PDA

View Full Version : Slowing down a trot!



victorian24
Dec. 18, 2010, 07:02 PM
My mare is very green, and has a major fast trot and a nice slow trot. How do I keep her in the slow contained trot?

She has so much energy, and I have to lunge her for 30min just to be able to expend her energy levels, and to get her emotions under control.

Once on her, she gets lazy, but with a crop she is right back up to wanting to canter, or trot way to fast. So without the crop she has a hard time picking up any trot.

I am working inside a 60ft round pen....really looking for some great suggestions. I will try anything to help her stop riding with her emotions and start thinking. She has gotten so much better with thinking, but still I can see her emotions rise back up into it...

Petstorejunkie
Dec. 18, 2010, 07:23 PM
1. your ipod is your friend. rating is controlled by the rider, but controlling it is kind of like running down hill when you were a kid.... sometimes it's easier just to speed up and go with it. hence why rating your horse seems so hard. ideally you want to find music that has the exact rhythm of her trot that you want. play it either on headphones, or a stereo near the RP and focus on the music. I actually have different playlists for different horses and their "workouts"
2. do you have somewhere other than the RP to work her? other than spiraling in and out, and a few figure eights there isn't that much else you can do in 60ft, and i'm betting some of that hotness/laziness is boredom.
3. sing. see option 1

RLF
Dec. 18, 2010, 07:46 PM
I agree that YOU need to control the speed with your seat- and music can really help you with this...but I am going to go one step further and say that your mare sounds like she needs the basic understanding of transitions and rythem vs stride length.

I also wonder if by faster/slower trot you are talking about rythem or length of stride or power of impulsion... lol ...And not seeing what you mean I am imagining in my own mind the difference between a typical 'western' jog and a fast, medium trot, maybe unbalanced?

I'm not sure how much I can describe here, but I would start with her in the walk and use your seat to ask for a short, medium, and long stride in the walk (Transitions within that gait) and if she tries to trot, gently remind her to walk by blocking her trot movement with your seat and stretch your shouders upward while settling your seat deeper into the saddle, while maintaining motion to signal a walk gait.
When you are ready to ask her to trot, stretch upward with some additional weight into your stirrups and just think trot. Once she is trotting you can ask for the same short, medium, and longer strides in the trot. Maintain the same rythem in all stride lengths.
She needs to understand that a transition to a new gait is not asking her to merely go faster, or slower (trot or walk) but you are asking her to CHANGE the sequence of her footfall. In order to communicate this you need to be very aware of your position in the saddle and be deliberate in your movements.
IF she moves with you, she will find harmony. If she moves against you, she will experience disharmony- which is not pleasant and creates pressure for her.

Soon you will be able to ask for the slower trot in your seat and she will follow your lead in order to maintain harmony.

Resist the urge to let her transition to the trot in a fast trot and use your reins to bring her back- make sure in all transitions you are LEADING her and making it clear what you are asking for... If she answers you incorrectly, do not try to force her into it, go back to the walk and make it clear there..then try it in the trot.

This excersize actually has many many steps to it, and is hard to explain here- but hopefully you have gotten something from this!

I also think this excersize will help you communicate with your seat and hopefully bypass the crop- from your description it sounds like the crop merely 'wakes her up' but the actual communication isn't there...

I will pm you because there is so much more! lol

Good luck with her! Sometimes it seems overwhelming with a greeny, but if you stick to the basics she will start to get it...

victorian24
Dec. 18, 2010, 07:48 PM
I am def. going to be bringing out the radio. I listen to my ipod now when I ride, but I would rather have it through the radio.

We are building our arena so all I have is a roundpen for 30more days. :-)

Should I keep lunging her?

the place that broke her and rode her for 6-7weeks, said it took him about 30min to get her to focus on what he was asking her to do.
When I did this with-in 10min she was focusing on me instead of looking out.

victorian24
Dec. 18, 2010, 07:50 PM
I agree that YOU need to control the speed with your seat- and music can really help you with this...but I am going to go one step further and say that your mare sounds like she needs the basic understanding of transitions and rythem vs stride length.

I also wonder if by faster/slower trot you are talking about rythem or length of stride or power of impulsion... lol ...And not seeing what you mean I am imagining in my own mind the difference between a typical 'western' jog and a fast, medium trot, maybe unbalanced?

