PDA

View Full Version : A Horse, A busy life and yet Another, but Geen horse?



Ozone
Nov. 17, 2010, 01:22 PM
Talk me into this please. Or give me a good reason of why not to.

Like most of us there is the horse. With that is husband/house/full time job, no kids (You who can swing kids and horses, you are my hero) basically pretty busy with all 'life' things that occur.

My horse is schooled and I get the same ride every time with him. Great horse, I enjoy him, best horse I've owned.

I stumbled across a green bean that is a green bean but how many of you have seen horse after horse enter your barns? Or horse after horse that you've tried out ? Just then you see him! That horse that comes off the trailer or the one you go to try for purchase and ..... You.Just.Know. this is a horse for you? That is where I am at.

BUT, how do you all who have the lifetime horse that is going to be with you forever, the husband/wife, the kids, the job, ... do you have enough time? Make the time necessary for your green horse? And, of course, not let your lifetime horse hit the back burner for the green horse.

Please let me know your stories that worked out and that did not. I am on the fence.

sptraining
Nov. 17, 2010, 01:46 PM
Hard choices.

I know the feeling. I had to pass on the perfect horse because we couldn't afford it and I still (10 years later) regret it. I know there's always another horse but I'll never forget the feeling...

If you really want this new one, maybe consider leasing out your older guy? Or do you have someone to help you with the green one when you can't get out?

Two horses is a lot on a full time job and family. For a while, I had two, and worked with two others. I got to the barn at 7am, did a horse, then went to work, came back to the barn in the evening and stayed until 9pm. It was exhausting and I couldn't keep it up for very long. My best suggestion is to find someone to help you at the barn (coughworkingstudentcough).

Good luck. Let us know how it turns out.

KateKat
Nov. 17, 2010, 02:05 PM
if your current horse is well schooled and could be ridden by an ammy, then I would definitely think about leasing him out! Before I bought my own I would have jumped at the chance to half lease a well schooled horse that I could learn from.

Because honestly, if you have the funds and all that you're missing is time to buy this horse, I think you'll find a way to MAKE time to make it work. Just look at the other thread on here about working, family and riding. SO many people on here make it work.

findeight
Nov. 17, 2010, 02:41 PM
Having done the kid raising, hubby sitting and working out of the home PLUS running a small buy and sell horse business....don't.

Yeah, you can find the time...but something else gives up the time and, really, your marriage and job have to come first. Then you already have a horse you sometimes are pressed to find time for.

Most greenies are at least a 4/5 day a week commitment and you cannnot tell just how long a session will take because you just don't know. Or you have to spend an extra day correcting something that went wrong on a day you had other plans involving other people.

However, if you want to work out a way somebody else can take on your other horse and hubby is, and be honest, willing to be without you while you tackle this project??? Then you might be able to do it.

But both horses, a marriage and a career? Might regret that.

Umm...do you board out or can you keep at home???? If it, or they, can be right at your door? It is alot less time spent. If you have to drive to them....with 2 horses, you are really committing to alot of time on most days of the week and weekends.

Royal Monaco
Nov. 18, 2010, 10:12 AM
In January 2008 my mare got injured. She had to be 6 months off. In March, I found out I was pregnant with my first child. Perfect timing to let my mare heal.

In December I gave birth to my daugther. Here in Quebec we have one year off when we give birth. I was pretty lucky to have one year to get my mare back to work. But...

My mare wasn't quite right, and the vet was not optimistic. I decided to breed her to get my next prospect. She was bred in June. In July, I went to a big breeding farm with my husband and daughter to have a picnic in a field full of nice horses. And there SHE was. A 2 y.o. Holsteiner mare. I fell in love. I didn't think of anything and bought her.

In november I went back to work. I have a job with big responsabilities, a husband that works A LOT, my daugther and 2 horses (a third one in the oven). I decided to sell the foal when it would be born. Fine.

In March, I sent my 2 y.o. to a professionnal rider to be backed. When she came back, I had no time to ride her. It was an evidence I couldn't do it with 3 horses. Luckily, my foal sold very quickly, but still, I had to manipulate him a lot before weaning because I wanted him to be well behaved before leaving. So I had no time for my new mare. Plus, i had not ride consistently since a year and a half. I was in no shape to ride a greenie.

In August, it was clear that the condition of my older mare was deteriorating. The vet made a diagnostic and suggested me to put her to sleep instead of letting her suffer more and more. I made the decision to let her go.

So I ended up with one green horse. It was clear that without help, I couldn't work my horse enough. A boarder at the barn who is a qualified rider suggested me to ride my mare once or twice a week for a minimal fee (10$ per ride). I called my former dressage trainer to come over and give me lesson once a week. And with the help of my family, I manage to ride 2-3 times a week. So my mare is worked 4-5 times a week.

Honestly, I couldn't have made it with 3 horses, a full time job, a husband, etc. And now, I am pregnant again, so I'll writethe next chapter next year ;)

If you want to give the maximum you can to the new horse, lease the other or sell it. That is just my opinion.

Lucassb
Nov. 18, 2010, 10:24 AM
Well... I did it. At the time, I was single, my made horse was getting older (but still going strong)... and I just sat on a nice young green bean and knew he was the one.

I have a pretty demanding job, and to be honest even without family commitments - I couldn't do it and give both horses the time they needed and deserved. Even though the green bean was quiet and very straightforward.

I ended up leasing one of the horses to another rider in the barn, which was a help. Then I got engaged, and moved to where I live now in CT, almost a thousand miles away. My older horse, who would not have done well in our cold winters, stayed behind with my old trainer, who is a very close friend. She leases him out to one lucky person who enjoys him a great deal and keeps him in work. Although I miss him like crazy, I knew it was the only workable solution. There is NO way that I could have managed two horses well with the other demands on my time and attention.

I hate to dissuade you, as I know how it feels when you see "the one." But I think that the other posters who've said that *something* will have to give are absolutely correct.

touchstone-
Nov. 18, 2010, 10:59 AM
The only way I've been able to make it work is by leasing the older horse.

Lexus
Nov. 18, 2010, 11:44 AM
I keep three horses at a time, work a demanding FT job and have 2 kids and a husband. The only way to make it work is that the horses live at home AND my dd rides. So either she or I will do 2 a day, usually her and I tack up the second one so it's all ready when she finishes #1. At this point in my life the horses revolve around my daughters goals and my riding is to support her.

At one time when dd was young I kept two and it was only sustainable for a very short time, it was just too exhausting.

LittleblackMorgan
Nov. 18, 2010, 11:59 AM
I'm trying to figure out the logistics of the exact same issue...
I have a 14 year old horse who can sit for years and be the same guy when you ride again, I just bought a green WB who needs consistancy, I take a weekly lesson at a differant farm and work FT (commuting 2 hours each day!) and have a home and hubby, 2 large aging dogs and 3 cats.

Hubbs said "Now I'll never see you"

I've attempted to full lease out my pony, got 2 responses. But in New England, with no indoor and winter approaching, my window is very narrow. I would absolutely not let him off farm. I really dont want to do an on farm free lease, as in leasee pays nothing at all...I think if someone pays for a lease, they are more apt to ride the horse and be appreciative I guess? Its not about the $ its about the time. The way I figure, I'll need to rearrange my work schedule from 9-5 to 7-3 for the winter. Which means the same amount of time at home, but more daylight to ride after work (or not...it'll still be dark out when I get to the barn).

I feel ya Ozone! If you figure it out, let me know!

Ozone
Nov. 18, 2010, 12:55 PM
Thanks for all of your advice... still, I don't know what to do...

Findeight you really opened my eyes with your post and basically hit the nail on the head of what I don't want to happen. Especially the thought of another horse taking the time away from something else in my life such as my husband.

As understanding to the horse he is, it is my "job" as the wife to never take advantage of that completly and be the wife he married, the wife with only one horse and the time for him that I have now.

I never thought I would consider leasing my schooled horse but right now the possibility may have to be a reality if I take on the green horse.

My horse is a mile down the road which is great. I am at the barn everyday whether I ride or not. I have people left and right offering me pretty nice horses for free. As we know nothing is free and the board, upkeep alone is what takes free out of free. I have passed on all of them until now. I have him for some weeks to 'try' and I can decide to keep or not which is really nice actually but bottom line is at the end of the day do I have the time for this horse!

Financially I am able to care for them both. Physically I am usually burning the candle at both ends. I make sure DH is good to go and happy, my small animals need my time too, the job is what funds my life and the list goes and goes.

I feel anxious thinking about this horse somewhere else now. But will his life with me be worth his wild? It is so hard to commit when in my world you can never plan what you are doing day to day because something always changes that!

I don't want to pass up something I see as being my next superstar... but can I handle it? Phewwww! :eek:

P.S. Little Black Morgan..... I wish I could figure it out but as you can see by my post I am more of a cluster at this time ;) ha-ha

DMK
Nov. 18, 2010, 02:39 PM
In the summer of 2008 I bought a yearling. My show horse was 16 and I had been showing him pretty steadily in 06/07, making an effort to do a little point chasing because for about the first time in a very long time (ever?) "money(ish), time(ish) & talented, experienced show horse" all came together. I've always had the green beans and when Robbie really stated to come into his own and get the kind of mileage where you can start to finesse your ride ... 9/11 and some unemployment set discretionary spending back for a good long while. But 06/07 was fun and it was done. I found in 2008 I really didn't want to spend that money and some shows were just fine.

Then I found a yearling colt, right price, maybe not the right time ( a year earlier than I planned) but the right horse. So I bought him but left him in FL turned out with another colt until November to have a last hurrah.

I didn't have much of a plan other than when Lido was 4, Robbie would be 19 and a young horse had to come along sooner or later...

Funny how life happens. I kept riding and schooling Robbie (but not showing out of choice and I was about 85% sure he was retired) and started showing Lido on the line in 09 as a 2 year old and in mid summer had a pretty bad accident involving nearly cutting off my thumb. Yeah, not a lot of riding happening for the rest of summer and fall (as far as my surgeon knew). But certainly not showing even if I wanted to - the splint curled my wrist and thumb in a fashion that made riding w/2 hands impossible. So it was a good time to work with a youngster.

By the time he turned 3 and I started him under tack, I had 100% admitted that Robbie was retired. He's totally happy getting turned out and being ridden 2-3 times a week, mostly on trail rides and if the weather holds I can usually ride 6 days a week. Ideally I manage both on Sat/Sun, the 3 year old has 2 days off a week- one of those days I ride Robbie, the other is off for both. Add winter to the mix and that schedule is shot to hell for Dec/Jan/Feb and I know it. Realistically the older horse will be off most all of winter and the young horse will be lucky to have 4 days a week.

But no, there is no working and riding 2 horses a day in my schedule (and I work at home and do not have children, so my schedule is wide open compared to my 2 hour commute days). About 10 years ago when I got the last green bean, I used to try and convince myself it could happen, but it doesn't and it never will happen with any degree of consistancy. So now I'm only doing the green bean if I really am ready to stop showing and regularly training on the older horse

fourfillies
Nov. 18, 2010, 05:33 PM
I have two very broke and quiet ones (amatuerized, most definitely), work (a lot) and have an understanding husband (for the most part). Most of the time it is fine (barn is very convenient so no big city commute which would make it much harder). It is still difficult this time of year when cold and dark (even with an indoor). I am pretty committed (and never sit down either) and doing a made one and green one would be tough, unless the green one is super easy. There are green beans that are just easy (ie won't be a nut/set back three weeks in their training if you get stuck at work and can't ride for a couple of days). High maintenance green bean I'd pass, no matter how perfect otherwise. Oh, and God bless anyone who can do it WITH kids.

lesson junkie
Nov. 19, 2010, 08:47 AM
I say go for it. If your current horse is made, it won't hurt him to have fewer rides-he may even benefit from the change in routine.

