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View Full Version : Do you participate in cross disciplines?



sunnycher
Jan. 6, 2011, 05:17 PM
Do any of you ride in the local h/j shows in between events (I'm talking lower levels, of course). If so, do you do the jumpers, due to similar style? Anyone do hunters?

I have a young one coming 4 and will ride him in the local derbies and clinics, but thought it would be fun to take him to the local h/j shows, too. I love to get them out for different experiences.

Do any of you take lessons from h/j trainers in addition or instead of eventing/dressage trainers?

Eventing Strong
Jan. 6, 2011, 05:25 PM
I'm guilty of taking "dressage" lessons from my mom's reined cow horse trainer. I've never trailered my horse into ride with him but when I ride my mom's young horse, he usually comes down and gives me a few pointers. Everything that he has told me to do on my mom's cow horse has easily transferred over to the dressage court. He's also watched videos of me riding my horse at events and has given me advice for getting my horse more balanced off of my seat and leg. It actually really helps.
I on't take lessons from any one else but my barn does go to quite a few jumper shows for experience.

NMK
Jan. 6, 2011, 05:31 PM
Yes, I have done both hunters, jumpers, even dressage, and I had one horse that did team penning in the winter. I think they like doing different things. I enjoyed meeting some new folks too.

I do use the local A hunter trainer at times. She is terrific. I have spent a few winters boarding there and you can sure tell judging from the horse trial photos from that following spring. My horses jumped terrific!

Team penning was a great way to stay in shape for bothof us, and it is very thrilling. I'd try it again if I had the chance.

Nancy

sunnycher
Jan. 6, 2011, 05:37 PM
Are the lessons all that different? Hunters and eventing. I used to take lessons from an A hunter trainer years ago before I had my own horse. Now when I do take lessons, it's from an eventing trainer and occasionally a dressage trainer.

I prefer the format for h/j lessons that I remember - half lesson is flat other half jumping. My young horse could go either way, so was just thinking might be fun to take from a h/j trainer, but the 'way of going' is different...right?

mg
Jan. 6, 2011, 05:49 PM
I'm planning to do some H/J shows this summer and try some Adult Eq classes. Eq classes seem like more of a challenge than jumpers (for me--I rode jumpers for years) since you have a trickier type course, similar to a jumper course, but you must stay composed and rhythmic. I think I will be good for me :) Regular hunter classes bore me and I don't need to go to a jumper show to jump twisty turny courses. I have a crazier mind than most of the people who design jumper courses at local shows around here anyway ;)

I *should* go to straight dressage shows, but dressage frustrates me and I'm afraid of making a huge fool out of myself. I'm more comfortable blowing a dressage test in front of fellow eventers who have been-there-done-that on a cranky TB :yes:

Eventing Strong
Jan. 6, 2011, 05:53 PM
Coming from the hunter world, it can be pretty different. Some hunter trainers are more focused on a pretty picture over the fence instead of the getting to the fence part (if that makes sense). Most A circuit hunter riders laugh at eventers so be prepared for some snickering if you go to an A barn.
At my friends event barn, their jump lessons are taught half on the flat and half over fences, it all depends on the trainer's way of teaching.

CANTEREOIN
Jan. 6, 2011, 06:14 PM
I take lessons from a Hunter/Jumper/Equitation trainer (A Circuit). Her lessons are different - very technical jumping, position of horse and rider. My eventing and dressage trainer thinks she does a fabulous job and encourages me to continue lessoning with her.

That said - I have a dressage trainer who has evented up to Advanced and an eventing trainer who has done the same. They are my primary resources for all aspects of eventing.

The foxhunting is just a blast. And wow, has it improved our cross country.

sunnycher
Jan. 6, 2011, 06:19 PM
do you find it confusing/conflicting in your riding or for your horse?

ss3777
Jan. 6, 2011, 08:26 PM
Absolutely!!! Eventing, foxhunting and hunters............all in one year :) My focus is eventing but I am super lucky to have a great friend/trainer that does the hunter jumper stuff and does not mind helping out an ole eventer. Her students compete at the highest level and I never feel bad showing up with my wee event horse. The cross training comes in really handy when you realize (years later despite said pro telling you many moons ago) certain pony would rather do hunters than eventing. I never felt that he was confused. Of course nothing beats foxhunting for sharpening up your XC skills. Off to a "straight" dressage clinic next week :)

purplnurpl
Jan. 6, 2011, 08:55 PM
Shows:

events are expensive and all you get is a darn ribbon.
and, 4-8 show jumping rounds a year does not get me anywhere.

I like to do the jumpers at the local shows. That's 3 SJ rounds and 2 jump off. 5 show jumping rounds for 70 bucks.
And tons of prizes.

I also like to do the hunters if I have a young horse that needs to do easier courses.
also, tons of prizes.

I won a custom wooden tack trunk this summer. AAA show worthy.

I also like to hit the schooling dressage shows if they are on a free weeknd.

And we are members of the trail horse association. My mother and I are going to hit the trail competitions next fall.

Trainers:
right now my favorite trainer is my hunter jumper coach. I've been riding for 15 years and always had a sucky eye. I took 2 lessons from her and have only missed one distance since (past 6 months).

I actually recommend hunter training to everyone. They really teach you to have an great eye and a good hunter trainer will take a little bit of the "jumper crazies" out of people with electric butts.

And I have a pure dressage coach 15 minutes down the road.
I like to do Ride-A-Tests with her before shows.

CANTEREOIN
Jan. 6, 2011, 09:24 PM
do you find it confusing/conflicting in your riding or for your horse?

I had a "behavioral" problem with my horse one season. Both dressage and eventing trainer had the same ideas on how to fix us which were vastly different from the HJ trainer. That was the only time it was difficult.

I took a break from the HJ trainer, problem got fixed and then I continued my jumping training with her.

The great thing was and is that all three are ok with each other and all three are interested in what each is telling me. I also found that the good ones are not telling you anything incredibly new or different. Just tweaked...

chestnutwithchrome
Jan. 6, 2011, 11:22 PM
I have a 18 yr old QH that I have taken to Multiple events, h/j shows, trail trials, and done two 25 mile endurance rides on. Endurance training and Xcountry fitness go great together, and I love changing things up. My 4yr old will be going to several h/j shows in preparation for her first event. Its a lot cheaper to do multiple classes at a schooling show!

gottagrey
Jan. 6, 2011, 11:43 PM
at my old barn the trainer there did a hodgepodge of things... primarily it was a h/j barn and we would go to a couple of local horse trials since they were so close... I think it's good to do some different things w/ your horse - keeps them fresh and keen. On weekends off from shows we would do a bit of team penning. I was horrible at it but our trainer liked it for us because we didn't worry about riding we just rode after those darn cows... amazing how your legs and balance improves chasing cows lol...

as far as going from eventing to hunters...I know a couple of gals who took their eventers into a couple of hunter shows...both wound up champions - go figure

DefyingGravityEventing
Jan. 7, 2011, 06:01 AM
I participate in hunter/jumper, dressage, pony club, foxhunting,& hunter paces. Particularly with the young horses (or sale horses) getting out there and experiencing the world at large is quite important. It is different with every horse, but wherever our weakness lies - we dive into it!

For example: I have one horse who wasn't quite comfortable outside of the ring - so we went off and did some competitive trail riding and hunter paces. Another one needed to get better with groups, so we foxhunted (hilltoppers but it still did the trick). I will do some hunter shows if I need to work on a horse's pace/balance (something along those lines) in a non-stress environment (aka outside inside outside inside).

I really don't think you can go wrong with exposing your horse to a variety of disciplines. With that said, my upper level horses (prelim +) usually stick to jumpers/dressage/eventing.

GutsNGlory
Jan. 7, 2011, 09:19 AM
Absolutely. Not H/J really because there isn't much of that around my area (unless you drive a few hours). However, growing up, I was kind of a jack-of-all-disciplines. Eventing has been my passion since I was introduced to it, but I've always dabbled with other things - 4H (every class I could enter - halter, jumping, WP, reining, gaming, etc.), a year or two of PC, FQHA/Ranch Association shows, reining, open gaming, driving, etc.

Granted, I didn't do all of these things with one horse. I've had a lot of horses who could cross-over and some who couldn't. I've done First Level dressage, english pleasure, and gaming on my reining gelding, but certainly no jumping or eventing as he is more of a "run through it" type. And I've done everything with my little OTTB mare except drive her and cut cows - she even placed very well in w/t WP classes and 4H versatility (4 classes in one, with tack changes in-between - english flat, WP, reining, and a gaming event).

My current boy (TB/WB - very much a modern event type) was started by a cowboy and spent time playing with/sorting cows there. It was good for him to get the experience and be introduced to things outside of his comfort zone.

I'm also a big believer in trail riding. And I mean the 8-10 hours out in protected wilderness where you're lucky to pass another group of riders or maybe a hiker in the time you're out type of trail riding :). Teaches the horse to relax and accept his surroundings. And it's good for your soul too!

Anyway, I know you were looking for advice more on the Eventing to H/J cross-over, but I think my experiences have taught me that there is nothing wrong with switching things up!

sunnycher
Jan. 7, 2011, 11:00 AM
Thanks everyone. I just have too many horses at the moment. My oldest mare has foxhunted, Novice eventing, jumpers shows, trail.

The boy in question is coming 4 - 16.2 already. Has the BEST canter I've ever sat on, big stride and balanced and not at all spooky. We trail ride a lot and I've taken a few flat (dressage-y) lessons with him. I have popped him over some x-rails and a few bigger jumps on the lunge line. He could go either way, so I appreciate the input. There just seems to be a big difference in the styles.

I'd love to find someone like my old trainer here. We foxhunted in the winter, rode in parades in the summer, punched cows, did local h/j shows and lessons in the summer, and went on weekend schooling jaunts at an eventing facility in ca.

Trixie
Jan. 7, 2011, 01:07 PM
ming from the hunter world, it can be pretty different. Some hunter trainers are more focused on a pretty picture over the fence instead of the getting to the fence part (if that makes sense). Most A circuit hunter riders laugh at eventers so be prepared for some snickering if you go to an A barn.

I don’t know where you’ve been, but I don’t know any A circuit hunter riders who “laugh” at eventers. That’s really strange.

Also, a good hunter trainer is not going to ignore the “getting to the fence” part – how do you think you get the pretty picture OVER the fence? By riding properly up to it.

I’m fortunate – I’ve ridden with both. Current trainer is an upper level event rider who also does hunters and jumpers. Previous trainers were primarily hunter trainers. Both say the same exact things.

Horse has done hunters, jumpers, foxhunted, gone XC, and been ridden sidesaddle. He doesn’t appear toooooo confused.

goodmorning
Jan. 7, 2011, 01:26 PM
A horse that jumps well and has a good foundation should quite easily cross into the H/J/Eq ring - at least up to the 3' level in the hunter ring, and I can't imagine the Big Eq or Child/Adult Jumper ring would be problem if you're at the equivalent level in eventing. You might need a bit more coaching to win ribbons in a competitive AA (3') class or A/O (3'6) hunter ring - just because style plays a big role. Getting the horse to that sweet spot, so it jumps perfectly out of a loping canter, is more difficult than a jumper course at 3'6 where you can take the contact a bit more. Not sure if it's economical to show a horse at the 'A' shows for mileage, but depending on location, they might be the best option due to the often superior footing & warm-up areas.

jenm
Jan. 7, 2011, 03:14 PM
I go to local h/j shows and also ride ocassionaly with the h/j trainer at my barn because I love that we get to work on equitation.

Last summer, I a one star and a three star dressage show and had a blast! It was not nearly as scary as I thought it would be, the dressage people were great and very encouraging.

I have also done Trail Trials with my horse, I think it's gareat to go outside our training regiman and do something interesting and fun.

MeghanDACVA
Jan. 7, 2011, 08:33 PM
I do whatever I can do whenever I can do it!!
I do local H/J shows, when I can. I do both the hunters and the jumpers. Just to get time in the ring and for practice. I accept that I prob won't ribbon in the hunters but have been pleasantly surprised a few times. I ride the course with my own agenda of what I want to work on. I don't ride it for a hunter ride or ribbons. Same idea for the jumpers. I am not after ribbons, I am after working on stuff to make it count when I am at an event.

I do the same thing with schooling dressage shows. I need ring time. My horse needs practice. I go to get the scores and comments and to try out new things I have been working on, or need to work on when I get my in the ring butterflies. Again, with the attitude I am going to SCHOOL (isn't that why they are called schooling shows?). If I ribbon well, fine. If not, fine. Besides, that blue ribbon I get for being the only one riding the test I am riding really doesn't mean a whole lot.

FWIW

RAyers
Jan. 7, 2011, 08:35 PM
Do you participate in cross disciplines?

Nah, only angry ones.

Reed

JER
Jan. 7, 2011, 09:57 PM
Do any of you ride in the local h/j shows in between events (I'm talking lower levels, of course). If so, do you do the jumpers, due to similar style? Anyone do hunters?

I usually do jumper stuff as well as eventing but I'm not competing at either right now.

I've never done hunters but my two younger mares might be doing hunters in addition to eventing. My almost-5 year-old is a very elegant TB who is said to be 'too lovely' for eventing. I don't believe there is such a thing but she's quite stylish and classic over fences (and also very steady) so that aiming eventually for hunter derbies seems like a good idea. My almost-6 year-old is an unintentional large pony and I would like her to get some show mileage with a pony card. I also have designs on her being an FEI pony as she's shown a flair and willingness for dressage.

My oldest mare usually does a couple of shows at HITS before starting her eventing season. She's moving up to Advanced this year and does just fine against the straight jumper horses. She is not, however, suitable for hunters unless they add a speed class. :)


I have a young one coming 4 and will ride him in the local derbies and clinics, but thought it would be fun to take him to the local h/j shows, too. I love to get them out for different experiences.

Me too. I take mine to backyard shows, trail clinics, whatever. A day out is a day out.


Do any of you take lessons from h/j trainers in addition or instead of eventing/dressage trainers?

Yes. I rode with a jumper guy for years and currently ride with a local h/j trainer who runs a very un-fancy program. I started riding with her because she seemed like a nice person, had school horses and I wanted to ride regularly. She's turned out to be a really good match for me and is a very solid coach. But then she's used to working with budget kids on budget horses so the school of instant gratification is just not her thing.

As for me, my favorite cross discipline is cyclocross. But that's another story...

mg
Jan. 8, 2011, 12:14 AM
Do any of you guys drive your event horses?

My pony was originally trained to drive. I ground drove for the first time the other night and, besides it being REALLY tiring on my end, it was really fun! He definitely knows his stuff WAY more than I do (steering is incredibly hard, IMO! And I'm not quite sure you're supposed to try and use the driving whip like a leg, as I was). It seems like it might be a fun cross-training activity once summer comes around! A dressage friend of mine does lots of cross training (some events, jumper shows, side saddle, western, you name it) with her dressage horse and she does a lot of driving. She said it's helped their dressage a ton!

cleozowner
Jan. 8, 2011, 09:25 AM
My trainer is a H/J trainer...there really aren't any dressage or eventing instructors in this area. However, behind any great jumper is a lot of good flatwork, so for our low level it's just fine. I would love to eventually take some dressage lessons again, but since I am trailer-less and very horse-poor, that may need to wait a while.
I take my pony anywhere I can...schooling CTs, one time XC schooling, H/J shows, etc. He's so green that any show environment is helpful.
mg--I really should try driving! My boy is a former carthorse, and I think it'd be neat to try. I just have to get the supplies and maybe a quick driving lesson from my friend...

ddashaq
Jan. 8, 2011, 09:38 AM
I am just a BN rider, but this summer we are doing some events, some schooling h/j shows, trail riding, and next fall some of the winter dressage scholling shows. I ride with an eventing instructor, but she does a great job cross training my horse and I-- when I ride well at the h/j shows my horse does place. The h/j shows have been very good for helping me get over my nerves as I am usually so fed up with waiting around, that I am not remotely nervous when it is time for my class!

Fillabeana
Jan. 8, 2011, 02:04 PM
Do I cross train? Hee hee, I have an OTTB that is now a ranch horse...we check and move cows a lot, hopefully soon he will be able to rope/doctor, too...we jump enough downed timber, and I was an eventer in a past life, so maybe we'll end up at a BN or N event in a year or two.
Horses do really well when they have to work cows, it gives them a job they can understand, and gets you thinking about getting it done rather than pestering the horse about being in a particular frame.
And I have never seen a TB without a decent, if not fantastic, dose of cow sense, though I have met several QHs that didn't give a rat's behind where the cow went.




I'm guilty of taking "dressage" lessons from my mom's reined cow horse trainer.
One of my past trainers would help the reined cow horse folks get their flying changes. My trainer wasn't really a BNT (though she was short-listed for dressage, Olympic games, rode to advanced eventing, rode steeplechase races, and was a whip for a foxhunt) but one BNT once commented that my trainer could put correct flying changes on a pickup truck :D


do you find it confusing/conflicting in your riding or for your horse?

I find that a really good trainer, is a really good trainer, whether they are doing vaquero-style horsemanship or hunters. Or both. Correct dressage is correct dressage; I am very picky about trainers because I can recognize when someone is using a gimmick/shortcut rather than riding correctly. I call it my 'BS meter'. A good trainer will also be able to address, and fix, behavioral issues with your horse, without anybody getting hurt.


Most A circuit hunter riders laugh at eventers so be prepared for some snickering if you go to an A barn.
I've sure seen some 'hunter snobs' myself, but it sort of baffles me that they look down their noses like that. I took one 'Flintridge Riding Club' transplant on a trail ride once, she literally screamed and cried about a rocky 1/8 mile downhill followed by a 2' wide irrigation ditch. I couldn't believe that, even if she were scared (and 28 years old, she was no 11-year-old crybaby, she'd shown 3'6" working hunters at Flintridge!) she would literally scream and cry out loud (emphasis on loud!!)- her horse was, amazingly, not upset about it. She was a bit snobbish about the hunters vs the eventers before that...but not so much, after.

JER
Jan. 8, 2011, 02:38 PM
Horses do really well when they have to work cows, it gives them a job they can understand, and gets you thinking about getting it done rather than pestering the horse about being in a particular frame.
And I have never seen a TB without a decent, if not fantastic, dose of cow sense,

My three home-bred mares (ranging from full TB to TBx) all started with cows. They loved it and were as good as any QH out there.