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City Ponies
Nov. 17, 2010, 03:13 PM
So the 'trainer spending $' thread got me thinking. I was barn shopping last year and looked at a few barns who required you to buy certain items (stable blanket, saddle pad) not excessive but they wanted you to ride in the barn colors.

Now I know of a few A barns here in the area that offer just boarding without requiring to be in a program, however if you showed you still had to represent the farm. My issue, when shopping last year, was that I had just spent $1000 on new blankets for my guy in MY colors - all my horses wear the same 2 colors, either navy or grey, and all my show sheets are Baker (bc I'm personally a Burberry nut and impose it on my poor beaties LOL). So here I am with brand new embroidered Baker blankets, coolers, and navy everything else.

Alas, I did not board for other reasons but I would be highly pissed if my tack, all very high end and matching, was not acceptable in some barns just because they have a code. I know many of you will say just don't board there, but if your not riding in "the system" but want a good facility with a good trainer for occassional lessons why should you have to do the $10000 make-over, provided your horse clearly doesn't look like a clearance rack nag ;)

I have no dog in this fight. I just know the other thread aggravated me to think I could walk into a barn and all my Pessoa, Baker, etc gear was not up to par and essentially was useless. But I love my barn and not moving!

Pirateer
Nov. 17, 2010, 03:30 PM
I have no dog in this fight. I just know the other thread aggravated me to think I could walk into a barn and all my Pessoa, Baker, etc gear was not up to par and essentially was useless. But I love my barn and not moving!

I would say that, unfortunately, both of them would be unacceptable in a BNT barn. Bakers don't seem to fit WBs as good as TBs, which obviously aren't en vogue anymore. And Pessoa used to be a decent saddlemaker but the new ones are kinda gross.

ExJumper
Nov. 17, 2010, 03:52 PM
Here is one thread:

http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/showthread.php?t=234846&highlight=dress+code

of a bunch:

http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/search.php?searchid=8211996

You'll see a lot of people who think being asked to wear a clean pair of breeches and a collared shirt is one step away from Nazi Germany.

Pirateer
Nov. 17, 2010, 03:56 PM
Here is one thread:

You'll see a lot of people who think being asked to wear a clean pair of breeches and a collared shirt is one step away from Nazi Germany.

Seig Heil Polo Shirt!

CBoylen
Nov. 17, 2010, 04:13 PM
For every person that comes with a Baker, there is someone who will show up with a nylon blanket in neon pink. "We only use our colors" is more polite than "Can I see your blankets?...Oh, yeah, you have terrible taste, YOU definitely need new blankets...But Susie over there is okay, HER taste is acceptable".

mvp
Nov. 17, 2010, 04:27 PM
You know the part in the movie where Joan Crawford yells "No wire hangars?" Yeah, that's me with respect to non-matching horse wardrobes and trunks.

I'll give you the Crawford-esque rant later.

But here I'll answer the Dr. Phil "So how's that working for ya" question.


My issue, when shopping last year, was that I had just spent $1000 on new blankets for my guy in MY colors - all my horses wear the same 2 colors, either navy or grey, and all my show sheets are Baker (bc I'm personally a Burberry nut and impose it on my poor beaties LOL). So here I am with brand new embroidered Baker blankets, coolers, and navy everything else.

Alas, I did not board for other reasons but I would be highly pissed if my tack, all very high end and matching, was not acceptable in some barns just because they have a code. I know many of you will say just don't board there, but if your not riding in "the system" but want a good facility with a good trainer for occassional lessons why should you have to do the $10000 make-over, provided your horse clearly doesn't look like a clearance rack nag ;)


Yeah, I finally realized 1) I could never afford to be in the Dressed To The Teeth barn I wanted; and 2) I probably wouldn't be a docile enough client to do that, so....

I chose my own damned colors, designed my own monogram, trunk and halter/saddle board for the shows. I look like a high end barn of.... wait for it... one or two stalls.

That means when I travel with a barn, my stall will always be on the end. No one is unhappy. I keep my space clean and raked. I'm both independent and helpful for the barn I show with. And, really, the barn's row of stalls had to end somewhere, so no one cares if mine marks the border.


I would say that, unfortunately, both of them would be unacceptable in a BNT barn. Bakers don't seem to fit WBs as good as TBs, which obviously aren't en vogue anymore. And Pessoa used to be a decent saddlemaker but the new ones are kinda gross.

Yes, and edging toward Joan. I'm so sorry you put Bakers at the center of your universe for this reason.

On the other hand, you can Baker up just about anything-- your tailer's pads, your car seat covers, your clothing and shoes. You could probably wall paper your front hall in that plaid if you were so inclined. Maybe you should, just to make a point to people like me.

Aelfleah Farm
Nov. 17, 2010, 04:29 PM
Our trainer solved the non-matching saddle pad thing by giving each rider on her show team a saddle pad (simple white A/P pad with her logo in the corner) and expecting them to use it when at shows.

funky colors perfectly acceptable for schooling (and showing - after all this is an eventing barn, we do serious color coordination for cross country - I have one horse that goes out in lime green and another that goes out in purple)
funky horse clothes are fine - I have a turnout for one of the eventers that is got a 60's flower power theme
as long as the riders are reasonably neat (shirt tails tucked in, hair constrained), anything goes.

As long as you tow the company line by using the supplied saddle pad when showing as a representative of the farm, your fine.

danceronice
Nov. 17, 2010, 04:35 PM
You know, if you MUST insist on everyone having exactly the same blanket, okay, but what kind of trainer objects to a saddle so long as it fits the horse and isn't dangerous?

Aelfleah Farm
Nov. 17, 2010, 04:35 PM
I chose my own damned colors, designed my own monogram, trunk and halter/saddle board for the shows. I look like a high end barn of.... wait for it... one or two stalls.

That means when I travel with a barn, my stall will always be on the end. No one is unhappy. I keep my space clean and raked. I'm both independent and helpful for the barn I show with. And, really, the barn's row of stalls had to end somewhere, so no one cares if mine marks the border.

I do the same thing, even though the barn we compete with isn't a matching Nazi's barn.

I am a breeder, so when my rider shows with her eventing team, she's representing both her trainer and her breeder (me). She is "borrowing" my horse and all of the gear on that horse is mine, so I pick what *I* want. I get my own tack stall - and then share it with the team as necessary. I hang my banner and stall curtains on my stalls. We are always on the end of the team stalls.
Works great.

Renn/aissance
Nov. 17, 2010, 04:47 PM
My farm does not require that we all have matching show gear, although it is encouraged. My horse happens to have a custom wardrobe in other colors (I knew when purchasing Tip's wardrobe that thanks to college and graduate school I'd be doing some serious barn-hopping in the upcoming years, so I bought his clothes in hunter green and gold to satisfy myself.) I am doomed to the end stall on the aisle, at least until I buy a trunk cover that matches the farm colors of hunter and burgundy, but our show setup looks so classy that I can take pride just in walking my horse down that aisle.

purplnurpl
Nov. 17, 2010, 04:54 PM
I would say that, unfortunately, both of them would be unacceptable in a BNT barn. Bakers don't seem to fit WBs as good as TBs, which obviously aren't en vogue anymore. And Pessoa used to be a decent saddlemaker but the new ones are kinda gross.


