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Bluey
Dec. 3, 2010, 05:42 PM
... and coming to a place near you, if they are not there yet:

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704369304575633003631542986.html?m od=WSJ_newsreel_ahed

They came here five years ago and are now a problem for most everyone.
Batten the hatches if they come to your area, because there is not much anyone can do about them.:(

JSwan
Dec. 3, 2010, 05:56 PM
Some game dept people told me we've got them in Virginia.

Guess they'll be making their way up through the state.

Bad. Very Bad.

:no::no:

Twisting
Dec. 3, 2010, 06:03 PM
Feral pigs are a big problem here in Hawaii. They're everywhere. About a week ago they decided to uproot the immaculately kept lawn infront of the ranch's office. We're talking putting green quality lawn that looks like someone took a tiller to it. They're ignoring the traps too. The ranch is probably going to have to resort to hiring someone to "remove" them.

It's pretty common for folks around here to hunt them, the limit is one per day (two per day on Maui), which kind of tells you what the islands think of the pig population. Some of the hunters don't use guns, just dogs and really big knives.

oldpony66
Dec. 3, 2010, 06:13 PM
It's pretty common for folks around here to hunt them, the limit is one per day (two per day on Maui), which kind of tells you what the islands think of the pig population. Some of the hunters don't use guns, just dogs and really big knives.

Hmmm... dogs and knives... sounds like Georgia, except there I think the season is open 365 days a year with no limit. And they are still everywhere. Good eatin' though.

BasqueMom
Dec. 3, 2010, 06:16 PM
We're north of Dallas and they have made their way to Denton, biggest town
on the north side before it gets more rural. We haven't seen any in our area
but looks like target practice time if they do show up. They are a big, big
problem in Texas. I don't like hunting (no bunnies or deer for me) but think I could make an exception for these things. Definitely don't want to run into any on the way to the barn--they can be very mean!

jawa
Dec. 3, 2010, 06:22 PM
The feral pigs in VA are in the Back Bay area. This part of VA is a protected area with limited access. They have had a few hog hunts. You can find out about it through the VA Dept of Game and Inland Fisheries.

cholmberg
Dec. 3, 2010, 06:45 PM
I'm actually surprised it's a problem. . .in MS where I"m from they are considered VERY good eating and prime sport and hunters get really territorial about them. Shoot them and serve them up in the shelters.. . .my in laws love wild pig and have a freezer full of it.

jawa
Dec. 3, 2010, 06:54 PM
They can be very damaging to the environment. In the Back Bay they are trying to control the population because they damage natural and sensitive marsh and dune grasses, and they can be hard on the ocean turtles and shore bird nests, add to that the area has no large predator to control their numbers and you end up with an ecological problem from a non native animal.

Catersun
Dec. 3, 2010, 07:03 PM
:) I've been plotting to start hunting feral pigs when I am done with this pregnancy crap. learning more about hunting them with dogs as that seems to be the most effcient way to do it.

Bluey
Dec. 3, 2010, 07:16 PM
We just saw four crossing the road yesterday, not scared at all, but no one of us had a gun right then.:no:

No one can raise peanuts around here any more.
The hogs dig them out as fast as they can.
One 200 acre field had over 400 hogs at once rooting in there.:(

Did you see that picture of Hogzilla in that article?:eek:

2tempe
Dec. 3, 2010, 07:24 PM
One of the things I noticed shortly after moving to central florida are the signs posted in some areas: "Hog Hunts;Trophies". Call xxx xxxx". Apparently they are in many parts of Florida, with few, if any, natural predators.

When I lived in a semi-rural area in NE Ohio, we had: Deer, raccoons, more deer, coyotes, more deer and more coyotes. An occasional fox. Some wild turkeys.

Here I'm on the edge of a small town, and we have: Alligators in the lakes (across the street), coral snakes, water moccasins, bears - yes bears! at least one bobcat, some coyotes, but not like up north. And replacing the wild turkeys are sandhill cranes, herons and egrets, which seem to patrol the neighborhood. Have not seen the hogs, but obviously they're lurking out there too!!

MistyBlue
Dec. 3, 2010, 07:25 PM
Saw the big one, bagged within 200 yards of city limits. Wouldn't want that wandering around.

CT doesn't have an issue with them. At least not now. They do survive cold climates but it's not optimum for them so it's unlikely we'd ever have them at problem levels.

Goats, OTOH...:lol: :eek: :lol:

subk
Dec. 3, 2010, 08:00 PM
The article is a little misleading when it implies they are all the decedents of pigs brought over by the Spanish conquistadors. It takes a matter of a few months for a domesticated pig to grow tusks and get a hairy coat to make the transition to "feral."

I think they have the same natural litter size adjustments in accordance with the space available in the environment that make coyotes impossible to eradicate.

ladybugred
Dec. 4, 2010, 01:17 AM
Wild hog is supposed to be delish eatin'!!
I read an article in the WSJ, yes I am a finance geek, about how bad they have gotten in TX. Apparently there is no limit or season, they are free to bag, and they will be having a "Get The Hog Outta TX" competition where the hunter with the highest number of hogs bagged gets $25,000. not small change, even from a finance geek's POV!
25Gs and freezer full of wild hog?? Watch out TX I'm a comin!! Jk for now!

Part of me can't wait til they make their way up here, the sane part of me realizes that they are a total HASSLE!!

I don't give 2 sh*ts about grass, other than grazing, but root up my roses and we are gonna throw down piggie!!

LBR

ladybugred
Dec. 4, 2010, 01:21 AM
subk is right , we had an issue here in MD with a bad breeder, who didn't have good enough fences, and wasn't doing a good job of keeping them fed. Apparently a good num got loose. Dept of Ag tried to kill them off, but piggies are smartand since this happened in a pretty rural area, there may well still be a small feral herd that is unknown.

LBR

bizbachfan
Dec. 4, 2010, 07:06 AM
They are a nuisance and can ruin footing in your fields, arena. But there was one that used to sleep next to my horse in her shelter at night that I got attached to. Someone shot him. There are hog hunts here in Florida and the state/county someone keeps the population in check with regular trappings. They do reproduce rapdily.

Bells
Dec. 4, 2010, 09:24 AM
Last week I was driving in Tuscon around 9 pm and a herd of them popped up from the arroyo below the road. I know I hit one of them w/the truck side step but didn't find any blood. My friends swore the pig just ran off. I guess they have been cruising Tuscon for years.

Are javalinas different from wild pigs?

pnalley
Dec. 4, 2010, 09:37 AM
We have started seeing tham at severl of the National Forest Areas that we ride in. They have no fear of people or horses.

cholmberg
Dec. 4, 2010, 09:53 AM
maybe they need to put a bounty on them.. . .nothing motivates
people like money. If they are truly a nuisance, and there is a
decent bounty, I'd think hunters would be chasing those things
down day and night. . . plus the bonus of them being a very good
eating animal. Ham for everyone?

Guilherme
Dec. 4, 2010, 10:00 AM
Feral hogs are dangerous game.

I've not seen any around here. I don't know if TN has a season or not. If you're going after them then use a rifle with sufficient hitting power to take out the pig with the first shot. In brush country I'd be inclinded to a semi-auto shotgun with 00 buck.

Some guys I know hunt with a large caliber handgun. Don't think Dirty Harry (with his wimpy .44Mag.). Real men would use a S&W 500, a .50 Desert Eagle, or a 50GI Model 1. ;)

Personally I'm not into hunting or blood sports. But I've no problem removing predators or animals that damage my land and streams.

G.

Daydream Believer
Dec. 4, 2010, 10:55 AM
When I was hiking on the Appalachian Trail in Georgia in May, I came across a herd/pack of European Wild Boars...they were the brown long haired ones with the massive mean looking tusks. I looked at them on the trail ahead of me in some astonishment as I did not realize there were wild boars in Georgia. Thankfully they ran when I banged my hiking poles together which sounded a bit like gunshots.

I have been told they are bad in the Smokies also and hikers have had aggression issues with them. They are way more dangerous than even a bear in being unpredictable and aggressive. Bears 99% of the time run when they see you..not so with Wild Boar.

Now I did not see a feral pig...kind of a different look to them. Apparently the European wild boar was introduced in Colonial times for hunting and sport and got loose.

I was in Hawaii on vacation some years ago and was told about the local sport of pig hunting with a knife. We actually saw a fellow with a dead pig over his shoulder and no rifle so he must have killed it some other way.

Bluey
Dec. 4, 2010, 11:47 AM
Feral hogs are dangerous game.

I've not seen any around here. I don't know if TN has a season or not. If you're going after them then use a rifle with sufficient hitting power to take out the pig with the first shot. In brush country I'd be inclinded to a semi-auto shotgun with 00 buck.

Some guys I know hunt with a large caliber handgun. Don't think Dirty Harry (with his wimpy .44Mag.). Real men would use a S&W 500, a .50 Desert Eagle, or a 50GI Model 1. ;)

Personally I'm not into hunting or blood sports. But I've no problem removing predators or animals that damage my land and streams.

G.

Our game warden tell us to keep harassing them, that will keep them on the move, not let them settle in one place too long, that is when they thrive.

