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View Full Version : Cold pressed canola meal and/or peanut hull pellets in horse feed?



In_
Dec. 4, 2010, 07:30 PM
A local, small-level feed company has contacted me to ask if I would consider switching my horses to their feed. The first two ingrediants are not ones I have had experience with (in large quantities) with horses. I have my own thoughts about it - but would love to see if I am on the right path or way off-base.

"The freshly pressed canola meal is processed at low temperatures in order to retain the Omega 3, and 6 fatty acids that provide the highest level of nutrition that is normally lost in higher temperature and chemically processed protein meals. The fiber content is a blend of beet pulp for the fore-gut and peanut hull fiber for slow fermentation in the after-gut for control of colic and essential fermentation for maximum nutrient absorption.
Sweet Horse Feed is low in starch, for a controlled release of energy, with naturally occurring biotin, Vitamin E and Chlorophyll, not usually found in other sweet feed formulations."
Guaranteed Analysis
Protein (minimum)……………15.00%
Fat (minimum)….…………….10.00%
Fiber (minimum)..……………15.00%
Calcium (minimum)..………….0.75%
Calcium (maximum)…………..1.25%
Phosphorus (minimum)….……0.50%
Salt (minimum)…….…………0.40%
Salt (maximum)………………0.80%

Ingredients
Cold pressed canola meal, peanut hull pellets, crimped barley, corn, beat pulp, molasses, mineral salt.

In_
Dec. 4, 2010, 10:07 PM
Anyone?

I know this is not a super interesting topic - but it was a serious question.

Mali
Dec. 4, 2010, 10:11 PM
I wouldn't feed anything that contained peanut hulls. There are way better options for fiber. I laugh at them calling their Sweet Horse Feed "low starch". It contains corn, molasses, and barley - just what is their definition of low starch?

RedMare01
Dec. 4, 2010, 11:07 PM
I hadn't heard of canola meal being used in horse feed before, so I did a little quick research, and it seems okay...sort of similar to soybean meal apparently.
http://www.ker.com/library/EquineReview/2004/Nutrition/N23.pdf

That said, this doesn't sound like the greatest feed in the world. Salt is added, but what about other vitamins and minerals? There are a lot more than salt, :lol:. And corn, barley, and molasses? Not seeing low NSC there. :)

Caitlin

foxhollow
Mar. 5, 2011, 08:57 AM
Thanks for the interest. I am the producer, am would like to answer these questions and concerns. I produce the cold pressed canola meal, on an expeller here in NC, using winter canola grown in NC. I do add minerals, in with the salt formulation, but do not list them, my bad. The product only contains 12% starch, as this represented from the corn, which is cracked and also locally grown, and the barley, which is crimped, and grown locally.
The fiber comes from both peanut hulls, from a facility in Georgia, where my family feed business has been doing business with them for 3 generations, and they test regularly for alfatoxins, as do my other grain suppliers.
The cold pressed canola meal, using an expeller, is one of the most natural feed sources available. If you would be so kind and look at your label for your feed you will most likely see that they are using wheat mids or "grain products" or some other by product for the main item in the feed. Therefore, they have to add all the vitamins, minerals and fat which is removed in the factory processing the "grain", usually wheat for human consumption.
Canola, is one of the blessings from the field, that has Omega 3 fatty acids, vitamins, minerals, chlorophyll and phospholipids, already present. These are items, that are normally added back to the feed, or used as a supplement in the form of Health Oils to correct their absence.
The feed is being used as a nutritional supplement to broodmares, horses in stress (US Equine Rescue League), and artisan goat herds for the production of cheese.
I invite you to go to my Facebook page, Fox Hollow Oil and Feed, as I post nutritional information about this and other products for animal nutrition.

Androcles
Mar. 5, 2011, 09:30 AM
If it were an option for me, I would consider feeding this since it has no soy in it.

And just because it contains some high starch ingredients (corn, barley), doesn't mean necessarily it's high starch. It would depend on the proportion of those grains in it. I'd rather see oats though than corn, as corn isn't the most digestible feed, and oats has all the amino acids.

As an aside, I thought beet pulp was fiber fermented in the hind gut, not the foregut.

Mali
Mar. 5, 2011, 10:08 AM
What is the ingredient list for the peanut hull pellets? Is there an artificial binder used?

Hampton Bay
Mar. 5, 2011, 10:25 AM
I wouldn't feed anything containing peanut hulls, period. It's not an appropriate source of fiber for horses. It's low in nutrition, and poorly digested. It makes better bedding than feed.

In_
Mar. 6, 2011, 09:16 AM
Thank you, Foxhollow, for taking the time to address my questions!

Daydream Believer
Mar. 6, 2011, 10:10 AM
The fiber comes from both peanut hulls, from a facility in Georgia, where my family feed business has been doing business with them for 3 generations, and they test regularly for alfatoxins, as do my other grain suppliers.
The cold pressed canola meal, using an expeller, is one of the most natural feed sources available. If you would be so kind and look at your label for your feed you will most likely see that they are using wheat mids or "grain products" or some other by product for the main item in the feed. Therefore, they have to add all the vitamins, minerals and fat which is removed in the factory processing the "grain", usually wheat for human consumption.
Canola, is one of the blessings from the field, that has Omega 3 fatty acids, vitamins, minerals, chlorophyll and phospholipids, already present. These are items, that are normally added back to the feed, or used as a supplement in the form of Health Oils to correct their absence.


I mean no disrespect but how can you call canola meal a "natural" feed for horses much less peanut hulls that are legume roots essentially which I doubt horses would dig up? To me, natural should mean something that would be in a horse's natural evolutionary diet...something they would have eaten for a long long time without human intervention. That does not include a lot of what people feed to them today but I don't see how canola and peanuts are more natural than much of the by- products in horse feed today.

Canola is not quite the wonder oil for people that it is claimed....now this is about the oil versus the meal...but it's interesting information. An excerpt from the book "Nourishing Traditions" by Sally Fallon:

"Canola Oil contains 5 % saturated fat, 57 % oleic acid, 23% omega 6 and 10-15% omega 3. The newest oil on the market, canola was developed from the rape seed, a member of the mustard family. Rape seed is considered unsuited to human consumption because it contains a long-chain fatty acid called erucic acid, which under some circumstances is associated with fibrotic heart lesions. Canola oil was bred to contain little if any erucic acid and has drawn the attention of nutritionists because of its high oleic-acid content. But there are some indications that canola oil presents dangers of its own. It has a high sulfur content and goes rancid easily. Baked goods made with canola oil develop mold very quickly. During the deodorizing process, the omega-3 fatty acids of processed canola oil are transformed into trans fatty acids similar to those in margarine and possibly more dangerous. A recent study indicates that "heart healthy" canola oil actually creates a deficiency of Vit E, a vitamin required for a healthy cardiovascular system. Other studies indicate that even low-erucic acid canola oil causes heart lesions, particularly when the diet is also low in saturated fat."

She footnotes the studies in her book and I can look them up if anyone wants.

Now granted that is about the oil from a human perspective but I just wanted to share that information. I'm not sure how much that applies to the canola meal and for feed in a horse but don't be caught up in the marketing today that canola is a wonder food. Every food stuff has positive and negative aspects and you should be aware of what they are before you add them to your diet or your animal's feed.

Melyni
Mar. 6, 2011, 07:30 PM
I have no problem with the canola meal. CM has a very interesting and useful amino-acid profile. I use Canola meal in a couple of my products for that reason.

And for those who don't like soy this would be an alternative feed.

There is nothing wrong in using peanut hulls for a fiber either.
Straw has been used as have soy hulls.
You guys are way too quick to condem a feed with relatively little knowledge here.

Foxhollow. you might send a sample up to Equi-analytical and get an NSC value on it, that would be very useful for the folk with EMS/IR horses.

If you were closer to me, I'd give it a try for sure, but I am pretty sure the shipping would make it cost prohibitive.
But speaking as a nutritionist, this is not a bad feed.
MW

Meadow36
Mar. 6, 2011, 07:45 PM
I agree with Melyni on all accounts. I'm not too thrilled with the corn, but the rest of the feed looks interesting. I would try it for sure if this were in Florida. I love that it's soy-free. Peanut hulls are a good source of indigestible fiber, which horses need in their diet to help push sand through the gut and add form to the stool. It sounds like the producer is getting the hulls from a reputable distributor, which would have been my only concern.

I'd be curious to see the vitamin / mineral package.

TrueColours
Mar. 6, 2011, 08:30 PM
What about people with peanut allergies coming in contact with this feed or the manure?

Last year I was seriously considering marketing a peanut hull bedding up here. Looked like a fabulous product and had a lot to recommend it. Upon further examination and investigation, I felt that it would open me up for HUGE lawsuits if someone inadvertently came into contact with it, or a horse that had been laying it in, and they got ill or died as a result

It wouldnt be my #1 choice as a fibre source for horses. It just seems to be a "cheap" filler that has little to recommend it but a cheap price

Am I correct in assuming that it would be the cheapest fibre option out there in your geographical area?

Daydream Believer
Mar. 6, 2011, 09:41 PM
You guys are way too quick to condem a feed with relatively little knowledge here.
MW

I don't have any nutrition credentials and it may well be safe...safe as we could guess or presume for such a recent feedstuff being added to equine diets.... but it gets my back up when people try to label a food "natural" for a certain animal when it has NEVER been in their diet at any time in the millions of years since the animal existed. It's nothing but faddish marketing, and it's a total turnoff to me.

Seriously though, I'd never spend money to feed my horses peanut hulls. I live in peanut growing country and..no thanks...I'll pass. That money would be much better spent on good quality hay. JMO. :no:

foxhollow
Mar. 27, 2011, 12:22 PM
What is the ingredient list for the peanut hull pellets? Is there an artificial binder used?

There is no binder used, it is formed under pressure from ground hulls and a small amount of water and heat.

foxhollow
Mar. 27, 2011, 12:42 PM
I mean no disrespect but how can you call canola meal a "natural" feed for horses much less peanut hulls that are legume roots essentially which I doubt horses would dig up? To me, natural should mean something that would be in a horse's natural evolutionary diet...something they would have eaten for a long long time without human intervention. That does not include a lot of what people feed to them today but I don't see how canola and peanuts are more natural than much of the by- products in horse feed today.

Canola is not quite the wonder oil for people that it is claimed....now this is about the oil versus the meal...but it's interesting information. An excerpt from the book "Nourishing Traditions" by Sally Fallon:

"Canola Oil contains 5 % saturated fat, 57 % oleic acid, 23% omega 6 and 10-15% omega 3. The newest oil on the market, canola was developed from the rape seed, a member of the mustard family. Rape seed is considered unsuited to human consumption because it contains a long-chain fatty acid called erucic acid, which under some circumstances is associated with fibrotic heart lesions. Canola oil was bred to contain little if any erucic acid and has drawn the attention of nutritionists because of its high oleic-acid content. But there are some indications that canola oil presents dangers of its own. It has a high sulfur content and goes rancid easily. Baked goods made with canola oil develop mold very quickly. During the deodorizing process, the omega-3 fatty acids of processed canola oil are transformed into trans fatty acids similar to those in margarine and possibly more dangerous. A recent study indicates that "heart healthy" canola oil actually creates a deficiency of Vit E, a vitamin required for a healthy cardiovascular system. Other studies indicate that even low-erucic acid canola oil causes heart lesions, particularly when the diet is also low in saturated fat."

She footnotes the studies in her book and I can look them up if anyone wants.

Now granted that is about the oil from a human perspective but I just wanted to share that information. I'm not sure how much that applies to the canola meal and for feed in a horse but don't be caught up in the marketing today that canola is a wonder food. Every food stuff has positive and negative aspects and you should be aware of what they are before you add them to your diet or your animal's feed.

I was interested in what Ms. Fallon would say, as I am a member of Weston A Price Foundation, and have subscribed to their practices for over 8 years, drinking raw milk, making nutrient dense foods, like kefir, and kimchi. I believe that the most important food for a horse, is pasture. I am working to make feed as close to pasture as possible, with cost as a consideration.
I wrote to Ms. Fallon, and described my process and the use of my meals and oils for animal uses, and she supported the use and value of my products. If you would like a copy of her email and discussion, please let me know.
Peanut hulls, are a very economical source of fiber, and are very palatable. They are also tested and have worked for years as a reliable source of feed.
To address the "natural" barb, I would have to agree. I will remove it as misleading. Only pasture is natural, as is only grain left in the field to ripen, mature, and to ferment, is natural. I have used the term to represent that this is not a by product, like wheat midds, or a chemically processed protein meal, like cotton seed, soy or even canola from most all production facilities that use chemicals to process the product.
I use only mechanical pressure, no chemicals and use only products that are as close to "natural" as possible.
I have had some conversations with Doug at Virginia Equine Research, and agree with him as to the value of roasting. We will be working together with his licensed partners here in NC to bring this type of added nutritional benefit to our feeds.
Right now, I am producing a limited 1 ton batches of feed, and conducting feeding trials with both horses and dairies, both artisan cow and goat, to monitor the progress and adjustments to the formula.
This summer we will be in a new production facility and have 3 formulations for different needs. Each will have the basic formula as mentioned above with different levels of protein, but consistent levels of fat and fiber. We will also be adding a better quality of mineral package to the mix and will have a web page to announce our distribution of these products.
I will be checking this web site on a regular basis to answer any other questions....or I can be reached and followed on face book as well to answer any other questions or concerns.

foxhollow
Mar. 27, 2011, 12:45 PM
I was interested in what Ms. Fallon would say, as I am a member of Weston A Price Foundation, and have subscribed to their practices for over 8 years, drinking raw milk, making nutrient dense foods, like kefir, and kimchi. I believe that the most important food for a horse, is pasture. I am working to make feed as close to pasture as possible, with cost as a consideration.
I wrote to Ms. Fallon, and described my process and the use of my meals and oils for animal uses, and she supported the use and value of my products. If you would like a copy of her email and discussion, please let me know.
Peanut hulls, are a very economical source of fiber, and are very palatable. They are also tested and have worked for years as a reliable source of feed.
To address the "natural" barb, I would have to agree. I will remove it as misleading. Only pasture is natural, as is only grain left in the field to ripen, mature, and to ferment, is natural. I have used the term to represent that this is not a by product, like wheat midds, or a chemically processed protein meal, like cotton seed, soy or even canola from most all production facilities that use chemicals to process the product.
I use only mechanical pressure, no chemicals and use only products that are as close to "natural" as possible.
I have had some conversations with Doug at Virginia Equine Research, and agree with him as to the value of roasting. We will be working together with his licensed partners here in NC to bring this type of added nutritional benefit to our feeds.
Right now, I am producing a limited 1 ton batches of feed, and conducting feeding trials with both horses and dairies, both artisan cow and goat, to monitor the progress and adjustments to the formula.
This summer we will be in a new production facility and have 3 formulations for different needs. Each will have the basic formula as mentioned above with different levels of protein, but consistent levels of fat and fiber. We will also be adding a better quality of mineral package to the mix and will have a web page to announce our distribution of these products.
I will be checking this web site on a regular basis to answer any other questions....or I can be reached and followed on face book as well to answer any other questions or concerns.

foxhollow
Mar. 27, 2011, 12:56 PM
Peanut hulls are the least processed low cost fiber source here in a pelleted form. We have been using this form of fiber, and use cotton seed hulls, in some feeds that customers have requested...but the most consistent source is this pelleted product.
The canola mix adds very digestible protein, fiber and minerals. As mentioned before we are working on a higher quality mineral blend with Virgina Equine Research, along with their roasting processed barley to replace the barley and corn that supplies the necessary carbohydrates needed and loved by the horses. They receive an energy boost that they love when eating carbs, but too many feeds have used too much corn, oats and barley as feeds, that bring too many digestible carbs to the party, and not enough digestible protein.
There are many good feeds out there, and we plan to be one of the best we can be, not one of the largest.
I believe there are great suppliers, KER, VER, and Wysong to name a few that I hope to join in their ability to bring nutritional excellence to the equine and artisan dairy industries.

foxhollow
Mar. 27, 2011, 01:07 PM
Melyni,

Please send me the information required and I would love to have it tested..currently I have a local analytical company test for protein, fat, fiber and contamination of mold or fungus, even though I do everything possible to have fresh, clean material and processes when making my batches.
Thanks again for the support.

foxhollow
Mar. 27, 2011, 01:10 PM
Most allergies are from the protein segment of the plant...there should be no allergic reactions to this feed with any contact. Remember, allergies are a result of a poor digestive system, and can be corrected by limiting carbohydrates, cleaning up yours or your horses system, and working with probiotics and proper follow up diet restrictions.

Daydream Believer
Mar. 27, 2011, 02:24 PM
I was interested in what Ms. Fallon would say, as I am a member of Weston A Price Foundation, and have subscribed to their practices for over 8 years, drinking raw milk, making nutrient dense foods, like kefir, and kimchi. I believe that the most important food for a horse, is pasture. I am working to make feed as close to pasture as possible, with cost as a consideration.
I wrote to Ms. Fallon, and described my process and the use of my meals and oils for animal uses, and she supported the use and value of my products. If you would like a copy of her email and discussion, please let me know.
.

That is interesting since she does not recommend Canola Oil for people any longer for the reasons I quoted above. I don't disbelieve you but find her endorsement surprising since Weston price supports traditional diets and there is nothing traditional about feeding either canola meal or peanut hulls to horses. Is she even educated in animal feeds?

If you can sell this feed to someone than more power to you but I'll pass for more traditional and natural feeds like hay.

Daydream Believer
Mar. 27, 2011, 02:36 PM
Most allergies are from the protein segment of the plant...there should be no allergic reactions to this feed with any contact. Remember, allergies are a result of a poor digestive system, and can be corrected by limiting carbohydrates, cleaning up yours or your horses system, and working with probiotics and proper follow up diet restrictions.

I wasn't going to post again but I have to say that I would caution anyone with serious food allergies to try what is suggested above. Allergies to foods can be serious and deadly. I have shellfish allergies probably resulting from a lifetime of untreated Celiac disease an autoimmune disorder. I have been told by a real physician to never eat shellfish again as serious food allergies rarely go away on their own and the more exposure to the allergen just makes it worse. One brush with anaphylaxis was enough for me.

I'm all for healthy diets but I think the above information is highly questionable for someone with serious food allergies to try.

cloudyandcallie
Mar. 27, 2011, 02:45 PM
I boarded at a barn for over a year where the low end Purina "country acres" feed was fed to all horses. Feed store owners told me it was mostly peanut hulls. My ottb mare and WB both gained weight on it and were healthy and very high spirited. Both did great with peanut hulls for feed.:lol: (I've always read that peanuts are a great food for humans. Of course my state produces most of the peanuts.)

Even though they got fit, I did later supplement their feed with Seminole and supplements. Now I use Semnole because I like the feed company.