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HannoMerci
Dec. 26, 2010, 12:29 PM
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mzm farm
Dec. 26, 2010, 01:35 PM
I vote for give a month off and completely restart.
If you had luck doing things your way, then do that.


I would be curious to know why the trainer chose those tools/methods to start her.

mbm
Dec. 26, 2010, 01:59 PM
i would give more than a month off... maybe the winter and restart in the spring. it takes time to get rid of incorrect sore muscles.

then just restart her the way you want.

InsideLeg2OutsideRein
Dec. 26, 2010, 10:13 PM
Chiro and massage :) And spend lots of time getting to know her. Will not chime in on the months off or not, that'll be clear once you have her and see what she's like in person. Congratulations! I also bought a young greenbroke mare a few months ago and it's quite the journey. Couldn't be happier I've got her in my life though. :)

KrazyTBMare
Dec. 26, 2010, 10:49 PM
Chiro and massage :) And spend lots of time getting to know her. Will not chime in on the months off or not, that'll be clear once you have her and see what she's like in person.

Ditto. Give her some time to unwind, bond with her, etc. I agree with starting with her from scratch though - as if she hadnt been started - get her used to your way of doing things, let her learn that work can be fun and enjoyable, learn to go forward and move over her body. I think once she comes to know you and trust you and relaxes she will come around for you.

Congrats!

BTW no "I bought a new horse" post without PICS!

netg
Dec. 27, 2010, 01:25 AM
Dressagenoir- So you gave her a month off? I'm trying to gather as much information as possible. What did you chrio say? Was your TB sore for a while? How's her brain now?

Oops, didn't read your post correctly....you're giving her the rest of winter off as well! Let's keep in touch!

I vote for a winter off for her, too. I think a few months can heal many emotional/bad training flaws better than correct work from what I've seen.

I also agree - treat her as if she has no training and put the foundation you want on her. You don't want to have to back up and install fundamentals in a few years, so get them in now, and everything else will be easier. :)

Velvet
Dec. 27, 2010, 09:31 AM
The nice thing about young horses, and one that was only trained by someone else for a short period of time, is that they have flexible minds and are pretty forgiving. While I don't agree with the massage and chiro work (most young horses do not need these extreme measures, their muscles are MUCH more forgiving and quick healing--it's usually in their head not their body), I do think that spending time playing with her and working on ways to bong are all good.

Does that mean you can't ride her? Not necesssarily. You don't really gain a lot by throwing the horse out, but you can gain a lot by teaching her free lunge, and stretch on her own, and then getting on her when she seems happy and relaxed and making the rides about fun and not about serious work for a while.

JMO

netg
Dec. 27, 2010, 10:07 AM
I do think that spending time playing with her and working on ways to bong are all good.


It'll really help her chill, too.


(Sorry, Velvet, I had to quote that typo!)

WBLover
Dec. 27, 2010, 10:25 AM
Freudian slip?? Ha ha!

I have always given my 3yos the winter off after they were started to finish growing and chill out and it has worked for me. Lots of times they go through a growth spurt and some awkwardness at that time anyways. I agree, just re-start her in the spring the way YOU want things to be done. I don't think you need to do the chiro and massage either, young bones and muscles spring back pretty easily.

She's a BEAUTIFUL mare, congratulations!

MysticOakRanch
Dec. 27, 2010, 10:37 AM
If you know a good equine chiropractor, I would invest in one visit - young bodies can also learn new (and not always good) routines pretty quickly - so if she had 30 days of "wrong" work, why not give her a little help in getting back to "right"? And yes, definately give her some time off - heck, it is cold, rainy, snowy, muddy, icey, bleah anyway, good time to not ride. Ditto the comments, spend some time getting to know her, grooming, and if you really want to do ground work - put a bridle on and lightly (from the ground) bend her, teach her to stretch down and out, and heck, do a little fun stuff, teach her to bow or count or something that makes both of you laugh! It is all about bonding, especially if she's a mare!

Marshfield
Dec. 27, 2010, 11:32 AM
I think some body work either chiro or massage plus some downtime will help. I think that if you can safely hack her out (both footing and her mentality) that some gentle swinging walk work would help.

Velvet
Dec. 27, 2010, 11:42 AM
It'll really help her chill, too.


(Sorry, Velvet, I had to quote that typo!)

:lol: Since you like that typo so well, I'll just leave it. :lol:

princessfluffybritches
Dec. 27, 2010, 07:08 PM
I think I would undo all that cr@p-damage by just walking on a loose rein for a time, and maybe slip some stretching exercises in. A massuese sounds good. It sounds to me like the previous owner did too much too early too quickly. And now she's very tense.