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SidesaddleRider
Dec. 28, 2010, 10:43 AM
How many of you use hay racks/mangers in your stalls? Do you like/dislike them? Do you notice that the horses waste less hay, since they can't kick it around? Any issues since they aren't eating off the floor?

I am referring to these types:
http://www.doversaddlery.com/hay-rack/p/X1-4799/c2p/cs/
http://www.smartpakequine.com/ProductClass.aspx?productclassid=4217&cm_vc=Search

JackandMo
Dec. 28, 2010, 10:51 AM
I don't currently use them, but have in the past. I liked them. Seemed to be less waste.

AdAblurr02
Dec. 28, 2010, 11:00 AM
We have the steel racks that are wall-mounted, with doors made to feed from the aisleway. REALLY does help with the wastage, they still tend to pull out big wads and then do the sorting on the floor, but usually not the WHOLE bunch of hay at once. Since they are still feeding from a natural position (ie, head down) I see no health issues - and not having the hay confined in a bunk or tub lets them keep from being immersed in whatever dust may be there. Our stalls are all rubber matted, it's easy to sweep the feeding corner and keep dirt to a minimum. Ours are mounted in the opposite corner from the automatic waterers - they still get some hay in the waterers, but it's not a big deal.

Downsides - we have some BIG horses, and they like to scratch their butts and shoulders on the just-right not-sharp corners of the racks - a few have been mangled, and a couple broken. Hubby welded the broken ones easily, and they can be bent back to some semblance of normal shape with a bit of effort. Also, you need to attach them ruggedly, with either bolts or heavy lag screws, for those same reasons.
A couple of the kids who are always STARRRRRVING!!! and impatient learned to shove the entire load of hay UP and out of the rack. I learned to tie a net of hay twine up from the rack to the top of the stall wall, to disallow this behavior :)

tasia
Dec. 28, 2010, 11:13 AM
I feed off the ground in the stall. I don't like hay racks. I would rather waste some hay and not have something that could cause an injury. I have used a hay bag for one horse, but it wasn't long before the tabs on the bag ripped.

jazzrider
Dec. 28, 2010, 11:32 AM
I have them in two of our five horses stalls. One for a messy/hay waster and the other for a horse that due to an injury is often in. I don't think they really slow down consumption, but they do help cut down the mess for horses that like to mix their hay into their bedding rather than eating it. They are mounted with the bottom about four feet over the floor. I'm not sure what the injury risk would be -- unless you have youngsters that do a lot of rearing up in their stalls. I occasionally use hay nets for the other guys if everyone is in for bad weather -- I think they're riskier. I wouldn't recommend using the metal racks if your hay is dusty or has lots of small particles in it though. I find I only use them in the winter when the horses get more hay.

pintosrock
Dec. 28, 2010, 11:33 AM
I feed my hay in tubs on the ground. I have a paint that is uber-sensitive of dust/bugs/etc. Starts her ears watering, and then they get pussy and gross. Feeding in the tubs seems to contain some of the mess.

Ware Whip!
Dec. 28, 2010, 11:37 AM
I have never been a fan. To me, they are an accident waiting to happen.

RunningwaterWBs
Dec. 28, 2010, 11:50 AM
I'm not a fan either, although our new barn came equipped with them in almost every stall. If anyone in the Frenchtown, NJ, area wants about 8 of the black metal kind, let me know!

Pennywell Bay
Dec. 28, 2010, 12:03 PM
I have them in most of my stalls. I use them 75% of the time. I do not leave halters on in stalls, I have never had an accident though I can see the concern.

tasia
Dec. 28, 2010, 12:41 PM
I know of a few accidents that happened from horses rolling and getting a leg stuck in them.