We shoot them mostly with an AR 15, .223 and that will drop them dead from a fair distance with that.

Like with any you shoot at, if you can't get a clear, proper shot, you don't shoot.
Crippling is cruel and not acceptable.

JanM
Dec. 4, 2010, 05:41 PM
I live near Fort Benning, GA and a friend used to hunt the feral pigs for a bounty on each one of them. He made about $4,000 last year. They can be hard to hunt down and usually don't come around people, but a few months ago there was a large group of mom and a bunch of mostly grown babies having brunch in the ditch next to the main highway just off post.

Huntertwo
Dec. 4, 2010, 06:21 PM
Saw the big one, bagged within 200 yards of city limits. Wouldn't want that wandering around.

CT doesn't have an issue with them. At least not now. They do survive cold climates but it's not optimum for them so it's unlikely we'd ever have them at problem levels.

Goats, OTOH...:lol: :eek: :lol:

That was going to be my question... Do they like the cold? Don't want to run across any while trail riding.

I'm guessing my weeny pepper spray wouldn't deter a whole pack? :dead:

Goats? What goats?

Ghazzu
Dec. 4, 2010, 07:06 PM
I think there may still be a few on the loose up in NH, where they escaped from the Corbin Game Preserve a few years back.
I'll have to ask my sister.
Pigs do just fine in the cold--handle it better than the heat.

Beentheredonethat
Dec. 5, 2010, 11:23 PM
They're all over the place in CA. In my area this spring was horrible. I used to wonder what was "tilling" the fields, and then this spring it looked like someone brought a tractor to the whole hillside. I would see herds of pigs daily when riding, a mom with 5-10 babies. They're BIG now. I saw one the other night bounding down the hill like a deer--must have been 200-300 lbs. I usually run into them riding every 3/4 weeks. I know the "I smell a pig" posture of the horses really well, and viola, something goes running away a minute later. I've never had any of them stick around or try to attack.

Luckily the guy who owns the facility next to where I am likes to hunt. I run into him walking the hills every month or so and we always talk about the pigs. He has pig hunts regularly to the delight of bow hunters who are his friends, and for the good of the area. I drove into the barn with truck and trailer last spring and saw a 300 pound pig standing there in broad daylight!

Cool thing is, though, I found a pig skull with tusks all nice and clean in the fields. The guy must have been 3-400 pounds. I shellacked in and keep it in my classroom. The kids think it's a dinasaur!

cyndi
Dec. 6, 2010, 08:36 AM
They are a menace in upscale suburbs southwest of Houston, and where I used to ride in a 4,000-acre rice field I came across a 'herd' of about 8 or 9 of them rooting along the irrigation canal that runs all through it. I was very glad that I saw them before my horse did, and that he could not smell them since we were upwind of them. They were HUGE. I had seen evidence of their damage from rooting, but had never actually seen them in person. I think I would freak if I came across some while on foot!

PRS
Dec. 6, 2010, 09:17 AM
They are a very big problem here in Georgia. I regularly see large groups of them while riding. If I don't see the actual pigs I can observe the damage they do to the farmers' fields. They nearly scared my horse and me to death once running through a field of feed corn (when corn is left to dry on the stalks in the field before harvest). Yikes! A herd of pigs can make a huge racket that way and with their loud grunting and squealing they were even scarier. We didn't know which way the were going or where they would come out. We were in a narrow area between the corn and a fenced cow pasture with no where to go. Luckily I was on my steady 27 year old mare who at least didn't try to buck me off....we just did several spins.

wireweiners
Dec. 6, 2010, 10:36 AM
Feral hogs are a big problem here too. Around here most folks live trap them. One of our neighbors told us that he has trapped 17 on a place next to our land. He promised us some sausage. The smaller, young hogs are decent to eat but the older, larger hogs have a rank, musky taste so most people just kill them and let the carcass go for the buzzards, coyotes and other hogs.

For the poster that asked, javelinas are a true wild pig. The feral hogs that are the big problem are the descendants of domesticated hogs that either escaped confinement or were run on open range and never caught. Years ago, it was common practice to turn hogs loose in the woods to forage for themselves and fatten on acorns. Obviously some were never caught. They have no natural predators, will eat anything and reproduce like crazy. They can be quite agressive if cornered and are very destructive to crops and land.

AggieDQ
Dec. 6, 2010, 11:24 AM
My DH's bird dog was gored by a feral pig & spent several weeks in intensive care. In the Matagorda Bay area they are typically hunted with packs of pit bulls (out-fitted in safety vests) & heavy artillery.

