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View Full Version : Another OTTB confo critique...UPDATE: Home!



Big_Tag
Nov. 17, 2010, 08:17 AM
I kind of like this young man!

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v303/RouxKazoo/?action=view&current=Gelding.jpg

Any thoughts? Same asking price as the mare I looked at (see other thread). A lot bigger, but will need some letdown time.

Thanks :)

purplnurpl
Nov. 17, 2010, 10:06 AM
me too. you have to sort of imagine him without the wasp waist and shorter toes to get a good look.
:yes:
I think his hip will look much bigger after let down time and some added lbs.

I like his long neck. I'm really tall and always go for the horses with long necks.
Though, for the hunters, you'll always have to fight with the fact that because he's TB and has that long neck, he'll never have a loaded top line like many of the warmbloods you will compete against. The TBs that end up looking warmbloody, I think, have a shorter back and lil shorter neck. Hence adding to the look of thickness.

He looks like a nice quiet character as well.

danceronice
Nov. 17, 2010, 10:23 AM
He looks like he's standing a hill. ;)

Overall I like him. How young is he? If he's on flat ground and is just butt-high, is he young enough he's likely to grow?

findeight
Nov. 17, 2010, 10:25 AM
Better. Much better. Think he is not wasp waisted, just tightened up since he is race fit.

But, beware, that croup is pretty much a goose rump and will limit step and jump.

Nonetheless, attractive, well balanced and all the parts look like they belong to the same horse. Looks like he has a nice topline and that usually indicates decent gaits. Nice in the neck and throatlatch which usually means decent balance.

Can't tell much about the legs and feet. Undoubtedly they are not perfect but he is standing with equal weight on all 4 and I can't see anything glaring.

I know let down is a pain but at least you know where he has been.

If you do go look, take a neutral third party with you. When you are buying off the track, cheap, they won't hold for a full PPE and you cannot go too far to look? Another pair of eyes is vital. Preferably with experience pulling them off the track.

Oh....butt high??? I don't see it at all on this one. Think there is a slight slope to the ground lifting the back end but if you look at those 1x8s that appear to be horizontal and run up above his belly-he is built uphill.

Big_Tag
Nov. 17, 2010, 10:39 AM
Thanks for the comments thus far. He's 5. Seems real quiet. He also seems rather well-bred to me. Described as "kid-safe" to handle and easy to ride. He *may* not be on track anymore so I might get a chance to sit on him as well.

He is right up where my first OTTB was, in Ohio, and I had one of Dr. Genovese's partners vet him. I think I will go the same route here.

He last raced in Mid-October..has 26 starts from late 08 to now.
To be honest, probably for the best that he needs some let-down time. With the winter and the fact that it's dark when I get out of work at 5 now, and I prefer to board him at a less espensive facility while I put the flat work on him, it's probably a good time to let him chill out over the winter.

findeight
Nov. 17, 2010, 10:47 AM
Sound like a good plan, Can you share the breeding? Makes little difference in a career changer but it's fun. Race record says he stayed sound enough, no gaps.

He looks to have some quality to him...that is always a better place to start then plain, common looking and small because those things cannot be changed. You start with nice looking, you are ahead of the game. Overall, he is nice looking. With food and regular work, he may be stunning.

Big_Tag
Nov. 17, 2010, 10:58 AM
But of course :)

http://www.pedigreequery.com/start+over2

That race record is incorrect; I looked it up and he has 26 starts and 1 win. I don't know a lot about TB bloodlines (however I'm like an Aspberger's candidate when it comes to STB pedigrees ;)) but I see some names there I know and have heard favorable things about for sport horse pedigrees.

Yeah he just looks pleasing, I agree. He looks like one you want to sit on, whereas the mare didn't look like much and her merit was her good mind. maybe this guy has both. Plus, big and gelding= if I need to move him, I can much easier, assuming he isn't a wacko or a cripple ;)

ETA: Findeight, i know you can't ride a pretty face, but still, doesnt hurt!!
http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v303/RouxKazoo/?action=view&current=StartOver0081.jpg

findeight
Nov. 17, 2010, 11:14 AM
Nothing terribly fasionable up close and pretty much all outcrosses. That's good.

