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View Full Version : Turning horse loose in side reins or, Should that horse's face be that shade of RED??



Fantastic
Dec. 27, 2010, 06:44 PM
Title says it all. How common is this? Sorry if I am venting, but this just sounds WRONG to me!

WHO, I ask you, WHO turns a horse loose in side reins, let alone a horse that has never worn them before?

This horse had never been in side reins before a day in it's life - ever. Side reins were put on the horse, and the horse was turned LOOSE in arena. Damage is done 1.5" up the corners of the horses mouth and also buised bars of mouth, and who knows where else. A 2" wide strip of flesh was removed across the nose of the horse because the horse was lunged in a halter with a chain on it.

Now, the person that did this is a driving trainer who competes at the highest levels, and was hired to put the basics on a dressage prospect.

Imagine the "fun" of rehabing a horse from this "positive" side rein and "training" experience? :cry: :rolleyes:


I can only cry for the poor horse in this situation. :cry::cry::cry::cry::cry::cry:


Quality, educated trainers with GOOD JUDGEMENT in any discipline do not do this abuse of turning a young horse loose, the first time it has ever worn side reins. However, I do have some sales videos from Germany showing young horses free lunged in side reins. The difference here is that the horses are obviously CONFIRMED in side reins, not side rein virgins. Regardless, I do not free lunge in side reins, as accidents can too easily happen.


But seriously, how common is this in your world - turning a horse with side reins? It is unheard of in mine.

Schiffon
Dec. 27, 2010, 07:10 PM
Well, for one, to answer the first part of the question: Reiner Klimke recommends free lunging with side reins in his Basic Training of the Young Horse book. This is in a small school (20x40 m or so) with a whip handler in the center of each 20m circle and cones in each corner to encourage the horse to stay to the outside. This is after regular lunging is taught and has advantages over continual lunging circles.

So, as with many things in training, it is all in the application and in the common sense and understanding of the person doing the training. Sorry you and the horse had to experience that. SHudder!

Carol O
Dec. 27, 2010, 07:10 PM
Sounds terribly unfortunate. I did once hear of a BNT advise a friend to put her horse in side reins, in the stall, while introducing the double. My friend did not like the advice, so did not pursue it.

LookmaNohands
Dec. 27, 2010, 07:26 PM
Title says it all. How common is this? Sorry if I am venting, but this just sounds WRONG to me!

WHO, I ask you, WHO turns a horse loose in side reins, let alone a horse that has never worn them before?

This horse had never been in side reins before a day in it's life - ever. Side reins were put on the horse, and the horse was turned LOOSE in arena. Damage is done 1.5" up the corners of the horses mouth and also buised bars of mouth, and who knows where else. A 2" wide strip of flesh was removed across the nose of the horse because the horse was lunged in a halter with a chain on it.

Now, the person that did this is a driving trainer who competes at the highest levels, and was hired to put the basics on a dressage prospect.

Imagine the "fun" of rehabing a horse from this "positive" side rein and "training" experience? :cry: :rolleyes:


I can only cry for the poor horse in this situation. :cry::cry::cry::cry::cry::cry:


Quality, educated trainers with GOOD JUDGEMENT in any discipline do not do this abuse of turning a young horse loose, the first time it has ever worn side reins. However, I do have some sales videos from Germany showing young horses free lunged in side reins. The difference here is that the horses are obviously CONFIRMED in side reins, not side rein virgins. Regardless, I do not free lunge in side reins, as accidents can too easily happen.


But seriously, how common is this in your world - turning a horse with side reins? It is unheard of in mine.

If that is the end result then NO! It is not okay. Bad trainer. Get a picture and out him/her.:no:

Fantastic
Dec. 27, 2010, 07:26 PM
This is not the first story of poor judgement from this person, unfortunately for all those ever involved.

Free lungeing a horse in side reins the first time it has worn them is a far cry from free lungeing an experienced horse. I can only imagine the pain, panic and confusion that that poor horse must have experienced being trapped like that!

At the onset of it all going wrong, the intelligent person would have stopped and put the horse away before someone got hurt.

Carol O - your friend was obviously quite wise. The BNT: NOT!!!

goodmorning
Dec. 27, 2010, 07:38 PM
It seems to be quite common, particularly when training young horses over in Germany, based on my recent trip. However, I think this was after extensive in-hand & traditional lunging work.

scubed
Dec. 27, 2010, 09:00 PM
I did this with my TB all the time (he had been in side reins on the lunge line frequently before turning lose first time). I would put side reins on, turn him loose in the arena, tell him to trot and go get dressed to ride. He would trot around for the 5 or 10 minutes and then I would take off the side reins and get on to ride. Never had a problem (he was and is one of the most sensible horses on the planet and was 7 years old when I got him, so also not a baby)

luchiamae
Dec. 27, 2010, 09:37 PM
I don't think there is an issue if the area is small. We always lunge our young horses (LOOSE, no rein to hold them on a circle) in a small area that ISN'T a circle and they travel happily around in W/T/C. In saying that, all our horses are capable of being lunged, have been long reined and get the beginning of the idea of contact so introducing the side reins has never been a big deal.

What you just described is very, very sad.

Fantastic
Dec. 27, 2010, 09:59 PM
On an unbroke horse that has never ever worn side reins, applying them hot turkey without an introduction - just wham, bam, crank em', and turn em' loose - it's an accident waiting to happen = unacceptable.

On a confirmed and experienced side rein wearing horse, it's a whole different situation = acceptable.



Who let the brain out? :lol: