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View Full Version : Has a Trainer ever gotten you hurt or put you in a risky situation?



HorseLuvr
Nov. 15, 2010, 03:51 PM
Has a trainer ever gotten you (or your horse) hurt/injured? Put you in a bad or risky situation? Something such as setting the combination striding wrong and you crashed and got injured. Or putting you on a horse they knew had bucking/rearing problems and not telling you and you ended up getting hurt. Or telling you not to lunge your horse when you really knew against your better instincts that he needed lunging. Or setting the jump height way above your horse's jumping ability and telling you to jump it anyways? I am just curious.

I have definetly been put in a bad situation before where I ended up getting injured riding a horse I knew nothing about. I trusted the trainer but went against my better instincts. Trainer set up a rather high jump that I did not feel the horse was capable of jumping but I didn't say a word and the horse ended up crashing, resulting in me getting injured.

Sometimes at shows I see people riding in lower level jumper classes that appear to be way in over their heads or an accident waiting to happen. I cringe as I watch them flat out gallop and chip in to every single jump or combination with loose legs and barely hanging on for life. I sometimes wonder if these trainers ever take into consideration a horse/riders ability before allowing them to compete in a level they obviously don't belong or if they take the well being of the individual into consideration. Just food for thought.

Blondie22
Nov. 15, 2010, 03:59 PM
I trust my trainer with my life. After 3 years, I've never been put in a situation that I felt my horse couldn't handle.

Hunter Mom
Nov. 15, 2010, 04:02 PM
My trainer has never put me in a bad situation. I do that to myself without help when I get too over analytical instead of just shutting up and riding.

FWIW - I have, however, been the rider you described. It was a day when I just rode like dookey. Unfortunately, it hapened at a show.

whbar158
Nov. 15, 2010, 04:11 PM
I find that a good trainer knows when to push and when not to. I have had trainers that if they told me to go jump something I trusted that they thought I could do it and they would not ask me to do anything they didn't think I or my horse could do. I have also ridden with trainers that I did not trust, and usually tried to use my better judgment unfortunately that was when I was a kid and did not always speak up, I was lucky that my mom knew some things about horses and often spoke up when she thought things were unsafe (I eventually did not ride with this trainer anymore). Some of my friends were not always so lucky, and I witnessed a few falls that easily could have been prevented, some which did result in injuries.

I will never understand how a trainer can take such chances at times. Don't get me wrong I have crashed and have been lucky not to get hurt as that is just a chance we take when riding. Some of these trainers don't even see that it is dangerous at times, and are honestly not out to get anyone hurt, sometimes just uneducated, but there are some out there that are pushing the dangerous activities and I don't know how they do it.

2tempe
Nov. 15, 2010, 04:12 PM
My trainer has never put me in a bad situation. I do that to myself without help when I get too over analytical instead of just shutting up and riding.


I have had three trainers; one in my past hunter days and two in my current dressage days. My hunter trainer in particular was incredibly concerned about the safety of his adult ammys, and was great at matching horses and riders.
In an odd situation, I committed to free leasing a horse I loved for a year; he thought it was the wrong horse because it was green and had a funky BIG jump every now and then. He was peeved w/ me to say the least; but it was funny, the horse never did it to me; he did however do it to said trainer a couple times!
And yes I've been known to overanalyze as well.........It actually makes me better suited for dressage.

meupatdoes
Nov. 15, 2010, 04:40 PM
I have always had trainers that I trusted completely.

I have complete faith that if I listen to and do what they say, everything will turn out ok.

So far it always has, and none of my trainers have ever abused that trust or even so much as acted in a way to weaken it.
Ever.

FineAlready
Nov. 15, 2010, 05:18 PM
Yep, I've been put in bad situations by trainers and have gotten hurt at times as a result. The worst was when I was 14 and was put on a horse that had a known rearing issue at the mounting block. That time resulted in permanent metal rod the entire length of my femur.

As I've gotten older, I've developed the cajones to speak up when I feel something is not a good idea. That said, I do very much trust my current trainer and she has not led me astray yet. However, I make the final call on things that could, you know, impact whether I live or die during a ride.

TarheelJD
Nov. 15, 2010, 05:28 PM
My trainer has never put me in a bad situation. I do that to myself without help when I get too over analytical instead of just shutting up and riding.


Same here. :yes:

If I did not trust my trainer 100%, I would not be riding with her. I have come off and been injured twice in the 26 months I've been with her, but neither of those falls was even remotely attributable to the trainer. I am so thankful that someone recommended her to me when I started riding again after a very long break.

KateKat
Nov. 15, 2010, 05:46 PM
No, my current trainer is all about safety for the horses and safety/confidence for the riders. I do feel that she will often push me outside of my comfort zone, but that is something I need the trainer to do otherwise I would probably still just be bopping along doing ground poles! :)

However, I have been at barns where I feel like safety wasn't the number one priority and that some of the school horses should not have been school horses. Like the one I used to ride that hated tractors and cows yet we were surrounded by uh, tractors and cows :) That horse spooked and reared on me a couple times, which was more than enough to get me to leave.

shawneeAcres
Nov. 15, 2010, 05:48 PM
I am a trainer and have been teaching for over 35 years. In that time I have had three really "serious" injuries. I don't consider any of them "my fault" as they were all on the students own horses that had not had any issues previosuly. All three resulted in broken bones, one was a broken leg, one was a broekn shoulder and one was a broken wrist. The leg occurred at a show when a novice rider PANICEd and inspite of me going in the ring and actually getting the horse stopped, she lost her balance and scared the hrose who began to run. She took a bad fall into the post of the fence. The shoulder was at home in a lesson as was the wrist. The shoulder was simply a situation where the rider put the horse to a fence on an off stride. The mare landed and put in a little buck and the rider fell off, again into the rail of the fence. The wrist was, again, a little buck on the other side of an xirail, rider came off and landed with her arm out. Falls are my greatest fear and I take EVERY precaution to avoid them. If I think the situation is getting dangerous, out of control I will basically just stop and either get on the horse myself or save it for another day. ALl of these instances came out of the blue on horses the riders were very used to. Unfortunately, accidents can and do happen in this sport, and I think any rider who falls should be careful at whom they point the finger to. Non of these riders "blamed" me. Now I have seen instances where the rider was VERY POORLY mounted and is those cases it COULD be the trianers fault. However, at the same time I have seen horses that were purchased that were TOTALLY inaapropriate and in spite of the trainer trying to get the horse sold etc, the rider continues to ride said horse.

amastrike
Nov. 15, 2010, 05:48 PM
I think just once, and it was a minor injury. We were doing a gymnastic, and the striding between the last two elements was off. I asked to have it changed when the fence was raised, but trainer said no, the striding is off because you're too forward. I ended up landing on my head on the other side of the fence.

findeight
Nov. 15, 2010, 05:58 PM
Over 40+ years, one trainer and one clinician put me into trouble and got me terrified by being overfaced and seriously hurt.

You absolutely need to know when this happens and either just say no or not use that instructor.

I regret I did not do so.

One clinician destroyed confidence for me for years to the point it interferred with my abilty to go forward to a jump. I was simply overfaced on an old horse that could not do it...yet harangued to continue to try-until I had a bad fall off a really forward distance in a tiny indoor to a coop 3 strides away from the wall...horse, bless his honest old heart...went over despite being well short of the required distance, caught the top ridge and landed in a heap sending me off hard. Man, that really, really scared me-and it hurt. Bad. At age 50. Didn't do the old horse any good either, got him hurt a little and scared alot. He started stopping.

The other time, with a new in barn assistant trainer, horse just back off a layoff and recently body clipped on a cold, November night. I said no, horse was over it and she said just one more. Yeah, landed me in the ER with the most painful injury-a cracked shoulder-I ever had and cost me 8 weeks off work.

Easy for them to say "oh, you can do it" or "just once more and you can quit".

Harder to say no but of I had????? Would have beat what I went through.

Please, just say NO.

luckyduck
Nov. 15, 2010, 06:08 PM
I have had 2 serious injuries.... the first was caused by an ill tempered handler with a baby...and the second was all me for the blame.