There are some well known names there, at least one known for iffy dispositions. But they are too far back to mean much...as in been dead for years. I would not give that any thought with the outcrosses.

Seems pretty much a blank slate.

Here's hoping he is sane and serviceably sound and not that whack job cripple most of us have gotten stuck with at some point over the years.

Good luck, keep us posted.

magnolia73
Nov. 17, 2010, 11:33 AM
My OTTB mare has a long neck and over time it has filled out very nicely and made a nice shape. With good flatwork you can get some beef to that long neck. Most people think she is a WB or a WB cross (though next to the holsteiner mares at my barn, she looks like a TB).

This is a good shot of her neck OF
http://www.facebook.com/album.php?aid=2034496&id=1191895652#!/photo.php?fbid=1215266180423&set=a.1215265540407.2034496.1191895652&pid=30658332&id=1191895652

Your horse is a good looking horse. They change a lot once they get fed and ridden differently.

Bogie
Nov. 17, 2010, 07:53 PM
I like him. I like a horse with a longer neck and his whole body seems balanced. He seems to have good bone and depth to his body. After he's let down, and puts on some weight and muscle I think he'll be quite handsome. And at least in that shot he exudes calm.

If Randall's vets him and he looks good to them, that's worth a lot. Dr. Ron is one of my favorite vets. I watched him do several PPEs on OTTBs. That's a practice that really knows how to evaluate them in the context of their next career.

Certainly I'd go look at him in person.

OneMoreTime
Nov. 18, 2010, 12:34 AM
I like him very much. In fact, he closely resembles my big chestnut OTTB. One thing to consider with the high withers/low back is saddle fit- this is a challenge, especially as they grow and develop a topline. be prepared for the saddle fit to change dramatically over a year or two.

Big_Tag
Nov. 18, 2010, 07:58 AM
Well, I'm going to see him this weekend so I will keep everyone posted ;)

One other question though; he really does seem to want to stand under himself. See here: http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v303/RouxKazoo/?action=view&current=Gelding2.jpg

Any thoughts on this? I can think of two horses off the top of my head who stand like that--one's an old grand Prix horse who did the Puissance back in the 90s and the other is our one STB mare who was a phenomenal racehorse. However, since it seems to be a bit of a conformational "flaw," what do you all think??

That being said, I am excited to meet him. He sounds like a really nice guy, but I guess we'll see!

findeight
Nov. 18, 2010, 03:15 PM
Urrrgh...site is blocked. I'm at work.

Anyway...I'd go look on something like that. Some things you need to see them move to really tell if there is an issue or not. And that is something that really does not bother some of them at all...may well be something you can easily live with-if it is there at all. Unless it's really bad, I never disqualify from a picture. Especially in the lower price range where you know you are going to have to give somewhere.

tidy rabbit
Nov. 18, 2010, 04:00 PM
Mr Prospector & Buckpasser are a super combo, in my opinion.

I've had 3 with this blood line.

This one. (http://pets.webshots.com/photo/2897529430048495570GKxmJa)

And

This one. (http://pets.webshots.com/album/407470338CoVzla)

And
This one... (http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2519395740048495570UzibRP) I like the bloodline so much this last one I breed myself. He's looking like he'll be a super jumper one day.

Great athletes, these horses.

meupatdoes
Nov. 18, 2010, 04:00 PM
I am not a big fan of it when the elbow is so much lower than the stifle. I just think it is bad conformation and it can really make lead changes a b*tch.

tidy rabbit
Nov. 18, 2010, 04:11 PM
One other question though; he really does seem to want to stand under himself. See here: http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v303/RouxKazoo/?action=view&current=Gelding2.jpg

Ahhh, yes... this could be a soreness issue... or just a bad photo. I'd watch him stand in the barn aisle for a few minutes.

See if he wants to stand straight or if he puts one foot out further than the other routinely; or if he stands under himself like that.

I also like to peek in at them in their stall when they are resting, this will give you good idea too.