LMAO!!
wait, was this serious?
Don't let Rodrigo hear you say that.

enjoytheride
Nov. 17, 2010, 04:56 PM
I think that purchasing a trunk cover in the barn colors and a dress sheet if you show is perfectly acceptable.

I have blankets that I use only for shows, unfortunatly one of them happens to be a purple plaid fleeece dress sheet :cool: If I were at a barn like those mentioned I would certainly expect to play along, and would probably have the money to at least buy a sheet, a pad, and a trunk cover.

I wouldn't pick a trainer that thought saddle brand mattered over fit, and would assume that a clean well fitting saddle is acceptable.

Reagan
Nov. 17, 2010, 05:00 PM
For every person that comes with a Baker, there is someone who will show up with a nylon blanket in neon pink. "We only use our colors" is more polite than "Can I see your blankets?...Oh, yeah, you have terrible taste, YOU definitely need new blankets...But Susie over there is okay, HER taste is acceptable".

100% agree. I could never afford the custom blankets, coolers etc and my trainer was really great and always had extra for people like me who just couldn't afford that. We were also always provided show saddle pads so that everyone matched. It makes a much more professional picture at shows. If you have a nice baker blanket or a conservative wool cooler, many trainers will still let you use them, but they have to "protect" themselves from the girls who want to have neon pink and green everything :winkgrin:

REH
Nov. 17, 2010, 05:12 PM
For every person that comes with a Baker, there is someone who will show up with a nylon blanket in neon pink. "We only use our colors" is more polite than "Can I see your blankets?...Oh, yeah, you have terrible taste, YOU definitely need new blankets...But Susie over there is okay, HER taste is acceptable".


ROFLMAO

Trixie
Nov. 17, 2010, 05:17 PM
LMAO!!
wait, was this serious?
Don't let Rodrigo hear you say that.

Well, it's sort of true - it depends on which one you have. For a while there, some of the Pessoas had leather that was extremely plastic-y.

I wouldn't discount them entirely, but I've seen - and ridden in - some fairly awful ones.

Madeline
Nov. 17, 2010, 05:24 PM
You know, if you MUST insist on everyone having exactly the same blanket, okay, but what kind of trainer objects to a saddle so long as it fits the horse and isn't dangerous?

One who is a pathologically controlling or one who is getting a nice kickback from their saddle supplier...

MHM
Nov. 17, 2010, 05:26 PM
Two words for barn hoppers:

Wooden trunk!

Classic, timeless, never the wrong color. ;)

Sonoma City
Nov. 17, 2010, 05:27 PM
I was at a barn once that was pretty particular about matching colors, but it served a purpose. The colors were Navy/hunter/burgundy. Sheets (turnout and stable), were to be hunter. Medium blankets were to be navy. Heavy blankets were to be burgundy. I thought it was actually pretty clever. That way, it was easy to spot what blanket was what so that the stable workers didn't have to remember which plaid or color or whatnot for each horse went with what weather. We weren't required to get a particular brand, so could choose what suited our budget and horses shape within the color scheme. Yea, you might have to spend some money when you first arrived if your colors didn't match, but you also weren't required to buy custom everything from TCH at crazy prices!

Pirateer
Nov. 17, 2010, 05:30 PM
LMAO!!
wait, was this serious?
Don't let Rodrigo hear you say that.


The newest ones don't appear so bad- and I'd kill for an old, old A/O.

However, the ones made from, say, 2000-2006 (arbitrary #'s based on the years i saw people purchase them) were ugly, plasticy, stiff POS saddles. And I will say that right to Rodrigo's face, if asked.

mvp
Nov. 17, 2010, 06:00 PM
The newest ones don't appear so bad- and I'd kill for an old, old A/O.

However, the ones made from, say, 2000-2006 (arbitrary #'s based on the years i saw people purchase them) were ugly, plasticy, stiff POS saddles. And I will say that right to Rodrigo's face, if asked.

I'd say it to Rodrigo's face, too.

But I wouldn't see it because he's laughing all the way to the bank.

Of course, he might turn around and say "Whenever you are ready to pay for good leather and a living wage in a First World Nation, you let me know. Then I'll be happy to build you a saddle I'd actually like to ride in every day, too."

dogbluehorse
Nov. 17, 2010, 06:45 PM
Y

I chose my own damned colors, designed my own monogram, trunk and halter/saddle board for the shows. I look like a high end barn of.... wait for it... one or two stalls.


I am kind of a do-it-yourselfer, keep my horses at home, don't get a tack stall, etc etc. Was thinking of getting some kind of sign with my farm name etc, but tried to design the logo and am not very artistic so didn't manage to finish it. So mvp if you are looking for another monogram to design, let me know!

I guess I must be a libertarian in the horse world, because there is no bleeping way I would buy all new horse blankets to match someone else's color scheme. Just as well I keep my horses at home and meet various trainers at the shows who seem OK with training me even though I am not a fully subscribed member of their barn.

AllOverFarm
Nov. 17, 2010, 07:22 PM
My kids have just started showing at the local level. It's basically just my 2 and the trainer-no other clients. I have been noticing that at this local show all the various barn's clients/parents/trainers/etc all have shirts with their farm logo. It's almost as if everyone at the show has some sort of farm logo shirt. Everyone but us... Do farms do this at the "A" level also? Just wondering.

barnbum81
Nov. 17, 2010, 08:08 PM
You'll see a lot of people who think being asked to wear a clean pair of breeches and a collared shirt is one step away from Nazi Germany.

OKay this made me LOL for real:lol:

barnbum81
Nov. 17, 2010, 08:09 PM
Seig Heil Polo Shirt!

This even more!!! :lol::)

JFJ
Nov. 17, 2010, 08:16 PM
I would say that, unfortunately, both of them would be unacceptable in a BNT barn. Bakers don't seem to fit WBs as good as TBs, which obviously aren't en vogue anymore. And Pessoa used to be a decent saddlemaker but the new ones are kinda gross.

I don't believe this is true at all. Bakers are pretty standard equiptment in most BNT barns I've been in.

CBoylen
Nov. 17, 2010, 08:31 PM
I don't believe this is true at all. Bakers are pretty standard equiptment in most BNT barns I've been in.
Me too. The last rate sheet I was given they were a required item.
My Baker blankets are Clothes Horse made Bakers though, and I think a lot of people buy theirs from there. I believe the regular ones fit differently. I haven't bought a regular one, because I haven't had to replace my blankets in ten years. They last forever and you can go anywhere with a Baker and a Witney. ;)

snaffle635
Nov. 17, 2010, 08:39 PM
Me too. The last rate sheet I was given they were a required item.
My Baker blankets are Clothes Horse made Bakers though, and I think a lot of people buy theirs from there. I believe the regular ones fit differently. I haven't bought a regular one, because I haven't had to replace my blankets in ten years. They last forever and you can go anywhere with a Baker and a Witney. ;)

Are the Curvon Bakers different from the Clothes Horse Bakers in terms of durability? (I mean sheets, not blankets.) Mine only last 1 or 2 years.

CBoylen
Nov. 17, 2010, 08:50 PM
My Clothes Horse Baker sheets I did replace with regular Baker sheets. My answer is, yes, the Clothes Horse ones were of better quality and lasted longer, or at least mine did with the lined shoulders and fleece withers. However, a sheet I think is just a generally destructible item of clothing, and they didn't last THAT much longer. So I replaced them all as they died with regular ones, although I miss the lined shoulders. They wear out more quickly, but are more easily replaceable.
Looking at the Clothes Horse site, what I'm talking about is the custom "traditional tan plaid" clothing, not the "ready-made Curvon" which is the same everywhere, just to be clear.

Lucassb
Nov. 17, 2010, 09:00 PM
I guess I must be a libertarian in the horse world, because there is no bleeping way I would buy all new horse blankets to match someone else's color scheme. Just as well I keep my horses at home and meet various trainers at the shows who seem OK with training me even though I am not a fully subscribed member of their barn.

There is a difference between stabling on your own and simply getting training at shows (in which case you can certainly use and wear whatever pleases you) and stabling WITH a certain trainer - in which case most A show programs will want you to have at least a couple of the basics in their color scheme.

Trainers often put quite a lot of effort into producing an organized, professional appearance for their program at shows. It is part of their marketing effort, and it is appreciated by a lot of clients who genuinely enjoy having the nicely appointed tack room/sitting area.

As CBoylen pointed out, there is no nice way to allow one person to use their own personal stuff while prohibiting someone else from doing so, without passing judgment on their individual taste. And even if it's all quality stuff in different colors... having a barn full of "everyone's own choices" simply doesn't present the organized, professional appearance that is the desired result.

FWIW, I do agree that a nice polished wood trunk, some Baker clothing, a Whitney for the cold weather and properly maintained good quality tack, are usually welcomed just about anywhere. Or at least that has been my experience, and I've been in my share of A show barns.

ExJumper
Nov. 17, 2010, 09:14 PM
After walking down a long indoor aisle at a winter Ledges show (indoor heated facility) a non horse person asked me if all the horses "had to have that plaid jacket" to be allowed at the show.

JFJ
Nov. 17, 2010, 09:17 PM
After walking down a long indoor aisle at a winter Ledges show (indoor heated facility) a non horse person asked me if all the horses "had to have that plaid jacket" to be allowed at the show.

LOL

City Ponies
Nov. 17, 2010, 10:25 PM
Like I said I have no dog in this fight. I'm the only boarder at my barn but I have always been anal about all my stuff matching.

My Pessoa is an older one, ya know the nice made in France (really made in France!) And I love it, I personally wouldn't ride in anything else unless I had a bad fit. I'm a Baker plaid fanatic, yes I've ordered the trailer gear and when I buy my new truck will get the seat covers. But its my personal taste and it looks snazzy on a bay IMO :) otherwise all his stuff is a conservative navy. His day sheet and cooler for shows is Bake and is shipping sheet, all turnouts, all my leather tack is Pessoa. Just my tastes. I can see ordering a sheet or pad is ok, but I could never justify the entire tack makeover. And yes of course a simple wooden truck :)r

Trixie
Nov. 17, 2010, 10:46 PM
But I wouldn't see it because he's laughing all the way to the bank.

Of course, he might turn around and say "Whenever you are ready to pay for good leather and a living wage in a First World Nation, you let me know. Then I'll be happy to build you a saddle I'd actually like to ride in every day, too."

I've not noticed horse folk shying away from paying for a truly quality product. However, it's how you choose your demographic - if you'd prefer to turn out 8-zillion average/below average pieces of track because it makes a nice product, or if you prefer to specialize in a higher quality, higher price point with a smaller business. Obviously, the market has room for both.

ILuvMyBoy
Nov. 17, 2010, 11:31 PM
The barn I board at has a list of sheets/blankets/show attire that's encouraged, but not required. Basically I think if you go to purchase something like a new blanket then they'd like to it be the ones they prefer. As someone said, at shows they're trying to promote something and I think that's a good thing (again, not required, but encouraged).

At home I think the reason behind having the same blankets/sheets is that in a large barn like I'm at, its an easier way to know that the horses are comfortable. It'd be inefficient to have to think everyday that Spot's sheet is heavier than Bubba's so therefore he might be hotter but Max only has a thin nylon sheet on so maybe he's cold. Basically, if one horse is warm they're all likely warm (assuming they're all clipped or have the same coat thickness). Personally, I have no problem adapting to the blanketing rule since I think that it's done (at my barn anways) for the health of the horses and efficiency of the staff, not to create a uniform. FWIW, I do not have a pricey personalized show cooler or wooden trunk and I don't get the end stall at horse shows :winkgrin:

Void
Nov. 17, 2010, 11:39 PM
While I don't think my trainer would describe our barn as an 'A' barn we have been known to show at 'A' shows when the mood strikes (and the pocketbooks are on fire.) I know our trainer would like everyone to have a show trunk, and 90% of us do, 5% have wooden trunks and the other 5% go without. Our trainer doesn't really enjoy hauling and setting up the set up so we usually travel with less. All in all we can have whatever blankets, pads, tack we want as long as they are clean, fit well and we ride well. lol

I on the other hand love everything to be matchy matchy, so I have sets of stuff in my trainer's colors and in my colors.

horsemom17
Nov. 18, 2010, 12:19 AM
You'll see a lot of people who think being asked to wear a clean pair of breeches and a collared shirt is one step away from Nazi Germany.

I literally laughed out loud when I read this!! LOLOLOL :lol:

SnicklefritzG
Nov. 18, 2010, 01:41 AM
Seig Heil Polo Shirt!

ROFL:lol:

cherham
Nov. 18, 2010, 06:56 AM
I too keep my horses at home but stable "with" the woman that rides my mare in the pro classes. She includes me in her stall count and I am always at the end of the row which is just perfect. I take care of my horse entirely myself and set up my stall with my own barn colours, tack cover and name plate etc. I have no use (nor do I pay) for any of the shared amenities...tack up stall, sitting area, feed room etc.

Oh, and I do not show with anyones farm logo on my saddle pad.....eeeek! I represent myself not the barn. I would really resent if that was suggested to me.

mvp
Nov. 18, 2010, 07:37 AM
So mvp if you are looking for another monogram to design, let me know!

