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View Full Version : Spinoff-Your favorite breed for a farm dog



spotnnotfarm
Dec. 28, 2010, 01:26 PM
With so many suggestions on the Boerboel thread for good farm dogs I thought I would start a thread about favorite breeds of dogs for a farm. Why did you choose your breed and it's pro's and con's.

My favorite is a Coonhound. I love their baying voice and they are comical! Mine makes me laugh all day because he is a goofball! He is not very bright which adds to his charm!:lol: He is very loud and bays at most anything so I am alerted to people in the driveway, the nieghbors loose dogs, stray cats, wind blowing etc....

Cons- I ahve only found a few problems with them, not very obendient due to an instinct to follow his nose and not his owner, which means I cannot let him run loose on the farm. Also, I get a lot of people asking me if I coonhunt! That is a NO!

Overall, he is wonderful, happy go lucky and sweet! I do not think he would scare of an intruder but hopefully my very large labrador will make someone think twice! (he is also a great farm dog, in many ways better than my coonie because he is quiet and obeys!)

Pennywell Bay
Dec. 28, 2010, 01:36 PM
My JRT was my pal all the years I mucked and late night braiding. Now I have my own farm and love my GSDs and my JRTs. I am by myself w/ my daughter and the Shepherds always alert me to people.

Ozalynda
Dec. 28, 2010, 01:50 PM
Swiss Mountain Dog, no doubt. My Swissy Elmer is along all the time I am out at the horses, doesn't cause any problems, is big enough that he won't get inadvertantly stepped on (plus easy to keep an eye on). Plus he loves EVERYONE who comes by, so it you want a guard dog- forget it. If he was allowed to, he would hop in the vet's car with him.

wireweiners
Dec. 28, 2010, 02:05 PM
I suppose my favorite breed for a farm dog is the Catahoula. They are smart, tough and territorial. We live in a very rural area and law enforcement in our county is spread thin. I think Daisy, my catahoula, would make an intruder think twice about approaching the house. For a pure working around the farm companion, my pit, Tiger, my lab, Stinker and our mix, Sadie Jo, are great. They take every step I do, don't harass the livestock, and are great company when I'm feeding before daylight or after dark.

appaloosalady
Dec. 28, 2010, 02:05 PM
Australian Cattle Dogs - hands down the best dogs I have ever owned. I have 2 right now, a 8 month old male and a 13 month old female. I've had at least one on the farm for the last 18 years and will never be without one. They definitely are not the right breed for everyone, but are tremendous for the right owners.

opel
Dec. 28, 2010, 03:30 PM
Short-hair (or at least slick hair--i.e. border collie) dog. Though they need a warm area during the winter, they don't get so dirty. I've seen long-haired farm dogs who are so dirty and matted that it's a risk to their general health. Treated many a filthy long-hair with life-threatening maggot infestations. Yuck.

equusvilla
Dec. 28, 2010, 04:36 PM
Pembroke Welsh Corgi.. but we have sheep so that herding instinct comes in handy.

sophie
Dec. 28, 2010, 05:44 PM
My best barn dog was a glorious mutt, part Belgian Shepherd and part Griffon. Medium sized, longish hair. Great around horses, kids, other dogs, and people in general. Would go on trail rides with us, no problem. Everyone loved him.

Eklecktika
Dec. 28, 2010, 06:13 PM
Cowdogs first-Heelers get first choice, catahoulas, aussies

Then a Pit, a Rottie, or a doberman, then a Dane.

Brazilian mastiffs (fila brasilero) would be a top pick as would a presa canario.

I'd love a cane corso-but corsos are ubertough, and while I love them, I don't know that I'm enough of a handler to have one. The prey drive would be problematic for barn kitties. Heh...can you tell I like my molossers? Always have...not sure why.

I refuse to consider anything a 'farm' dog that has to

a) wear clothing to stay warm (eg, chihauha's)

or

b) requires more grooming time than my horse.


That said, I'm currently owned by a flying ball of fur that resembles an australian shepherd in his still (read: asleep) moments-he was supposed to be a mini, but actually turned out standard-and a LARGE standard at that.

He's eligible for registration as a 'mini'-I've seen both parents and full sibs-they're all <30 pounds.

Chuck weighs in at 55 pounds of fluff and muscle. His cannon bone is just slightly larger than my wrist.:eek: He's been on raw, though, from 6 weeks of age. I suspect that was the problem.

suz
Dec. 28, 2010, 07:03 PM
i'm thinking my sabrina is an awesome farm dog. she's a mutt, probably some aussie heeler northern breed cross. she's blue merle long haired with a plume tail and prefers to sleep curled in the snow like a little eskimo dog.
it took her five minutes to learn that chasing hens or horses was verboten here, and has not even looked twice since. in fact, having yelled at her just once to quit chasing the hens, she even avoids looking at them!
she actually looks away with a distant expression when they come pecking and clucking around her. she is an excellent patrol dog, i've seen her forty lb self chase off pairs of much bigger dogs who dared to step foot on our land.
she's getting older, when she leaves me i'll probably get an english shepherd.

Zu Zu
Dec. 28, 2010, 07:24 PM
Australian Shepherds are the BEST Farm dogs ~ IMHO ~~ The BEST dogs for anywhere and everywhere ~ IMHO ~~

My Two Cents
Dec. 28, 2010, 07:47 PM
We have two Aussie/Catahoula crosses. Nothing gets past those two. They both weigh in at 55 pounds but look nothing alike.

tasia
Dec. 28, 2010, 08:03 PM
Love my JRT and Choc Lab:) The JRT is the mouth and the lab is the muscle. Both are friendly once I give the ok. Neither one bothers the horses, chickens or cats. JRT does have a coat, but I still consider him a farm dog:yes:

coloredcowhorse
Dec. 28, 2010, 08:14 PM
When I was raising Akitas they were wonderful...not for everyone though as they have a WIDE stubborn streak and you have to work around that for training them. Now have Aussies and may have found THE breed for my farm. Friendly once they have the OK to meet people but sound off the instant someone comes in the driveway or anything is out of order (was asleep one evening and they tuned up and wouldn't shut up when I hollered at them...got up to find a herd of mustangs in the front yard!), very smart, pretty, happy dogs.

Daydream Believer
Dec. 28, 2010, 08:22 PM
JRT's for us. We love our feisty little dogs and the vermin fear them!

kchfuller
Dec. 28, 2010, 08:36 PM
Aussies!

We have two and they are the best! Super loyal and smart too. They have tons of stamina and are very savvy around horses- or at least ours are. Our 2.5 year old female has never needed a leash... she WANTS to be around us and listens so well. Our 6 month old male is great too and I am sure will be as loyal the older he gets.

spotnnotfarm
Dec. 28, 2010, 08:42 PM
Love my JRT and Choc Lab:) The JRT is the mouth and the lab is the muscle. Both are friendly once I give the ok. Neither one bothers the horses, chickens or cats. JRT does have a coat, but I still consider him a farm dog:yes:

I have a Chocolate Lab also. He is 85lbs and while friendly, he does make people think twice. He is the muscle and brains behind our dog security. My beloved coonhound is too well......"special" to be more than entertainment! He is sweet but as I am writing this he is chasing his tail and hitting the coffee table:lol: My lab is laying there annoyed!

tasia
Dec. 28, 2010, 08:50 PM
My beloved coonhound is too well......"special" to be more than entertainment! He is sweet but as I am writing this he is chasing his tail and hitting the coffee table:lol: My lab is laying there annoyed!

:lol: Awwwwwww gotta love the special ones!!:)

Behind the 8 Ball
Dec. 28, 2010, 08:53 PM
Border Collies! Those plus a German Shepherd ( now deceased ) and you have alarms and an enforcer. My border collies, while full of their notorious high energy, are great with my kids, goats, chickens and horses. They are a little rocky for the first 18 months or so but listen great, protect the kids ( the now 9 yo, Misschief chased off a mother black bear and 2 cubs from my daughter a few years ago ). Their disgusting manure covered, muddy and wet fur miraculously gets clean after an hour in the mud room. And they are really funny! Our 3 yo Imp gets bored with us and "hikes" rocks up and down the driveway. She also helps weeds the garden and will do back flips when you throw the pulled weeds for her.

Simbalism
Dec. 29, 2010, 01:37 AM
Aussies! I have had two standard size aussies(just put my last one down in October due to cancer). I am getting older and wasn't sure I wanted another 50+lb dog so found a nearby breeder who has mini aussies. I now have a cute rambunctious black tri female 12week old puppy. She is already in barn training, pretty savy around the horses, and loves riding in the truck. She is currently a sweater wearer as she was all of 4.5lbs when I got her in November and we have had some pretty cold temps. Last vet vist she was 7lbs 6oz and her fur is getting thicker. My previous dog always sounded an alarm if someone came to the house and was very obedient. She only tried a few times to chase my horses, and a sharp reprimand (GET OUT!)and the crack of a lunge whip cured her of that. She occasionally thought about chasing, but the command Get out made her think again. The nice thing about aussies is that they want to be with you. So even though they may venture around, they keep checking in with you.

Ozalynda
Dec. 29, 2010, 03:28 AM
The nice thing about aussies is that they want to be with you. So even though they may venture around, they keep checking in with you.


Very important quality in a farm dog. Had a wonderful smooth collie who we unfortunately lost to a cerebral bleeding at the early age of three. He was a super dog, BUT, he would totally forget about you if he got distracted by something. And he was so fast that he would simply be GONE if you turned around and didn't pay attention. Not because he didn't want to hang around, but more that he forgot to hang around.

He was a super sweet, loving playful fellow, but not the sharpest tool in the shed.

I can't accuse Elmer the swissy of being a canine einstein, but I certainly value that he keeps on eye on my whereabouts. And he is as sweet and goofy as can be.

yellow-horse
Dec. 29, 2010, 05:12 AM
The dog I've had by far was a lab/hound mix, she did not wander or cause any problems, understood every word told to her, killed varmints but never a kitty, anything I didn't want killed, I told her it was a kitty. She was also delta certified and a therapy dog. She was very alert and knew just how to act in all situations.
The best farm dog I had was an aussie, he was a dedicated hard working guy, took it all very seriously and even on his last day when we were putting him down, he had to be in sight of his herd, his people,his farm. He was great when I had to feed horses and goas in the filed, he would keep everyone in order with no fighting among feed dishes,if a goat got loose he herded them back in the fence, let me know if a horse was acting up.I miss him every day.
I currently have a gsd mix who is a good protective dog and doesn't wander, the goats and horses are important to him and he prefers to stay in the yard and keep an eye on things but he does not herd or have any idea what to do with the goats and horses but watch them,although he's a smart dog and will come and scratch at the door to let me know get out here mom. He's a great dog to have around living in the woods, he is a huge guy and is intimidating to strangers.

Megaladon
Dec. 29, 2010, 10:07 AM
Doberman. Loyal, intelligent. Good size, not too big or too small. Got along well with other animals and good with other people. Really stays by your side-minimal wandering, never out of earshot. Cons: intolerant of extreme cold=less time outside in winter months.

Pit Bull. Good coyote dogs. Tough. Never bothered my cats, good with horses. Very friendly with other people Cons: Mischevious coupled with high-pain threshold=getting into life-threatening trouble.

Chow/Lab. She was a great farm dog, but alas being a mix, she could have been a fluke. :confused:

tasia
Dec. 29, 2010, 11:59 AM
Doberman. Loyal, intelligent. Good size, not too big or too small. Got along well with other animals and good with other people. Really stays by your side-minimal wandering, never out of earshot. Cons: intolerant of extreme cold=less time outside in winter months.

Have always loved Dobies! I don't have any right now, but will again. Your feet are never cold with a Doberman, they love to sit on them. I used to have a Doberman and a Tea Cup Yorkie. The Yorkie was the mean one:lol:

Megaladon
Dec. 29, 2010, 02:18 PM
Have always loved Dobies! I don't have any right now, but will again. Your feet are never cold with a Doberman, they love to sit on them. I used to have a Doberman and a Tea Cup Yorkie. The Yorkie was the mean one:lol:

Same here, don't have any now. We had 3 and one mini poodle, just like your Yorkie, she was nasty to them but they never harmed a hair on her head! :lol:

unicorndreams21
Dec. 29, 2010, 03:03 PM
It's interesting to hear (read) the differing opinions and reasons. For me it would be gsd's & pitbulls.

My gsd, Gabriel, weighs in @ about 115-120 lbs, protects & guards his "herd" and pack. Looks out for the kitties, loves to lay/sit & watch out for the horses, listens well, helps me pull brush, keep the horses in line, & is my shadow & constant companion. He's also a therapy dog, and knows his "job" (whichever one is needed @ the time). I LOVE him to pieces and will always have a gsd.

My pbt/labx, Bentley, weighs in @ around 70+lbs, could care less about the various critters & will guard/protect his 2 leggeds. He's also a great lawn tractor "pace" dog. Extremely obedient & loyal. I joke that he holds all of the great apbt qualities & all of the "bad" lab qualities & quirks. :lol:

Both of my boys make "perfect" farm dogs for differing reasons. I will always have a gsd and a rescue apbt or pbtx. And both are quite intimidating to strangers, or any who may even think of doing harm. :winkgrin:

CowgirlDressage
Dec. 29, 2010, 03:39 PM
We've had an Aussie and a GSD in the past, and we miss them dearly. That said, hands down I'll never go without an ACD ever again!

We have 2 currently and they are the most personable, intelligent, goofy, fun loving dogs we've had, together or separately. I agree with other posters who've stated they're not for everyone, definitely not. But if you are an ACD person you are blessed indeed.

HuntJumpSC
Dec. 30, 2010, 02:04 AM
I had a JRT for 6 years and he was a great barn dog. Only problem was, I had a mare that would try and mow him over every time I brought him to the barn, so I gave him to a friend of mine who kept him for a couple of years at her barn, then he wound up at her neighbors when their boys fell in love with him. Last I heard, he's almost toothless, 15 years old, and still doing great.

My last dog was a Boykin Spaniel, named Chewy. If you are not familiar with Boykins, google them~ they are the SC state dog, and originated in the Camden area as the "little dog who doesn't rock the boat". He was my hubby's dog, but wound up being my barn/travel buddy and was great around horses.

We are currently looking for a puppy to add to our family now. Something that will be great with our 2 year old son, and can be a barn buddy/horse show companion, as well as a "manly" dog hubby can take places with him. Our first choice is either another Boykin or a yellow lab, since hubby is getting back into duck hunting a bit. We're also considering an Heeler, every one I've ever been around has been a great all-around dog. We're in no hurry, we know the right dog will come along when the time is right.

dawglover
Dec. 30, 2010, 01:16 PM
Love my Catahoulas. They've been the BEST farm dogs. The 2 I have are getting older and when they go I'll search for another one. They stay close without being underfoot and are very horse savvy. They are protective but not in an overly aggressive worrying sort of way. They will stay between me and anyone they don't know, and I believe if anyone tried to harm me they'd do their best to prevent it.

I've got JRTs but not ALL of them make good farm dogs. I have one that can't go to the barn with me because she'll kill a barn cat as quickly as she'll kill a rat. I've got a huge fenced back yard so she goes there to play while the rest of us go to the barn.

I've also got 2 mixed breed strays that showed up eons ago as pups and they're good farm dogs as well. One is a blonde chow mix, vet thinks the other part may be collie of some sort. She weighs about 60 lbs. She's very pretty but her coat needs constant grooming. She likes to be furminated though so it's not an issue. The second one is a black and tan mongrel with one blue eye that has no really identifiable breed characteristics. Truly a Heinz 57 type. She weighs about 70 lbs. Neither would hurt a flea but they make lots of noise to alert me if anything is going on that they don't like and they'll stand by a vehicle door and look threatening so people that don't know them won't get out until I call them off.

And last but not least, I've got 3 beagles. Left behind, collarless, by hunters 3 years ago because 2 of them are not particularly motivated to hunt. The other one only hunts till she hears the first gun go off and then she quits for the day.
Noisy, mostly useless little creatures, but they are good for entertainment and don't bother the horses.
The two tri colors are hilarious, going BOOO BOOO BOOO at top volume when the neighbor's dogs trot down the right of way. (they won't come on the property having been bitten by my electric fence) I'll yell at them to be quiet and then it's boo boo boo at low volume like they think I won't notice. :lol: Those two also Love to tree cats and bay at them, but they back right off if the cat won't play the treeing game. My old neutered male cat gives them "the look" and if they bark at him again he whackwhackwhacks 'em on the nose and they go find other things to do.

J. Turner
Dec. 30, 2010, 03:02 PM
Love my Catahoulas. They've been the BEST farm dogs. The 2 I have are getting older and when they go I'll search for another one. They stay close without being underfoot and are very horse savvy. They are protective but not in an overly aggressive worrying sort of way. They will stay between me and anyone they don't know, and I believe if anyone tried to harm me they'd do their best to prevent it.

The two tri colors are hilarious, going BOOO BOOO BOOO at top volume when the neighbor's dogs trot down the right of way. (they won't come on the property having been bitten by my electric fence) I'll yell at them to be quiet and then it's boo boo boo at low volume like they think I won't notice. :lol: Those two also Love to tree cats and bay at them, but they back right off if the cat won't play the treeing game. My old neutered male cat gives them "the look" and if they bark at him again he whackwhackwhacks 'em on the nose and they go find other things to do.

First, I lived in SE Georgia for 7 years and met many Catahoulas. A friend had one that she didn't give enough exercise and he was overly exuberant. Nice dog. Wasn't his fault. We also saw Boykins as we were only 1 1/2 hours from SC.

I don't have my own farm - or a horse - right now. I do ride at my friend's place. I usually bring along my yellow lab, who's actually in training to be my son's service dog. He is very smart in some ways, but not in others. In general, he's great around the barn. He doesn't stray. He's learned to give the horses their space. He does however have to learn better to stay out of the ring. He just doesn't want to leave my side. He's great on a trail ride in the washes. He stays close by, goes and plays, and comes back and checks in. My standard poodle is essentially the same (is it me?) in wanting to stay near me. She is naturally a clean dog, but sometimes the mess that buries itself in her coat is too much. Don't bring a greyhound to the barn! They run away, are somewhat delicate, and NOT horse smart. It must've been bred out of them for racing because they used them so much in the middle ages and Renaissance! Unless, of course, you have a couch in your tack room. then they are the perfect barn dog!

susanne
Dec. 30, 2010, 09:14 PM
Our Maltese, Billie Holliday (tiny even for a Maltese), will tell you that she is an excellent farm dog. She accompanies me every morning while I feed the horses, helps the chickens eat their feed, helps me clean corrals and barn by picking up errant road apples, keeps us warm at night, alerts us to visitors, and always makes us laugh.

Pound for pound, she has to be the best farm dog EVER!

We are, however, looking for another quasi-livestock guardian dog (Pyrenees cross) to help Billie with her duties. Our late big girl, Ella Fitzgerald, was Pyrenees and Lab, and was an incredible dog for all reasons. I miss watching her squeeze into our Shetland filly's corral to guard and comfort her. Scarlet, the filly, would stand mesmerized, eyes closed, as Ella gently licked her face.

wildlifer
Dec. 30, 2010, 10:09 PM
The muddy skinny things that show up one day sadly in need of a few meals and a de-ticking. They are forever needy and forever grateful for a safe and loving home. I'll choose them every time.

opel
Dec. 31, 2010, 11:40 AM
Absolutely Wildlifer. Nothing could be better than giving a sad, needy dog a home---and having what you need in a scrappy survivor.

leilatigress
Dec. 31, 2010, 01:54 PM
I second the Akitas but I am just not mean enough to keep one here in Texas summers. We always had catahoulas and heelers (usually free). Most interesting one was the dobbie. He slept in the barn office of one of the barns and you really couldn't see him unless you were right on him. Fantastic guard dog and very smart. He had his own bed in the office and a dog door to get him in and out of it. He however completely sucked at getting horses in and out. He would just watch the horse run past him and then look for the adult to catch the loose horse. We always had to be careful with the heelers as they took their herding job a bit too serious on occasion.

MissintheSouth
Dec. 31, 2010, 09:42 PM
I live on/manage a large horse farm. I have an Aussie/Brittany Spaniel mix and she is the most wonderful dog (farm and house) I've ever owned! She stays close but isn't attached at the hip to me. She listens most of the time, occasionally I have to put the obedience collar on her (she is still young and sometimes gets rusty).

But she is absolutely perfect to ride with - when I am riding she lays quietly next to the ring, when I am teaching she sleeps at my feet. When I trail ride, ok well, she explores the woods and sometimes is the world's spookiest shrub monster. But that's her only vice...haha!

TBJumper514
Jan. 1, 2011, 01:02 PM
Catahoulas, definitely! Haven't had one since we put the last one to sleep 3 years ago, but I am definitely considering getting another in the near future. They're tough, independent(but most of our have also LOVED attention), wary of strangers, horse/cow savvy and very self-sufficient. Ours would go off and hunt or swim in the ponds, but when you needed them, they were right there. We had friends that would come "borrow" them regularly to round up cattle. Great dogs, and they come in lots of fun colors to boot!

Piatt Farms
Jan. 4, 2011, 06:44 PM
Hands down, my Anatolian Shepherd. He was perfect. I could tell by his bark who was here, he never forgot someone (even years later, I could tell by the bark that he knew them), intiminating enough to deter unwanted visitors but kind enough to accept someone once I had deemed them ok. He never bothered the cats or new horses/dogs but was fantastic at keeping the bobcats and coyotes away. His downfall was wanting to "patrol" an ever increasing amount of territory which was eventually his downfall (that and it was deer season, and he was the right color).
So now we are getting another one in March.

Next to that would be my Border Collie. She loves my kids, is a crazy streak of black and white outside but a couch potato inside.

And finally the pit/something stray that showed up. She is large, sweet and somewhat scary looking, although she is more likely to lick you to death then actually do bodily harm.
She is my companion in the pasture and in the house (shhhh...don't tell the hubby!!!)

PiaffePlease
Jan. 5, 2011, 12:40 AM
I dont think its been mentioned yet, but Dalmatians make good farm dogs too. Not many people have them because they are high energy and that gives them a bad name. I wouldnt say they have more energy than labs, border collies etc.

They are known to be good with horses and are great protectors. My Dal was as sweet as could be with kids and people she knew, but she didnt like trespassers and she always held her ground. Not to mention they are beautiful and dont require much grooming.

BetterOffRed
Jan. 5, 2011, 01:02 AM
I don't discriminate. Any dog makes a great farm dog.... ;)

Somermist
Jan. 5, 2011, 02:03 AM
Love my GSDs. Great alarms and wonderful with the animals.

Fred
Jan. 5, 2011, 09:06 AM
It's interesting to hear (read) the differing opinions and reasons. For me it would be gsd's & pitbulls.

My gsd, Gabriel, weighs in @ about 115-120 lbs, protects & guards his "herd" and pack. Looks out for the kitties, loves to lay/sit & watch out for the horses, listens well, helps me pull brush, keep the horses in line, & is my shadow & constant companion. He's also a therapy dog, and knows his "job" (whichever one is needed @ the time). I LOVE him to pieces and will always have a gsd.



Our first farm dog was a Chesapeake Bay Retriever. She was a WONDERFUL dog, good around the horses and barn kitties, loyal,kind, very territorial and protective.
Believe me, people do not get out of their vehicles when there is a Chessie on the job. :) Jessie was such a good dog, and is still sadly missed.

Then we got our first GSD, and I think they are great farm dogs. Our present dog Breezie is also big, about 115 lbs, very kind and quiet around the animals, good with the chickens and barn cats - with the size and presence and BARK to impress visitors.
She is very obedient, intelligent and never strays.
She too is my constant companion, at my feet or by my side at all times.
Breezy has actually won in sheep herding competitions!!

The only thing she does 'wrong' and it is not wrong in her mind - is she sometimes wants to herd the horses when I am leading them and gets too close to the horses' hind hooves. I know she thinks she is helping, and just doing her job.

She is particularly 'on the job' when I am leading the stallion, and really thinks I might need her help with him (which I don't) - and when we are breeding, she has to stay in the house. ;)

I love BOTH my Chessie and my GSDs. :yes:

crestline
Jan. 5, 2011, 02:51 PM
My firstborn child was a 7/8 aussie 1/8 blue heeler. I lost her about two years ago and still can't write about her without choking up. She understood everything, had a discerning taste for fine imported leather goods, had the lovely heeler eye roll down to perfection, and was would have fought to the death if someone tried to hurt me. She was a once in a lifetime...
Her sidekick was a 7/8 aussie 1/8 catahoula...that one taught me that a little catahoula goes a long way, hahahaah. She had magic fur that looked aussie but was fluffier and never got dirty...amazing....it took a few more years for her to mature but once she did she was fabulous. She crashed after we lost the other one and died four weeks later...turns out she'd had cancer but was so stoic we didn't know...I think her broken heart took her out but at least I can know the two are together...probably micromanaging some mystic farm in heaven...well...that's what I like to think they are doing...

I have another aussie now(this one a tri...my others were blues) and found a starving hound/lab something-or-other last summer in our driveway...both are turning out great but amazingly it's the mutt that is taking over the show...We have an old rescue Springer here too that is wonderful...when we lose her I think I need another blue aussie....
There is just something about an Aussie...

hosspuller
Jan. 5, 2011, 03:55 PM
Dobermann ... Had 4 of them in a row over the last 24 years. Sadly one for only 6 months. They have been good loyal dogs. Truely a velcro companion.:yes: I'll always have a Dobermann (or two)around