I'm not sure how much I can describe here, but I would start with her in the walk and use your seat to ask for a short, medium, and long stride in the walk (Transitions within that gait) and if she tries to trot, gently remind her to walk by blocking her trot movement with your seat and stretch your shouders upward while settling your seat deeper into the saddle, while maintaining motion to signal a walk gait.
When you are ready to ask her to trot, stretch upward with some additional weight into your stirrups and just think trot. Once she is trotting you can ask for the same short, medium, and longer strides in the trot. Maintain the same rythem in all stride lengths.
She needs to understand that a transition to a new gait is not asking her to merely go faster, or slower (trot or walk) but you are asking her to CHANGE the sequence of her footfall. In order to communicate this you need to be very aware of your position in the saddle and be deliberate in your movements.
IF she moves with you, she will find harmony. If she moves against you, she will experience disharmony- which is not pleasant and creates pressure for her.

Soon you will be able to ask for the slower trot in your seat and she will follow your lead in order to maintain harmony.

Resist the urge to let her transition to the trot in a fast trot and use your reins to bring her back- make sure in all transitions you are LEADING her and making it clear what you are asking for... If she answers you incorrectly, do not try to force her into it, go back to the walk and make it clear there..then try it in the trot.

This excersize actually has many many steps to it, and is hard to explain here- but hopefully you have gotten something from this!

I also think this excersize will help you communicate with your seat and hopefully bypass the crop- from your description it sounds like the crop merely 'wakes her up' but the actual communication isn't there...

I will pm you because there is so much more! lol

Good luck with her! Sometimes it seems overwhelming with a greeny, but if you stick to the basics she will start to get it...

I am awaiting your PM...I am printing this out so I can keep going over it in my head.

Thank you for being so encouraging :D

Valentina_32926
Dec. 20, 2010, 10:46 AM
For green horses I regulate their tempo by singing jingle bells at the speed I want them to trot - then posting to that "Jingle Bell" speed. Even if the horse is trotting 500 MPH you keep posting at 5 mph and eventually horse will match your tempo. The singing helps (espeecially green horses) to hear the expected tempo and match it to your posting.

Deepinmanure
Dec. 20, 2010, 11:05 AM
For green horses I regulate their tempo by singing jingle bells at the speed I want them to trot - then posting to that "Jingle Bell" speed. Even if the horse is trotting 500 MPH you keep posting at 5 mph and eventually horse will match your tempo. The singing helps (espeecially green horses) to hear the expected tempo and match it to your posting.

That's funny...I used to sing 'Jingle Bells " while I trotted my "greenie" years ago. You brought back memories.

May I put my 2 cents in as far as rhythm in the trot?.
When you are longing your horse make sure that his trot is in the rhythm that you want when you are riding the working trot.Horses get used to routines and trotting "in rhythm" will become routine for him if you are consistant in your training longeing or riding.:)

ThreeFigs
Dec. 20, 2010, 11:17 AM
Yes, YOU control the speed & rhythm through your seat. Post sloooow -- I tell students to sit down as if their bottom is sore -- sit slooowly.

The spirals in & out are a good idea. Ride smaller circles if your youngster can handle them. Smaller circles help slow & focus the horse. 12 or 15 Meter circles -- 10's might be too much yet. Determine to ride a smaller circle at every compass point, then continue to the next compass point, ride a smaller circle, etc.

Sometimes it's hard to see the forest for the trees when riding a greenie. Remember to sit tall -- and sit even taller when you're asking for slow or a down transition. Lift that sternum!

Ride lots of transitions from trot to walk BEFORE she gets up a head of steam and goes chugging around the RP at full speed. She'll figure it out and transitions are another way to get her to focus.

Work on your own core strength. It helps your ability to implement half-halts (and therefore speed control) with your seat alone.

ACP
Dec. 20, 2010, 12:14 PM
I will add that you might want to develop a voice command to slow down any gait. When you lunge, your body language will influence your horse.

Head up, shoulders back, chest up, eyes on the horse, body square to the horse, leading hand with the lunge line out away from your body, whip hand out away from your body, not turning but walking in a bit of a circle with big steps = GO to a horse.

If you drop your head, shoulders, chest, look down, turn a bit sideways [shoulder to the horse, not chest], hands close to the body, pivot in place = SLOW to a horse.

Add the word "Easy" in a sing-song tone of voice with a lot of extra vowels, and a downward inflection, not crisp as in "Walk On" or "Trrrooottt".