CDE Driver
Dec. 6, 2010, 11:33 AM
My DH's bird dog was gored by a feral pig & spent several weeks in intensive care. In the Matagorda Bay area they are typically hunted with packs of pit bulls (out-fitted in safety vests) & heavy artillery.

Oh my gosh, the picture in my mind of a pack of pits in flack vests accompanying guys with rocket launchers is quite something!

wireweiners
Dec. 6, 2010, 01:03 PM
Oh my gosh, the picture in my mind of a pack of pits in flack vests accompanying guys with rocket launchers is quite something!

Yes, they are made out of kevlar, same as the vests the cops use. They make kevlar spike collars for them too. Most folks that hunt hogs with dogs also carry a surgical staple gun to put the dogs back together in a pinch. Around here, the folks that hunt them with dogs use catahoulas or black mouth curs along with pits. One guy told my dad that he preferred the catahoulas and curs as they would hold the hog at bay and not try to grab it so they didn't get hurt as much. The pits will try to grab the hog and get cut. Remember the scene in Ol' Yeller where Yeller and Travis got cut by the hogs?

mjrtango93
Dec. 6, 2010, 02:09 PM
They're all over the place in CA. In my area this spring was horrible. I used to wonder what was "tilling" the fields, and then this spring it looked like someone brought a tractor to the whole hillside. I would see herds of pigs daily when riding, a mom with 5-10 babies. They're BIG now. I saw one the other night bounding down the hill like a deer--must have been 200-300 lbs. I usually run into them riding every 3/4 weeks. I know the "I smell a pig" posture of the horses really well, and viola, something goes running away a minute later. I've never had any of them stick around or try to attack.


Where in CA are you? I am up in Northern about 25 minutes from San Fran, and we don't have any pigs at all. Lots of coyote, a family of deer, some sort of bobcat, and turkeys, but thats about it.

JSwan
Dec. 6, 2010, 07:03 PM
For those of you who live in states with a Hunters for the Hungry program, is it limited to deer or does feral hog also get processed?

In my state, our program feeds a heck of a lot of hungry families. Pork would be a nice addition to venison.

Alagirl
Dec. 6, 2010, 07:11 PM
not normally for this stuff, but they need to organize a German style hunt on them beasties:
Set up stands on one end and herd them down that way from the other, shoot everything that moves and isn't orange.

Boars are damn mean, a female with young even more so. I would guess a can of pepper spray would only piss one off really bad.

I think my uncle - seasoned hunter - suggested cautious, but swift retreat if you see a boar on the trail. (Males travel alone most of the year as I recall, females in groups)

Boar ham or roast is a delicacy in many parts of the old world...it sure could fill up a pantry with bacon for the less fortunate...or breakfast sausages...

Beentheredonethat
Dec. 6, 2010, 11:15 PM
Where in CA are you? I am up in Northern about 25 minutes from San Fran, and we don't have any pigs at all. Lots of coyote, a family of deer, some sort of bobcat, and turkeys, but thats about it.

You must be missing them! I'm in the east bay across from SF. There are about seven regional parks back to back, so there's a lot of open space. I didn't see them too much in Oakland, but they love they Castro Valley hills. I think it also depends on where you ride and when. If you're not going further out where there aren't a lot of people, you may not have run into them. And they tend to like dusk. But where I am right now you can see them running across the hills during the day. Last spring I would see them at the base of this big communal house and in their garden--I had to yell at them to get them to run.

The deer are so overpopulated, it's ridiculous. They come to the pasture to be "fed" with the horses. At the barn today, I put out the horse's grain with a deer watching about 25 feet away. Instead of moving away when she saw me, she actually approached to see if she could get some gran before the horses. I actually had to shoo her away.

Bopper
Dec. 7, 2010, 07:57 AM
In our area several years ago people were turning domesticated and some Russion Boar crosses loose with plans to hunt them. The population has just exploded and they can not kill enough to keep them under control. They multiply very quickly, eat anything including native animals usualy food sources or things like turkey eggs which harms the wild turkey population, tear up property, and are a general nuisance. They can be EXTREMELY dangerous if taken by surprise especially a sow with piglets.

jcotton
Dec. 7, 2010, 09:44 AM
If you have a sow and a boar--you are overpopulated by too many pigs!!!
A sow's first litter is small, average of 8 piglets, each following litter is larger. Usually maxxing around 13-15 piglets when the sow reaches full reproductive maturity. Reproduction starts at 4-6 montha of age and then 3 litters each year.

Feral pig breeding consists of russian boar, domestic pig and other native pig. And when a few domestic pigs escape or get turned out then you will see black and white, light brown with spots or any number of color combinations from different varieties of domestic mixing with the ferals.