Because I can't afford to buy a made horse of the quality I want, I end up with OTTbs or 2yos. For the most part, I've been able to keep them in a program, with the help of a trainer with a great senes of humor. I've held on to my husband, and been able to keep my job. I keep my horses at home, and that does help. If I have a spare half hour, I can get a little done. Often, that's all you need to do any way.

In order for it to be a success, you have to be patient, and enjoy the process. You have to be prepared to be satisfied with small victories, and you can't let setbacks make you crazy.

If you can afford it, do it. If you like sitting on this horse, you'll find the time. Just save that crockpot thread.

Good Luck.

Ozone
Nov. 19, 2010, 09:07 AM
I say go for it.

In order for it to be a success, you have to be patient, and enjoy the process. You have to be prepared to be satisfied with small victories, and you can't let setbacks make you crazy.

If you can afford it, do it. If you like sitting on this horse, you'll find the time. Just save that crockpot thread.

Good Luck.


Thumbs up icon on the crock pot thread ;)

My horse is a schooled 15 year old, he is a nice consistant type of horse but the downside to him is he NEEDS to be in a program, he needs to ride. If not he becomes beligerant on the ground however, he is predictable undersaddle, alway.

I rode the green bean again last night and he is what I call EASY! He is level-headed, smart and actually wants to understand what I am asking of him. He has yet to canter - this I did not know until talking to his owner. I was wondering why when I asked for the canter he just got longer strided and it was like he was saying to me "I am trotting" I am! :) He is wiggly in the ring but I took a video of him and he does not look as wiggley as he feels! Green but a kind green horse.

DMK - My thinking is how yours was. Your made horse got older so you got another one. Wrong timing but you have something now and your made horse is retired. And that comes down to me not wanting to pass up something really nice now even though the timing stinks! I think it will always stink and I don't think I will have the opportunity in the future to get a horse as nice as he is, even being green.

I am still tossing it around. I thought and posted yesterday about leasing my guy but I've decided not to. I've had him as mine for 10 years now and he knows who Momma is. I don't want to back burner him. I have a blast with him! If I decide to get the green boy I will need my horse as a"break" from the greenie!

Bottom line is I have to make a decision which includes my life as it is now, busy but I do it and add the new horse to that. Make time, take time out of another area of my life - but do both horses! Stressful to say the least!

DMK
Nov. 19, 2010, 10:46 AM
The only thing I will add Ozone, is my guy is a program free horse. He can have the whole winter off and still act like he's been in a program (yes, I know how lucky I am!) so the one thing I could count on was that I would enjoy riding my older horse and could do fun things like school him over jumps or go trail riding without him being in a program. If I go in the way-back machine, when Robbie was the youngster off the track, his predecessor (the "older horse") was sort of the type that needed a full program. He pretty much got left alone after I got into riding/showing Robbie since he really wasn't a lot of fun too hop on a few times a week - seems like we had more crappy rides than good one if I pushed him beyond the easy stuff...

Lucassb
Nov. 19, 2010, 11:11 AM
The only thing I will add Ozone, is my guy is a program free horse. He can have the whole winter off and still act like he's been in a program (yes, I know how lucky I am!) so the one thing I could count on was that I would enjoy riding my older horse and could do fun things like school him over jumps or go trail riding without him being in a program. If I go in the way-back machine, when Robbie was the youngster off the track, his predecessor (the "older horse") was sort of the type that needed a full program. He pretty much got left alone after I got into riding/showing Robbie since he really wasn't a lot of fun too hop on a few times a week - seems like we had more crappy rides than good one if I pushed him beyond the easy stuff...

This was my experience as well. Very good point.

findeight
Nov. 19, 2010, 01:29 PM
careful with DH.

Men are just awful about saying anything about what they really think...until they get mad and you end up in a fight. Then it's too late.

I have much personal experience with this. Including a major dust up with long time BF who suddenly expected me to cancel an out of state AA show after the entries were paid and the horse was in the other state...to go out on his 34' boat fishing. In summer. In Florida. Really hurt him when I said no.:confused:. What'd he think I was going to say????? He knew I had been planning that show for 6 months, easy.

Anyway, be warned.