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View Full Version : Paddocks off of stalls - size?



SkipHiLad4me
Dec. 26, 2010, 01:28 PM
Planning my future barn :D and wanting to fence paddocks off of my stalls that I can open up into the pastures when I turn the horses out. I want the horses to have the option of being in or out even when I've got them "in" at the barn but don't need the paddock to provide exercise. Just room to move around What's the smallest paddock area that you would use off of a stall that is A) still useful and B) isn't so big that it becomes cumbersome to incorporate into your pasture space?

mkevent
Dec. 26, 2010, 03:46 PM
My paddocks are about 30 ft by 40-50 ft. They are a bit oddly shaped, depending on which pasture they lead into. I think you can get a bit of an idea of what they look like on my website below.

If you can swing doing overhangs, they have been one of the best investments I've ever done! I feed all the hay in haynets under the overhangs and it has made a huge difference in how much cleaner the stalls stay. The horses also stay cleaner because when they lay in their stalls there is a lot less manure in there.

SAcres
Dec. 26, 2010, 03:48 PM
It depends on how much land you have, how long the horses are going to be "in", if you're planning on putting actual footing down or not, etc.
I've seen small paddocks that were the same size as the horse's stall. They worked well. I think both stalls and paddocks were 12x12. So there was enough room to move around and whatnot, but it wasn't big enough for the horse to gallop around and goof off in. It did prevent the horses from getting stocked up and the horses didn't feel "cooped up" as much. I thought they were a bit small but the horses were turned out everyday, no matter what the weather was like, so it worked. Another place I knew of had 10x10 stalls with 10x30 paddocks. They were nice too.
When I win the lottery and get my dream barn I want stalls that are 12' deep and 14' wide. I'd like paddocks that are 14' by 40' with stone dust footing. I'd like a 10 ft overhang into the paddocks so I could lock the horses outside to clean stalls or whatever in bad weather (raining, snowing, etc) and not have to worry about them getting cold or wet. It would also be convenient when I want to bring them off of pasture for the winter or I have an easy keeper that can't be on grass.
That goes along with a huge indoor, a hundred acres of trails and pastures, full cross country course, jump ring, a barn that would make the whole world jealous, etc etc. Yea, I can dream big! :D

Watermark Farm
Dec. 26, 2010, 03:56 PM
The paddocks off my stalls are 12x36. I wish they were wider to better accomodate horses laying down safely in them, but the length is good (I find long, narrow paddocks seem to invite pacing). The footing is baserock, and it's compacted and sloped for good drainage. They have a gate at the end of each paddock and they open directly into the pasture, which makes turn out/turn back easy.

I love the overhang idea and wish I could incorporate that. In winter it would be nice to have a dry place to feed other than the stalls, which get really yucky on rainy days.

SkipHiLad4me
Dec. 26, 2010, 05:40 PM
I'm thinking I'll have about 12-14 acres of pasture split into 3 pastures. No more than 4 horses in all. At this stage of planning, stalls will be 12x12 with 6' overhangs off the stalls. I haven't priced it out yet but I'd be interested in putting down geotextile fabric with screenings or gravel in the runs. I definitely don't want to end up with mud bogs! Horses will be out most of the time if possible. Thanks for the input thus far :yes: Much appreciated.

mkevent
Dec. 26, 2010, 06:36 PM
If you can afford 10 ft overhangs, that gives plenty of space for the horses to hang out under and also helps prevent muddiness (sp) outside the stalls. I put mats (I bought 2nds for $26/mat) and put them under the overhangs. It makes cleanup a breeze and keeps that area dry (I did elevate them so they stay dry) no matter how bad the rain/mud/snow is.

I added my overhangs after the barn was built. I would imagine it would be a lot more cost effective to do it when the barn is being built.

I turnout no matter what the weather and never have to worry about the horses. It's so great not having to run home during sudden rainstorms or worry if the horses have a place to get out of the weather. It's nice because with seperate paddocks, the more dominant horses can't prevent the lower ranking herd members from getting under the shelter.

dmalbone
Dec. 26, 2010, 10:15 PM
My paddocks are about 24'x48'. I have a horse coming off each side of the 24' wide barn, but if I were to add a stall to each side I'll divide them in 1/2 so they'll be 12'x48'. It would make me much leerier about them laying down, but a lot of people do that. My oldster has decided it's much more fun to roll outside in the snow in his paddock than his stall. I never see him do it but I see horse snow angels every morning. :)

horsepoor
Dec. 26, 2010, 10:59 PM
Agree with the person that suggested making the overhang 10' rather than the 6' you are planning. Mine is 10' and it is the best hang-out place for the horses, we can feed out there, or even for a bit made it a temp stall when I was over-horsed at home. 10' gives the horse room to turn around in the overhang area, while 6' would not.

For paddocks, I have boarded where the paddocks were just 12'x18' pipe corrals -- not for exercise but just a way to have a little more room than just the stall, they could socialize better out there, and they still got turned out in bigger grass paddocks during the day. Worked well enough.

