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View Full Version : NJ peeps: is there such thing as a house without a radon problem?



SnicklefritzG
Nov. 28, 2010, 06:41 PM
I moved to NJ a few months ago and am currently looking to buy a house or a condo. I've found some nice homes, but a lot of them have radon issues. The problem seems to be worse in Hunterdon county.

How difficult is it to find a house in NJ without a radon problem? I'd really rather not deal with that if at all possible.

JanM
Nov. 28, 2010, 07:37 PM
Radon can be remediated with air exchange systems, so if the houses you are looking at don't have this then don't even go any further. The resale is not good because of people's fear of radon, and in some future time there are maximum amounts you can have in a house you may not be able to get rid of the place at all. In places that commonly have radon systems there should be remediation systems built right into the house.

It's much cheaper to build this into a house during construction than to retrofit it.

JulesGirl
Nov. 28, 2010, 07:41 PM
We had our house retrofitted with a radon mitigation system at closing, since it had tested slightly high. It's made the amount of radon not even register on a test now. The system cost the seller a few hundred dollars.

Yes, it's possible to find a house in NJ without a radon problem -- those with slab foundations, for example, are pretty good. We wound up going through home inspections on a few places before buying and two of the three places had no radon problem at all -- and with the mitigation system working, we bought the one that did.

Guin
Nov. 28, 2010, 07:45 PM
Open the windows in the basement. Radon goes away if you're properly ventilating.

SnicklefritzG
Nov. 28, 2010, 07:51 PM
Radon can be remediated with air exchange systems, so if the houses you are looking at don't have this then don't even go any further. The resale is not good because of people's fear of radon, and in some future time there are maximum amounts you can have in a house you may not be able to get rid of the place at all. In places that commonly have radon systems there should be remediation systems built right into the house.

It's much cheaper to build this into a house during construction than to retrofit it.


The houses that have had radon problems also had radon remediation systems in place. I don't know if there are different types of systems, but I could see a PVC pipe running from under the basement floor up through the ceiling and presumably up to the roof.

When you talk about "air exchange system" are you referring to a radon remediation system or are those two different things?

keepthelegend
Nov. 28, 2010, 07:57 PM
My basement has a reading of 10.....how worried should I be since we spend almost no time down there? Sorry to be slightly of original topic.

JanM
Nov. 28, 2010, 08:00 PM
Yes, the remediation systems do have PVC pipes and I think little fans or something to get the radon air outside, and I've heard them called air exchangers too. It's good that the houses you looked at had the built-in systems because retrofitting can be very pricey and involve a lot of expensive work. If you get a great home inspector they should explain if the house remediation system is okay. The number of radon homes depends on the soil and the granite in the subsoil so it does occur in wide geographic areas.

And I've been told by a building inspector who should know that even a slab house can have a radon problem because it will come up through the soil where the pipes and other voids are in the slab. But not as much as a raised foundation with bare soil underneath. It's enough to make you totally paranoid.


Keep-the problem is radon supposedly rises through the house, and if you have run a radon test you are required to disclose it in most states (where I live there is no disclosure requirement). You might call someone like the local building inspector and ask them, because if you call a radon remediation company they'll tell you it's a problem they can solve for a lot of money.

JulesGirl
Nov. 28, 2010, 08:01 PM
My basement has a reading of 10.....how worried should I be since we spend almost no time down there? Sorry to be slightly of original topic.

Four picocuries is the "acceptable" level, though the EPA states that any amount is bad, really.

SnicklefritzG
Nov. 28, 2010, 08:05 PM
Why is it that some of the horsiest parts of NJ have the worst radon problems. waaahhhhh!!!!! :(

JanM
Nov. 29, 2010, 07:04 AM
Snickle-once it's remediated the amount should be very low or zero and the house seller should have this documented. It is not a problem once it is remediated properly. Apparently the reason radon and horses go together is the limestone and granite that have it in, and the same minerals cause rich grass and therefore are in good horse country.