As a trainer, I never asked my students to face something that I know I would have trouble with and I was always sensitive to thier fears. NO ONE is going to learn from being scared into it and a good trainer can "talk" you through it.

The most dangerous accidents happen when people are placed into a situation they can't handle. If you feel unsafe, not ready or just plain don't want to do it....then that's ok.... another day, another time, another way....

Can't tell you the number of times I have stood on the side of a ring at a show, coaching another trainers kid from the rail because the trainer is flipping out as much as the horse and the kid in the ring.....

I know as a kid...I heard my coach....it was if she was the only person in the world...and when things were going wrong....I listened for her voice to get me through it.

jaslyn1701
Nov. 15, 2010, 08:07 PM
My trainer has never put me in a bad situation. I do that to myself without help when I get too over analytical instead of just shutting up and riding.

This is me as well. Every fall I have had has been my fault - including the one after the group spook in a lesson where we jumped out of the ring! Yes, it was my fault - could not/would not get my head out of my a____ enough to think. Rode the jump and then bailed.

As someone else said - I trust my trainer with my life and have confidence in her that she knows when to push me and when not to.

fordtraktor
Nov. 15, 2010, 08:11 PM
Well, it depends. Yes. I would say, but I don't have a problem with that. When I was a working student at two different places I used to be the person who climbs on the new horses, as I was young, willing and bounced well and trainers either didn't ride or had a bad back.

I don't think either put me in unreasonable risk and I never felt rushed onto any horse. But to say there was no risk? Eh, of course there was risk, it's horses. There's always risk.

pony4me
Nov. 15, 2010, 08:19 PM
Putting you out of your comfort zone and helping you rise to the occasion is the mark of a good trainer. Putting you, or your horse, in harm's way is the mark of a bad trainer. In 27 years of riding at my barn, I have never been put in a dangerous situation. I've been challenged a lot, pushed a bit (mostly when I request it) and overall have done more than I ever thought possible, and have had a blast the entire time.

arena run
Nov. 15, 2010, 08:44 PM
Being pushed to new levels is one thing -- but one of my students was overfaced at a clinic and fell off. Almost destroyed what little confidence she had been able to build after she had fallen at a show (and the reason she was riding w/me to begin with).

I must say -- I have some mighty hard feelings against that trainer now. I used to repsect her, but no more. I -- me, myself -- can deal w/being pushed, but it is beyond anything I can understand for a person to put a kid in danger. Kid had already landed on horse's neck twice and was visibly shaken and upset. Stupid, stupid, stupid thing that she made this child continue to trot to real jumps when she was OBVIOUSLY only a walk-over X-rail type rider.

Equsrider
Nov. 16, 2010, 12:09 AM
It's easy to blame the trainer, but in all honesty, you are the one on the horse, and after the fact, to speak up, is too late. Communication is the key to success! Kids need to learn and ask questions. If a distance looks off, ask how many feet it is set apart,or have them walk it for you and see for yourself. You should be able to gauge it by knowing approximately the length of the horses stride you are on, if you don't you should learn. Become a responsible, knowledgeable participant! If you feel overfaced, then you probably are, which does neither you or the horse any good.I know children are taught to respect their elders,trainers,which is all good. But if you communicate it in a way as a quest for knowledge and safety then I can't imagine any good trainer being offended.I am not a trainer, just a knowledgeable horseshow mom, but I have made sure DD knows when to ask questions and talk to her trainer about how to proceed before she begins the task at hand, and if she is really against something to put her foot down and tell trainer that she would like to save it for another day.Bad things happen...and those things you can't take back!!

crazyhorses
Nov. 16, 2010, 12:26 AM
I have had it happen. I trusted said trainer Way too much (I was 12 with nonhorsey parents and I like to see the best in people).

We got jumps put up to 4'3" when neither of us were ready. Thank god nothing bad ever happened with that.

I was the one who was always volunteered to go on the trouble horses, I almost got flipped over on once.

I was loose in the tack but was still the first one to jump a GIANT green TB, I flew off.

She "made" me buy a horse from her that was def. NOT the right horse for me. I ended up breaking a rib at our first horse show when he chucked me into a metal fence. I loved that horse but c'mon! For a scared 12 year old kid, he was NOT right...

