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View Full Version : safety of counter/shelves in aisleway?



ayrabz
Dec. 18, 2010, 08:54 AM
Hey all ! Hope the holidays are going well for everyone!
I'm excited to schedule our 'barn doors' delivery and installation once this weather breaks!

Builder has made them with windows in top half and cross buck 'x' on bottom....double, sliding open Lh and Rh sides. Can't wait!

"aisleway' also has been matted fully with interlocking mats cut to fit edge to edge since these photos!

Now, aside from electricity being run/installed in the spring, my next step is going to be: a 'built in ' corner tack locker, and an 'adjoining' counter top (same depth) along/under the window area. What I'm curious is: as this 'aisle' is obviously doubling as my 'tack' area/yada yada....do you guys feel I should/must? have cabinet doors /solid sliders? or something enclosing the bottom area under the counter? I'm expecting to design it to accomodate some large bins...and could? simply have a board shelf so have some bins on top, some on bottom.. (plus one small refrig) .but would this being 'open' this way seem like a scarey safety issue to you guys? (What would be your choice?)

here's a link to the slideshow...interior 'widdle barn' :lol: aisle/shots towards the end.

http://s594.photobucket.com/albums/tt25/ayrabz/Farmette%20Completion%20Sep%2009/?albumview=slideshow

TIA!

lorilu
Dec. 18, 2010, 10:53 AM
Will this area also be a feed room?

I have sterlite (I think that's the brand) plastic lower cabinets in which I keep health care/supplements/ etc. I wuse the top to make up my feed. Feed is stored in galvanized trash cans - two-three 50# bags will fit in each. Mice can't get in.

I'd suggest you go to Home Depot or Lowe's and look at the garage storage cabinets. They are built to take more abuse, and be more weather resistant, than typical kitchen cabinets.

IMO, closed upper cabinets for bridles/halters, strap goods/etc would be nicer than open hooks, and the tack would stay cleaner.

L

clanter
Dec. 18, 2010, 02:31 PM
I beleve solid sliders for doors would be the only way to keep things tidy, other wise an open door is begging to be ripped off

MunchkinsMom
Dec. 19, 2010, 01:01 AM
I beleve solid sliders for doors would be the only way to keep things tidy, other wise an open door is begging to be ripped off

I second what clanter said. I boarded in a barn that had shallow cabinets in the aisle, with swinging doors, and yes, eventually they all ripped off.

hundredacres
Dec. 19, 2010, 07:31 AM
Your place is lovely :).

I would suggest a cabinet with sliding doors - one side gets opened at a time. I have those door racks that you hang inside a pantry, to stick my brushes in at my cross ties; they are white coated wire...very common from the closet/storage aisle at Target They are smooshed from a horse backing into it during a vet visit. SO I vote for anything sturdier than that that can be closed.

ayrabz
Dec. 19, 2010, 09:20 AM
Thanks all ! Will look into the suggestions....I guess? my only worry was: I want BIG bins to fit for storage, and wasn't sure? if I should just leave it open with one shelf and the bins above and below....(as they will keep the dust out/etc) or? if that was really 'safe' for an aisleway....I DO like the slider door idea, but not sure if the space available will allow me to 'get' the bins inside a slider door arrangement.

in re: feed room....no, the goal is, to have a door 'across' the other end of the aisle (across from the door into the run in) into THAT adjoining outbuilding, and that area houseing the hay and feed. I'd like a dutch door similar to the others...so that I can have the top half open for cross air.....

for now, as its just 'visits' until moving there permanently, I'll keep feed in a protective closing scenario----OR in the horse trailer!

2DogsFarm
Dec. 19, 2010, 03:19 PM
I covet your sliders!
They are exactly what I wanted....after the fact.
Aftermarket pricing is a b-yotch :(

You'll need to enclose anything you store that you don't want coated in dust.

I have a wire tower of storage bins that lets a lot of dust fall through, but still things stored there accumulate a fine coating.
And you have to account for collateral damage from birds that will get inside.

My tack is covered by a piece of fabric for these reasons.

Also try to keep the aisleway used for horse or other traffic clear.
Not only for horses, but my hayguy has come this close to taking out the little 6" deep shelves on my stalls (for brushboxes) when he drives his truck down my 12' aisle.
And just the other day spooking pony on a crosstie nearly took down one of the shelves.

Less in an aisle is more & safer.

Bluey
Dec. 19, 2010, 04:19 PM
I still can't see the pictures, they keep changing from black blank screen shot to black blank screen shot.

Anyway, anything loose in aisles, if a horse gets in there unsupervised, it will be fair game.
Any place we had shelves with anything on them, sooner or later those became some horse playthings, including a bottle of gentian violet, that gave us some purple surrealistic floor and wall drawings.:eek:

If you have open shelving, use them for stuff that doesn't break or will be damaged by being played with.:yes:

cyndi
Dec. 19, 2010, 11:17 PM
I have an odd shaped barn because it did not start out as a barn, but a shop. So I have a "T" shaped aisle with lots of wasted space in aisle - like 20 feet wide.

I have cabinets along the wall at the 'top' of the T, with doors that open, and the horses have never come in contact with them.

I also have several of the Sterlite cabinets and chests of drawers and love, love, love them. They get dusty themselves, but are easy to wipe clean, and the drawers are SO deep, they hold a LOT of stuff, and keep the stuff inside from getting dusty. Have not had a horse come in contact with those either - but mine is a private farm and I only have three horses in the barn. I even have a washer in the aisle, too with no trouble there either. But if I did not use my 'wasted' space in the aisles, it would be very inefficient! I do have a separate small climate controlled building for tack storage - down here, I could not store tack in the barn without it growing a furry coat of mildew!