Since this horse is a 2005 model, I'd say what you see is what you get as far as bone structure and growth.

Big_Tag
Nov. 18, 2010, 07:42 PM
I'll check it out. He's raced as recently as a month ago and he had been racing all along so I'd like to think he isn't horribly lame but I will definitely check it out. Plus if I like him enough to merit it, he'll of course be vetted out.

He definitely is higher at the stifle than the elbow but it's particularly pronounced, I think, because he's racing fit.

I think I will order a couple of his races through equibase just for fun, see what he ran like.

TR: Yours are awesome looking. Let's hope this guy has some of that ;)

Deepinmanure
Nov. 19, 2010, 02:14 PM
If you look closely at the picture they've got him standing on a incline facing downhill. He has to stand underhimself They just have photographed him at an uncomplimentary angle.He's really nice. !!!

Big_Tag
Nov. 21, 2010, 06:21 PM
So, I went to see him today. I like him. He's a character. He's actually a bit pushy on the ground (i.e., flings his head around a good bit) but obedient. I got on him indoors where their hotwalker is and he was pretty "up" but content to walk, albeit a bouncy little walk. When he faced the door to outside he all of a sudden made a little sideways canter beeline for it but I was easily able to turn him back to the inside and the seller shut the door after that. He trotted around nicely, but again, pretty squirrely. They offered to let me take him outside in the open but given how up he felt I wasn't too keen on it. He definitely has brakes, was very easy to slow down/stop. So I hop off and ask if I can see him at liberty in their roundpen (it was a bit muddy to ride in there) so we untack him and take him in there and he runs around a good bit, for probably about 3 minutes of as much speed as he can accomplish in there. And then the seller laughs and says "oh geez he's pretty excited! I guess since he hasn't been out in three days!"

Well, thanks for the heads up, team. No wonder he was a little squirrely! So all in all I thought he was rather well mannered. Apparently his trainer's 8yo son rides him around the roundpen with a halter and lead. He's also supposedly very well behaved on the track; goes from the bath stall to the shedrow with just a halter and will actually just follow w/o any guidance. He's cute. I like him. I would have liked to have ridden him when he wasn't so excited but the fact that he was actually quite mannerly given the situation impressed me after I found out that he'd stood for 3 days. He's very nice to sit on.
So, I think I will vet him. He has really clean legs. I knew this from looking at his race lines but he is a closer and the seller said that's often the case with closers; they don't exert themselves till the end of the race and are generally not as tough on themselves.

One question though: I rode him in a "ring bit." Anyone know how tough a bit this is? The seller said she thought he'd probably go in a pelham till he got more riding time on him but I personally like to start in a snaffle of sorts; however, I'm not familiar with a ring bit so if I was riding him around in a ton of bit I'd like to know. Like I said, brakes were totally fine, but just so I'd have a baseline.

I snapped a photo of him today too; when I switch computers and can upload it I will. He's put on a bit of weight since his last photos.
Whew, that was long, sorry! Thanks for listening; any input is appreciated! :)

ETA: http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v303/RouxKazoo/?action=view&current=IMG_0380.jpg (please excuse his muddiness/saddle mark; I just wanted to post a picture of him with a bit more weight and a different stance)

Madeline
Nov. 21, 2010, 06:45 PM
http://www.pedigreequery.com/start+over2



I have no direct interface with Petionville's offspring, but he ranks in my top 5 good looking horses of all time...

Lord Helpus
Nov. 21, 2010, 08:16 PM
I love his pedigree! Petionville has had a number of good hunter types and he deserves to. Wavering Monarch is a great sport horse influence, although, I usually see him on the bottom side.

His dam is also nice with Tim Tim Tam and ?? (senior moment).

I like to start my OTTB's in a fat bit gag with a snaffle rein attached to the bit's ring. Race horses are taught to lean on a snaffle -- but I hate to start with harsh bits. The answer I have found is to create a different pressure point (the poll) around which they have no preconceived association.

As soon as the horse responds to the gag portion I reintroduce the snaffle rein and keep the gag as a backup pelham rein.