She put me in all sorts of interesting situations, I'm sure I could go on and on about it... Luckily, since I've moved, I've had nothing but positive experiences!

3 is the limit
Nov. 16, 2010, 01:30 AM
It's easy to blame the trainer, but in all honesty, you are the one on the horse, and after the fact, to speak up, is too late. Communication is the key to success!!!

Yes, I was the one on the horse, but it was my second time IN MY LIFE and my teacher put me on a 2 year old paint gelding. :eek: She said it would be fine...it was a kid's horse. I figured that was great because I was 33 so I could hang with this. She didn't mention that the kid was a superstar who'd been riding forever.:mad:

Walk, trot, canter was fine. Then he got spooked by something and off he went at a full gallop. I couldn't get him to stop and then went flying into an alumimum fence. Got a concussion, black eye, slit in my eyebrow, broken rib, and a twisted ankle.

Did I mention that I was not wearing a helmet because it was a western barn and the teacher thought I didn't need one because I had the safety of the western saddle?

So in this case specifically, I do hold her directly responsible.:sigh:

Equsrider
Nov. 16, 2010, 01:49 AM
I am soo sorry this happened to you!!I agree this was not your fault!You were walk-trot and cantering your second time EVER to ride???on a 2 year old horse???? That is INSANE!

And even on an older horse that can happen, horses spook and run...I use to teach years ago, and I can assure you no one ever was off the lunge line on a saintly school horse until they could prove they could firmly sit the canter and engage the breaks without even thinking about it.But I am a safety freak,I've had enough accidents personally that I wouldn't wish on anyone, mainly from riding young horses...

As I said in my post " a good Trainer" would not object to your concerns.I wish you a speedy and full recovery, and if you deciede to ride again, find a new trainer!!
PS And always were a helmet!!

HorseLuvr
Nov. 16, 2010, 07:53 AM
I totally agree that a trainer should continue to push a rider beyond their limits. It is the only way for future improvement. I have no problem with this and I enjoy it. That, like others have said, is a sign of a good trainer. It is when trainers push riders or horses for that matter prematurely or beyond their abilities that it becomes dangerous.

Also, I do not blame a trainer whenever I fall off, usually as others have said it is my fault or a dumb mistake. It is only when I am put in a situation where I do not feel comfortable with either myself or with the horse, or I feel the trainer is asking us to do something beyond my or horse's capabilities. I have been riding long enough that I know the limits and I do speak up now!

sar2008
Nov. 16, 2010, 09:27 AM
It's easy to blame the trainer, but in all honesty, you are the one on the horse, and after the fact, to speak up, is too late. Communication is the key to success! Kids need to learn and ask questions. If a distance looks off, ask how many feet it is set apart,or have them walk it for you and see for yourself. You should be able to gauge it by knowing approximately the length of the horses stride you are on, if you don't you should learn. Become a responsible, knowledgeable participant! If you feel overfaced, then you probably are, which does neither you or the horse any good.I know children are taught to respect their elders,trainers,which is all good. But if you communicate it in a way as a quest for knowledge and safety then I can't imagine any good trainer being offended.I am not a trainer, just a knowledgeable horseshow mom, but I have made sure DD knows when to ask questions and talk to her trainer about how to proceed before she begins the task at hand, and if she is really against something to put her foot down and tell trainer that she would like to save it for another day.Bad things happen...and those things you can't take back!!

You must not be a trainer.

Clients thinking they are ready for something they clearly are not ready for is the story of my life. I had a client go to a new trainer because I wouldn't let her do the level 1 jumpers at Culpeper...she couldn't even flat a horse properly. No way in hell I'm letting her jump around.

Long story short, she broke her back a month after moving. At a horse show.

IME, clients don't always know what is best for them. They trust you as their trainer to not put them in bad situations, or do something that will cause them to hurt themselves. If you set a combination short, mention it. So they are prepared to ask for that collection on the landing.

IMO, yes. Trainers should push riders. Thats what causes them to excel. In a safe manner.

Jumping a 3'3 jump at a show when you school 3'9 at home. Yes, you push them. You know they can do it. It's just nerves getting the best.