I guess I must be a libertarian in the horse world, because there is no bleeping way I would buy all new horse blankets to match someone else's color scheme. Just as well I keep my horses at home and meet various trainers at the shows who seem OK with training me even though I am not a fully subscribed member of their barn.

Actually, I *love* designing monograms. And I'm good at it.

(See, I'm a professional historian and on a couple of projects I read letters in archives written by high-society women 1890s-1920s. Looking at the designs offered to us now versus those? Honey, we are living in the dark ages.)

So we can talk.

But also, I can't see having different colors per horse. I'd like to in theory as I like choosing barn colors, too. Once you have designed yours, it's over. Then you get this kind of post-natal depression. But I wouldn't want to actually have different horses with different color schemes, or actually buy the stuff.

I'd love to spend other peoples' money on custom wardrobes and trunks and such. Can I do this professionally if I don't suck?

Jsalem
Nov. 18, 2010, 08:20 AM
Over the years, our farm has moved more towards the "uniform" concept as well. In the old days, I required a "wooden trunk". Then I ended up with big, small, skinny, fat, coffin-sized, light, dark and everything in between on the hall at shows. It didn't look good. So I chose a vinyl trunk. Yes, they're expensive, but so are the various wooden ones. Those with matching trunks get their horses placed in the primo spots on the aisle, the unmatching ones get put down the row. Plastic may not be out, but will be put in the feed room.

I used to have an "anything goes" blanket policy for the shows. Then we found that we were traveling with stinky, dirty turnout blankets. It was gross and it didn't look good. Now we allow whatever the client wants at home, but everyone is required to have a stock, Baker plaid sheet (very inexpensive, but uniform and tagged with horse's name). At the shows we require a custom show blanket. Expensive, but they stay clean and packed and look great. The plaid sheets are easy to wash and look great under them.

We try very hard to help clients sell their blankets in the barn when they change horses and the sizes change. The system works great and the used ones are snatched up immediately for discounted prices. We found a sale this week on our custom new ones so an email went out immediately for those that needed to buy one.

My old days with the hodge podge turnout and the kids having pink! or purple! stuff is out. The end result is a uniform, professional look that bespeaks attention to detail and a pride in turnout. I much prefer it!

MIKES MCS
Nov. 18, 2010, 09:42 AM
My concept is simple, if a trainer wants their clients to be uniform , then buy the tack trunks, blankets, saddle pads , yourself and rent them. Race horse trainers use to do it all the time as the barn belonged to them and so did the equipment. If an owner wanted to buy a trunk or what ever they were free to do so as long as it was in that trainers colors ect.. You can always give your client a choice of rent to own.

mvp
Nov. 18, 2010, 09:50 AM
Over the years, our farm has moved more towards the "uniform" concept as well. In the old days, I required a "wooden trunk". Then I ended up with big, small, skinny, fat, coffin-sized, light, dark and everything in between on the hall at shows. It didn't look good. So I chose a vinyl trunk. Yes, they're expensive, but so are the various wooden ones. Those with matching trunks get their horses placed in the primo spots on the aisle, the unmatching ones get put down the row. Plastic may not be out, but will be put in the feed room.

I used to have an "anything goes" blanket policy for the shows. Then we found that we were traveling with stinky, dirty turnout blankets. It was gross and it didn't look good. Now we allow whatever the client wants at home, but everyone is required to have a stock, Baker plaid sheet (very inexpensive, but uniform and tagged with horse's name). At the shows we require a custom show blanket. Expensive, but they stay clean and packed and look great. The plaid sheets are easy to wash and look great under them.

We try very hard to help clients sell their blankets in the barn when they change horses and the sizes change. The system works great and the used ones are snatched up immediately for discounted prices. We found a sale this week on our custom new ones so an email went out immediately for those that needed to buy one.

My old days with the hodge podge turnout and the kids having pink! or purple! stuff is out. The end result is a uniform, professional look that bespeaks attention to detail and a pride in turnout. I much prefer it!


My concept is simple, if a trainer wants their clients to be uniform , then buy the tack trunks, blankets, saddle pads , yourself and rent them. Race horse trainers use to do it all the time as the barn belonged to them and so did the equipment. If an owner wanted to buy a trunk or what ever they were free to do so as long as it was in that trainers colors ect.. You can always give your client a choice of rent to own.


Good points and good plans, both of 'em.

Yes, there is Wood trunk... but then also wooD Trunk..... and WOOd trUNk. All are expensive. All are heavy.

And when all are of different sizes, it's a PITA to plan packing them in trailers or on flatbeds to go to the show. Been there, done that where it was directly my problem as a groom.

And to have the set up aisle not look good at the end of that long, tough pre-show travel day? And then have clients arrive to either not care that it looks like caca (and others care that it does)? It makes you want to cry because you busted butt to make it great with what you had and-- fugly or not-- it still took a lot of work.

Yes, it makes sense for everyone to have show sheets or blankets apart from the ones that get dirty at home. No one wants to handle those, let along pack them or put them on horses bathed and groomed for showing.

I thinks-- and laid money on it in the "Future Tacky" thread that big barns will follow in the lines of race horse trainers. Clients will rent the stuff the trainer wants to see at the shows.

Lucassb
Nov. 18, 2010, 10:38 AM
I truly can't see the rental thing working for anything but a very small operation.

Are trainers supposed to invest in enough "inventory" to outfit the whole barn? Meaning multiples in every size?

What happens when you run out of 80's and the next horse comes in and is the same size? Does he have to squeeze into a 78 because that's all that's left?
Does the owner get a break on the rental fee because it rubs his shoulders raw?

What sort of rental fee are we talking about? $5 per sheet, per month? Are blankets more? Who keeps track of all that? If the owner pays late, or doesn't pay... does the horse have to go nekkid? Is there a sliding scale of cost for someone getting this year's brand new blanket, vs. the five year old sort of beat up model that has some repairs??

I just dunno. It seems to me that it's just a lot more practical to have clients who wish to show with the barn purchase at least the basics. It really isn't *that* costly to get a sheet and perhaps a blanket. For the cost of one show, they can probably get everything they need and probably have some cash left over.

I *can* see the barn having a couple extra dress coolers and a scrim or two for general use, and to take horses to the ring if the owners don't happen to have the desired stuff. Those don't have to fit quite so exactly and aren't going to get beat up just from walking the horse around at a show.

bazinga
Nov. 18, 2010, 10:52 AM
I fully agree with dress codes. I when I was barn hunting a few years back it was so nice to see everyone with matching tack boxes, coolers, scrims and bakers. They allowed more options for the turnout blankets and stable blankets, but everything else was uniform. It looks so nice walking into the tack room and seeing the order in there, it just makes everything very classy.

Where I ship in most people have the barn coolers, and boxes but if you don't they are not going to shoot you. When I plan to stable at the shows next year with them we will be using our own colours and barn name, so we will probably be put at the end of the aisles. I already have a big wooden box from a previous barn so I will just continue to use that one.

