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View Full Version : Anyone have an opinion on HOSE NOZZLES?



JoZ
Dec. 23, 2010, 11:22 PM
Another "ZOMG! You'll never need another hose nozzle in your lifetime!" hose nozzle just bit the dust. Honestly? I'm glad to see it go. It reminds me of (stay with me here, at least the older folks) Meatloaf's song Paradise by the Dashboard Light... "so now I'm waiting for the end of time, to hurry up and arrive, cuz if I gotta spend another minute with you I don't think that I could really survive..."

Yes I have had a beer or two, why do you ask?

Anyway... I need a new one. My requirements are simple. Turn on. Shut off. Require minimal effort to do those two things. Stay on so I can leave it in the bucket/trough and go do something else (and forget about it and flood the barn). Keep the same stream if I leave it on -- don't want to come back and find that it has become a wide spritz that is showering a big arc around the buckets. Last more than a week.

What type do you use? This is for the barn hose with which I do all of the stall watering, so lots of on-off-on-off multiple times a day. TIA.

CobJockey
Dec. 23, 2010, 11:34 PM
Equine studies grad here, at the College all of the hoses had this type of on/off valve. (http://www.aquastarym.com/images/20142.gif) Because of the way the program worked, they were on and off probably 30 times a day every day, used for exactly what you use yours for. The plastic ones weren't reliable, but the metal ones with the big switch never gave out. Open the valve, water comes out and the stream never changes, close the valve and nothing comes out. The simpler the item, the less chances it has to break IMO!

Beentheredonethat
Dec. 23, 2010, 11:43 PM
Like the picture above, use a simple BRASS nozzle. I can't tell you how many I've bought that broke. A brass one costs about $8 versus $2, but lasts about 5,000 times longer. Always buy straight brass.

JillCozza
Dec. 24, 2010, 12:42 AM
get those for sure
I was a zoo keeper for 5 years and we used our nozzles all the time, we actually carried our own with us. I loved the brass ones, and you can buy a cone that attacheds to it if you like.

JoZ
Dec. 24, 2010, 12:58 AM
Really? I've had that kind in plastic: not impressed. I think we may have had it in brass already too -- and the lever broke. I'll reconsider though.

By the way, in case anyone is tempted, these aren't even close to "ultimate" (http://www.amazon.com/Bon-Aire-Original-Ultimate-Nozzle-Aluminum/dp/B0001L0DFA)...

Calvincrowe
Dec. 24, 2010, 01:16 AM
Get the best brass nozzle you can find, simple on/off. I've used mine daily for 7 years, and the only thing I've had to do is tighten the screw holding the little lever a couple of times. Nothing fancy, nothing plastic, keep it simple. It has frozen, been stepped on by horses, run over by full wheelbarrows, been dropped on the concrete floor and it looks like new.

Tom King
Dec. 24, 2010, 08:00 AM
For washing horses, the one that looks like this one made by Gilmour and available in big box stores. I did a search for the Gilmour one and couldn't find it, so it might not be available any more. This Bosch one should be even better.

http://www.google.com/products/catalog?hl=en&q=firehose+nozzle&rlz=1W1ADRA_en&wrapid=tlif12931953827341&um=1&ie=UTF-8&cid=2009157345630003700&ei=jJgUTZD-FoWKlwfQxemcDA&sa=X&oi=product_catalog_result&ct=result&resnum=12&ved=0CFAQ8wIwCw#

I like the pistol grip style of these better than the straight on the end of the hose style. The straight ones cost a few bucks less, but they are not as comfortable to hold and the twist to off is not intuitive, plus you have to go back through hard stream to off. The big lever on this one works well without having to think about it.

These need real water flow of something over 6 or 7 gpm and a 3/4" hose to work well. I have no use for the little ones.

If I was going to use one on the end of a hose to fill buckets up, I would use some version of a long handled ball valve and probably upsize from the 3/4" hose to a !" ball valve. Anything smaller than the inside diameter of the hose, even something like a quick disconnect fitting, significantly slows up water flow.
http://www.amazon.com/Mueller-107-755HC-1-Ball-Valve/dp/B001D0VQHW Ball valves should last longer than any other valve since the good ones are rated for gases like Propane and Natural Gas. Plus they are really easy to use even with heavy gloves on. By upsizing to a larger ball valve than the hose I.D., it would not only keep flow up, but cut down on pressure for the same volume so the water would stay in the bucket and not spray back on you. It would have to be adapted to hose threads, but by going up in size the inside of the adaptor wouldn't decrease flow.

cyndi
Dec. 24, 2010, 10:02 AM
Like the picture above, use a simple BRASS nozzle. I can't tell you how many I've bought that broke. A brass one costs about $8 versus $2, but lasts about 5,000 times longer. Always buy straight brass.