I have a friend that has a high fence game ranch, near Bandera. Their policy to their hunters is that they(the hunters) are required to drop(KILL DEAD) any feral hog they see, then they can kill what they have paid to hunt --red stag, axis deer, white tail deer....
On my property, I have guys that prefer to hunt hogs and take the meat, too.
I trap the dumb ones because the smart ones won't go in a trap. In a trap or the end of a bullet--dead is dead and one less to do damage.
Unfortunately, there are more hogs than we will ever be able to reverse to the growing overpopulation and reproduction.

BriarCreek
Dec. 10, 2010, 10:48 AM
WOW-so much of the info posted here @ pigs is just pain wrong & cruel. Like deer, when humans start taking over their natural habitat there will be more human/pig interactions. I find it funny that pigs are the ones that are doing all the damage, not us humans (I know they are not responsible for global warming)? Many of the pigs you are seeing are actually domestic pigs & mini pigs that have been abandoned & strayed (I can tell from the video provided). Hence your problem! The easiest way to keep animals in general including pigs out of your yard is a good fence. I use horse wire to keep my pigs in.

PS- pigs are the 4th smartest animals (humans -which I have my doubts, primates, dolphins/whales & then pigs) They are almost identical to us from a biological stand point and have the intelligence of a 5 year old child. Would you ever think of killing a 5 year old child with dogs & a large knife.

JSwan
Dec. 10, 2010, 11:07 AM
Good Lord. Is school out or something?

I raise pigs too. It doesn't matter what kind of pig it is.

When it becomes feral, it joins the ranks of invasive species.

Invasive and feral species wreak havoc upon habitat. These species are responsible for the absolute destruction of rare and endangered plants and ecosystems throughout the United States and its territories.

It's cuteness, intelligence and adorable traits are irrelevant.

A sounder can destroy an entire crop, pasture or hayfield in a day.

It's not us that need education on this subject. It's you. Throw the PETA literature in the trash and read up on the facts about invasive species in the US.

mjrtango93
Dec. 10, 2010, 11:48 AM
You must be missing them! I'm in the east bay across from SF. There are about seven regional parks back to back, so there's a lot of open space. I didn't see them too much in Oakland, but they love they Castro Valley hills. I think it also depends on where you ride and when. If you're not going further out where there aren't a lot of people, you may not have run into them. And they tend to like dusk. But where I am right now you can see them running across the hills during the day. Last spring I would see them at the base of this big communal house and in their garden--I had to yell at them to get them to run.

The deer are so overpopulated, it's ridiculous. They come to the pasture to be "fed" with the horses. At the barn today, I put out the horse's grain with a deer watching about 25 feet away. Instead of moving away when she saw me, she actually approached to see if she could get some gran before the horses. I actually had to shoo her away.

How funny, I am super close to you in the East Bay. We are about as un-populated as you get in CA. The barn is on 350 acres, surrounded by literally thousands of free acres, probably a grand total of 15 houses scattered about for the land owners. I ride at dusk all the time, but never seen one, or heard of them being around. All the land around us is cattle land though so wonder if that has something to do with it :confused:. We don't have deer either, just the one family living in the ravine, and trust me if they even think you are around they take off running. I guess our hills just aren't as good as over in Castro Valley.

appaloosalady
Dec. 10, 2010, 12:09 PM
WOW-so much of the info posted here @ pigs is just pain wrong & cruel. Like deer, when humans start taking over their natural habitat there will be more human/pig interactions. I find it funny that pigs are the ones that are doing all the damage, not us humans (I know they are not responsible for global warming)? Many of the pigs you are seeing are actually domestic pigs & mini pigs that have been abandoned & strayed (I can tell from the video provided). Hence your problem! The easiest way to keep animals in general including pigs out of your yard is a good fence. I use horse wire to keep my pigs in.

PS- pigs are the 4th smartest animals (humans -which I have my doubts, primates, dolphins/whales & then pigs) They are almost identical to us from a biological stand point and have the intelligence of a 5 year old child. Would you ever think of killing a 5 year old child with dogs & a large knife.


Wow :eek: Really? How many pigs of any kind have you ever raised and kept for any amount of time?

Did you know that hogs kill more farmers every year on average than any other farm animal?

They are very intelligent, that is one of the biggest problems when dealing with them, but I haven't seen one yet that compares to any 5 year old person, what kind of study gave you that information? Could you post a link to it please?

Bells
Dec. 10, 2010, 03:10 PM
and have the intelligence of a 5 year old child. Would you ever think of killing a 5 year old child with dogs & a large knife.

hmm Most 5 year old I know can read (among a lot of other things such as add and subtract). Have you run into a pig that can read?

katarine
Dec. 10, 2010, 04:22 PM
The Great Smoky Mtn Nat'l Park has traps scattered across it to capture the hogs. Gregory Bald is rooted up and torn to bits in places c/o hogs.