Jumping 3'3 when you can't even flat a horse correctly, um no.

Equsrider
Nov. 16, 2010, 09:38 AM
You are exactly right, IMHO!More often than not trainers have to look out for others who don't look out for themselves...nothing wrong with pushing, if horse and rider are capable.:)

purplnurpl
Nov. 16, 2010, 09:39 AM
I was put in a poor situation at an Andalusian show in Waco Texas a few years back.

A "trainer" (yes, this trainer get double finger quotes) needed someone to run one of her horses.

She had an older mare and a yearling stallion.
The stallion was a better mover then the mare and it was a movement class.

She gave me the stallion. I figured he would be fine because people are not supposed to be idiots..right? She is a "trainer", therefore she should be able to make good judgment calls?

He bit at me the whole time. He tried to plow me down when I was running him and then as we were leaving the ring he put his front feet on my head.

Meanwhile, the older mare, who moved like crap, just jogged along like a western pleasure horse. There was no need for her to even be in the class.

Talk about a sorry excuse for a trainer.
And that was my first impression of breed shows. :no:

HorseLuvr
Nov. 16, 2010, 09:43 AM
You must not be a trainer.

Clients thinking they are ready for something they clearly are not ready for is the story of my life. I had a client go to a new trainer because I wouldn't let her do the level 1 jumpers at Culpeper...she couldn't even flat a horse properly. No way in hell I'm letting her jump around.

Long story short, she broke her back a month after moving. At a horse show.

IME, clients don't always know what is best for them. They trust you as their trainer to not put them in bad situations, or do something that will cause them to hurt themselves. If you set a combination short, mention it. So they are prepared to ask for that collection on the landing.

IMO, yes. Trainers should push riders. Thats what causes them to excel. In a safe manner.

Jumping a 3'3 jump at a show when you school 3'9 at home. Yes, you push them. You know they can do it. It's just nerves getting the best.

Jumping 3'3 when you can't even flat a horse correctly, um no.

This is so true!! Good for you for standing up and not letting her do the Level 1 if she was not ready!! There needs to be more like you. Too many times I think trainers are put into situations as you were and end up letting the client do the division they want to do even if they are not ready for it. Mostly because maybe they need the money and don't want to loose rich client, but in the end it only makes the trainer look bad and gives them the responsibility if someone gets hurt.

eclipse
Nov. 16, 2010, 09:52 AM
Never, I trust my trainer with my life. She knows when to push, how much to push and when to back off! Last year at a show, there was a judge that I have no idea who it was (up from CA) that was so impressed with how she was handling one of our nervous older ammies she asked the steward to let her know she had been watching her and how much she appreciated her methods! :D

My one serious injury, she wasn't even around for and it was totally MY fault. I was bringing my mare back after surgery and should of known better than to get on whens she started bucking on the end of the lead! But get on I did, ony to get rodeod off and ended up with a crushed radial head for my own stupidity!

Yes, my trainer has had students get injured....which trainer hasn't? But in all the years I've been with her (and it's been over 10) there has never been a serious one. (and by injured I mean a fall and winded and maybe a wrist injury). Some students have left because they say she doesn't move them up fast enough! :rolleyes: And, of all of those that have left, only 3 or 4 have actually gone on to do anything higher! LOL

leilatigress
Nov. 16, 2010, 10:10 AM
Never here as well. My trainers were always excellent, now dad... not so much. Crazy unbroke 2 y/o stallion meet 12 y/o child. Yeah that went well! Now DD's trainer I trust completely and the moment I don't she'll find a different one. DD's trainer always starts her on the lounge line on a new horse and she's never the first one on that horse that day either. DD is not a brave rider by any stretch of the imagination so its really up to me as mom to keep her safe and happy.

hntrjmprpro45
Nov. 16, 2010, 10:21 AM
My first trainer I rode with had zero common sense when it came to safety. Luckily I never got hurt but here are a fee prime examples of her being a complete idiot.

1. She had me ride a hot ottb mare over some 2'6" jumps. Okay not such a big deal right? I managed to keep somewhat in control while I was riding but as I was tacking down the horse started to shake and convulse it's neck. My trainer told me "don't worry she sometimes has seizures". Yes, she put me on a horse that was known to have seizures. Needless to say that I never rode that horse again!