DITTO.

goeslikestink
Dec. 24, 2010, 10:55 AM
Another "ZOMG! You'll never need another hose nozzle in your lifetime!" hose nozzle just bit the dust. Honestly? I'm glad to see it go. It reminds me of (stay with me here, at least the older folks) Meatloaf's song Paradise by the Dashboard Light... "so now I'm waiting for the end of time, to hurry up and arrive, cuz if I gotta spend another minute with you I don't think that I could really survive..."

Yes I have had a beer or two, why do you ask?

Anyway... I need a new one. My requirements are simple. Turn on. Shut off. Require minimal effort to do those two things. Stay on so I can leave it in the bucket/trough and go do something else (and forget about it and flood the barn). Keep the same stream if I leave it on -- don't want to come back and find that it has become a wide spritz that is showering a big arc around the buckets. Last more than a week.

What type do you use? This is for the barn hose with which I do all of the stall watering, so lots of on-off-on-off multiple times a day. TIA.

you can get values for hose pipes like this
http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&source=web&cd=1&sqi=2&ved=0CB8QFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.hozelock.com%2Fwatering%2Fhos e-fittings%2Fconnect-to-tap.html&rct=j&q=hozelock%20hose%20pipe%20tap%20valves&ei=bcIUTeqiCMawhQecxrW3Dg&usg=AFQjCNGqfD9iSqzuwCKF-wWH_XfAal_Beg&sig2=6b1AH9Xo226c5k0wzfKP5g&cad=rja

lorilu
Dec. 24, 2010, 11:54 AM
simple brass adjustable nozzle with turn off "switch" as described above.

Just don't try to force it if it is frozen and you think it should have thawed by now.

L

bludejavu
Dec. 24, 2010, 12:15 PM
I have discovered over the years that nothing holds up for any length of time to hired help and a concrete floor.:lol: I purchased the expensive brass ones only to have the barn help accidentally drop the hose and the on/off lever would break in an instant. My husband finally bought a zinc one with a large plastic on/off valve. I'm the only one using it as I don't have any barn help now and so far it's lasted a year and held up to hot and cold water flowing thru it. This one is a bit unusual as it has a larger on/off switch than any I've seen, making it very easy to use. I never liked the brass ones that simply twist on because you have to put up with a second or two of wide spray before you can adjust enough to get a stream.

My present hose valve: http://www.castlewholesalers.com/GILMOUR-05V-Zinc-Hose-Shut-OffValve-Single.html

deltawave
Dec. 24, 2010, 01:08 PM
You can buy the heavy brass ones and they last a couple of years. Or you can buy six of the normal ones, each of which lasts six months, and come out even. :) I do the latter method so if I wind up hating the one I have, I just wait till it dies and try a different style! ;)

alto
Dec. 24, 2010, 04:45 PM
Lee Valley

http://www.leevalley.com/US/garden/page.aspx?p=44680&cat=2,2280,33160&ap=3

Mali
Dec. 25, 2010, 03:48 AM
Lee Valley

http://www.leevalley.com/US/garden/page.aspx?p=44680&cat=2,2280,33160&ap=3

Thanks for posting this link! I currently have a high flow shut off valve that has almost bit the dust. It looks like their shut off valve might be a good replacement! I hate the ones that limit the flow, as I save a considerable amount of time by having the high flow. I've been looking for a replacement for 4 months, but haven't been able to locate one!

2DogsFarm
Dec. 25, 2010, 03:44 PM
I like the adjustable ones with a range of settings.

Pistolgrip is easier to use one-handed as in filling buckets or hosing off a horse.

They are doomed to die within the year, so I just grab 2 of whatever TSC has in the $5 or Less bin.
That way I have a spare on hand when whatever stops working stops.

Equibrit
Dec. 25, 2010, 04:02 PM
One of these; http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1vZ1xg1/R-100390562/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053

With one of these #K; http://www.mcmaster.com/#garden-hose-nozzles/=aazdxs

Mali
Dec. 25, 2010, 09:16 PM
[QUOTE=Equibrit;5302768]One of these; http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1vZ1xg1/R-100390562/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053


I bought one of those, used it less than 6 times and it broke (summertime and the on/off switch broke right off). I was so bummed! I took it back to HD and they gave me my money back, no questions asked.

bludejavu
Dec. 25, 2010, 10:42 PM
[quote=Equibrit;5302768]One of these; http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1vZ1xg1/R-100390562/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053


I bought one of those, used it less than 6 times and it broke (summertime and the on/off switch broke right off). I was so bummed! I took it back to HD and they gave me my money back, no questions asked.

I have two of those laying around. One started leaking a few months after purchase. I replaced the washer but it still leaked. I thought it was a fluke and because I liked the way it worked, I went and bought another one. A few months later, darn if it didn't start leaking too. I gave up and got something different.