Once you have developed the voice command you can use it to reinforce your aids. This will help teach her to relax.

Smart horses pick up on body language and tone of voice very quickly.

ise@ssl
Dec. 20, 2010, 12:18 PM
If you are working in a rising trot - SIT LONGER. Stay behind her trot and use your weight to shift her onto her hind legs. Wait for the saddle to push you up and stay close to the saddle.

ToN Farm
Dec. 20, 2010, 12:35 PM
Maybe because she is half PasoFino she will not be able to have a slow, floaty trot.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SYWXfhwTNzM&feature=related

kdmiddleton
Dec. 20, 2010, 12:48 PM
One more suggestion to try in addition to the others, and depending on the situation. If you are finding that you are not able to regulate the trot or the horse keeps speeding up on you dispite best efforts, make her trot a 10 m circle (or smaller depending) with bending and inside flexion. This will make the horse think of something else other than moving forward fast and on the forehand. Continue on straight and if the horse speeds up again dispite regulating with the seat, put her into another smalll circle. This also helps with getting them more engaged on the hind end, and makes the horse more willing to listen to the aids as they are expecting another command.

InsideLeg2OutsideRein
Dec. 20, 2010, 01:05 PM
Ha, I had the same issue with my green mare! :) My lessons were built around exaggerating the down phase of the posting (like a full body half halt), also doing the "spiral in, spiral out" exercise made her have to pay some attention to me... And a lot of it was just insisting, going in with the mindset that she CAN and WILL do it, not that she is a baby and doesn't know any better ;). I also tend to keep her very busy with lots of changes of direction and transitions. Putting the flash on also made a big difference for the stability of the bit. Make sure you keep your leg ON, it's a natural tendency to want to try to keep your legs off her. Keeping your legs on is essential to give you access to her body.

victorian24
Dec. 20, 2010, 02:06 PM
Maybe because she is half PasoFino she will not be able to have a slow, floaty trot.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SYWXfhwTNzM&feature=related

I was first thinking this as well, but she does slow down, and even when she is fast, its not a trot like in the video, its much more extended. After we have rode for awhile and she is more focused she will go into a slow trot, perfect with my rythem.

victorian24
Dec. 20, 2010, 02:09 PM
I will posting a video of her in the roundpen later today :-)

carolprudm
Dec. 20, 2010, 02:51 PM
Ride lots of transitions from trot to walk BEFORE she gets up a head of steam and goes chugging around the RP at full speed. She'll figure it out and transitions are another way to get her to focus.

Work on your own core strength. It helps your ability to implement half-halts (and therefore speed control) with your seat alone.
This

I could never get the concept of sitting longer until I stopped thinking of sticking my bottom to the saddle but instead resisted the rise by engaging my hip flexors. Traditional crunches don't do much to strengthen them, leg lifts work better.

When you can ride in a straight line try caveletti. She will have to think about what she's doing rather than just zip along.

The downside to lunging a horse to let her blow off steam is that it will start to take longer and longer to blow off steam as she gets fitter and fitter

goeslikestink
Dec. 20, 2010, 02:58 PM
Yes, YOU control the speed & rhythm through your seat. Post sloooow -- I tell students to sit down as if their bottom is sore -- sit slooowly.

The spirals in & out are a good idea. Ride smaller circles if your youngster can handle them. Smaller circles help slow & focus the horse. 12 or 15 Meter circles -- 10's might be too much yet. Determine to ride a smaller circle at every compass point, then continue to the next compass point, ride a smaller circle, etc.

Sometimes it's hard to see the forest for the trees when riding a greenie. Remember to sit tall -- and sit even taller when you're asking for slow or a down transition. Lift that sternum!

Ride lots of transitions from trot to walk BEFORE she gets up a head of steam and goes chugging around the RP at full speed. She'll figure it out and transitions are another way to get her to focus.