But I do not get on an OTTB until they are voice trained on the lunge. That way he and I have a language in common right from the git-go. Every aid is preceded by the word he knows so he can make an association, and is never left wondering what I want.

lalahartma1
Nov. 21, 2010, 08:45 PM
He's cute as the devil! :)

lolita1
Nov. 22, 2010, 06:49 AM
It would depend on how thin the ring bit was as to its how it was on the horses mouth. In general jockeys actually balance off the horses and their mouths so many of them are a bit hard in the mouth until they have had time to learn. Most of them really don't have the "best" breaking in options handed to them. Its more go and when you are puffed woo.

If he was good for you when in full race condition and 3 days off he is going (IMHO) to be very good once in "normal" condition. I wouldn't place too much trust in the young child riding the horse so get a vet check and in my experience generally the ones I bought a long time ago were drugged. ... I once went out to see a horse that was given "dressage" training along with it's race training. The thing bolted with me (didn't buy it) and that is saying something about the bolt the first one I bought bucked so its tail hit me (still bought it) as I sat the buck and the second never did a thing. He is the one I regret selling :no:

Good luck I like him and yes his rump is goosie but ... actually I think it makes them quite good behind they in generally really get under themselves. Just MHO again. In fact you see it in warmbloods.

Big_Tag
Nov. 22, 2010, 09:10 AM
Good luck I like him and yes his rump is goosie but ... actually I think it makes them quite good behind they in generally really get under themselves. Just MHO again. In fact you see it in warmbloods.

I very much noticed this while watching him zip around in the roundpen. He travels underneath himself a good bit, which I also like. He seems very balanced.

One thing I forgot to mention and in my 20+ years of riding I have never had this happen: he dropped his head so fast to itch his face on his knee that I honest to God almost fell off! We were walking and all of a sudden WHAM! There was nothing in front of me!
My immediate thought was "are you seriously going to drop your head and buck me off at the WALK?!" and then, "are you trying to lay down??" Then I realized that was all he was doing. It was very bizarre though, and I would have felt like quite the moron if I had tumbled over his head :D

Deepinmanure
Nov. 22, 2010, 09:35 AM
Good for you!!!! He looks like a nice horse.Pull his mane,feed him this winter and by spring you'll have a winner. He's lucky to find a home like yours.
I am not sure what a ring bit is. If you longe him befor you ride and you are indoors I don't see why you can't ride him in a plain snaffle of some sort. Keep the noseband tight as some racehorses put their tongue over the bit.
Have fun !!!I'm envious!!!

findeight
Nov. 22, 2010, 10:43 AM
Ring bit is alot of bit and you don't see it much off the track in modern times-and they need it on the track for some of them. It won't hurt a thing down the road and you will be starting him all over anyway. So not worth a worry.

I still like him and don't see anything I couldn't live with. Plus it sounds like he will accept the training and be reasonable about things.
Like to see him after let down and 100 pounds with a copper penny color coat come spring.

Keep us posted on the vet results.

Brooke
Nov. 22, 2010, 04:15 PM
A trainer at the track told me that the ring bit helps the steering. I've not had a problem switching to a regular bit. Some seem to prefer a regular snaffle, some I've started out in a French link or Dr. Bristol.

danceronice
Nov. 22, 2010, 06:37 PM
I think, looking at his win picture, Lucky ran in a ring bit back in his allowance days, and if it's for steering I can believe it as when he gallops he has a tendency to wander way the heck off to the right unless you really get on his case. But since we only work on the track for fun I wouldn't bother with one for riding. I started him in a copper dee, and when he fussed a lot, I swapped for a rubber mullen mouth pelham to give him the curb to think about. Then for a while we went to a plain rubber mullen dee, and now we're back to the copper dee, which he finally seems to get. (I don't lunge. The one time tried he seemed to think I was insane, and to say he's quiet is an understatement.)

I would definitely have the teeth checked as the number one priority--I think a lot of Lucky's bit issues were his teeth were terrible and a metal snaffle was jabbing him in places that hurt a lot!

