PDA

View Full Version : Whats "liberty"?



dressagenoir
Dec. 22, 2010, 10:38 AM
I watched a couple videos. Just curious. Thought and opinions??? go!

netg
Dec. 22, 2010, 10:52 AM
A philosophy the foundation of which really lives in the Renaissance, from such writers as Thomas Hobbes and John Stuart Mill.


I assume you actually are asking about horses at liberty, but I don't understand what you're asking. What's free longeing? What's liberty for a horse who is constrained within human fences?

merrygoround
Dec. 22, 2010, 12:39 PM
Usually used at inspections when horse sans rider jumps a course of fences. Or a tackless horse is longed without a longeline in large open area. This is designed to show how the horse moves and acts without a rider.

Eclectic Horseman
Dec. 22, 2010, 01:44 PM
Some breed shows have "liberty classes." Arab and ASB, mostly I think but others may do it as well. The horse is released alone with just a halter on into a closed arena. The handler uses a stick with a plastic bag or some other object to encourage the horse to flag its tail and run around the arena.

I've seen it, but have no idea how it is judged.

asb_own_me
Dec. 22, 2010, 01:47 PM
Must be the Arab shows, because it's not a division in the ASB world. I've only ever seen a liberty class at multi-breed shows.

In response to the OP's question: A waste of time :D

Eclectic Horseman
Dec. 22, 2010, 01:49 PM
I wasn't sure myself- so I looked it up and really all I could find was this:

http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080323163549AAPIkWu

Looks like it is pretty much an Arabian thing. To me it sounds like a vet bill waiting to happen!

Found a description on a minature horse website:

LIBERTY CLASS The Liberty Class demonstrates the beauty and elegance of the style of movement that is natural to the particular miniature horse. Some miniatures may gallop wildly, buck, and rear, while others may go through various gaits including the canter. The selection of music should suit the style of the horse. The exhibitor and handler enter the ring with the horse. At the first sound of the music, the halter is removed by the exhibitor and the horse runs "free" in the arena demonstrating various gaits, or just trotting to the music. The exhibitor’s musical choice should be taped to end at exactly one and a half minutes. The exhibitor has exactly two minutes to catch and halter the horse. A handler may assist the exhibitor in the ring to keep the horse in motion but may not catch or halter the horse. Neither the exhibitor or the handler may touch the horse in any way during the performance. Shakers and whips are allowed but the must not touch the horse. Baiting to catch the horse is not permitted.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Yikes :eek:

asb_own_me
Dec. 22, 2010, 02:00 PM
To me it sounds like a vet bill waiting to happen!


:lol: LMAO :lol:

Too true!

SillyHorse
Dec. 22, 2010, 02:05 PM
The exhibitor has exactly two minutes to catch and halter the horse.
And if they can't catch it, I guess they shoot it. :lol:

alibi_18
Dec. 22, 2010, 02:21 PM
This is a liberty arab class freestyle!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j4DVczd5EUE

And this a miniature liberty freestyle class

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jPfXCIiQM1g

They look all 'greasy'! :D

Eclectic Horseman
Dec. 22, 2010, 02:29 PM
And if they can't catch it, I guess they shoot it. :lol:

:lol::lol::lol:


And "Baiting to catch the horse is not permitted."

I'm getting a visual of a carrot on the end of a fishing pole.

SmartAlex
Dec. 22, 2010, 03:52 PM
They have Liberty classes at some of our local shows (and yes, the Saddlebreds participate). When I get my lazy butt to a show I am for certain entering it since we do that sort of stuff at home all the time. My farrier said the last show of the season all they took was the hackney road pony, and entered him in the Liberty class. He said it was the most fun they'd had at a show all year.

ridingarts
Dec. 22, 2010, 04:09 PM
And if they can't catch it, I guess they shoot it. :lol:

OK that was funny! :yes::D

Arrows Endure
Dec. 22, 2010, 04:48 PM
I love liberty classes. I smile every time I have the opportunity to watch and/or participate in them. There is nothing better than watching a horse do what it does best. I have never seen a horse injured in a liberty class.

My young guy is half arab. He's done one liberty class at a show, and both he and I had a blast. Most horses in the liberty classes are very easy to catch. Put down the stick, go get 'em. No problem at all.

InsideLeg2OutsideRein
Dec. 22, 2010, 06:47 PM
What is the horse judged on in the liberty classes? Gaits? Attitude/Showiness? (Sorry, ignorant...)

dressagenoir
Dec. 23, 2010, 10:09 AM
I think this is what I'm talking about....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zJ8XTXpd0BU

I recently met a woman who does "classical" dressage... ie dresses in costumes. (I guess I always thought classical dressage was a little more Klimke and a little less ren. fair)

....anyway, she was saying her horse was liberty trained and clicker trained. So I was wondering what exactly the liberty training was.

ridingarts
Dec. 23, 2010, 10:25 AM
I think this is what I'm talking about....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zJ8XTXpd0BU

I recently met a woman who does "classical" dressage... ie dresses in costumes. (I guess I always thought classical dressage was a little more Klimke and a little less ren. fair)

....anyway, she was saying her horse was liberty trained and clicker trained. So I was wondering what exactly the liberty training was.

All kidding aside... often liberty acts will be a part of Arabian Nights or Medieval Times performances. The Cavalia show which toured the U.S. last year had some super liberty work - the video linked below is of Frederic Pignon, who was formerly with Cavalia. He does some beautiful liberty work. A lot of the good liberty horses are trick-trained, and have a pretty impressive repertoire.

A number of the Hollywood horse trainers also did / do liberty training with their horses, as there will be times in movies where the horses will need to work tackless. Remember the Black Stallion, and the scenes on the beach, etc? Cass Ole was 'liberty trained' to do that work.

Here's Frederic: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w1YO3j-Zh3g

Hope that helps a bit!

Petstorejunkie
Dec. 23, 2010, 10:41 AM
Liberty training is more commonly practiced with performance (as in "on a stage", not "judged") horses than what you typically see entering the ring at your local competition.
With horses being primarily visual learners liberty work is a means of communication that a horse is used to communicating with others.
Think of "at liberty" to mean something similar to NH round penning except sans carrot waving idiot and pointless communications. I do take a chip of offense when someone sees me doing liberty work and then asks what clinician I follow, but I can understand why they could be confused. The others at the barn call my liberty work "getting inside their head"

I have a friend that performs and every horse she starts spends their first year at liberty. I don't spend quite that much, but I find it VERY useful with the rehab work that I do. With my current project we spent the first month at liberty in a 20x40m arena. He went from having to be heavily drugged to be handled to now teaching up down lessons in a span of about 4 months.

If you have further questions, feel free to PM me.