2. She would routinely put me on horses that hadn't been out of their stalls in months (this barn had about 60 horses on 15 acres- hardly any turnout). Let's just say some of those rides turned into me holding on for dear life as the horse went galloping/bucking around the arena.

3. One of the saddest moments I remember was when my horse kept stopping at a fence (rider error). My trainer grabbed one of my reins and proceeded to whack my horse with a crop while I was still on him. He was an ottb so needless to say, whenever she let go of the rein I was in the next county. I felt so bad for my boy but I was a REALLY timid 10 year old who didn't have the courage to stick up for him.

Needless to say I left that trainer but not before I told her what I thought about her. To this day I hate seeing her around because I have flash backs to how abusive she was to both horse and rider.

hntrjmprpro45
Nov. 16, 2010, 10:25 AM
Thought I would add... As a trainer I have not had any serious injuries at my barn but I know that I have been quite lucky. My students fall off just like everyone elses but somehow we haven't even had a single broken bone. The only ER visit was myself- I got kicked in the chest by a naughty yearling while in his paddock.

findeight
Nov. 16, 2010, 10:28 AM
Well...it is fine for a trainer who knows you and your horse well to push on you and expand your comfort zone.

Not so fine for a clinician (not one of the bigger names in my case) who should know they are taking a risk pushing an unknown horse and rider in a less then ideal situation. That meaning small ring, dead of winter, fences a foot higher then I had ever schooled and ignoring the obvious fact the horse was old and limited in ability with an older rider jumping only for about a year. I should have just quit regardless and not worried about looking like a whuss.

Also not so good for that new assistant trainer who insisted a horse I had owned for 6 years just coming off a 90 day layoff was not going to buck landing off that practice oxer into the corner. Even though I said she had a hump in her back like a camel and I wanted to stop where I was having jumped several courses nicely. I should have stuck to my guns and quit on that one-that assistant didn't last.

Sometimes trust can be misplaced so it really is best to speak up. Even if you paid 100 or more to not do what the person you paid tells you to do. Kind of a grey area there.

Dapples7
Nov. 16, 2010, 10:32 AM
I owned a bolter when I was a teenager. I boarded her at my lesson barn and took lessons on her every week with my trainer. My horse would bolt a few times a month and every time it happened, the trainer told me to "just hang on". My trainer never mentioned, let alone taught, one rein stops or emergency dismounts - I didn't even know what those were. It's a miracle I didn't get hurt, because that horse was fast and would sometimes bolt for several minutes at a time. The parents whose kids rode at that barn (mine included) didn't know any better, since the trainer did a very good job of "talking the talk" and making it appear like she was "walking the walk". That trainer ended up quietly leaving the state after beating a horse to death and is now working at another barn... :no:

Another trainer wanted me to canter her ancient lesson horse for the first time in a tight circle on uneven ground when the horse had not gone above a trot for months. To top it off, the horse had been stumbling a lot in the past few weeks and and had already stumbled twice during my lesson. Needless to say, I don't ride with that person anymore. I hope that poor old horse is okay.

Tha Ridge
Nov. 16, 2010, 10:32 AM
None of my personal trainers ever have, but an NCAA coach of mine did. Constantly over faced our horses, set up dangerous courses, etc. Obviously her intentions weren't malicious, but she just wasn't knowledgeable. At all. A few girls did get hurt.

thatsnotme
Nov. 16, 2010, 10:36 AM
I was a working student for a reining trainer (I was H/J rider) a million years ago when I was 19. He did alot of bad/stupid/wrong things. I was so excited to have a job working with horses that I turned a blind eye to both the abuse of myself and the abuse to the horses. This had nothing to do with reiners and everything to do with him being an %#$@&^*! He put me on a young horse one time, blindfolded in a western saddle, with no bridle, in a roundpen while he chased the very fearful horse around, having her quickly change directions, etc. This was to help my seat. The mare finally panicked enough to dive through the plywood, dislocating my kneecap. Lots of minor cuts and scrapes to both the horse and myself, but the kneecap injury still bothers me and I'm a long ways from 19! I am still a little afraid if I get on a horse in an enclosed roundpen.
We had lots of other small things-horses flipping over, bolting, etc. It took me 2 years to realize I wasn't in the right place.

jump4me
Nov. 16, 2010, 10:45 AM
Yes, one trainer did. That was the last lesson I took from that trainer (after 4 years) and I left the barn as soon as I found an opening at another barn. Not interested in going into what happened, but it was completely inexcusable and unprofessional.
And ended up in me not being able to ride for several weeks, at the time I was riding other peoples' horses also.