At home, I have larger paddocks -- one is 30'x30' and the other is maybe 20'x50'. Those are mud-free with pea gravel over hoof-grid, mostly, with a portion that is still the "old" gravel over geotextile. These are off the stalls and open all the time. Then there is access off those paddocks to the pastures.

Over at my neighbor's house, where I keep my retired horse and mini-mule, the set-up is similar with 12x12 stalls that open to a 10' overhang, then dry paddocks off that -- I think they are about 15 or 20 feet wide and maybe 50' long. Then those open to the pastures.

I'm in the NW, so with all our rain, I can't use my pasture much a lot of the winter, so those paddocks are a lifesaver. My horses are so much happier than when boarded and stuck inside on crummy days, since most boarding stables here won't spend the money to do the mud-free runs. And their feet and legs are much healthier without being in the mud all the time.

Dalemma
Dec. 27, 2010, 11:39 AM
Mine vary in size and shape....I have 2 that are 24' x 100' one that is 24' x 75', another that is 30'x 60' and two more that are about 40' x 50'.

http://i149.photobucket.com/albums/s77/DalEmma2002/Paddocks.jpg

Dalemma

TrotTrotPumpkn
Dec. 27, 2010, 02:35 PM
Mine vary in size and shape....I have 2 that are 24' x 100' one that is 24' x 75', another that is 30'x 60' and two more that are about 40' x 50'.

http://i149.photobucket.com/albums/s77/DalEmma2002/Paddocks.jpg

Dalemma

Pictures are so helpful! Do you keep any of those wires hot? What type of fencing (brand) is it? I just ask, because I see they share fencelines.

TIA!!

KatherineC
Dec. 27, 2010, 04:02 PM
I have paddocks off of each stall. They vary in size from 30' x 120' to 50' x 200' and they lead to the pastures. In addition to allowing the horses to always be "out", it is also nice safety feature, nobody gets run over turning out excited horses.

I also have run ins off of each stall that are 12 x 12'. I can close off the run-ins in bad weather to keep everyone in. This gives them their stall and their run in to move around in.

Footing in the paddocks is screenings with good drainage. If you pick them everyday they stay pretty dry and very little mud accumulates. We add more screenings about every 18 months.

Most of mine pee in their stall and poop in the paddock. I use Swift Pick shavings and toss the wet shavings into the run ins to dry. These shavings are really just big saw dust particles so they dry very quickly (even in the winter) and then become part of the bedding in the run-in. It saves hugely on hauling away bedding and gives the guys nice footing in the run in. It never smells and the horses eventually walk it into the paddocks and it becomes part of the footing there.

Good luck with your new barn.

PS - If I ever build a new barn again I would get one of those prefab metal barns. We build a wooden one about 25 years ago and everything eats wood (horses, bugs etc).

AdAblurr02
Dec. 28, 2010, 11:49 AM
Our runs vary in size, as the usable area behind the stable row (shedrow barn) is sort of a rounded wedge shape (drainage ditch off the ends of the runs). The longest are about 160 feet by about 40 feet at the far end (stallions and big young colts), the smallest are about 30x40 and wedge shaped - all come down to stall width, 10 feet. Zero issues with having the narrow size at the stalls. We have highway-grade rock base, with finer crushed rock compacted over that. We now have a "porch" outside the doors, covered in rubber mats for all the stalls - a lot of the horses now poop on their porch, which really helps with cleaning!

We installed a large pad of Grassy Pavers (http://www.arena-rehab.com/grassypavers.htm) across the front entrance to the concrete aisleway about a year ago - man, did that help with mud and water coming in! I am now putting in the Grassy Pavers (http://www.arena-rehab.com/grassypavers.htm) grid for about 15 feet outside the doors, as it allows better drainage and keeps the smell down better than plain rock -easy to clean too. Got the elder stallion's porch done first - now no more dugout where he likes to drag his hay to the doorway and trample it into a mat! Hope to have all the main barn done this winter, though it's hard to do this sort of thing in lousy weather :(

SkipHiLad4me
Dec. 30, 2010, 09:02 AM
Thanks for the link to the Grassy Pavers! I had forgotten about those. They might actually work better for what I want to do than the geotextile fabric. Anyone have any idea of the cost difference for the pavers versus fabric over the same area? I know the fabric requires a bit more site prep to properly install.

horsepoor
Dec. 30, 2010, 01:30 PM
Thanks for the link to the Grassy Pavers! I had forgotten about those. They might actually work better for what I want to do than the geotextile fabric. Anyone have any idea of the cost difference for the pavers versus fabric over the same area? I know the fabric requires a bit more site prep to properly install.

I have Hoof-Grid installed in my paddocks -- same sort of plastic snap together grid system as the Grassy Pavers. There is also another version called Stable-Grid that you might check into as I think the US distributor might be in your area.

The grids are significantly more expensive to put in than the fabric, at least when you look at the cost of grids (mine were $2/sq ft) vs. fabric (I can't remember exact cost, but we're talking pennies per sq ft for it). But they do work incredibly well, and since you don't have to pull out and replace gravel when it gets mucky as much, there will be some cost savings over time with that.

For me, the grids prevent my dig-to-China horses from digging, and that is worth every single penny. And we had probably 4 inches of rain over the past couple of days and the paddock with the grids stayed relatively dry.

NBChoice
Dec. 30, 2010, 01:35 PM
We have small runs attached to our stalls. Our horses have the option of being inside their stalls or going out into the run to get fresh air. They mostly choose to go outside. The runs are about 10x30 feet. They work really well for us. The doors going out into the runs can also be shut halfway or shut completely in case of severe weather. My mare doesn't like being shut in completely though, so this is rarely used. :D

SkipHiLad4me
Dec. 30, 2010, 02:04 PM
I have Hoof-Grid installed in my paddocks -- same sort of plastic snap together grid system as the Grassy Pavers. There is also another version called Stable-Grid that you might check into as I think the US distributor might be in your area.

The grids are significantly more expensive to put in than the fabric, at least when you look at the cost of grids (mine were $2/sq ft) vs. fabric (I can't remember exact cost, but we're talking pennies per sq ft for it). But they do work incredibly well, and since you don't have to pull out and replace gravel when it gets mucky as much, there will be some cost savings over time with that.

For me, the grids prevent my dig-to-China horses from digging, and that is worth every single penny. And we had probably 4 inches of rain over the past couple of days and the paddock with the grids stayed relatively dry.

Thanks for this info :yes:

Dalemma
Dec. 31, 2010, 02:27 PM
Pictures are so helpful! Do you keep any of those wires hot? What type of fencing (brand) is it? I just ask, because I see they share fencelines.

TIA!!

The perimeter fencing is Electrobraid and the interior fencing is electric tape......and yes it is hot 24/7 only turn it off to do repairs.

Electrobraid is not recommended for interior fencing unless you use 12' alley ways to separate.

I use the tape for interior as they do occassionally get fighting over the fence and the tape breaks before it does any damage to the horse.


Dalemma

Touchstone Farm
Jan. 1, 2011, 10:00 PM
Ours our 15' x 50' -- the one on each end of the barn is a bit wider. I like them the size they are. The only thing I wish we had done was over-hangs because the rain and snow do blow in. But overall, I wouldn't set up my barn any other way! (For most of the horses, the stalls stay cleaner too, but it means picking out the paddock to keep it clean and manure-free...but shavings last longer.)

slantedhorse
Jan. 2, 2011, 11:33 AM
For those with overhangs and for that matter paddocks off the barn. How do you keep the horses from eating/damaging the barn. Which way do they face? South?east? If the doors are open. Are there more flies in the summer due to increased light? Cold breeze in the winter?

Dalemma
Jan. 2, 2011, 12:15 PM
For those with overhangs and for that matter paddocks off the barn. How do you keep the horses from eating/damaging the barn. Which way do they face? South?east? If the doors are open. Are there more flies in the summer due to increased light? Cold breeze in the winter?

As you can see by my picture my barn is sided with old shakes....to stop the chewing I simply ran 4 rows of electric tape on the building.....did it in nice even rows so it does not look bad.

The only thing I wished I had done is put in big over hangs....I have one stall that has its doorway right in the path of the prevailing winds but the horse can still tuck itself around the corner of a wall to get out of the wind......the other stalls are fine because of the way the face........I don't have any big issues with flies because of my manure management practices and I also have fans in each stall for those hot days in the summer.

Dalemma

horsepoor
Jan. 2, 2011, 01:21 PM
For those with overhangs and for that matter paddocks off the barn. How do you keep the horses from eating/damaging the barn. Which way do they face? South?east? If the doors are open. Are there more flies in the summer due to increased light? Cold breeze in the winter?

My overhangs are on the west side of my barn. Winds are from the east here, so we specifically located the stall doors and overhang on the opposite side to give them some protection from the wind.

I have board and bat siding and would not do that if I did it again -- the retired horse didn't do any damage, but the youngsters all found the bats (about 1x2 inch) were just perfect to chew on. We spray with no chew stuff and that helps, but finishing the barn with something smooth on that side would have been better. On corners, like on the overhang support posts and doorways, etc., I have heavy duty plastic corner covers that I got from Farmtek and those have worked well to keep them from chewing. Others use metal, but I hate the metal as it always rusts or has points/edges, so I went with the plastic.

I don't ever have a fly problem in the barn, maybe because we are diligent in manure management and use fly predators in the summer. The sun is up high that time of year, so the overhang really provides a little shelter for the barn to keep the sun out -- kind of like the brim of the hat, if that makes sense. Similar design thought went in to our house (shaded in summer, open more in winter when sun is low).