If you're looking for famous names in the pedigree, there is Bowl of Flowers, multiple champion and Hall of Famer, who is out of Flower Bowl and therefore a half sister to Graustark.

HeyJealousy
Nov. 22, 2010, 07:38 PM
A majority of the horses I've galloped have gone in ring bits, especially when they are tough enough to run right through a snaffle (usually when they start breezing as 2 year olds). Ring bits are pretty common. But since this guy has run a number of times, he probably doesn't know "whoa" from pulling back (in any bit). He will learn that with time. It sounds like he was a good boy despite probably a little extra energy from having three days off! He seems like a good soul. Keep us updated!

Big_Tag
Nov. 24, 2010, 11:21 AM
Thanks for the comments on the ring bit. Like I said he downshifted very easily so I'm guessing it won't be too much of a problem either.

PPE is Monday...Fingers crossed!! ;)

Big_Tag
Nov. 29, 2010, 12:37 PM
So big boy was vetted today. Aside from apparently bouncing around like a nutto for his jogs (again with the bad weather I guess he's been in) he was good, and the findings are as follows:

-Slight dermatitis issue
-A touch bench kneed
-Apparently at some point he broke the lower part of his tail and it sits at a 45-degree angle at the tip. Weird, but not a problem.
-Flexed slight positive right hind so I went ahead and did hock x-rays. He has a spur forming in the lower right hock but the vet said it's not affecting joint space. Now his LEFT hock, though, he had a much larger spur.

I hate hocks. It seems like they never X-ray very clean so it just becomes a judgment call. As the vet said--and I already knew--they don't tend to be career-ending problems, just something that will need maintenance at some point so then it just comes down to what I want to accept. I feel I could probably find something a little cheaper (he's on the high end of what I'd like to pay for a fresh OTTB) with maybe a little cleaner X-rays. Plus down the road, if I DO want to sell, his hock changes might be of concern.

Sooo now I gotta decide. Anyone want to chime in with their experiences? ;)

Bogie
Nov. 29, 2010, 01:03 PM
It depends.

Hocks are manageable. If the horse has a good brain and he's sound now, then maybe. If he needs injections now, I'd be concerned because he's quite young.

If you had the PPE done at Randalls then you had one of the best clinics going evaluate him. Did Dr. Ron do the exam? When he evaluated horses for me he was always pretty straight about his opinion as to whether the horse was suitable for the job . . . or not. But then again, he was also my vet.

Much depends on how sound the horse is now, whether he's been sound in work and whether he's got a good brain. I don't know what his price tag is, but while you can often find horses that are less expensive or have cleaner films, if they don't have a brain, that won't help.

Good luck!

SnicklefritzG
Nov. 29, 2010, 01:04 PM
I too will be interested to hear what others have to say on the matter.

I've worked with a lot of OTTB's in the past, most of whom had some minor issues. Most were things that required maintenance, as your vet said, but didn't prevent them from having a busy career, even over fences.

It can be a bit of a gamble, but if there are others you like, perhaps you could continue to look around for a bit.

SquishTheBunny
Nov. 29, 2010, 01:14 PM
As a resale project - pass. To keep for yourself - go! You seem to like him,he is gorgeous. I dont know many horses to have 100% clean hocks. If you are ok with maintenance and they are willing to give you a good deal on him...might be worth taking him IF you really really like him.

findeight
Nov. 29, 2010, 01:39 PM
Well, none of them are perfect and a great many do get by with hock issues.

That's going to be your call.

I would venture to say that, although it might limit value a little, he would still have value as a real pretty lower level horse for somebody. Not like he's going into the Big Eq, 4' hunter Derbies, taking 2 lessons a week at 3'6" and hitting 30 shows a year or anything.

His conformation says he will be limted in step anyway and he'd make somebody an attractive, affordable 2'6" on down type to play with.

Just afraid the next one can easily have something a whole lot worse and less manageable then hocks. They all have something. Least this one is not bothered much by it since he is still in work.

As a resale, depends on your market and time frame. For yourself? I'd get him.

Big_Tag
Nov. 29, 2010, 02:30 PM
I feel like I am trying to talk myself out of him and I don't know how to interpret that. I guess I am not terribly worried about the hocks. I really trust the Randall practice and while Dr Genovese didn't do the PPE--Dr Paradine did--I was happy with the assessment and talked to the vet a good bit about it. It's not like I have Grand Prix aspirations here. Maintenance is fine and there was no legit "red flag" on the vet's part. Just some changes which, let's be serious, probably exist to some degree in most horses.

I think part of the worry in my mind is twice now--once with my own eyes and once by the vet/vet assistant--it's been mentioned/noted how "up" he is. I realize circumstances have maybe kind of clouded his "real" personality and the seller stresses how calm he is AND given the circumstance he probably could have put me through the barn door when I tried him out..but I'm not looking to work with something really high-strung. Don't get me wrong--I've worked with a lot of horses, some TBS, some not, who were pretty hot and while I'm not concerned about my actual capability of working with that, I am concerned with my willingness to do so. And maybe this isn't a concern at all given he's really had no down time, no turn out except a roundpen..so it might be a moot point but how do you *know* that?

I really like to second guess myself, clearly.

SquishTheBunny
Nov. 29, 2010, 02:36 PM
Up can change drastically with downtime. TB's generally have great work ethic, and that "UP" can be channeled into training. Not saying he wont be crazy, but I'd say in general once in a non-race environment you will notice 100% difference in him. But.....if you are nervous of him, dont do it.

If you get him, give him a big paddock and buddies....that in most cases makes a world of difference on horses mental states!

MHM
Nov. 29, 2010, 02:47 PM
I feel like I am trying to talk myself out of him and I don't know how to interpret that.
---
I think part of the worry in my mind is twice now--once with my own eyes and once by the vet/vet assistant--it's been mentioned/noted how "up" he is.

For all decisions when you're on the fence about something, try this:

Take out a quarter. Decide that if it's heads, I'll do A. If it's tails, I'll do B.

Toss the quarter in the air, then see which side you're hoping for. If you're saying, "Heads! Come on, heads!" Then do A.

The freshness thing is a little trickier, because you have only somebody's word that the horse had actually been standing in. If it's somebody you don't know at all, and they're really trying hard to move the horse, well... are you sure they're being truthful?

Whether they're truthful or not, it's hard to predict what the horse will be like after being let down, since his lifestyle will be so different off the track. So that part really is a gray area.

Good luck with whatever you decide!

findeight
Nov. 29, 2010, 02:50 PM
Have never seen many right off the track that were what you'd call dead quiet. They don't know how to be anything but a little up compared to horses with more mundane jobs...and dead fit with little or no turn out and God knows what pumped into them to keep that "edge" there.

The ones I have seen dead quiet were sick or so full of pain killers they were in la la land. They were anything but quiet when they got to feeling better:eek:. Usually corresponding to the day the check cleared.

Part of the gamble of taking one right off the track is you do have no idea about eventual disposition with let down and retraining. Just as much a gamble buying one that has been sitting-it is usually not for "let down", more for lame.

That is all going to be what you feel you can handle. I do trust you have a nice field and some buddies for him for 3 to 6 months? Start back in when the weather warms up-they are all stupid when it's cold.

Up to you and what you think best. If your heart is not in one? Pass-you need alot of heart for these projects.

PonyLady29
Nov. 29, 2010, 02:50 PM
If you are second guessing yourself don't do it. There is a reason your intuition is making you question it, trust your feelings. You will always find another one, albeit he is cute and seems nice but if the upness is making you worry usually your body is telling you what to do. With your second guessing I would pass on this guy and find a nicer quieter one.

Big_Tag
Nov. 29, 2010, 02:58 PM
Have never seen many right off the track that were what you'd call dead quiet. They don't know how to be anything but a little up compared to horses with more mundane jobs...and dead fit with little or no turn out and God knows what pumped into them to keep that "edge" there.

The ones I have seen dead quiet were sick or so full of pain killers they were in la la land. They were anything but quiet when they got to feeling better:eek:. Usually corresponding to the day the check cleared.

That is all going to be what you feel you can handle. I do trust you have a nice field and some buddies for him for 3 to 6 months? Start back in when the weather warms up-they are all stupid when it's cold.

Up to you and what you think best. If your heart is not in one? Pass-you need alot of heart for these projects.

Agreed. My first OTTB was dead quiet..and then when he was feeling better, while he was never bad, he definitely came to life. His first winter he was dull-looking, gross coat..I pulled blood on him @ his PPE but never actually tested it but I would imagine he was on a lot of racing pharmaceuticals that took several months to clear his system.

These sellers don't strike me as misleaders--seems more like "what you see is what you get." And he definitely was standing in when I went to see him--the roundpens--which were the only turnout they have--were clean of hoofprints since the most recent rain which was 2 or 3 days before I went to see him.

I always over-worry. I'm one of those people who is always "what if, what if, what if??" I had no problem handling him whatsoever, really.
Findeight--he will have several months of as much legitimate (i.e., not roundpen) turnout as he is comfortable with, with a buddy or two or three, depending on how he acclimates.

I think I might talk to the seller about price given the PPE findings and maybe see what happens after that.

findeight
Nov. 29, 2010, 03:13 PM
I think I might talk to the seller about price given the PPE findings and maybe see what happens after that.

Excellent idea-even if the vet did not red or yellow light it, it will show up when you sell him.

Bogie
Nov. 29, 2010, 04:12 PM
Sounds like you have a plan. The three OTTBs that I've retrained have always settled down with lots of turn out and regular work. They were still high energy horses, but once they had a place to channel that energy, were fine.

Even my current one (who was a basket of nerves when I got him), is now very calm and relaxed . . . right until the hounds are cast!

jenarby
Nov. 29, 2010, 04:34 PM
I've had a lot of horses right off the track that were incredibly quiet. The ones that weren't ended up being pretty darned close once I turned them out in my pasture. 15 acres and 24/7 turn out makes for a different horse in a day or two. If it helps any, I just sold a horse about 3 weeks ago through CANTER that I never thought would be quiet enough for anyone but a pro. I gallop my own horses on the farm and while I owned this guy for about 3-4 months I never rode him. On the ground he was always full of himself, spooky and silly. I really didn't want to test ride him. I turned him out one DAY after his last race. Four days later I got on him for the first time when a buyer came to see him. Kick along quiet! So much so that I seriously thought about keeping him for myself! I pointed him right to my cross rails and over he went. My horses do not get anything mentioned in previous posts, for racing and he was in show ring weight to begin with. I sold him to a 15yr old pony clubber for an eventing prospect.
Turn them out as much as possible and put them right back into regular work...

enjoytheride
Nov. 29, 2010, 05:16 PM
Well, you got on a currently racing and in race condition TB after it had not been worked in 3 days while still being fed everything to make it go as very fast as possible.

Considering that he didn't explode as soon as you got on him I'd take that as a good sign.

TBMaggie
Nov. 29, 2010, 07:41 PM
I'd take a chance on this horse, but then again, I love thoroughbreds. He has a nice eye, and I'll bet with down time, he'll turn into a lamb.

I've gotten all of my tb's right off the track, and in some cases, right off their last race. They all like a routine that they can depend on (feeding at the same time, lots of turn out for most but you'll find some want their stall more, etc.). Some have been quiet and well mannered from the start, while others have taken longer to adjust. I have one now who is just a big dork on the ground - I've owned him for 10 years - but is dead quiet under saddle. Need spurs quiet. So, I wouldn't be put off by this guy's pushiness. I think he'll come around.

Go for it! Really, he needs you!

monalisa
Nov. 30, 2010, 09:54 AM
Very cute.

Big_Tag
Dec. 2, 2010, 08:50 PM
Well, I bought him :) I'm excited..more excited than I thought I'd be given how back and forth I was about him. Thanks again for everyone's input and help; greatly appreciated!!

SnicklefritzG
Dec. 2, 2010, 08:58 PM
Well, you got on a currently racing and in race condition TB after it had not been worked in 3 days while still being fed everything to make it go as very fast as possible.