Work on your own core strength. It helps your ability to implement half-halts (and therefore speed control) with your seat alone.


this and if it was me as we dont round pen in uk

i would rahter teach ahorse to go straight as then they are more forward and are able to balance themselves a lot easier

go here fr helpful tips read all of page one i also explain how to do the hh and how to do this with a new horse or a youngster than doesnt know
any new strides are always done in walk 1st
http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/showthread.php?t=178116

also rtry to ride between leg and hand and indepedant seat dont relay on your crop for a faster movement if you was my student i take it away and make you use you seat and legs and keep of the head end

Perfect Pony
Dec. 20, 2010, 03:00 PM
The downside to lunging a horse to let her blow off steam is that it will start to take longer and longer to blow off steam as she gets fitter and fitter

Totally agree, you may be actually working against your best interests relying on lunging before you ride. Some sensitive horses actually just get riled up, then you end up lunging more and more, and the horse becomes more fit. Maybe try doing low key groundwork to get your horse listening, then get on.

mbm
Dec. 20, 2010, 09:33 PM
i am going to slightly disagree with PP and Beasmom. I have a very hot/energetic and forward horse. lunging her before i ride is what allows her to focus, burn some energy, get the kinks out and be ready to be ridden.

i have never found that i needed more time - in fact i ended up needing less because she learned to focus and be drivable sooner.... when i first started lunging her way back when i complained to my trainer that she would just get more fit.... he just shook his head at me... lol.... and he proved to be right.

also, for a horse that is very emotional,doing lots of transition scan really rev them up. i have had great success with circles and bended lines... but keeping the curves to a degree the horse can balance on and not get out of balance because that tends to set them off and make them go faster.

serpentines are great because of the change in direction.

i learned with my mare when she was young to just count 1,2,1,2,1,2 and to this day if i count she will immediately match my count ...

also if she is paso there is inherent tendencies that may not be possible to counteract.

angel
Dec. 20, 2010, 10:21 PM
I'm going to agree with mbm. Lunging a greenie meanie is the best thing you can do for them until they reach a point you have their attention. It is so much better to let them fight against themselves on the lunge, than for you to have to have a running battle that you are forced to win. Winning battles is not really productive if you must escalate the force of the riding in order to do so.

I am also going to agree with TonF. I see a Paso running gait in that video. You might do better to find a Paso trainer and get his/her opinion about your options. This horse might be happier as a gaited horse.

ToN Farm
Dec. 20, 2010, 10:53 PM
Angel, that video I put up was not of the OP's horse. It was just a random Paso video to show how quickly their natural trot is. I apologize if that confused people.

I have had some hotter horses in the past, but I have never owned a horse that I had to lunge before riding. That includes babies I started. I have lunged to train them to voice aids, but that was the extent of it. I think if they are turned out, lunging shouldn't be needed. Of course, that is jmho.

Also, I think it is really hard on a horse's joints to lunge in a circle the size of a round pen. If you can move with them on long straight lines, that would be better.

I find the most calming exercise is just to walk on a long rein. If a horse is always so wired that he can't do that, I probably wouldn't put any more time into him.

mbm
Dec. 20, 2010, 11:11 PM
lol! back in the day i lunged my mare because i would rather she leap and buck without me on her, and i could settle her and get her to use her back - all without me in the saddle :)

there are various other reasons we chose to lunge her, but in the end it worked for her. :)

and i dont use round pens and i lunge the entire width of the arena and travel...

eta: wired has nothing to do with it... lol!

ThreeFigs
Dec. 21, 2010, 12:50 AM
OP has mentioned that all she has right now is a round pen. The suggestions I made had that in mind.

In a perfect world, yes, she'd have a standard arena to work in. Given that she does not, we make suggestions to fit the working area she has available.

I am eager to see videos of the horse in question. I don't know any Paso crosses in dressage, but other gaited crosses have had success in this discipline. Many years ago, there was a fellow with a TWH cross who did well at the higher levels.

Maybe someone here remembers him? He was on the cover of the old Dressage & CT magazine a long time ago. The horse had a short three letter name as I recall. Ubu, Odo, Bo, something like that...

If the Paso side comes through strong, there may be issues. If not, and the gaits are of good quality, the papers make no difference. Anyway, dressage is supposed to benefit ANY horse, right?

Perhaps the OP doesn't care if the gaits are "pure" enough for show -- just wants suggestions to quiet her horse's gaits. That's training. That's dressage.

Perfect Pony
Dec. 21, 2010, 12:52 AM
The OP is lunging the horse to the point of exhaustion, in her own words "30 minutes" until when she gets on she has to use a whip to get the horse to trot.

There are plenty of times in life I have stuck a horse on a lunge line for a couple minutes if I truly thought the horse needed it, but if I had a horse I thought I needed to lunge for 30 minutes every time I got on I would seriously either re-evaluate my program with the horse, or move the horse on to another owner.