BAC
Nov. 18, 2010, 10:58 AM
I would say that, unfortunately, both of them would be unacceptable in a BNT barn. Bakers don't seem to fit WBs as good as TBs, which obviously aren't en vogue anymore. And Pessoa used to be a decent saddlemaker but the new ones are kinda gross.

Well I don't know about Pessoa, but Baker is certainly accepted in Frank Madden's barn, a monogrammed Baker sheet and stable blanket is a requirement for every horse in his barn. I would consider Frank Madden a BNT. And I know of others in AA show barns where Baker was a requirement.

Personally I wish our barn did have some type of dress code, some of the outlandish costumes on both horse and rider at the barn I ride at are enough to make me gag. :D

Linny
Nov. 18, 2010, 11:18 AM
Where I rode as a kid they had "show boxes" with the barn logo and and barn coolers with colors/logo etc. The barn owned them. They were only for use at shows. Most of the "show horses" had Bakers (I showed schoolies and their clothes were not always as pretty.) Every horse went to the ring with the barn cooler on them and they looked great.

Once a cooler started to get pretty worn out, if became part of the communal schoolie supplies and a new one was ordered. That way at the shows, everyone looked uniform at ringside but the clients didn't have to invest a fortune in the barn's colors or logo.

REH
Nov. 18, 2010, 11:29 AM
I don't believe this is true at all. Bakers are pretty standard equiptment in most BNT barns I've been in.


Agree. I've been required to buy Bakers in the past. They last longer than comparable products.

naters
Nov. 18, 2010, 11:45 AM
See and what screws me up is this:

I have one horse. I would LOVE everything to match or be coordinated.

But generally when I need something, I cannot ever find it in the color scheme that I was originally thinking of.

Plus, I love Rambos, and those things are so bizarely colored, its ridiculous to try to match anything.

TrakeGirl
Nov. 18, 2010, 01:35 PM
Plus, I love Rambos, and those things are so bizarely colored, its ridiculous to try to match anything.

Agree and agree.

So, what we really need is for Rambo and Baker to get together and produce some "Bambo" blankets. The fit and durability of a Rambo, the colors of the Baker.

Just so you are aware - I am filling out my patent form NOW.

naters
Nov. 18, 2010, 01:42 PM
Ooooh, Bambos.... my new favorite blankets!!!

I want the "black" plaid though, and not the blue...

TrakeGirl
Nov. 18, 2010, 01:45 PM
The Bambo would be available in any of the current Baker plaid color options. It would be the heavyweight option.

It's sister product - the Bimbo - will be the lighter weight sheet.

Silk
Nov. 18, 2010, 01:46 PM
My children go to the ring properly outfitted. I could care less if they dress their ponies in pink and neon green. I require them to be clean and well fitted but other than that, I don't care.

I have one whose mom died of breast cancer and everything her pony has is smartpink plaid. I find it rather heinous but it means a lot to her and her dad. I think the pony looks like a giant Easter bunny when he is decked out in his pink but whatever floats their boat:)

Kid still wears TS breeches and RJ and ariat tall boots with a beval saddle to the ring.

naters
Nov. 18, 2010, 01:50 PM
It's sister product - the Bimbo - will be the lighter weight sheet.


And it would not allow for "bras" underneath (aka Jammies, sleazies, etc).

fordtraktor
Nov. 18, 2010, 01:54 PM
I must say that I have avoided ordering the Wug because I hate my horse looking like Barney, even though the high neck would probably be a good idea.

I am not very vain, but I am at least that vain.

Equibrit
Nov. 18, 2010, 01:55 PM
I'd rather have clean properly outfitted, horses and riders who win if they chose to compete, and have fun if they prefer not to show. All the rest is useless ephemera. Checking results/horsemanship is a better way to chose a barn than going with your colour preference.

MHM
Nov. 18, 2010, 02:22 PM
The Bambo would be available in any of the current Baker plaid color options. It would be the heavyweight option.

It's sister product - the Bimbo - will be the lighter weight sheet.

Sign me up!

I have the Rambo Wugs, which I really like for all their good features, but they are so VERY purple.

Punkie
Nov. 18, 2010, 02:29 PM
I'll be showing with a BN farm this winter and next summer and they came up with what I think is the perfect solution for these situations: they rent show equipment to the riders. Their in-house policy is that you can have whatever conservative, well-fitted stable clothing you wish, but when you go to horse shows, you rent scrims, coolers, sheets, wraps, trunks, etc. if you don't have any of your own or wish to buy them. I have wraps and trunks (my trunks are wood with brass, so if they are being really picky, I'll buy new covers, but I think that'll be just fine) in their colors, but I'll be renting my blankets from them for each show. I have no plans of ever boarding with them (much too far away!) and I don't know if I'll continue showing with them past this season. If I do, I'll invest in my own things. But for now, this makes the most sense to me. The prices are reasonable and it lets you look uniform without spending a million dollars to do so!

City Ponies
Nov. 18, 2010, 02:37 PM
Agree and agree.

So, what we really need is for Rambo and Baker to get together and produce some "Bambo" blankets. The fit and durability of a Rambo, the colors of the Baker.

Just so you are aware - I am filling out my patent form NOW.

Yes!! I would be on the waiting list for the Bambo (even if it was a $500 blanket). As well as the Bimbo. I love Rambos as well but the green and purple don't do it for me so I've settle for the Navy Rhino plaid and my Pessoa Turnouts which are Navy and Black/Grey. I like the durability of my Pessoa turnouts so far, have lasted longer than everything except Rambo.

Trixie
Nov. 18, 2010, 02:58 PM
I'd rather have clean properly outfitted, horses and riders who win if they chose to compete, and have fun if they prefer not to show. All the rest is useless ephemera. Checking results/horsemanship is a better way to chose a barn than going with your colour preference.

I really doubt most people are picking barns based on color preference :winkgrin:

Oberon13
Nov. 18, 2010, 02:58 PM
And the Bimbo will be "cheap" right? :)

sarcam02
Nov. 18, 2010, 02:59 PM
The Bambo would be available in any of the current Baker plaid color options. It would be the heavyweight option.

It's sister product - the Bimbo - will be the lighter weight sheet.

VERY FUNNY!!

equidae
Nov. 18, 2010, 03:09 PM
Hmm. What the usual colors that a barn chooses as 'their' colors?? Because I'm VERY picky and really can't stand anything other than brown, black, royal blue or dark navy. I loathe the hunter/navy/burgundy crap these days and would much rather see a Baker than that on a horse so the snobbery towards a Baker is not something I understand. (Except for the fact of fitting issues and that my WB would not even be able to put his head down to eat in one ;)


I don't know.. I think the whole barn colors thing sounds kind of tacky to me. I can see (and would promote!!) a horse and rider dress code, ie: only ride in tall boots, black gloves and polo shirts- no Tee's or tank tops, and only allow certain colors for horse blankets boots and pads, ie: only black/dark blue/brown blankets and white fitted saddle pads.. I don't think I'd like to see every single horse in the same exact colors/shades of maroon and hunter green :(

Anyone care to share pics of their barns color codes? Just curious to see.