GilbertsCreeksideAcres
Dec. 28, 2010, 12:56 PM
Tried 'em. Horses trashed 'em.

crosscreeksh
Dec. 28, 2010, 01:04 PM
We've been using the corner ground feeders I built myself for 30+ years. I make them using 4.5 feet long rough oak boards and stacked 28 inches high. I have never had a problem and when bedding on sawdust it keeps the hay contained better. The racks are nailed to the two walls with just two nails and if a horse did get a leg hung inside, he could easily pull the rack off the wall.

lostkiwi
Dec. 28, 2010, 01:05 PM
Have one, have not installed it.

I just place hay on ground. But use old water troughs rubber tubs in the pasture to feed hay so it doesn't get scattered (can't find round bales right now), and am thinking might use this idea in the stalls using the smaller type water troughs. Hmmm food for thought.

SLW
Dec. 28, 2010, 01:20 PM
I bought mine from SmartPak but not the corner style, the style that is flat against the wall. Really reduces hay waste and if I want to feed extra I can put 3 flakes in the feeder and a couple underneath.

The key, IMO, is to have them high enough to be out of the way of legs if a horse rolls but not so high the horse is on tippy toes with his neck outstretched trying to nibble.

JoZ
Dec. 28, 2010, 02:11 PM
Long ago (5+ years) my friend and I fed another boarder's horse M-F and in return he made us wooden hay feeders. We were so excited!

And a few years later we were equally excited to get rid of them.

Of course I doubt anyone is considering a WOODEN feeder and some of the problems (chewing, for example) were entirely because the feeders were wooden.

But it also was difficult for us to lift the hay up and over, and any mess that it saved in the stall was counteracted by the mess we made in the aisle (stalls are pipe panel so we were standing outside the stall hoisting the hay up and in). And our horses were able to make percussion instruments out of them... "It's time for dinner... BANG! hurry up with the hay... BANG!" Once I had read a number of articles indicating that ground feeding was more natural and healthier, I was happy to say buh-bye.

cyndi
Dec. 28, 2010, 02:37 PM
I use muck buckets as hay mangers - hung in a corner at the same height as their feeders. They hold several flakes of hay - my old wall feeders did not hold enough. They're cheap and even when stupid filly climbs into one, she does not get hurt. I have had the metal racks mounted to the walls, and they still lets lots of stuff fall on the floor. Much less waste with this method. And I think I've been using them for 6 or 7 years and no one has ruined one of them yet.

I will never have the metal hay racks attached to the wall again - I had a horse get a badly scratched cornea from having hay fall in his face while eating out of a wall-mounted hay rack.

Bluey
Dec. 28, 2010, 02:43 PM
We have the hay mangers with bars above and a pan below, but our horses didn't like them and I think their eyes can get irritated from the hay and dust above their faces.

They also make great scratching posts.;)

We went back to feeding off the ground on rubber mats and really don't have any more waste than we did with mangers.

We still have them, in storage, for the rare horse that may have problems eating from the ground and needs to have it's feed elevated, as may happen from a sore neck from a wreck or a reaction to a shot.

Since we feed alfalfa hay, we are not talking large amounts of hay and they clean it very well quickly.

The idea of the big manure buckets is interesting, but feeding all as a group, the wander from flake to flake easier without anything in the way.

DMK
Dec. 28, 2010, 03:04 PM
I use a ground manger for Mr. I Can't Eat Hay I Have Stepped On. It's a really high tech device: a 30"x60" framed out 3/4" plywood board snapped to a corner of the stall w/screw eyes (stained and spar urathaned because that is how I roll). Hay goes behind it. Horse eats hay out of manger and unless he's in a speshul mood, doesn't drag it out of the bin. That's a lot less hay and wasted shaving for me, thank you very much. It cost me about $25 to make and it's been in maybe 7 stalls over the years?