Big_Tag
Nov. 16, 2010, 10:48 AM
and it really was an odd situation.
New horse, she had tossed me on him the week before to show to a client. He was fine, quiet but a little too rammy in a fat snaffle so switched to a triangle snaffle and he was perfect. Client bought him, authorized his use in lessons. Next week I rode him; client hadn't had him out AT ALL and he was bouncing around out of his mind but when I actually wanted to use my hands he would have none of it (too much bit) so she had me just bury my hands down a line, he landed out of the line going a million miles an hour, and the second I touched his face he propped and shot his head down and I went a-- over teakettle and hit the ground HARD. I wasn't seriously hurt but had a huge hematoma..that was 2yrs ago and if I poke my hip hard enough it still hurts.

I got up and she said "well..too much bit, huh?" "Yup, I could feel that coming." "I'm sorry, we should have switched it."

To be fair if I had spoken up we would have switched it. We did, I climbed back on, he was still a loon but at least I could ride through it.

But she always asks if something looks too big, too scary..and she will never overface a horse. But she is also the sort of trainer that if it's a little big and scary but she knows if you ride like you can you will be fine, she'll tell you.

Aliascml
Nov. 16, 2010, 11:02 AM
Never have my trainers put me in a dangerous situation or overfaced me. They have pushed me to get better and trusted what I was capable of, even if I was unsure about my capabilites. My falls have been MY fault. :)

rugbygirl
Nov. 16, 2010, 11:39 AM
Long story. Read if interested. Has a point, I promise.

First two years I EVER rode (I mean ever, I was 22 and had just had my arm reconstructed 3 weeks prior and was "out" of rugby for the season...I figured riding would be easy :yes::lol:)

Things started well, walk-trot-canter private lessons on a SAINTLY elderly Arabian gelding. Started to think I was going to be ok at this hobby. Learned to post, learned to ask for his very quiet canter when I was ready. That lasted 3 weeks.

Trainer assigned me next horse. She was a 10 year old mare, had been broke out by a 12 year old girl and left outside for about 2 years. Liked to "pretend spook" but it was fairly tame. About 4 more weeks of flat work on this mare. Included cantering, where "turn her into the wall" worked when she would bolt. If I stayed on long enough.

Then we started jumping (in the 12 year old girl lesson class...I felt like a GIANT.) I came off at least once a lesson, usually bowling through either the rail or the standards. Never hurt. I am 5'11" ish bigger but incredibly fit at the time (recovered from surgery fine and was playing Varsity rugby), and this was a 15hh Arab mare. We were taught to go into two-point three strides out. Looking back, this horse was WAAAAAAAY too small to jump out from under me up on her neck. I eventually got to the point where my balance and leg on this horse worked somehow, and "graduated" to the Adult Ammy class.

I began to suspect that falling off every class was not normal and went to a Jumper barn and got an appropriately sized TB to ride. Different lesson entirely! Never fell there. They had me flat only for about three lessons, then we started trot-in/canter out, then we did some canter-in/canter-out lines. Fun! Left Arabian barn, sadly, I had grown to love Bolty McRidertoss.

Then I took a break for a few months and bought my own green horse (hey, I had LEARNED on one, right?) She was a 17hh Clydesdale, unbroke. Got some help from a great trainer with her, and we did well with supervision. I took her home and actually taught her to canter. Some relatively minor injuries ensued, but trainer was available from a distance for questions/concerns. Started to show her by myself, did reasonably, for a beginner on a just-broke Clydesdale. I knew I wasn't a great rider, but I took pride in being at least patient and fairly soft handed.

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So far, all the trainers I'd had had one thing in common, they built up confidence in me. Even if I fell, I was an experienced Martial Artist who knew how to hit the dirt and we weren't doing things THAT crazy.

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My real injuries happened with a trainer who worked very hard to undermine my confidence. I think she really felt she was putting safety first, but she basically told me to erase all my previous riding and that I was NOTHING. It worked, I became stiff, nervous and totally dependent. The last of the injuries was a serious concussion over a tiny fence that I could have cleared easily in my very first year of riding. Watching video, I was curled up practically in the fetal position on my horse's back. Did the trainer get me hurt? No, I did it to myself by watching my confidence erode in degrees over two years.

Since I left her? Yeah, I've fallen a few times, but my confidence is starting to grow back. If she could see me ride now, I'm sure she'd call it an unmitigated disaster...but I stay on, my horse seems fine and we are starting to have fun again.

RugBug
Nov. 16, 2010, 11:57 AM
I got lucky with my childhood trainer as I probably would've done anything she asked. Thankfully, she never asked me to do anything I wasn't able to do or ready for.

My current trainer would never put me in a dangerous situation and if I tell her I'm nervous, she listens. She knows what makes me anxious and usually doesn't ask me to do those things (placing poles at canter jumps, straightness rails on landing sides, etc).

I have gotten hurt seriously while in a lesson, but it wasn't her fault...it was just one of those things. I was on my horse (while we weren't a good match, I can't blame her...I'm the one that bought him) and he bucked on landing and took off around a corner. Physics ruled the day and even though I stayed on through the buck, the bolt and turn coupled with being loosened, did me in. I broke my humerus in two places. Ended up out of work for 4 months, 9 months of physical therapy, frozen shoulder, etc. It was kind of an ordeal.

Trainer is another that maybe takes too long to move people up...but she'd rather they be safe than move up too quickly. I appreciate that about her.

Isabeau Z Solace
Nov. 16, 2010, 12:48 PM
I had grown to love Bolty McRidertoss.



Ah haha hah !!

Timex
Nov. 16, 2010, 05:38 PM
i will admit that perhaps i'm to cautious with my students. to the point of paranoia. then i read threads like this and find it reassuring. lol

i'm lucky, i've never gotten hurt, where it was a trainer's fault. not saying that trainers haven't put me in a bad spot, just that i never got hurt because of it. but it amazes me what people 'teach' thier students. i had a young girl (8? 9?) come to me that told me her last trainer said she was ready to jump. kid couldn't do a posting trot and steer at the same time, even with me at the head of the 25 yr old dead-broke mare. i've gotten other students from this 'trainer'. she teaches all of them to kick the snot out of a horse to get them to walk. needless to say, the first time i saw that, my eyes about bugged out of my head, and the OTTB lesson horse i was using nearly had a coronary (didn't do a blessed thing, but nearly died from the shock, poor thing. lol). terrifies me to think what ELSE they've been 'teaching' over there, and i'm stunned that they haven't had more serious injuries.

goldenhorse
Nov. 16, 2010, 07:12 PM
Yes, but I have learned to not be afraid to speak up. I hate doing warm up jumps before going in the ring because it rattles me for some reason. I just told my trainer "No, I'm going straight in without the warm up jump". She protested but I ended up winning the division that day and she never has a word about it from then on...

indygirl2560
Nov. 16, 2010, 09:35 PM
My trainer has pushed me, but never to the point where the situation has become dangerous. I trust her as well as my instincts and if I ever felt like a situation was downright dangerous, I would talk to her about it! I trust my trainer 100% but I will speak up if I feel something isn't right.

PaintPony
Nov. 16, 2010, 10:23 PM
How about when you are the trainer trying to make sure that your student DOESN'T get hurt? (maybe we need a new thread?)

I lost a student last year because the non-horsey mother was insisting that kid should be showing at a certain level. Kid, while a good rider, was NOT ready for that, and I was adamant that I did not agree, nor would I allow her to jump that high in lessons.

Mommy knows best huh?:no: And kid did go somewhere else, got pushed beyond what she could do, and got very hurt. From what I understand she is now afraid to jump. :(

Makes me very sad!:cry: