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Bluey
Jan. 5, 2011, 01:29 PM
Here is a story on a mountain lion where they really don't expect to see them:

http://beefmagazine.com/news/0105-farmer-shoots-mountain-lion/

Two weeks ago, in a small town NE of here, a mountain lion in the night got into the local kid's 4H barn and killed and injured every sheep they were rasing there.:(

We are seeing more and more of those, because no one hunts any more and we have so many more wildlife than we used to have, a good mountain lion food supply.

There is a black one at our neighbor's place, their 8 year old kid is being told not to go outside alone, not even walk to the barn to do anything with the horses.

Anyway, horses, especially young ones, are a mountain lion delicacy, so be aware if there are any lions around and try to keep the horses where they will be protected.

RAyers
Jan. 5, 2011, 02:51 PM
We get mountain lions (cougars in TX) around here almost constantly. I have caught a couple in the paddocks over the years. They have a hunting range that can extend 150 miles so it is a bit difficult to control them. The last mountain lion I saw in my paddock was later caught by DOW almost 50 miles away and had actually traversed downtown Denver.

I find that the horses do pretty well defending themselves and given there is easier prey for the cat (deer, rabbits, house cats, dogs, etc.), they leave the horses alone.

Reed

NoDQhere
Jan. 5, 2011, 03:02 PM
We have Cougars here, in fact it is hunting season for them. I see their tracks in the pastures and fields, but they haven't bothered anything other than deer and rabbits.

If you have a black cougar in TX, it is more than likely a Jaguar, (even more rare) as Cougars don't come in black.

sickofcollege
Jan. 6, 2011, 10:33 PM
We have a dark gray mountain lion (what I suspect to be a jaguar) on our ranch. Since I saw it I have banned any and all hunting on my property.

SLW
Jan. 7, 2011, 01:56 AM
Here in eastern Kansas we have mountain lions. They have been spotted over at the state park 5 miles from me. I've only ever seen bobcats in my rural neighborhood and that is a big enough wild cat for me. :)

Megaladon
Jan. 7, 2011, 11:10 AM
We have a dark gray mountain lion (what I suspect to be a jaguar) on our ranch. Since I saw it I have banned any and all hunting on my property.

Really commendable:). As per the Sierra Club, the Jaguar is on the Endangered Species Act. It once roamed from the Grand Canyon to Argentina--glad to see that it may be making a comeback. :D

NoDQhere
Jan. 7, 2011, 11:52 AM
We have a dark gray mountain lion (what I suspect to be a jaguar) on our ranch. Since I saw it I have banned any and all hunting on my property.

Good for you!

cssutton
Jan. 7, 2011, 06:37 PM
Really commendable:). As per the Sierra Club, the Jaguar is on the Endangered Species Act. It once roamed from the Grand Canyon to Argentina--glad to see that it may be making a comeback. :D



Since he is probably 100 miles away by now, you have done nothing but offend your neighbors.

It would be much more neighborly to call each of them who hunt and tell them that you do not want it shot and that if anyone shoots at it there will be a change in hunting permissions.

Everything I have read states that it is not uncommon for them to have a territory 100 miles square. Not 100 square miles, as is sometimes stated in error, but 100 miles square.

I have a rule on my farm that no fox will be shot...I have never had anyone break the rule. They would rather have the fox than to be told they can't deer hunt.

CSSJR

wildlifer
Jan. 7, 2011, 07:20 PM
Ummm, the neighbours are not necessarily offended. Perhaps they have compassion and enjoy wildlife too??

atlatl
Jan. 7, 2011, 07:57 PM
Why on earth would a neighbor be offended to be told not to hunt on someone else's property?? Frankly, I would be offended by a neighbor feeling entitled to hunt on my property. Geez!

Appsolute
Jan. 7, 2011, 08:07 PM
Any suggestions for getting a mountain lion to LEAVE?

The other day I found a HUGE pile of scat next to my deck, like 2 feet from the deck, 8 feet from my front door.

We are on 90 acres with no dogs other then my very small one. I wasn't him, and it was full of hair, WAY to big to by a coyote or bob cat.

Next was marking in the back yard, (urine puddle, with scratch marks in it)

then the next night, we HEARD it (low rumbling). I think it is trying to eat my cats and dog which I now keep 100% inside

I am scared to go out at night!!

I have been told game wardens won't do anything!

Can I do anything to try to get him to go back to the thousands of acres of woods, and leave my yard alone?!?!?

JSwan
Jan. 7, 2011, 08:33 PM
Why on earth would a neighbor be offended to be told not to hunt on someone else's property?? Frankly, I would be offended by a neighbor feeling entitled to hunt on my property. Geez!

It appears that the poster DID allow hunting on her property. Then, when she saw a species she liked, she barred hunters from her property.

It's her land and her right to exclude whomever she wants, of course. But it does appear she was allowing hunting on her land.

If the species she encountered is on the Endangered Species List, any hunter she permitted on her land would not have interfered with the animal in any way. It would be a federal offense - and even if it wasn't, the hunter obeys the landowners wishes. Always. It's a privilege to be permitted to hunt on private land - only a moron would abuse that privilege.

Though I've found the people who "love" nature the most scream the loudest when Nature craps on their front lawn.;) Or eats their dog, cat, digs holes in the barn or pastures....

cssutton
Jan. 7, 2011, 08:39 PM
Why on earth would a neighbor be offended to be told not to hunt on someone else's property?? Frankly, I would be offended by a neighbor feeling entitled to hunt on my property. Geez!

Think first, post later.

Reading the thread, one would understand that the neighbors had permission to hunt, which now has been revoked.

Or one has to assume that the neighbors had been trespassing on the poster's farm, which was neither stated nor suggested.

Nor is there any reference to neighbors feeling entitled to hunt on another's land.

Revoking permission with the insinuation that the neighbors can't be trusted to respects one's wishes is not the way to build friendships.

So I suggested a method that would make everyone feel OK.

It works for me.

CSSJR

RAyers
Jan. 7, 2011, 08:39 PM
Here in eastern Kansas we have mountain lions.

They can't be. Kansas has been mathematically and scientifically proven to be flatter than a pancake (surface roughness of greater than 0.94 with 1 being perfectly flat). You have flatlander lions.


As for getting a lion to leave, they will generally move on when the food supply is low. Our DOW will trap, provided you give them physical proof of the cat (e.g. scat etc). Our last one moved on after a few days. I knew this because the coyotes moved back onto the property.

summerhorse
Jan. 7, 2011, 10:09 PM
Since he is probably 100 miles away by now, you have done nothing but offend your neighbors.

It would be much more neighborly to call each of them who hunt and tell them that you do not want it shot and that if anyone shoots at it there will be a change in hunting permissions.

Everything I have read states that it is not uncommon for them to have a territory 100 miles square. Not 100 square miles, as is sometimes stated in error, but 100 miles square.

I have a rule on my farm that no fox will be shot...I have never had anyone break the rule. They would rather have the fox than to be told they can't deer hunt.

CSSJR

OK you got me, what is the difference between square miles and miles square?

To keep them away I've read that motion detector lights might help but really the only thing is some big old Livestock guardian dogs. Otherwise you have to sit out there with your night vision goggles and when they come around make all kinds of noises, sirens/alarms and shoot them with bean bags. Just in case you better keep a real load nearby!

cssutton
Jan. 7, 2011, 10:17 PM
OK you got me, what is the difference between square miles and miles square?

To keep them away I've read that motion detector lights might help but really the only thing is some big old Livestock guardian dogs. Otherwise you have to sit out there with your night vision goggles and when they come around make all kinds of noises, sirens/alarms and shoot them with bean bags. Just in case you better keep a real load nearby!


10 miles by 10 miles is 100 square miles.

100 miles square would be a square 100 miles on all four sides.

CSSJR

summerhorse
Jan. 7, 2011, 10:19 PM
Oh OK, thanks!

sickofcollege
Jan. 7, 2011, 10:23 PM
Really commendable:). As per the Sierra Club, the Jaguar is on the Endangered Species Act. It once roamed from the Grand Canyon to Argentina--glad to see that it may be making a comeback. :D

I just want to clarify...I have never allowed anyone from a neighboring property to set foot on my property with the intentions of hunting. The only people who once hunted the back 200 acres were by invite only (friends, family, etc.).

jollytrak
Jan. 7, 2011, 11:17 PM
They can't be. Kansas has been mathematically and scientifically proven to be flatter than a pancake (surface roughness of greater than 0.94 with 1 being perfectly flat). You have flatlander lions.

ROTFLMAO!

JackieBlue
Jan. 8, 2011, 09:56 AM
Think first, post later.

Reading the thread, one would understand that the neighbors had permission to hunt, which now has been revoked.

Or one has to assume that the neighbors had been trespassing on the poster's farm, which was neither stated nor suggested.

Nor is there any reference to neighbors feeling entitled to hunt on another's land.

Revoking permission with the insinuation that the neighbors can't be trusted to respects one's wishes is not the way to build friendships.

So I suggested a method that would make everyone feel OK.

It works for me.

CSSJR



Maybe the land owner's motivation here was to preserve prey for the cat as she enjoys knowing her property is in its current home range. Why assume that the hunting ban has anything to do with not trusting neighbors with the cat's life? Any hunter would know that the cat is off limits anyway. Why assume that anyone is offended?
And as for holding the threat of banning hunting if the cat is shot.....how would the land owner know? It's not as if the offending hunter would say, "Hey Land Owner, I shot that damn cat you were so fond of. I guess no one can hunt here anymore. Bummer."

Daydream Believer
Jan. 8, 2011, 10:59 AM
Actually here is a case of a deer hunter shooting a lion that he had no reason to shoot.

http://www.examiner.com/wildlife-conservation-in-national/endangered-florida-panther-shot-georgia

Bluey
Jan. 8, 2011, 11:54 AM
We didn't use to have any deer here, just antilope.
One neighbor, that liked to hunt deer, brought several trailer loads of mule deer in 1956, to try to introduce them here, so he and his friends would have some to hunt.
The game warden asked us to keep our canyons as a wildlife preserve, as it was ideal habitat for that and the deer would do well there, protected to raise more, then would spread to other places, where they could be hunted.
Hunting opportunities was seen as good, it brought hunters and so more economic activity.

We have been a wildlife preserve since 1957 and no one has hunted here since then.
The last years, not as many people hunt any more, deer are getting way too thick and the Fish and Wildlife Department, part of the Department of Interior, that manages wildlife, may need to change their recommendations about the need to hunt.
We also have a new problem, feral/wild hogs, that are getting very numerous.
A sow with two small hogs was seen in the middle of one of the nearby, 200,000 population city's park, where they were shot by authorities, after she attacked some people.

I think that people living far off, that hear stories about wildlife and insist those there do this or that, really don't have any idea of the situation.
I would not want to tell those living in the SC beaches not to shoot their mountain lions swimming around with the sharks and expect to be listened to.;)

JER
Jan. 10, 2011, 02:05 AM
We've had a few incidents in my neck of the woods this year. Like this one (http://www.bclocalnews.com/news/112093519.html) (graphic photo).

I haven't seen any on my property but I did see one on the road out front early one morning.

wateryglen
Jan. 10, 2011, 09:26 AM
We've had solid black ones here. The folks in town 2 miles away would freak if they knew. Had a pair w/a den one year. A blond & a black one with cubs. Other than seeing/hearing we've had no farm problems. Coyotes worse.
But they are scarey for sure!

altjaeger
Jan. 10, 2011, 09:33 AM
cssutton - the sources I've found on the web say that the range of jaguars is only about 5 x 10 miles, not 100 x 100 miles!

Bluey
Jan. 10, 2011, 09:46 AM
That is strange, to see a pair?
Here, mountain lions and bobcats don't seem to pair, the mother gets bred but raises the kittens alone.
They are not very sociable critters.

Our game warden tells us mountain lions generally have territories of 150 square miles they roam thru two or three weeks and some of those territories overlap.
When one has kittens, she may stay put when they are very little in one place, but not for long.
Mountain lions are roamers, don't stay in one small place long and even may change territories often, just move on, as they get it hunted out.

The game warden also told us true plain mountain lions come in black also, but it is a rare color in them.
We have seen all shades of tan, one dark gray and a few blacks.
I first thought the dark gray was a wolf, my brain didn't think that thinking gray and mountain lions were thoughts that went together when I saw that one.:lol:

I wonder, now that we have so many wild hogs, if mountain lions will be succesful hunting them, or if those are too mean to be worth it, deer much easier to bring down.

coloredcowhorse
Jan. 10, 2011, 12:11 PM
They can't be. Kansas has been mathematically and scientifically proven to be flatter than a pancake (surface roughness of greater than 0.94 with 1 being perfectly flat). You have flatlander lions.



:lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol: Was a military family and stationed at Ft Riley...in fact my brother was born there. My mom swore that there was absolutely NOTHING between Ft Riley and Hudson Bay but one broken down barb wire fence!! It's FLAT! (shaking my head over "flatlander lions"...just too funny!)

Blkarab
Jan. 10, 2011, 02:55 PM
Ha Ha...love Flatlander Lions! Too funny!

As a native Eastern Kansan...I can attest that Eastern KS is indeed pretty hilly, it's the Western part of the state that is so flat.

We have had cougar sightings around our property in the south central part of Oklahoma, around some of our oil properties. My hubby saw one out on the leases and couldn't believe how big it was. I have seen them here in Eastern OK as well. My dad actually saw a jaguar years ago in Eastern Kansas. Stopped his car and snapped a picture of it. Game Warden was in disbelief, as they kept denying that they were in the area. This was close to 20 years ago...so I'm sure they are more prevelant now.

KSAQHA
Jan. 10, 2011, 03:42 PM
I've only ever seen bobcats in my rural neighborhood and that is a big enough wild cat for me. :) No, kidding. The first one I saw between here and the lake, I mistook for a leggy medium-sized dog trotting down the road!


They can't be. Kansas has been mathematically and scientifically proven to be flatter than a pancake (surface roughness of greater than 0.94 with 1 being perfectly flat). You have flatlander lions. Yes, that is correct for western Kansas; however, The Flint Hills were intentionally built to add interest to the state. Also, trees are an endangered species in the west. :yes:

dressagetraks
Jan. 10, 2011, 04:00 PM
Just got a hay delivery from a possible new hay guy. Ran into him in the sole store (literally the sole store, as in if you want to buy a coke/gas/food stuff, this is your only option) in the nearest small townlette, and he was talking about growing hay, so I asked where he lives. Turns out he lives 2 miles from me! I hadn't encountered him, because there are lots of little dirt roads taking back off the paved road, and I haven't followed them all. But the idea of a hay guy 2 miles away sounded great. "That's not even worth charging delivery," he said. So I asked for a small load of test bales to run by Her Imperial Pickiness. These are probably about 100-pound bales, no exaggeration. Timothy/clover. $3.50. I might be in love. Nothing to set your heart beating like an old farmer in overalls who raises hay 2 miles away and delivers free.

Anyway, after the small test load had been unloaded and we had tossed a few flakes from it and were just chatting, he waved a hand at the woods that comes within 10 feet of my garage/hay shed and said, "By the way, there has been a mountain lion spotted in these woods. Hunter got a picture, even. I saw the picture."

Great. I'm not missing any critters, but there are certainly plenty of deer around. I wouldn't even mind giving the lion first rights at the deer; far too many suicidal ones try to dive in front of my car weekly. But I hope he confines himself to the deer. They don't tackle people or full-grown horses with plenty of other options around, do they?

Calamber
Jan. 10, 2011, 04:10 PM
Really commendable:). As per the Sierra Club, the Jaguar is on the Endangered Species Act. It once roamed from the Grand Canyon to Argentina--glad to see that it may be making a comeback. :D

Oh yeah, the Sierra Club is really to be trusted on these matters, no political agenda at all.:lol: I would imagine you would not be so happy to have them "roaming from the Grand Canyon to Argentina", if they were prowling around your neighborhood or on your farm with critters that you prized. It is really amazing to me how many people have such fond romantic notions of these "benign" large cats.

Calamber
Jan. 10, 2011, 04:12 PM
We've had solid black ones here. The folks in town 2 miles away would freak if they knew. Had a pair w/a den one year. A blond & a black one with cubs. Other than seeing/hearing we've had no farm problems. Coyotes worse.
But they are scarey for sure!

Okey dokey, in Warrenton no less. I would certainly be one of the ones freaked out. Not something I want to run into on horseback and out alone.

JGHIRETIRE
Jan. 10, 2011, 05:48 PM
We have bobcats, mountain lions and bears up here. I have yet to actually see one myself tho.
Just a couple weeks ago, it was reported that a mountain lion had killed a dog in town.

Megaladon
Jan. 10, 2011, 06:03 PM
Oh yeah, the Sierra Club is really to be trusted on these matters, no political agenda at all.:lol: I would imagine you would not be so happy to have them "roaming from the Grand Canyon to Argentina", if they were prowling around your neighborhood or on your farm with critters that you prized. It is really amazing to me how many people have such fond romantic notions of these "benign" large cats.

:eek: So you know where I live?! Maybe I DO have something benign prowling around my neighborhood! :eek:

Megaladon
Jan. 10, 2011, 06:06 PM
I would certainly be one of the ones freaked out. Not something I want to run into on horseback and out alone.

Love the Roosevelt quote by the way. ;)

naturalequus
Jan. 10, 2011, 07:23 PM
We used to ranch in cougar/wolf/bear/etc country and saw and/or heard all the preceding regularly on foot, on horseback, and on/in vehicles. It was never an issue, though of course you always have to maintain caution and awareness and make certain provisions.

Last Sept we lost a horse to a possible cougar attack. NOTHING in the pasture this horse could have injured himself on (all board, etc etc - vet noted it was the safest place she had been to), but he came down with severed tendons and arteries in the one hind leg (we are guessing he possibly kicked at the cat, who swiped at him??) - one nice slice - and had to be euthanised on the spot. A cougar was spotted both that morning and the next day as well as several days later right next to the pasture our boy was in; the horses were all quite flighty the morning it happened and our boy was the smallest in the herd at approx. 14hh. Sh!t happens.

I called Fish & Wildlife to report the sightings and possible attack, just for their records, to find we actually have pretty healthy cougar activity in the area, unbeknownst to all us in the area ;) The little mini is now kept up by the house and kids are hopefully even better supervised at the boarding facility.

JSwan
Jan. 10, 2011, 08:12 PM
Last Sept we lost a horse to a possible cougar attack.


A foxhunting friend has a horse that survived a mountain lion attack. Horse was attacked out west - not here.

The scars are horrific. Huge chunk of flesh missing off its haunch.

Mountain lions are incredible creatures. And not an animal I'd want to piss off.

AnotherRound
Jan. 11, 2011, 04:27 PM
That is strange, to see a pair?
Here, mountain lions and bobcats don't seem to pair, the mother gets bred but raises the kittens alone.
They are not very sociable critters.
.

I wonder if the pair were two sibling subadults who hadn't quite left the litter, or left each other, anyway. They may have been out "practicing' and would return to den with mom later. I find it common for folks not to be able to accurately guage the size of wild cats/animals they see, and if so, they likely aren't gauging the age, either.

Just an idea.

AnotherRound
Jan. 11, 2011, 04:31 PM
Last Sept we lost a horse to a possible cougar attack. NOTHING in the pasture this horse could have injured himself on (all board, etc etc - vet noted it was the safest place she had been to), but he came down with severed tendons and arteries in the one hind leg (we are guessing he possibly kicked at the cat, who swiped at him??) - one nice slice - and had to be euthanised on the spot.

Sounds "hamstringed" - a predator chases an animal and severs its hind tendons to get it to stop being able to run, to injure it and get it to wear its self out and give up. It conserves energy in the predator, and they don't have to chase it as long, or work as hard to bring it down. They can lie down, rest, wait for the animal to lie down and bleed out or give up or present its self for an easy kill. Wolves do it. Cats do it. Something scared the cat off and he didn't finish. Or, when you found the horse, the cat was in the bush waiting to finish and you took the horse from him before he could.

dressagetraks
Jan. 11, 2011, 09:37 PM
By the way, I passed the "flatlander lions" comment along to my brother and SIL, who live in eastern Kansas. They reply that in their part of Kansas, they have at the least hillbilly lions. :lol:

atr
Jan. 11, 2011, 10:05 PM
We have the works up here. We occasionally catch a fleeting glimpse of a moutain lion and there are quite a few bobcats around the mountain.

I know there is a bear up higher on the mountain, but I haven't seen him yet.

The big cats and Coyotes have enough food from the deer and rabbits, and haven't caused us any trouble.

It's the elk herd and the moose that cause me more problems, to be honest.

naturalequus
Jan. 11, 2011, 10:33 PM
Sounds "hamstringed" - a predator chases an animal and severs its hind tendons to get it to stop being able to run, to injure it and get it to wear its self out and give up. It conserves energy in the predator, and they don't have to chase it as long, or work as hard to bring it down. They can lie down, rest, wait for the animal to lie down and bleed out or give up or present its self for an easy kill. Wolves do it. Cats do it. Something scared the cat off and he didn't finish. Or, when you found the horse, the cat was in the bush waiting to finish and you took the horse from him before he could.

Unfortunately I was away from home at work at the time; the BM and then BO found him at feeding time in the morning and judging by the horses' flightiness at that time and the sightings close to the time it occurred, I figure the cat was still around or recently left. They caught the horse up and brought him in the barn; it appeared the incident had happened relatively recently at that time.

cssutton
Jan. 12, 2011, 02:41 PM
cssutton - the sources I've found on the web say that the range of jaguars is only about 5 x 10 miles, not 100 x 100 miles!

http://www.totalwildlifecontrol.com/mountain-lion-facts-habitat.html

First one out of the box:

Range : "Cougars usually have a large area in which they roam and their habitat can range anywhere between fifty to three hundred and fifty square miles. Typically, their range is in the shape of an oval, or circle. Once they have left "your part" of the circle, it will be a while until they return. Because of their short stay in any given area, it is important to contact us immediately should depredation occur, before additional damage is done. "

50 square miles = 5 x 10 assuming a rectangle. Note the article says oval. That would make the 10 mile distance maybe ll or 12.

Up to 350 square miles. That would be 60 x 60 if a rectangle or more likely 40 x 100 if an oval.

That is enough to make my point that their range is huge. Also note that the article states that after they clean an area out, they move on to another area.

So depending upon whom you are reading, a writer who looked at range over a three year period could come up with some really big numbers.

CSSJR

cssutton
Jan. 12, 2011, 02:58 PM
cssutton - the sources I've found on the web say that the range of jaguars is only about 5 x 10 miles, not 100 x 100 miles!

Or you could just pick a number:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cougar

Estimates of territory sizes vary greatly. Canadian Geographic reports large male territories of 150 to 1000 square kilometers (58 to 386 sq mi) with female ranges half the size.[30] Other research suggests a much smaller lower limit of 25 km2 (10 sq mi) but an even greater upper limit of 1300 km2 (500 sq mi) for males.[36] In the United States, very large ranges have been reported in Texas and the Black Hills of the northern Great Plains, in excess of 775 km2 (300 sq mi).[42] Male ranges may include or overlap with those of females but, at least where studied, not with those of other males, which serves to reduce conflict between cougars. Ranges of females may overlap slightly with each other. Scrape marks, urine, and feces are used to mark territory and attract mates. Males may scrape together a small pile of leaves and grasses and then urinate on it as a way of marking territory.[31]

Home range sizes and overall cougar abundance depend on terrain, vegetation, and prey abundance.[36] One female adjacent to the San Andres Mountains, for instance, was found with a large range of 215 km2 (83 sq mi), necessitated by poor prey abundance.[39] Research has shown cougar abundances from 0.5 animals to as much as 7 (in one study in South America) per 100 km2 (38 sq mi).[21]

Bluey
Jan. 12, 2011, 03:08 PM
I wonder if the pair were two sibling subadults who hadn't quite left the litter, or left each other, anyway. They may have been out "practicing' and would return to den with mom later. I find it common for folks not to be able to accurately guage the size of wild cats/animals they see, and if so, they likely aren't gauging the age, either.

Just an idea.

Could be, we don't have that many lions in our area to really know that much about them.

One chased some geldings thru a wire gate one dawn and thankfully the gate post broke so the horses were not even scratched.

One four year old very sweet ranch horse, that was extremely gentle, used to "help" me pull post with the tractor by unraveling the chain, was so scared after that mountail lion attack, he would not leave the pens any more to go out to graze with the others.
When the horses left, he would stand in a corner, shaking.
We tried leading and ponying him out and he was in a real panic and dangerous.

We finally sold him to a family in town, where he was just ridden around there and in arenas for a few years and he finally got over it and they could ride him in trail rides with large groups without trouble.

We never had a horse lose it like that one did, most are afraid of lions, but they know those are around and just shy, don't become basket cases.:(

Blugal
Jan. 12, 2011, 07:05 PM
I just read an article (http://www.bcmag.ca/issue/article/?id=3019) that stated that in British Columbia (where I live), less than 10% of wildlife incident reports concerning livestock were to do with cougars. Also only 8 humans had been killed by cougars in the past 70 years in B.C. (5 on Vancouver Island, where cougar/human contact is more frequent due to space issues).

Given those statistics, I am more worried about putting my & my horses' safety at risk by driving on the highways than what a cougar might do.

That article also stated that there can be chocolate brown cougars, as one was sighted in my region.