feb. 6, 2004, 05:42 PM
OK, re the Inverness thread (I should probably let this go, but I CAN'T), I have some decreased sensitivity down there. Could that be a result of riding bareback for like 8 years? Or am I just abnormal? I mean, my BF is very patient, but some of the comments on the Inveness thread make me think it's a personal abnomality.

"There are friends and faces that may be forgotten, but there are horses that never will be." Andy Adams
Gold Chips (http://www.marylandponybreeders.org/item.jhtml?UCIDs=546415%7C560127&PRID=394805)
Blondie (http://www.marylandponybreeders.org/item.jhtml?UCIDs=546415%7C560127&PRID=394809)

budman
Feb. 6, 2004, 05:43 PM
OK, embarrassing enough already, but I skipped the R in abnormality and don't know how to edit. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_redface.gif

"There are friends and faces that may be forgotten, but there are horses that never will be." Andy Adams
Gold Chips (http://www.marylandponybreeders.org/item.jhtml?UCIDs=546415%7C560127&PRID=394805)
Blondie (http://www.marylandponybreeders.org/item.jhtml?UCIDs=546415%7C560127&PRID=394809)

Gravie
Feb. 6, 2004, 06:58 PM
Do you have to qualify to attend A shows like Indio & Devon?

_____


oh-darling.net (http://oh-darling.net) my own domain, finally!

PaintedWhisper
Feb. 6, 2004, 08:07 PM
You have to qualify for Devon, Pony/Junior Hunter Finals, National horse shows (any of them), Pennsylvania National Horse Show and Washington International Horse Show.

Shows like Indio, Ocala, WEF, Middleburg ect. you dont have to qualify for, you just must get your enteries in early.

-Emily-
"Not all who wander are lost"-J.R.R Tolkein
http://community.webshots.com/user/uvgot2whisper

Janet
Feb. 6, 2004, 08:26 PM
Pony cut off.

I may be totally off base, but I THINK it dates back to Henry VIII.

Henry VIII was concernded that the English were not breeding enough big horses, so he passed a law that only horses over a certain height (I think 14h2") coud be turned loose to "field breed" the mares on the village common.

Janet
chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle, and Brain

dogchushu
Feb. 7, 2004, 07:05 AM
Okay, this one is really stupid: what is that D-ring in the middle of my girth for? I've seen them on some girths but not all all. I assume it's for attaching a martingale, but I've never seen a martingale that can attach to a D-ring without taking the whole thing apart.



"Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work." -- Thomas A. Edison

MistyBlue
Feb. 7, 2004, 07:23 AM
Quote by Budman:
"OK, re the Inverness thread (I should probably let this go, but I CAN'T), I have some decreased sensitivity down there. Could that be a result of riding bareback for like 8 years? Or am I just abnormal? I mean, my BF is very patient, but some of the comments on the Inveness thread make me think it's a personal abnoRmality."

*There, I put the "R" back in for ya! I do that all the time, fingers go faster than mind, LOL!

Anywho...about the decreased sensitivity...maybe it's Mother Nature's way of saving us some ouchiness. I also rode a LOT bareback as a youngster. At least 8 hours weekly, usually more. Didn't effect sensitivity, but then I had one chubby App without any discernable withers. It did act as a hair removal system for my inner legs though. Now more than 20 years later I only have to shave the outsides of my legs, the insides don't grow hair. Nice side effect, LOL!
I didn't have the Inverness problem until I tried to learn dressage on my hugely bouncy mare last year. Needed a PI to find my undergarments after each ride no matter what I wore, and showering afterwards was torture. STILL looking for a more comfy alternative, tried the padded undies and it looks like I'm wearing Depends under my britches. Plus, feels like it sits you another 6" off the saddle.

I'd be willing to bet that it could (riding bareback) indeed cause less sensitivity 'down there' though. If BF gets pissy about it eventually, you can always tell him it's not from riding...it's him. (sooo kidding, no flames!)

Equine Crash Test Dummy
Member of: Non-GPA Clique
Auto Release Clique
Connecticut Clique
Helmet Nazi Clique

Anne
Feb. 7, 2004, 07:26 AM
Some people have draw reins with snaps on the end, and assorted other "rigs" that can be homemade can snap on too.

Don't you also have to qualify for some things at Capitol Challenge? You don't have to qualify for Devon in equitation, just enter early.

PaintedWhisper
Feb. 7, 2004, 09:29 AM
Capitol Challange is another one that you dont have to qualify for, just get your enteries in very (insanely) early.

-Emily-
"Not all who wander are lost"-J.R.R Tolkein
http://community.webshots.com/user/uvgot2whisper

Paloma
Feb. 7, 2004, 03:01 PM
What does it mean when someone says a horse's hocks are "trailing out behind them"?

ponychic3
Feb. 7, 2004, 04:03 PM
Ok i dont know if anyone asked this but i really dont wanna read through this whole thing soo... If i ride in the childrens hunters can i enter in the junoir jumpers in that same show, is it the same if i show in the jr hunter and ch jumpers?

*~First god made man, then he though better of it and made a woman, and then he made a horse who combines the spirit and stranth of a man and the beauty and garce of a woman~*
Western Dance <3
Lauren Bacall <3 (for sale)

JMac
Feb. 7, 2004, 04:30 PM
Since the junior hunters have to qualify for Devon, do they keep a running list of the riders points? If so, where would I find a copy of the current 2004 list? We have a junior at our barn trying to qualify and I would love to know how she is doing compared to others. Thanks.