CosMonster
Nov. 18, 2010, 04:29 PM
I think having everyone in barn colors looks really sharp. At the breed shows it's a mixed bag, some with everything matched and some with just whatever happened to be clean and nice and lying around. ;) I don't think different colors for different horses looks bad by any means, but I do think having them all at least somewhat matching can be very nice and professional.

I also have seen it overdone, though, where everything was the exact same shades and designs and practically everything had the barn logo, and I think that looks a bit tacky. Especially the logo everywhere. Riders wearing baseball caps or logo shirts/jackets is fine (although I did once see a barn where everyone was dressed identically for schooling, that was a bit much :lol:), but on every sheet and trunk and saddle pad is too much.

I'm a bit of a hypocrite, though, I say that but my own tack room is a veritable rainbow of colors, and we certainly don't match when we go to shows. :lol: Actually, maybe it's from growing up in cowboy country and doing western pleasure a bit as a kid, but I have different colors for different horses even, picked to complement their coloring. ;) I can understand why more show-oriented barns expect people to fall in line (even though we show we're not a show barn, if that makes sense).

I do think I wouldn't want to board at a barn that requires it of people who are boarding but not in the program, although honestly I haven't seen to many of those--most you are either showing and training to some degree with them, or it isn't a good fit.

CBoylen
Nov. 18, 2010, 04:40 PM
I really doubt most people are picking barns based on color preference :winkgrin:
On the other hand, really attractive tack room drapes never hurt anyone's business ;).

mvp
Nov. 18, 2010, 05:52 PM
See and what screws me up is this:

I have one horse. I would LOVE everything to match or be coordinated.

But generally when I need something, I cannot ever find it in the color scheme that I was originally thinking of.

Plus, I love Rambos, and those things are so bizarely colored, its ridiculous to try to match anything.

Well, there's where you went wrong. It's Un-American to buy when you need something. You must prop up the economy by buying what you want, whenever, and often.

As I kid, I watched people not wash or look at their blankets until it was November and Something Had To Be Done. Then they went out, bought what was available usually at a premium.

So I decided I'd do my R&D ahead of time. If you do that, you can have what you want for the right price.

Again, I'd love a business that did this for people... and at various price points. There is The Clothes Horse. There is Jack's Manufacturing and Big D, at the other end. There are probably more companies out there that will do custom work as you like it.

indygirl2560
Nov. 18, 2010, 06:21 PM
Every barn I've been at never had any rules about buying specific brands and colors for the horses' blankets/clothing. Of course, the barns encourage buying items through them with the barn logo on it, (saddle pads, coolers, jackets, polos, tack trunks,etc.),especially for show items.

SmileItLooksGoodOnYou
Nov. 18, 2010, 06:29 PM
I would say that, unfortunately, both of them would be unacceptable in a BNT barn. Bakers don't seem to fit WBs as good as TBs, which obviously aren't en vogue anymore. And Pessoa used to be a decent saddlemaker but the new ones are kinda gross.

I have a big WB that wears a baker brand sheet just fine. He's a lighter type WB, but he's also very short front to back, so he wears an 80 or 81 and fits just perfect.


Same here. The custom (Clothes Horse I think?) Bakers were often preferred at my barns because we got them in the black plaid (as opposed to navy), had the shoulders lined, and put fleece on the withers- making it more of an "uber-Baker". I've had mine for years, and they always fit my big fatty WBs just fine.

Baker does custom too. You can order them with lined shoulders and fleece withers if you want them that way.


After walking down a long indoor aisle at a winter Ledges show (indoor heated facility) a non horse person asked me if all the horses "had to have that plaid jacket" to be allowed at the show.

:lol: Epic win.


My concept is simple, if a trainer wants their clients to be uniform , then buy the tack trunks, blankets, saddle pads , yourself and rent them. Race horse trainers use to do it all the time as the barn belonged to them and so did the equipment. If an owner wanted to buy a trunk or what ever they were free to do so as long as it was in that trainers colors ect.. You can always give your client a choice of rent to own.

One barn here does that for some things. However they do require clients to buy blankets... (they get bakers with black plaid I think and hunter green trim, both sheet and heavy blanket). It's nice looking.



I love Rambos, and those things are so bizarely colored, its ridiculous to try to match anything.

You might have to ask your tack shop to order one special for you (and maybe find a shop that will order singles), or pick a different model, but there are black, navy and hunter ones available.


I must say that I have avoided ordering the Wug because I hate my horse looking like Barney, even though the high neck would probably be a good idea.

I have a plain navy wug in the medium weight. You can get reasonable solid colors in light and heavy weight too I think.




I have the Rambo Wugs, which I really like for all their good features, but they are so VERY purple.

If ANY of you want me to check on a size or weight I might be able to help you find one in normal colors. PM me.

And since I missed this to quote...
equidae-- Would I be banned for wearing brown or tan gloves with my tan breeches and brown tall boots? (with a conservative matching polo/plain tee, sweater if needed and a matching brown helmet). And I had a trainer once tell me to get gloves that were light colored (grey, tan, even white) because she couldn't see my hands in black gloves against my dark horse across the ring. What about riders with really dark horses? (Please keep in mind I'm poking fun at you a little, not intending to be rude at all. I like tidy, matching and traditional as much as the next person.) :winkgrin:

ponies123
Nov. 18, 2010, 07:40 PM
And since I missed this to quote...
equidae-- Would I be banned for wearing brown or tan gloves with my tan breeches and brown tall boots? (with a conservative matching polo/plain tee, sweater if needed and a matching brown helmet). And I had a trainer once tell me to get gloves that were light colored (grey, tan, even white) because she couldn't see my hands in black gloves against my dark horse across the ring. What about riders with really dark horses? (Please keep in mind I'm poking fun at you a little, not intending to be rude at all. I like tidy, matching and traditional as much as the next person.) :winkgrin:

But...isn't hiding the hands sort of the point (or one of the points) of dark gloves?

Linny
Nov. 18, 2010, 08:01 PM
I can understand wanting everything to match at shows but who's bringing a turnout rug to an AA show? Uh, if it's cold enough for a turnout rug, you are NOT at an AA and if you are, were you going to turn out?!!!????
I live where it's cold, sometimes VERY cold. Any shows around here over the winter are pretty small. Gardertown is the closest venue with "better" shows over the coldest months. If you go from here to WEF or Ocala you might need a sheet a few nights (Ocala or Gulf Coast, not likely at WEF) so are "show blankets" really that important?
Coolers or light shhets that match look great but around here much of the show season is not held in "blanket weather."