Mr. Easy Keeper Chowhound has a corner box slow feeder. That IS a high tech device and it's a damn good thing I can build reasonably heavy duty stuff, because that was a project in a half. Not one I'm likely to repeat anytime soon.

here's a slideshow of the higher level assembly and if you hang around you can see exciting pictures of monopods and bottles of well named wine as well (bonus round)

http://www.flickr.com/photos/24594726@N04/sets/72157612148066145/show/with/3177812117/

bird4416
Dec. 28, 2010, 03:10 PM
DMK, how was the Bitch wine?

saddleup
Dec. 28, 2010, 04:38 PM
I bought and installed ProPanel feeders this fall and I love them. They fit into the corner, right under the feed door in the stall wall. They're probably 3 feet high from the floor of the stall, and the hay just goes in the middle compartment. The horses are essentially eating off the ground, but the hay's contained. I have virtually no waste since they just don't pull it up and out anymore. There are two smaller compartments and I put their grain in one of them. They weren't cheap, but I am so glad I have them. I had a lot of wasted hay before when I was just feeding them on the floor.

I don't know how to post a link, but it's propanel.com

tasia
Dec. 28, 2010, 06:23 PM
DMK, how was the Bitch wine?

That's what I was wondering:lol:

Calvincrowe
Dec. 28, 2010, 06:25 PM
I have large capacity, plastic corner feeders mounted in my stalls and love them. They hold up to 5 very large flakes of hay, are smooth so nothing to cut a horse, no feet can get stuck in them, and I can wash them out (disinfect them) if necessary. Cuts waste, though some still dig to the bottom and toss hay out (that's you Calvin, you rat!). They were $75 each, but have lasted years, unscathed by rambunctious yearlings and old farts.

carolprudm
Dec. 28, 2010, 07:03 PM
I have these
http://www.countrymfgstore.com/cofe.html
in some of my stalls and haven't had a problem with them. The horses waste less hay with them.

However I prefer these
http://www.thinaircanvas.com/nibblenet/nibblenetframe.htm

I have a Connemara pony who can polish off a half bale of hay in an hour and look for more without it

Fairview Horse Center
Dec. 28, 2010, 07:12 PM
I use a ground manger for Mr. I Can't Eat Hay I Have Stepped On. It's a really high tech device: a 30"x60" framed out 3/4" plywood board snapped to a corner of the stall w/screw eyes (stained and spar urathaned because that is how I roll). Hay goes behind it. Horse eats hay out of manger and unless he's in a speshul mood, doesn't drag it out of the bin. That's a lot less hay and wasted shaving for me, thank you very much. It cost me about $25 to make and it's been in maybe 7 stalls over the years?

Mr. Easy Keeper Chowhound has a corner box slow feeder. That IS a high tech device and it's a damn good thing I can build reasonably heavy duty stuff, because that was a project in a half. Not one I'm likely to repeat anytime soon.

here's a slideshow of the higher level assembly and if you hang around you can see exciting pictures of monopods and bottles of well named wine as well (bonus round)

http://www.flickr.com/photos/24594726@N04/sets/72157612148066145/show/with/3177812117/

Awesome! This solves all of the problems I have with hay feeders. I won't use them as they need to be installed high to keep them safe, but then you have issues with dust in eyes and lungs, creating an environment that leaves horses more likely to get sick as they are not eating in a head down, drain bacteria out of their noses stance.

Just wow! Great idea!

Fairview Horse Center
Dec. 28, 2010, 07:14 PM
On another note, I usually don't need to use anything. If I find a horse that is trashing their hay, I cut them back a flake or two until they are again cleaning it all up.

DMK
Dec. 28, 2010, 08:26 PM
DMK, how was the Bitch wine?

It is exceptional. I do believe I cranked up Elton John's The Bitch is Back (personal anthem) while knocking back a glass ... or two... or three... :D :D :D

WillowHill
Dec. 29, 2010, 10:46 PM
DMK,
I love your feeder but I’d like mine a bit higher. I know this would cause problems if your vertically challenged, as I am, with loading the hay but I’m wondering if you think the plywood between the top of the grate and the top of the box could be hinged? What is it about 8” to a foot of space? It would then be a front load instead of a top load and I suppose I’d have to load a flake at a time but I’m ok with that. Oh no does that mean I have to switch to high efficiency hay? :D

I currently have the good ole corner metal hay feeders and I’m ok with them but everyone of my guys are picky pigs and pull out more than they can chew and like yours won’t touch what hits the ground and tell me so by doing their business in it.

SDHorses
Dec. 29, 2010, 11:05 PM
I use the corner, wall mounted hay racks with the large rubber feed pan below. These were purchased thru my barn manufacturer (MD Barn), however, I had the feeders custom made by MD to suit my needs. They are wall mounted but are about 12 inches taller than the normal version for my taller horses that like to pull the hay out of the top (I am talking about YOU Barbie!). This prevents the horses from pulling the hay out, and I can easily fit 5 large flakes of hay into the feeder from the separate feed door on the outside of the stall. My hay is very clean as I won't feed dusty hay, therefore I don't have dirty hay falling from the feeders so that isn't an issue. I love the feed pans which hold their grain, salt block and goodies as well as all the leaf from the hay - none of it gets lost in the shavings.

As someone else mentioned, my automatic waterers are on the opposite wall away from the hay rack - keeps them much cleaner!

Fairview Horse Center
Dec. 29, 2010, 11:14 PM
My hay is very clean as I won't feed dusty hay, therefore I don't have dirty hay falling from the feeders so that isn't an issue.
as well as all the leaf from the hay

It is not about dusty hay, but just small particles that can get into eyes, lungs, etc from eating hay in an unnatural position.

Horses are supposed to spend almost all of their time with their head down. In this position, any inhaled bacteria, virus particles, etc are more likely to be eliminated from the body, and not taken in to cause illness.

SDHorses
Dec. 29, 2010, 11:47 PM
Daryln: your original comment was about DUST falling into your horses eyes and lungs, not hay particals.

As I mentioned in my post, I feed clean hay with NO dust so the hay racks are not a problem for me. My horses grab a bite of hay from the feeders and eat it with their heads down, therefore, they ARE eating in a natural position. Eating hay off of the ground mixed with wet and dusty shavings certanly has more bacteria than would be found feeding from a feeder. I have absolutely no illnesses with my horses due to eating in this fashion. Again, feeding top quality hay with no dust makes a huge difference in the health of my horses.

Do whatever works for you and your horses. The hay rack works perfect for me - no waste and no sick horses.

vandenbrink
Dec. 29, 2010, 11:50 PM
I only have one stall with a hay rack, the bottom is about 4 feet off the ground or so. It's homemade and a little bigger then the average and holds 4 plus flakes. It may help waste a little, but I don't have too much trouble with horses wasting hay..and if they do..well..then it's bedding, or I throw it too our cows. We don't get too excited about that. Sometimes it's because the hay has some weeds in it, or a flake is poorer quality. In the field they sort when they graze, so I don't mind them sorting a bit when they "graze" their hay. If you allow them to sort a little they tend to eat more.

Fairview Horse Center
Dec. 29, 2010, 11:51 PM
I feed clean hay with NO dust

All hay has dust particles.

sketcher
Dec. 30, 2010, 12:02 AM
As I mentioned in my post, I feed clean hay with NO dust

No you don't, there is not such thing.

I will never forget the night a waxed and overdue mare rolled in her stall, probably while entering the early stages of labor, and wedged her rear hoof in her hay rack. A hay rack that was designed to be 'safe' and was hung at the appropriate height.

That mare kicked out her hing leg in such a way that it slipped in between the bars and then slid down so that her pastern was wedged and the width of her hoof kept it there. The only way to get it out was to raise her leg up along the hay rack so that the space between the bars was large enough to pull her hoof out.

That was almost 30 years ago and I honestly can't remember exactly how we got her out. Probably by pure, sh*t luck. What I do remember is a huge, stuck, preggo mare with milk squirting all over the place. And I remember jumping up off my hay bale bed and running into the stall. and then I rememeber that when we freed her and then uncast her from the wall, she jumped up and leapt out of the stall, crashing through the hay bales, coffee cups, magazines and whatever other crap we had piled outside her stall door.