ThreeFigs
Dec. 21, 2010, 01:14 AM
Whoa! How did I overlook the 30 minutes of lungeing? That's a lot of lungeing. You have a point, PP!

netg
Dec. 21, 2010, 08:03 AM
I am eager to see videos of the horse in question. I don't know any Paso crosses in dressage, but other gaited crosses have had success in this discipline. Many years ago, there was a fellow with a TWH cross who did well at the higher levels.

Cyndi Jackson reached I-1 with her TWH/QH cross. (I believe they started out eventing through prelim if I remember correctly.)
http://www.tothemaxdressage.com/about.html


I agree that 30 minutes of longeing is excessive. When I first got my horse I longed him daily to help build fitness and get him alert and ready to go, not to try to wear him down. If a horse really needs wearing down (versus getting out the bucks) there's something wrong with the program.

victorian24
Dec. 21, 2010, 09:59 AM
Just to point out real quick, we have stopped the lunging of 30min. I was doing it on advice from the trainer who broke her :( So I am only lunging about 10min then we are riding the rest!

Here is a small video of just her in the roundpen. My mom couldn't come so I didn't take one of her undersaddle. This is just canter, trot, and walking.
My camera has a huge spot in it, Sorry for that :( Time to buy a new one..)



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=flAY7k0sHkU

carolprudm
Dec. 21, 2010, 10:17 AM
.

I am eager to see videos of the horse in question. I don't know any Paso crosses in dressage, but other gaited crosses have had success in this discipline. Many years ago, there was a fellow with a TWH cross who did well at the higher levels.

.

FWIW, I used to ride a Paso X ? He could have passed for a Welsh except he was a TERRIBLE jumper

victorian24
Dec. 21, 2010, 10:19 AM
Plus she is not gaited at all.....

victorian24
Dec. 21, 2010, 10:24 AM
The OP is lunging the horse to the point of exhaustion, in her own words "30 minutes" until when she gets on she has to use a whip to get the horse to trot.

There are plenty of times in life I have stuck a horse on a lunge line for a couple minutes if I truly thought the horse needed it, but if I had a horse I thought I needed to lunge for 30 minutes every time I got on I would seriously either re-evaluate my program with the horse, or move the horse on to another owner.

This was per a John Lyons Certified Trainer, about the lunging. I as the owner have stopped the 30min of lunging...so please pass on the rude comments. I am just trying to better my horse, hence why I asked.

Perfect Pony
Dec. 21, 2010, 10:26 AM
Awe, I just love her, she looks like a doll and actually does have nice gaits. She looks done in that video at about 20 seconds in.

I don't know, I think you just are a little over your head here or are trying to do too much with her. Take a few steps back and a deep breath, and start working more at the walk, with just short bits of trot, and quiet transitions. It's hard to tell what you are doing on her back to get her riled up, but in that roundpen video she looks like a sweet little mare who doesn't even want to go.

victorian24
Dec. 21, 2010, 10:50 AM
Awe, I just love her, she looks like a doll and actually does have nice gaits. She looks done in that video at about 20 seconds in.

I don't know, I think you just are a little over your head here or are trying to do too much with her. Take a few steps back and a deep breath, and start working more at the walk, with just short bits of trot, and quiet transitions. It's hard to tell what you are doing on her back to get her riled up, but in that roundpen video she looks like a sweet little mare who doesn't even want to go.


Thank you for your opinion, I for one can say I am not over my head with her, she just likes to run. so we are working on walking and trotting only. This was just a video to show you huys what she looks like. We do have alot of work ahead of us, but we are a team, and we are staying together. We are working on walking and just calming down with picking up trots then returning to walking.

I am looking into her bit, to see if thats the case, because w/out the bit she is fine.

I do appreciate all the advice on her from everyone...:yes:

victorian24
Dec. 21, 2010, 10:53 AM
I could not get the sound to be downloaded.

However when she is cantering, I am asking for a trot and saying easy big girl. thats why she is only cantering for a few seconds. I do not have a whip on her, and I am just using the tone of my voice. I will try to get a better video of her walking and just trotting.

mbm
Dec. 21, 2010, 11:16 AM
cute mare.

to me it looks like the typical horse made to be run off its feet. she is unbalanced, fearful, unsure etc.

because of all that you need to go back to the beginning and get this mare to relax and have some confidence.

i would put her in side reins.... long.... and put a lunge line on her (no more round penning) and work on walk/trot only just getting her to go slow.... you want her to stretch down/out and round over her topline... only then can she relax and only then can you sit on her.

if you sit on her s she is it will hurt her.

it should only take one lesson on the lunge to get her to change her way of going.

if you are interested in dressage then you will need to find a more dressage type trainer to work with... eventers are great too :)

and completely off topic - but this is a good example of what i dont like sending horses to non dressage type people to start. just too different.

netg
Dec. 21, 2010, 11:21 AM
Just to point out real quick, we have stopped the lunging of 30min. I was doing it on advice from the trainer who broke her :( So I am only lunging about 10min then we are riding the rest!

Here is a small video of just her in the roundpen. My mom couldn't come so I didn't take one of her undersaddle. This is just canter, trot, and walking.
My camera has a huge spot in it, Sorry for that :( Time to buy a new one..)



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=flAY7k0sHkU

She's much more suited to dressage than I expected! I only see Paso in the shape of her neck and croup, but wouldn't have guessed her breeding on my own.

Is she a little downhill in build? Hard to tell from the video. She's a cute little mover who is very willing to bend her hocks, so it likely wouldn't be the kind of problem it could be with a horse who won't bend in the hind joints even if she is. (Sorry if you already say that in this thread - I don't remember all the posts from reading it last night!)

I think in saying you may be a little over your head PP was saying you should see if you can get help from a trainer, not that you should get rid of the horse. It sounds as if you could benefit from a few lessons on another horse so you can practice using your body to slow the horse, while you have a trainer ride her a few times to teach her to do the same. It's a lesson which will improve your seat and riding drastically, and really should help the relationship the two of you have.

It's very possible your bit is bothering her, but more likely she's just green and unbalanced. Lack of balance is exaggerated by having the weight of a rider on their back, and makes a horse rush at times. I'd rather have rushing than bucking or rearing any day!

Good luck with her - she is a cutie!

Eklecktika
Dec. 21, 2010, 11:36 AM
She's really cute! I like her a lot.

Does she really work/chomp/grate on the bit? She reminds me of a very sensitive QH mare that I had for several years-super light sided and a mouth like warm butter, but really needed a snaffle with a roller in it. I found a Myler snaffle with a small copper roller in the middle (which incidentally, has been well liked by every other horse Ive used it on!) Contact had to be insanely steady or she'd freak-toss her head, lose her back, get tense. She'd give you this horrible little trot-steps about 6 inches long, head up like a camel, HQ somewhere between here and Seattle.

She was one of several horses I've ridden that would get more and more wound up with longeing, and finally figured out that climbing on 'cold' and walking was plenty of warm up, and kept their brain together. Trotting...you could hear her winding up like a jet. Later, with her, I discovered that I could longe her, but needed to start with a walk, and insist that she walk on the line. I didn't have a round corral or arena to ride in. But, if we trotted, we had to walk again, lots of walk interspersed with different transitions, not just going round and round at her speed.

She'd walk like we were checking fence for the first little bit, then settle in and slow up a little bit. Once she did that, THEN we could go to work.

Looks as though you have a lovely place to ride-do you not trust her out of the pen yet? (completely understand, if that's the case) Can you ride in the grassy bit about 90* behind the car? (Crummy description but I got dizzy trying to figure out a better way to say it!:lol:)

I got more results out of her by going for a long, long walk-out, down the road and it was a lot like
walk
walk
walk
oh look a bird lets trot a few steps and then walk again
we'd baby-leg-yield or serpentine back and forth across the path when she thought she needed to jig instead of walk, or trotreallfast when I asked for a trot.
more walk, walk, walk
a little more trot

Emphasis on relaxing and paying attention at the same time-circles randomly, stopping and standing for a second or so, longer as she came along

Sitting up and tall was paramount-relax...breathe...think heavy pasta dough draped around her-any quick moves just make it stretch and get longer and heavier. She took loooooong, heavy, quiet legs.

ANY flub I made was reflected and magnified in her attitude. If she got excited and offered more than I wanted-more trot, whatever, I just sat still (up and back and down, if that makes sense) and didn't fight her-just be dead, heavy weight that's h a r d to pack around. Didn't scold or really correct, but really made a fuss when she was good-to the point of hopping off and ungirthing for a minute if she really outdid herself. Even very green, she was super sensitive to weight and legs-she was hard to ride, because everything had to be in place.

You couldn't discourage the forward, just redirect it.

You've a ton of things to try-just remember-this too shall pass. If you DO have a good trainer, a few lessons wouldn't hurt, an educated pair of eyes on the ground is worth every penny.

cuatx55
Dec. 21, 2010, 11:45 AM
why exactly do you want to "slow her down"? She's nicely forward, not tripping, and has good balance. I would leave her alone unless she's just out of control. Pasos tend to be "quicker" horses, its just how they are.

If this was my horse I'd do lots of walking and W-T transtions to build up the muscles. She's a cutie!

shawneeAcres
Dec. 21, 2010, 11:50 AM
Your horse is quite cute and appears to have decent gaits. However, she is carrying herself very inverted naturally. Your first step is to get her to accept the bit and work on the topline. This means PROPER lunging with side reins, gradually shortening them thru several sessions until she begins to stretch DOWN into the contact. Not round penning, but true lunging with a lunge line. There is a time and place for both round penning and lunging and now is time for lunging. Teach her on the lunge to properly respond to walk, trot, and canter, work on lots of transitions, and you can do spiraling in and out on the lunge as well. A lot of what is probably happening making her quick when riding her, is lack of angagement of hind end and back being stiff and hollow. So working on teaching her simple leg yielding at walk and trot will help to to engage. Also get out of the round pen. It appears you have lots of nice flat land outside of the pen, go ride out there. You do not need an arena, just a flat area. It will also help her to stay more interested plus she needs to learn to work in straight lines, not always circling.

ThreeFigs
Dec. 21, 2010, 12:30 PM
Thanks so much for the video, Victorian 24! That clarifies things greatly and the posting of the purebred Paso video was just ... gratuitous. Your horse moves nothing like a Paso.

She's a cutie, and as others have said, has nice gaits and nicely forward. Sure, she may have issues, but what horse does not? Ignore the snark, take what advice seems logical, and best of luck with your darling mare!

InsideLeg2OutsideRein
Dec. 21, 2010, 02:01 PM
Thanks so much for the video, Victorian 24! That clarifies things greatly and the posting of the purebred Paso video was just ... gratuitous. Your horse moves nothing like a Paso.

She's a cutie, and as others have said, has nice gaits and nicely forward. Sure, she may have issues, but what horse does not? Ignore the snark, take what advice seems logical, and best of luck with your darling mare!

This! :D

InsideLeg2OutsideRein
Dec. 21, 2010, 02:02 PM
victorian24 -- sent you a pm!

victorian24
Dec. 21, 2010, 02:30 PM
victorian24 -- sent you a pm!

Got it! :D

victorian24
Dec. 21, 2010, 02:32 PM
cute mare.

to me it looks like the typical horse made to be run off its feet. she is unbalanced, fearful, unsure etc.

because of all that you need to go back to the beginning and get this mare to relax and have some confidence.

i would put her in side reins.... long.... and put a lunge line on her (no more round penning) and work on walk/trot only just getting her to go slow.... you want her to stretch down/out and round over her topline... only then can she relax and only then can you sit on her.

if you sit on her s she is it will hurt her.

it should only take one lesson on the lunge to get her to change her way of going.

if you are interested in dressage then you will need to find a more dressage type trainer to work with... eventers are great too :)

and completely off topic - but this is a good example of what i dont like sending horses to non dressage type people to start. just too different.

We are in the process of Looking for a Dressage Trainer for both of us.

I will be purchasing long side reins coming this week. So I do not have to round pen :)

Isabeau Z Solace
Dec. 21, 2010, 04:11 PM
http://www.mary-wanless.com/index.html

Check out Mary's blog posts on 'whizzy' horses. I believe the Nov 2009 post has some information that would be helpful. If you're not familiar with her work, check out her Ride With Your Mind:Rider Essentials book.

HollysHobbies
Dec. 21, 2010, 09:18 PM
Just wanted to say I'm right there with you, V! My morgan prospect (started in October) is in a zippy trot phase right now. I'm rewatching some Conrad Schumacher tapes...he says horses fall into 2 types: the typical warmblood type who need to learn to go first and the TB type that need to learn control first. We have the 2nd type!!

I use a smaller circle to slow her, and then go straight as soon as she slows into the speed I'm looking for. Focus on very even sized circles/you control her path of travel...that seems to help naturally slow my girl. Remember to praise, release pressure when she does it right...that is a reward! Where are you located...I'm sure some COTH people know great dressage trainers in your area. Good luck!