Considering that he didn't explode as soon as you got on him I'd take that as a good sign.

haha. good point. :)

bits619
Dec. 2, 2010, 09:50 PM
Well, I bought him :) I'm excited..more excited than I thought I'd be given how back and forth I was about him. Thanks again for everyone's input and help; greatly appreciated!!

Oh yay!!! I was secretly pulling for him! :D I know so very little about confo/ppe's/ottbs that my opinion would be valueless, but anyway, I'm glad you got him! Very happy for you and the new guy!

Bogie
Dec. 2, 2010, 10:53 PM
I hope you enjoy him!

Mukluk
Dec. 2, 2010, 11:07 PM
Congratulations on your beautiful new horse! Is he home with you yet? Would love to see more pictures and an update on how the both of you are getting along.

Langfuhr
Dec. 2, 2010, 11:24 PM
Congrats! I totally love him and looking forward to your updates!

Big_Tag
Dec. 3, 2010, 03:21 PM
Oh yay!!! I was secretly pulling for him! :D I know so very little about confo/ppe's/ottbs that my opinion would be valueless, but anyway, I'm glad you got him! Very happy for you and the new guy!


I hope you enjoy him!


Congratulations on your beautiful new horse! Is he home with you yet? Would love to see more pictures and an update on how the both of you are getting along.


Congrats! I totally love him and looking forward to your updates!

Thanks everyone! I am really excited! He isn't home yet and it actually may be a week before the seller and I can coordinate schedules enough to get that accomplished but regardless, he will be heading here soon enough.

I'm trying to come up with a barn name for him bc "Start" (what they call him) isn't going to cut it but I kind of like Stanley or Wally. We'll see, he will probably name himself, they usually do :)

Meadow36
Dec. 3, 2010, 08:25 PM
Add a "U" - Stuart. :)

Doctracy
Dec. 3, 2010, 08:46 PM
I like him. I have a son of a full brother to Mr Prospector. I recently found a place with full turn out. Between that and his age (13) he is a different horse. I am loving riding again. Not that I didn't always love him but he was a little sporty and I was getting a little too old for a sporty horse. Now I can ride him on the buckle and enjoy the scenery.
I think you will just love him. Mine is a character. He has won a lot in equitation (3') and jumping 3'6", and we fox hunt , all in the same season, which of course drove my trainer crazy. He's now just hunting and trail riding, although I may be tempted to hit some of the smaller schooling shows this spring.

Big_Tag
Dec. 4, 2010, 02:00 AM
Add a "U" - Stuart. :)

Or Stewie!!! Gosh I LOVE Family Guy!

Doctracy--thanks for the story on your guy. I don't mind if mine's a little forward but I'm hoping he'll be much quieter-minded with some time to relax ;)

MHM
Dec. 4, 2010, 02:14 AM
Stewie, Stanley, Wally, all good choices that follow the classic guidelines for barn names- two syllables ending in -y or -ie. :lol:

Looking forward to future updates. Congrats and good luck with him! :cool:

Justa Bob
Dec. 4, 2010, 01:34 PM
Congratulations. So fun to read that you GOT HIM! And now we await his homecoming, pictures and barn name! Really happy for you.

Big_Tag
Dec. 13, 2010, 08:59 PM
Start/Stanley/Wally/Bucco is home. What a funny guy. With the winter storm arriving yesterday/today, we turned him out more or less as soon as he arrived Saturday in the event he wanted to run himself silly. Aaaand..nothing. He trotted from end to end a grand total of twice, cantered once, and that was it. Turned his pasture buddy out, he sniffed noses, trotted around a little more, and started eating hay. This coming after the warning when we picked him up that "he hasn't been out in his roundpen for a few days so he might be feeling pretty fresh."

Oh, he's soo cute. I will have to get some pictures of him. Now time to fatten him up over the winter and get ready for spring!! :)

tidy rabbit
Dec. 13, 2010, 09:45 PM
Congratulations!!!!!

HappyHorselover
Dec. 13, 2010, 10:06 PM
congrats, can't wait to see pics!!