Briar Creek, I like pigs. I like bacon, too. But feral hogs are bad news.

Alagirl
Dec. 10, 2010, 04:25 PM
WOW-so much of the info posted here @ pigs is just pain wrong & cruel. Like deer, when humans start taking over their natural habitat there will be more human/pig interactions. I find it funny that pigs are the ones that are doing all the damage, not us humans (I know they are not responsible for global warming)? Many of the pigs you are seeing are actually domestic pigs & mini pigs that have been abandoned & strayed (I can tell from the video provided). Hence your problem! The easiest way to keep animals in general including pigs out of your yard is a good fence. I use horse wire to keep my pigs in.

PS- pigs are the 4th smartest animals (humans -which I have my doubts, primates, dolphins/whales & then pigs) They are almost identical to us from a biological stand point and have the intelligence of a 5 year old child. Would you ever think of killing a 5 year old child with dogs & a large knife.

Are you related to Ragweed Expert?

pig vs 5 yo kid?, no, really?!

not to mention that a domestic hog can do considerable damage, a wild boar is outright dangerous! Unlike a 5 yo child, you need the dogs, the big gun and the large knife or you end up being hurt or killed by that boar...(not to mention 5 yo kids don't multiply and I am not talking about math)

jcotton
Dec. 10, 2010, 06:26 PM
Is BriarCreek a troll or young?

Come to my ranch and I'll show you the damage they have done? As well as some of the other posters on this thread that "Know what they are talking about.
A sounder can totally tear up a hay field or any other pasture in one night. I had a neighbor ask what I was going to plant in one of fields that I "plowed with a disc" ---I was not the one who "plowed witrh a disc"!!! It was those &^%$# feral hogs!!!!

Carolinadreamin'
Dec. 10, 2010, 06:37 PM
BriarCreek, feral hogs are NOT native. They are descendants of escaped domestic pigs crossed with the more aggressive russian boars that have reverted to wild state. They carry disease, destroy native woodland and wetland areas and are very invasive and extremely destructive. They can be quite dangerous.

I view them as I do fire ants - very destructive, invasive and dangerous. They are in our area and we've had a few killed in the woods surrounding the farm where we board our horses.

Appsolute
Dec. 10, 2010, 07:08 PM
....when humans start taking over their natural habitat there will be more human/pig interactions..

Pigs are NOT native to North America! They are not in their "natural habitat" - hence the problem! ALL feral pigs should be eliminated, for the sake of the natural habitat!

"These transplants native to Europe and Asia are aggressive mammals posing serious ecological, economic, aesthetic, medical and veterinary threats."


....Many of the pigs you are seeing are actually domestic pigs & mini pigs that have been abandoned & strayed (I can tell from the video provided). Hence your problem! The easiest way to keep animals in general including pigs out of your yard is a good fence. I use horse wire to keep my pigs in...

Make no mistake, these pigs are not abandoned pets. YES, humans did make the big mistake of letting them loose, but many have been feral breeding for generations. Oh, and pigs dig! And aren't bothered by fences! You should see the damage they do to crops and pastures here. Plus, having had a mother sow CHASE me and my horse down a trail, I want NO part of them (well, I want a part of them in my belly!)

I agree, pigs are smart animals, and might be nice to keep. Feral pigs are no joke, and should be eliminated from the wild.

-Plus, they are GOOD eatn'! ;)

Here is some Pig handy work: Tilled (http://www.feral.org.au/wp-content/gallery/feral-pig-rooting-damage/KI_pig_rooting2.jpg)

danceronice
Dec. 10, 2010, 07:37 PM
Briar Creek: Dictionary.com is your friend. Use it to look up "feral". Russian boar and domestic hogs are feral invasives (rather like "wild" horses, actually, except wild horses generally won't kill you on purpose.) Big, nasty, dangerous animals with no natural predators in any number (a cougar MIGHT be able to take one down, but they are wildly outnumbered and outbred.)

Michigan doesn't have them in large numbers, though given the number of pig farms around here that kind of surprises me. But we must have some, because the DNR has a shoot and kill rule on them--if you see one, kill it if you can, no limits.

In case no one answered the upthread question, javelinas are a different species. I would not mess with them, but they're not boars.

Daydream Believer
Dec. 10, 2010, 08:41 PM
An AT hiker in the Smokies actually witnessed a Wild Boar (the Russian kind) attack and chase off a young bear. They are very dangerous. A pack of coyotes or a lion might take one, but that is probably all that will.

I know someone in Oklahoma who has been chased on her own ranch by feral hogs. They are not cute or cuddly but need to be eliminated. As others said, they are very damaging to the environment.

AggieDQ
Dec. 11, 2010, 10:11 AM
BriarCreek, thankfully my husband has only managed to attract the 200lb+ feral hog species to his live traps...maybe 5 year olds don't like the taste of sweet feed soaked in diesel fuel?

Carolinadreamin'
Dec. 11, 2010, 10:27 AM
Wait, are you saying you've found the best bait to be sweet feed soaked in diesel fuel?

Eventer55
Dec. 11, 2010, 10:28 AM
My Father in Law used to hunt them and they are really good eating. Lots of meat, low cholesterol and plentiful.

AggieDQ
Dec. 11, 2010, 12:32 PM
Carolinadreamin' - the ultimate feral hog bait is a 50lb bag of corn mixed with 3 gallons of diesel in a 4x8 trap (used MotorOil works as well). This is better than the "HogWild" bait that you buy at the outdoor stores because the only animal nasty enough to eat this mixture is a feral hog...deer won't get anywhere near it, and the hogs can't stay away. 161 pigs in the last 90 days can't be wrong. If you mix it they will come.

cssutton
Dec. 11, 2010, 12:40 PM
Carolinadreamin' - the ultimate feral hog bait is a 50lb bag of corn mixed with 3 gallons of diesel in a 4x8 trap (used MotorOil works as well). This is better than the "HogWild" bait that you buy at the outdoor stores because the only animal nasty enough to eat this mixture is a feral hog...deer won't get anywhere near it, and the hogs can't stay away. 161 pigs in the last 90 days can't be wrong. If you mix it they will come.



Great to know.

If you had 10 or 20 people in your area that trapped them with that bait, it would make a real dent in the population.

CSSJR

JanM
Dec. 11, 2010, 01:07 PM
CS-around here the only trap for hogs is a bullet. Most hunters donate the meat, but if you leave the hog in the forest everything but the major bones are gone within a week (a good reason to tell someone where you're hunting and when to come looking for you so if you don't come back on time you don't end up a skeleton in the deep woods). And there are worse things-a man and his dog not too far south of here were attacked by a panther, but the wildlife people keep telling him that they don't exist here.

cssutton
Dec. 11, 2010, 01:31 PM
CS-around here the only trap for hogs is a bullet. Most hunters donate the meat, but if you leave the hog in the forest everything but the major bones are gone within a week (a good reason to tell someone where you're hunting and when to come looking for you so if you don't come back on time you don't end up a skeleton in the deep woods). And there are worse things-a man and his dog not too far south of here were attacked by a panther, but the wildlife people keep telling him that they don't exist here.

Panthers:

Same thing in VA.

Recently a fellow posted that residents had told the VDGIF that there were panthers in his area. They told him that there were no such thing.

Later someone shot one and the VDGIF heard about it and promptly sent a game warden to see if it was tagged.

My daughter saw one between Lillington and Fayetteville, NC. She is a veterinarian and a serious wild life photographer so she knows her animals.

Unfortunately she was driving and she was not prepared to take a photo.

This just this week.

http://www.wxii12.com/news/26068485/detail.html

However if sows have 12 to 15 pigs up to 3 times a year, they will eventually be a much greater threat than coyotes or panthers.

Imagine: 200 sows producing 9000 piglets each year!!!

CSSJR

Alagirl
Dec. 11, 2010, 02:42 PM
Carolinadreamin' - the ultimate feral hog bait is a 50lb bag of corn mixed with 3 gallons of diesel in a 4x8 trap (used MotorOil works as well). This is better than the "HogWild" bait that you buy at the outdoor stores because the only animal nasty enough to eat this mixture is a feral hog...deer won't get anywhere near it, and the hogs can't stay away. 161 pigs in the last 90 days can't be wrong. If you mix it they will come.

erm, isn't that going to poison them? ???

I mean I am all for killing them but diesel fuel? :confused:

MistyBlue
Dec. 11, 2010, 03:35 PM
It takes a lot to poison a hog. They're like machines in the gastric department, one of the top reasons they adapt and thrive almost anywhere. They can safely eat what most other animals can't.

And yes, they LOVE diesel/petrol products. You can also bait them by soaking a cloth or burlap in diesel and wrapping it around a tree trunk. Draws them like flies. They also rub all over creosote poles/telephone poles.

Diesel soaked corn works best for them, keeps the other animals away. Usually baited in a pan or trough
though for environmental reasons.

As for saving the feral hogs...they're one of the top ecosystem damage producers in this country. They destroy habitat so quickly and completely that the natural native species of all types end up moving away or dying off. They cause erosion too.

Alagirl
Dec. 11, 2010, 03:38 PM
why didn't they all jump in the Golf then this summer :lol:

oh I am bad...bring on the diesel then! :cool:

crosscreeksh
Dec. 11, 2010, 03:51 PM
Diesel on corn???? Is that like a piggy gourmet salad dressing. Do they prefer street legal diesel or will they get by with the red dye/off road type??? We don't generally have a major problem here in NE OK, but my SIL got one as it crossed the dirt road a couple of weeks ago. That bugger weighed 325 pounds and was all two BIG men could lift into the truck!! Also had SHARP tusks like an elephant!!! Guess our coyote problem isn't so bad!!!

Carolinadreamin'
Dec. 11, 2010, 03:55 PM
I asked my barn owner/trainer about the diesel fuel and apparently she and/or the hunters are using that mixed in with the corn for the pigs. I never knew!

MistyBlue
Dec. 11, 2010, 03:57 PM
There's something about the smell of diesel to a hog...it's like catnip to cats. Pignip. :lol:
I have no idea why it attracts hogs like crazy.





why didn't they all jump in the Golf then this summer
Because they don't like Volkswagons.

AggieDQ
Dec. 11, 2010, 04:29 PM
In the spirit of the Holidays, we've been using red diesel. Once they're in the traps the only poisoning they have to worry about is of the lead variety.

Bluey
Dec. 11, 2010, 06:08 PM
In the spirit of the Holidays, we've been using red diesel. Once they're in the traps the only poisoning they have to worry about is of the lead variety.

In the spirit of the law, that red diesel is for farm use and that is farm use too.;)

crosscreeksh
Dec. 11, 2010, 08:45 PM
Definitely "off road use"!!! Just wondered if they preferred the expensive stuff or still liked the cheaper stuff with sulphur!!

threedogpack
Dec. 11, 2010, 09:57 PM
the guy who put in my furnace this year hunts hogs in Texas and Virginia (?) with his two Pitties and a Coonhound.

I guess they are hard enough to find that it's about all he hunts anymore.

No, that should be hard enough to HUNT not find.

Beentheredonethat
Dec. 11, 2010, 11:29 PM
How funny, I am super close to you in the East Bay. We are about as un-populated as you get in CA. The barn is on 350 acres, surrounded by literally thousands of free acres, probably a grand total of 15 houses scattered about for the land owners. I ride at dusk all the time, but never seen one, or heard of them being around. All the land around us is cattle land though so wonder if that has something to do with it :confused:. We don't have deer either, just the one family living in the ravine, and trust me if they even think you are around they take off running. I guess our hills just aren't as good as over in Castro Valley.

Hm. Where are you? Are you in an area that surrounds the east bay parks? Or maybe in that open area between Mt. Diablo and Dublin/Pleasanton? I can't imagine no deer or pigs or turkey, or anything else. There are cattle all over here, too, so that's not the difference. Maybe you're in some kind of cacoon that somehow kept the populations from growing.

I'm going to have to tell my pig hunting barn owner next door about the diesel next time I see him. I wonder if he knows about it? He's all about tracking them. (I can't tell deer and pig tracks apart.) If he set up a spot with diesel, then he would know where they are!

rideagoldenpony
Dec. 12, 2010, 02:03 AM
Having lived in a very rural area of Northern California that was home to MANY wild pigs, I can attest to their HUGELY destructive ways. We awoke many mornings to find acres and acres of the ranch had been "rototilled".

We also had a lot of problems with trespassers who were pig hunting. It wasn't that we minded them being hunted (a necessity, really), but they weren't always the kind of folks that you wanted to have hang around your home.

Definitely a problem to take seriously.

JSwan
Dec. 12, 2010, 08:31 AM
161 pigs in the last 90 days can't be wrong. If you mix it they will come.

Holy Moly. I'm filing that one away for future reference.

Got any advice for a coyote problem? :)


csutton - the game dept folks always poo poo sightings. I guess they have to until there is irrefutable proof, but that will come soon enough, I think.

cssutton
Dec. 12, 2010, 09:46 AM
Holy Moly. I'm filing that one away for future reference.

Got any advice for a coyote problem? :)


csutton - the game dept folks always poo poo sightings. I guess they have to until there is irrefutable proof, but that will come soon enough, I think.

I thought the interesting part was that they wanted to see if there was a tag.

And whose tag might that have been?

The suspicion is that it would be the VDGIF's or an agency with whom they are working, like maybe the US Wildlife people.

If anyone knows the answer, I have not heard of it.

CSSJR