Luckily she was not hurt and baby was born a short while later but I have never, ever used a hay rack since then.

TrotTrotPumpkn
Dec. 30, 2010, 12:03 AM
Barn has big metal ones with hay rack on top and feed pan attached below. I do not like them. They are big butt scratchers (or tail destroyers).

Also these just hang and can get knocked around (although they are very heavy).

Finally it is messy to put hay into, even with the big swinging feed door built into the stall wall, because the opening is higher. You basically need to open the door and walk into each stall to keep them clean (which defeats the feed door integrated into the stall).

spotmenow
Dec. 30, 2010, 07:53 AM
Once saw a horse rear up in his stall and get his foot caught...luckily he was found within the hour because his hind end would not have been able to hold his body weight for very long...

Also, I've never liked the idea of horses reaching up for their hay; it is not natural (they are designed to forage with their heads down) and the hay dust goes right down their airways.

I've seen hay troughs that mount to the wall much lower down...maybe a better option...me, I just feed off the floor/ground small amounts frequently. The last place I boarded they insisted on a hay feeder and my boys used to aggressively pull all the hay out anyway and dump it on the ground before eating it, so the mess was the same.

EquusMagnificus
Dec. 30, 2010, 07:55 AM
I plan on doing something similar to DMK, but a lot less fancy. :lol:

I will be simply installing a sheet of 3/4 plywood in a corner, open top, so the hay is on the ground and you just drop the flakes like in a muck bucket. Excepted that it can't be moved around, unlike the muck bucket.

My gelding will use it as a toy. It's fun.

I have pigs, I can't forego a hay feeder of some sort. They WILL spread it, lay in it, pee in it, poop in it and then give me the starving face. Ugh. Bad bad horsies!

My outdoor redneck hay feeders are the same principle, sheets of recycled plywood (we had a lot of demolition to do in our barn), forming a SIMPLE rectangle with 4 x 4 for the corners, 32" tall if my memory is correct. Cuts hay waste by AT LEAST 30%.

And perfectly safe for foals. :cool:

bird4416
Dec. 30, 2010, 08:15 AM
I have had a personal experience with hay particles and eye injuries. I was pulling down a bale from a stack above my head slightly and a small hay stalk (maybe a few mm long) stabbed my in the white part of the eyeball. I literally had a piece of hay sticking out of my eye. I gently plucked it out (probalby shouldn't have done this myself but it was a relfex almost). I had a nice little hole in my sclera.

I called my fox hunting buddy that is an eye doctor and he told me what to do and to come in if it didn't improve pretty quickly. I happened to have eye antibiotic ointment on hand It scabbed over in a few hours which feels really weird and then the scab fell off and I was good as new.

So this taught me that hay racks over head are not a good idea and stuff falls out of even the cleanest nicest hay.

Bluey
Dec. 30, 2010, 08:27 AM
I have had a personal experience with hay particles and eye injuries. I was pulling down a bale from a stack above my head slightly and a small hay stalk (maybe a few mm long) stabbed my in the white part of the eyeball. I literally had a piece of hay sticking out of my eye. I gently plucked it out (probalby shouldn't have done this myself but it was a relfex almost). I had a nice little hole in my sclera.

I called my fox hunting buddy that is an eye doctor and he told me what to do and to come in if it didn't improve pretty quickly. I happened to have eye antibiotic ointment on hand It scabbed over in a few hours which feels really weird and then the scab fell off and I was good as new.

So this taught me that hay racks over head are not a good idea and stuff falls out of even the cleanest nicest hay.

Just seems like common sense, doesn't it, that we should try to feed hay lower than their head, at level or below height.
I never did like those old stables we fed hay from a trap door above the hay mangers.
Even the nicest hay had some dust and very small hay particles falling on the horse's heads, as they would stand there waiting.

With cattle, we learned very quickly that our hay wagons holding three big bales were causing pink eye infections, thru the same principle of having to reach high and some particles falling and irritating eyes, so we quit using them.

I guess that there are always little details we can improve on, is there.:yes:

King's Ransom
Dec. 30, 2010, 09:26 AM
I had a metal rack like the one pictured by the OP, and my big horse, Eli, destroyed it pretty quickly by scratching his bum on it. I took it out and chalked that up to "bad idea."

This year I had a wooden manger / shelf built in to the front corner of each of the stalls. At first I thought I'd made a mistake, as they didn't seem deep enough to hold any hay. They are about waist-high off the floor (my waist), and only about six inches deep.

As it turns out, though, they are working perfectly. They hold 4 flakes of hay, just fine. The horses pull out what they want, and eat off the floor. For whatever reasons, this has resulted in a zero-waste policy! I am frankly shocked, and Elijah is definitely an "I can't eat hay I have stepped on" kind of guy.

But, every morning, their stalls are clean and they have eaten every strand of hay like vacuum cleaners. So, I am quite pleased.

TrotTrotPumpkn
Dec. 30, 2010, 10:54 AM
I had a metal rack like the one pictured by the OP, and my big horse, Eli, destroyed it pretty quickly by scratching his bum on it. I took it out and chalked that up to "bad idea."

This year I had a wooden manger / shelf built in to the front corner of each of the stalls. At first I thought I'd made a mistake, as they didn't seem deep enough to hold any hay. They are about waist-high off the floor (my waist), and only about six inches deep.

As it turns out, though, they are working perfectly. They hold 4 flakes of hay, just fine. The horses pull out what they want, and eat off the floor. For whatever reasons, this has resulted in a zero-waste policy! I am frankly shocked, and Elijah is definitely an "I can't eat hay I have stepped on" kind of guy.

But, every morning, their stalls are clean and they have eaten every strand of hay like vacuum cleaners. So, I am quite pleased.

Do you have any pictures? My filly feels she MUST pee in any fresh hay she receives if it is on the ground, so I'm always looking for alternatives.

DMK
Dec. 30, 2010, 11:41 AM
DMK,
I love your feeder but I’d like mine a bit higher. I know this would cause problems if your vertically challenged, as I am, with loading the hay but I’m wondering if you think the plywood between the top of the grate and the top of the box could be hinged? What is it about 8” to a foot of space? It would then be a front load instead of a top load and I suppose I’d have to load a flake at a time but I’m ok with that. Oh no does that mean I have to switch to high efficiency hay? :D

I currently have the good ole corner metal hay feeders and I’m ok with them but everyone of my guys are picky pigs and pull out more than they can chew and like yours won’t touch what hits the ground and tell me so by doing their business in it.

I'm sure it could be bigger, I modified it from a design that was meant to feed a few horses, not just one in a 12x12 stall.

The one design change I would make would be to hinge the front somehow, because that would make cleaning it out easier, but I'm not sure it would make loading it easier since a) it has a sloped "floor" so stuff wants to move from back to front and b) you have to fluff up hay in order for it to work properly otherwise a flake just sits at the back taunting a poor starving horse (Lido tells me he is starving and underfed all the time) . If it is a fescue "soft" hay you can shake it up as you are putting itin, but dense packed alf based hay like I feed? I pretty much have to toss it out in front of the box and then put it in and pack it down. Kind of messy but it makes me happy knowing he has hay past 11pm at night (I put 2 big orchard/alf and 1-2 fescue/orchard in there for a night, usually less in the summer when they are in during the day and out at night.

Eq. Magnificus - I have the low tech version as well, only why even bother with a muck bucket? I just sweep all the shavings off the mat in that corner and attach the 30x60 framed out board w/screw eyes/snaps. Easy peasy. :D

I'll try take pics of that one tonight. It's VERY low tech and very useful.

EquineImagined
Dec. 30, 2010, 11:48 AM
My guys are special. We have hay racks, and at first I was using them when it was still just the two and I was feeding them in the stalls, but by afternoon I'd go up and they'd have pulled the hay out of the rack and spread it everywhere. Pretty sure they were looking for the 'best bits' and discarding the rest. Since it all ended up on the floor anyway, I just started throwing it there, now that the stalls are reserved for a horse on rest and everyone just uses the overhang and the run in for shelter, I throw hay out in the pasture, or we get round bales.

I don't think this is one of those things where there is one right or wrong answer, just more right or more wrong depending on the individual. :) My neighbor has 'mangers' made in the corners of her stalls on the floor with a wooden board seperating the hay from bedding etc. With maybe one exception her guys tend to be very tidy this way, and since the board is a solid smooth piece there's no getting feet caught. It was relatively inexpensive to make, as well.

EquusMagnificus
Dec. 30, 2010, 04:52 PM
Eq. Magnificus - I have the low tech version as well, only why even bother with a muck bucket? I just sweep all the shavings off the mat in that corner and attach the 30x60 framed out board w/screw eyes/snaps. Easy peasy. :D


Oh yes, that's exactly what I meant! I just said that my system was going to be "just like using a muck bucket", but without the muck bucket! :lol:

Just like your really. :lol:

I love low tech highly functional ideas... :winkgrin:

Bravestrom
Dec. 30, 2010, 05:19 PM
I have the flat wall ones in all my stalls - but they are mounted near a corner and high enough that rollers would not get their feet in it. We have really big horses and they make a mess of their hay and don't eat it if it is on the ground.

They will usually flip out the top flake and eat it off the ground - sometimes they will even take a flake at a time out of the feeder - put it on the floor and then eat it. One mare has a stall guard and she takes a flake out of the feeder - puts it on the ground outside her stall in the aisle and eats it there with her head over the stall guard so she can see everyone while she eats.

That being said - I don't use them for babies as I think it is too hard on their necks - they have their hay on the ground - but their stalls are always a mess of hay - the others all have all their hay gone in the morning.

We have soft stalls and don't put shavings under the hay feeders so when the good stuff drops they can get it easily.

DMK
Dec. 30, 2010, 07:57 PM
Oh yes, that's exactly what I meant! I just said that my system was going to be "just like using a muck bucket", but without the muck bucket! :lol:

Just like your really. :lol:

I love low tech highly functional ideas... :winkgrin:

LOL, reeding 4 komprehenshun, not 1 of my skilz today!

Anyway, here's some really bad cell phone pics of my low tech manger - this is a 30x60 "board" but I did make 2 out of one piece of plywood and it worked (I think that is 30x48? not sure, killed those brain cells long ago). It has 4 big flakes fluffed up in it, but you could fluff up half a bale in there no problem. He does pull out some of the stemmier stuff, but it just ends up in front of it and along the wall, mostly not trashed in the stall... unless he has an opinion about the hay. Then it's just a EPA superfund site by the time he's done expressing his "opinion" :rolleyes:

first pic shows how it is snapped to the wall (Assuming you have mad skilz at deciphering craptastic pics)

King's Ransom
Dec. 31, 2010, 03:52 PM
Here are the hay racks we put in this year. As I said, at first I thought they were a big mistake, but as it turns out, they work great. Horses take what they want and pull it onto the floor. Eat that, then go back for more. In the morning, there is NOTHING left. They have a zero-waste policy. I'm surprised, but happy.

Facebook not needed: http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc4/hs1357.snc4/162927_1637947361918_1633774055_1510540_1851265_n. jpg

Public link on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=1510540&l=78535c2414&id=1633774055

lisann
Dec. 31, 2010, 04:05 PM
Oh, I like those corner feeders with the eye-bolts. I have corner feeders in my stalls, but they are nailed to boards with a 45 degree angle but off. I need to put mangers in 2 new stalls, and I may try that eye-bolt version.