MHM
Nov. 18, 2010, 08:08 PM
If you go from here to WEF or Ocala you might need a sheet a few nights (Ocala or Gulf Coast, not likely at WEF) so are "show blankets" really that important?

Some years at WEF, I've used a sheet and a heavy blanket for most of January, and a sheet at night well into February. And WEF is much warmer than Ocala!

CBoylen
Nov. 18, 2010, 09:16 PM
I've used Witneys at WEF at least a few times a season. Sheets almost every single night, blankets a couple times a week. One year we memorably had to add the turnout sheets over the top as an extra layer for lack of better options. It's not that warm for clipped horses. And generally down there barns and tents are open, with no way to shut anything to keep the wind out.
I've found you also need to pack blankets for every show through May, and every show after September, and always for northern shows like LP. Sheets always go. There are times you don't need them, but there's nothing worse than not having what you need.

JFJ
Nov. 18, 2010, 09:29 PM
I can understand wanting everything to match at shows but who's bringing a turnout rug to an AA show? Uh, if it's cold enough for a turnout rug, you are NOT at an AA and if you are, were you going to turn out?!!!????
I live where it's cold, sometimes VERY cold. Any shows around here over the winter are pretty small. Gardertown is the closest venue with "better" shows over the coldest months. If you go from here to WEF or Ocala you might need a sheet a few nights (Ocala or Gulf Coast, not likely at WEF) so are "show blankets" really that important?
Coolers or light shhets that match look great but around here much of the show season is not held in "blanket weather."

I live in north NJ and used to work at a show barn also in northern NJ. We always had at least three layers of blankets available at the WEF. Most times you didn't need the heavy blankets but there were the odd really cold nights you did! And also at several spring shows not to mention going to indoors in the fall.
We always had the customers with the barn colors (trunks and blankets) up front with the owner/trainers horses and the few customer that had different stuff were always put in the stalls further back. I would venture to say that is how alot of the BNT barns do it as well.

lesyl
Nov. 18, 2010, 09:39 PM
And the Bimbo will be "cheap" right? :)
True, but the Bimbo will cost more in the long run due to higher maintenance. Also the bimbo will only come in light pastel colors, dirt will show easily and it may be too tight for the more well developed in the hind horse.

Running Fox Farm
Nov. 18, 2010, 09:54 PM
Y'know, this is all fine and good, but has anyone stopped a minute to consider why this should be a focus for trainers? Hopefully, if you are teaching someone, your influence will extend to time they are not spending in the saddle, like maybe to their horse care.They'll notice how you care for your own animals, and that influence will change whatever " awful nylon hot pink blanket" and the like in their repertoire to something more appropriate and tasteful. You do hope to improve your students on many levels, not just their riding. But, this whole line of discussion is bringing me to one of my favorite rants, that kinda goes like " Back in the day, showing was more of a sport and less of a business. Today, showing is a business, pure and simple." Especially at the higher levels.

doublesstable
Nov. 18, 2010, 09:57 PM
Our trainer solved the non-matching saddle pad thing by giving each rider on her show team a saddle pad (simple white A/P pad with her logo in the corner) and expecting them to use it when at shows.


As long as you tow the company line by using the supplied saddle pad when showing as a representative of the farm, your fine.


Now that's how it should be done.. And I wouldn't object to them buying the blankets, halters what evah.......

xxreddxheaddxx
Nov. 18, 2010, 10:00 PM
OK so what's the big fuss on being required to have matching blankets?!!!! It is a bit unreasonable if the required ones are custom but matching ones for horseshows make your barn look nicer, therefore drawing clients in. No one on this thread can say walking next to a barn with perfectly folded blankets that were all the same looked like it was unreasonable. As for the clean pants and shirt, that should just be a given for anyone who rides. ever. It just looks really sloppy and gets almost to the point of diminishing the quality of the riding if one is not turned out in well fitted, simple, and clean clothing.
Used to be at a barn where we all were required (it was a known rule- you just didn't mess with it) to have a certain brand bridle and saddle. Everyone loves their bridles because they are not expensive for the quality and they fit a variety of horses and make the tack room look very uniform. As for the saddles, it was just easier to have the fitter come out and do everyone periodically and this way the trainer knew that it would fit the horse and place the rider the exact way she wanted it to be.

Ajierene
Nov. 18, 2010, 10:00 PM
So, my trainer was at an event with one of her other students. The student saw her old trainer with a gaggle of students, all in the 'team' or 'barn' colors. Student said to my trainer, "We should get colors like that so everyone knows we are with you!"

My loving trainer replied, "Not likely, then I would have to admit you are mine when you do something stupid to mess up at a show!"

Just sayin...something for trainers to think about when considering those 'barn colors that everyone has to have'.

Linny
Nov. 18, 2010, 11:19 PM
WOW! I lived in Miami for a while and never would have considered the idea of anything heavier than a sheet on a horse. Even when it was "cold" it was usually hot in 8 hours. Of course I never had a WEF type showhorse either...;)

I still think that perfectly matching everything is a marketing ploy used by trainers who foist the cost onto the clients. If the trainer wants to use his show set-up (including my horse) as a marketing tool then why should I pay for it. My hair dresser doesn't upcharge me $5 for advertising in the local chamber of commerce newsletter. It's part of the cut/color/blowdry charge. The stuff is more to his (or her) advantage than mine or my horse's, so he can pick up the cost or let me use my Baker!

City Ponies
Nov. 19, 2010, 08:09 AM
I can understand wanting everything to match at shows but who's bringing a turnout rug to an AA show? Uh, if it's cold enough for a turnout rug, you are NOT at an AA and if you are, were you going to turn out?!!!????
I live where it's cold, sometimes VERY cold. Any shows around here over the winter are pretty small. Gardertown is the closest venue with "better" shows over the coldest months. If you go from here to WEF or Ocala you might need a sheet a few nights (Ocala or Gulf Coast, not likely at WEF) so are "show blankets" really that important?
Coolers or light shhets that match look great but around here much of the show season is not held in "blanket weather."

We are going to Aiken AA in January and if its anything like the show we did in Feb of this year a thick stable blanket may not be enough. It was close to 15 at night on day and my wimpy nekked boy will probably sport his turnout on top. I'm not. Big fan of using more than 2 layers, and the turnout keeps the urine stains out better IMO for messy horses.

cyberbay
Nov. 19, 2010, 10:02 AM
Well, wouldn't it be nice if how the sheet or blanket FIT the horse were the priority over aesthetics?

I find it, uh, really hard to believe that the Baker fits so many types and builds of horses, and fits them well...

I've worked in the top show barns and I would have a dress code, too, for horses on the road. BUT, it is much saner to give a simple color scheme and find sheets that first of all fit the horse. With the color scheme, lots of brands can match. Isn't the horse's comfort the priority?

Also, the heavier Baker sheet is really quite heavy. Honestly, I would never put one of them on my horse -- the Amigo stable blanket, instead, is so light, so incredibly warm, slides over fur and sheds bedding. And comes in a pretty little navy.

I don't think people realize how sore horses get wearing clothing all the time. No wonder the vets are so busy!!

Lucassb
Nov. 19, 2010, 10:10 AM
Well, wouldn't it be nice if how the sheet or blanket FIT the horse were the priority over aesthetics?

I find it, uh, really hard to believe that the Baker fits so many types and builds of horses, and fits them well...

I've worked in the top show barns and I would have a dress code, too, for horses on the road. BUT, it is much saner to give a simple color scheme and find sheets that first of all fit the horse. With the color scheme, lots of brands can match. Isn't the horse's comfort the priority?

Also, the heavier Baker sheet is really quite heavy. Honestly, I would never put one of them on my horse -- the Amigo stable blanket, instead, is so light, so incredibly warm, slides over fur and sheds bedding. And comes in a pretty little navy.

I don't think people realize how sore horses get wearing clothing all the time. No wonder the vets are so busy!!

Most of the show barns I've been in have the horse's clothes custom made for exactly the reason you describe... including stuff in Baker plaid which The Clothes Horse will make (and pipe for you, in your desired barn colors. ;) )

TrakeGirl
Nov. 19, 2010, 03:21 PM
Well, wouldn't it be nice if how the sheet or blanket FIT the horse were the priority over aesthetics?

I find it, uh, really hard to believe that the Baker fits so many types and builds of horses, and fits them well...

I guess my thought is that if you aren’t in a barn where all the clothes are custom made to fit the horses – then there are two choices.

1.) You pick a set of uniform “stock” blankets for all the horses – and you end up having some not fit particular horses well. But everything looks nice and uniform.
2.) You pick a color scheme as you suggest – and you end up with a hodge podge of blankets that sorta match (know how many shades of navy there are?), but the fit the horses presumably.

I know LOTS of trainers that pick option 1 and as a boarder, that doesn’t set well with me. Although it does seem to be the norm and I am amazed at how many owners “drink the koolaid” and don’t seem to worry about blanket fit.

We are working through trying to pick things out for our barn and here is the happy medium I see (knowing that while we are a show barn, we are mostly local, maybe some C’s, an A every blue moon) - let the horses wear what fits them best at home. I do not see the need for matching turnouts at home. Really. Especially since they wear them SO MUCH in the winter. So much more important that they fit. Trainer could specify general requirements (no neon colors, etc). When at a show – I really don’t have a problem with a matching dress sheet, stable sheet, stable blanket policy. I think it looks much nicer. Even if the stable blanket or sheet doesn’t fit my horse great – I know the most he’ll be in it is 3 days as we only do weekend shows. I can deal with that.

mand_asbfan
Nov. 19, 2010, 03:52 PM
So, my trainer was at an event with one of her other students. The student saw her old trainer with a gaggle of students, all in the 'team' or 'barn' colors. Student said to my trainer, "We should get colors like that so everyone knows we are with you!"

My loving trainer replied, "Not likely, then I would have to admit you are mine when you do something stupid to mess up at a show!"



LOL! :D

The barn I just moved from had red, grey/silver, and black at their barn colors. Now all my stuff is in these colors and well those are pretty distinct. I'm thinking going forward I might switch the base color to grey or black and keep the accents in red since this is the opposite way they are doing it but I can still have matching stuff. I know a ASB barn that has orange and brown as their colors...

grey_pony
Nov. 19, 2010, 06:13 PM
I don't think people realize how sore horses get wearing clothing all the time. No wonder the vets are so busy!!

Do they really get sore? Is it just the weight of the blankets? I have never thought of that.

EquitateIt
Nov. 19, 2010, 06:17 PM
I don't believe this is true at all. Bakers are pretty standard equiptment in most BNT barns I've been in.

That's what I thought, that's what I usually see at Harrisburg anyway.

naters
Nov. 22, 2010, 10:19 AM
Well, there's where you went wrong. It's Un-American to buy when you need something. You must prop up the economy by buying what you want, whenever, and often.

.


:lol::lol: True true.

My stuff lasts forever because I take good care of it, but there is always that "oh crap" moment where one horse rips another's turnout, or something!

When I discover I need a new blanket all of a sudden, it seems like they are only available in neon purple LOL

mvp
Nov. 22, 2010, 10:31 AM
Do they really get sore? Is it just the weight of the blankets? I have never thought of that.

A really good old timey horsewoman pointed this out to me. A Baker blanket is heavier and more binding for the warmth if provides than is a quilted blanket rated to the same temperature. "Think of a traditional Baker blanket as living in a pair of tight jeans," she said. Then I got it.


:lol::lol: True true.

My stuff lasts forever because I take good care of it, but there is always that "oh crap" moment where one horse rips another's turnout, or something!

When I discover I need a new blanket all of a sudden, it seems like they are only available in neon purple LOL

And let that be a lesson to you. You must by more crap to have "on reserve" so that you are not subject to the las of supply and demand at any given moment.

Or think of it this way. You will give your money to someone. Whether you give it to the blanket maker of your choice or the purveyor of neon purple is entirely up to you.

naters
Nov. 22, 2010, 10:39 AM
I can understand wanting everything to match at shows but who's bringing a turnout rug to an AA show? Uh, if it's cold enough for a turnout rug, you are NOT at an AA and if you are, were you going to turn out?!!!????
I live where it's cold, sometimes VERY cold. Any shows around here over the winter are pretty small. Gardertown is the closest venue with "better" shows over the coldest months. If you go from here to WEF or Ocala you might need a sheet a few nights (Ocala or Gulf Coast, not likely at WEF) so are "show blankets" really that important?
Coolers or light shhets that match look great but around here much of the show season is not held in "blanket weather."



Because in Aiken at an AA show it can get pretty damn cold. And the showgrounds really don't have a windblock. :cool:

naters
Nov. 22, 2010, 10:45 AM
A really good old timey horsewoman pointed this out to me. A Baker blanket is heavier and more binding for the warmth if provides than is a quilted blanket rated to the same temperature. "Think of a traditional Baker blanket as living in a pair of tight jeans," she said. Then I got it.



And let that be a lesson to you. You must by more crap to have "on reserve" so that you are not subject to the las of supply and demand at any given moment.

Or think of it this way. You will give your money to someone. Whether you give it to the blanket maker of your choice or the purveyor of neon purple is entirely up to you.


Well, I gotta tell you, I will take a neon purple Rambo that is on sale over the black supreme one that is not..... so I guess I could spend more, and get a complete color scheme, but then I look at my bills and decide for cheaper.

I guess it doesn't *really* matter for turnout at the farm anyway.... it would just be nice if the planets aligned and the "x" color blanket was on sale when I needed it to be :lol:

The blankets that go to horse shows (heavy, medium, and light) dont ever come out of the horse trailer unless we are at a show, so they stay clean, and matched.

So at a show we look coordinated, but its my dirty little secret what we look like at home :lol: