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View Full Version : Have to cut our underground electric fence wire!?!



dmalbone
Dec. 4, 2010, 02:43 PM
I need a little help here. I finally understand the basics of electric fencing, and everything's been going great. We have an irrigation guy running water to the barn (finally) on Tuesday. He says the only way he can get it go the barn is to trench through our gate, which has an underground wire carrying power to the majority of the fencing. With it being winter and just getting a wonderful 4" of snow today I don't think there's any digging it up and reburying it. He asked if he could just trench through it and if we could just repair/hook it back up. I know I could completely replace it come spring, but what about now!? I need water in the barn. I'm pregnant and can't keep lugging buckets and frozen hoses. :no: Are there any easy solutions to this? Should we just dig by hand the three feet underground in the snow? What would you do?

Catersun
Dec. 4, 2010, 03:01 PM
trench up to it and just hand dig the 6 or so inches around it so it stays intact. I would NOT cut it.

being preggo myself, I feel your pain.

coloredcowhorse
Dec. 4, 2010, 03:04 PM
I'd put on my most pregnant outfit, arch my back a bit, waddle out there and explain to the man in the simplest terms possible that you need water AND electric fence....if he has to cut through it he needs to repair it as obviously you are in no condition to do so (there are advantages to being female and a few of them not even the bravest of men will dare to disagree with).

dmalbone
Dec. 4, 2010, 03:06 PM
Thanks. Yeah, I'm not sure I want Joe Schmo irrigation guy repairing my fence! He just made it seem impossible to dig around it and I saw no reason why not. Electric fencing IS admittedly new to me though so I thought I was missing something. I guess if all else fails I'll just waddle dramatically out there (all 5' of myself) and drag the shovel behind me and tell them to "just hold on and I'll dig around it myself".

dmalbone
Dec. 4, 2010, 03:09 PM
being preggo myself, I feel your pain.

Ugh, I already had to go to the Dr. yesterday because I slipped on ice carrying buckets heavier than I should have been and falling flat on the driveway. I was already in tears from a frozen hose and had a hormonal "ugly cry" right there on the icy driveway.

coloredcowhorse
Dec. 4, 2010, 03:16 PM
Thanks. Yeah, I'm not sure I want Joe Schmo irrigation guy repairing my fence! He just made it seem impossible to dig around it and I saw no reason why not. Electric fencing IS admittedly new to me though so I thought I was missing something. I guess if all else fails I'll just waddle dramatically out there (all 5' of myself) and drag the shovel behind me and tell them to "just hold on and I'll dig around it myself".



Hahahahaha....love it......guilt in a 5' dose...not a guy around that won't respond to that!!

clanter
Dec. 4, 2010, 03:28 PM
since the dude has a trencher... why can he not cut a new cross trench to run a replacement wire?

dmalbone
Dec. 4, 2010, 03:30 PM
since the dude has a trencher... why can he not cut a new cross trench to run a replacement wire?

That's a good question... I hadn't thought of that.

clanter
Dec. 4, 2010, 03:58 PM
might want to lay coduct in the cut to allow for replacement in the future

Tom King
Dec. 4, 2010, 04:36 PM
No reason not to be able to avoid it. It really shouldn't be much of a big deal at all. Even if he doesn't have a metal detector to find the wire, the dirt in the original trench that the wire is in is still soft and different than on both sides. It's not like it's farther up North where the water line needs to be 4' deep so there is not much shoveling involved.

And yes to putting an undergate hot wire always in plastic conduit, which is really cheap anyway.

Tom King
Dec. 4, 2010, 04:37 PM
since the dude has a trencher... why can he not cut a new cross trench to run a replacement wire?

There would be about as much shoveling involved to clean out the intersection as finding and avoiding the wire to start with.

dmalbone
Dec. 4, 2010, 04:39 PM
Thanks. Yes, it's already in plastic conduit. I think it was about 15" deep. I didn't see what was so hard, but now I feel better telling him it needs to be done the right way. We were clueless about barn building and got walked all over so don't want to go through that again. I think I have "sucker" written on my forehead.

dmalbone
Dec. 4, 2010, 04:41 PM
No reason not to be able to avoid it. It really shouldn't be much of a big deal at all. Even if he doesn't have a metal detector to find the wire, the dirt in the original trench that the wire is in is still soft and different than on both sides. It's not like it's farther up North where the water line needs to be 4' deep so there is not much shoveling involved.

And yes to putting an undergate hot wire always in plastic conduit, which is really cheap anyway.

So basically he trenches up to it, it's hand dug the 30" down he needs to go underneath the wire to the other side and he starts trenching again, right?

Tom King
Dec. 4, 2010, 05:27 PM
So basically he trenches up to it, it's hand dug the 30" down he needs to go underneath the wire to the other side and he starts trenching again, right?


Yes. Or better still, siince the trencher cuts at an angle sloping up at the end of a cut, the easy way would be to start on both sides of the conduit and go down to start and away from it in both directions. That would leave very little to hand dig out. If the trencher has a reverse, it could even be nothing to hand dig. A good operator with a good machine can easily do it. I've done it more than a few times.

I have no patience with contractors who only want to do what's easy for them regardless of the consequences to anyone else.

I once had a block truck driver deliver cubes of concrete blocks to a job. To avoid having to get back in the truck once or twice more and move it a few feet, he was going to stack the cubes, which would make it much more trouble for us to get the blocks down to lay.

Long story short, he was very crude rude about it, but without getting into a fight, I made him load it all up and carry it back. I'm sorry he had a family and ended up getting fired, but when you get up in the morning to go to work, you'd better be prepared to do more than just what's easy for you.

I don't understand why he can't just go under the fence and avoid the gate altogether.

RLF
Dec. 4, 2010, 05:59 PM
He sounds either lazy or ignorant.

Any 'trencher' could do this. When trenching in a lawn you think they just plow through anything buried in their way?

Stand your ground. And if he gets difficult, grab your belly with both hand and wince as if the stress is about to put you into labor! lol

coloredcowhorse
Dec. 4, 2010, 07:10 PM
Stand your ground. And if he gets difficult, grab your belly with both hand and wince as if the stress is about to put you into labor! lol



There!! another technique for guilt inducement in lazy men!!

Catersun
Dec. 4, 2010, 07:21 PM
Ugh, I already had to go to the Dr. yesterday because I slipped on ice carrying buckets heavier than I should have been and falling flat on the driveway. I was already in tears from a frozen hose and had a hormonal "ugly cry" right there on the icy driveway.

i did that a couple weeks ago and landed flat on my belly... and I didn't have the good excuse of ICE... ended up in Land D being monitored for 4 hours just to makesure mom and baby were both fine...

being preggo sucks. I'm currently fighting the ninth circle of hell due to this melon headed kid.


and in this current employment climate... a quick threaten to find someone who will do it right shouldn't be too far behind in the suggestion that he NOT cut that line.

winfieldfarm
Dec. 6, 2010, 11:32 PM
better yet, while digging it up yourself, fake electrocution. then you might get the whole job comped!