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Alterrain
Nov. 15, 2010, 11:53 AM
I guess the question is, What amount of your money does your trainer have to ask you before spending?

I kind of freaked out the other day because I got a bill for a new ($365) stable blanket which I didn't know my guy needed. It ended ok when I saw the old- completey shredded- one beyond repair. But I did have a "Please let me know when you spend more than X of my money" talk with trainer.

I've never questioned any amount before- shoeing increases, meds, misc tack, etc. So I guess my answer is about $350 :) There are definitely people at my barn who would rather have the money just spent and not be bothered with the phone call though!

Mel0309
Nov. 15, 2010, 11:56 AM
I just have to know, what kind of stable blanket was it? I'm not sure I've seen many blankets that cost that much.

sarapony
Nov. 15, 2010, 11:58 AM
Well I've never been in the kind of barn that does that. But my answer would be closer to $50.

In your case, I would've wanted a call anyway because I might have had an extra blanket at home waiting for just such a scenario. I am a fierce bargain hunter and if I saw a fab deal on a blanket I might buy it as a spare.

barnbum81
Nov. 15, 2010, 11:59 AM
$365 STABLE BLANKET!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! bahahaha! this is a joke right?

Duckz
Nov. 15, 2010, 12:02 PM
Well I've never been in the kind of barn that does that. But my answer would be closer to $50.

In your case, I would've wanted a call anyway because I might have had an extra blanket at home waiting for just such a scenario. I am a fierce bargain hunter and if I saw a fab deal on a blanket I might buy it as a spare.

Ditto. And holy cow, that's an expensive stable blanket!

MyGiantPony
Nov. 15, 2010, 12:05 PM
Well, the blanket was actually only $150...but the trainer had to tack on charges for ordering it, taking it out of the packaging, and putting it on the horse. :lol:

alter123456
Nov. 15, 2010, 12:08 PM
sounds like the trainer is ripping you off. Either that or you're in the wrong barn. :no:

luckyduck
Nov. 15, 2010, 12:15 PM
Ummm...if the barn where I kept my horse sent me a bill for something they could have called me for and I could have ordered....I would have had a cow! Further....if they billed me for a NON emergency item without calling, e-mailing or texting....they could take the bill and pay it themselves!

Alterrain
Nov. 15, 2010, 12:17 PM
She's not ripping me off, the bill is (and always is) directly from the manufacturer. I am not in the wrong barn (but thanks.) Blanket is I think the Clothes Horse?

I was just wondering.

dags
Nov. 15, 2010, 12:20 PM
I guess the question is, What amount of your money does your trainer have to ask you before spending?

I kind of freaked out the other day because I got a bill for a new ($365) stable blanket which I didn't know my guy needed. It ended ok when I saw the old- completey shredded- one beyond repair. But I did have a "Please let me know when you spend more than X of my money" talk with trainer.

I've never questioned any amount before- shoeing increases, meds, misc tack, etc. So I guess my answer is about $350 :) There are definitely people at my barn who would rather have the money just spent and not be bothered with the phone call though!

The sticker value might be a shocker, but... how are you not aware your horse's blanket is worthless and you need a new one? I guess I mean, maybe the trainer was kind of taking initiative that had to be taken? An 'If you're not gonna do it, I will' kinda thing?

Equsrider
Nov. 15, 2010, 12:20 PM
If I could get people to pay me $150 for ordering, unpackaging and putting said blanket on a horse,I'm gonna start a new business!!!!
I would tell trainer she can eat the other $150, since she didn't bother to call you first! That is the most ridiculous thing I have ever heard. Did she show you the invoice that came with the blanket? I would tell her I need it for my records!!!

Pennywell Bay
Nov. 15, 2010, 12:22 PM
Echoing the "holy moly, that is a lot of money!!!" Is it plated in gold? ha ha. But seriously- I would want to see the receipt for that( ETA- saw that you got it). But that is just me. If you have that kind of money- AWESOME!!!

Go Fish
Nov. 15, 2010, 12:25 PM
Yikes - $365 sounds like a lot for a stable blanket...I've spent that much for turn out blankets, though.

I'd probably be fine with my trainer spending my money this way. Although, as someone else mentioned, I would have appreciated a call from the trainer to see if I had a spare blanket at home, first (I would have). My trainer's pretty good about calling me first over stuff like this, or he'd throw on one of his blankets until he could speak to me in person.

I hate blanket-shredding horses!

dags
Nov. 15, 2010, 12:25 PM
Equsrider, that tidbit was not from OP :)


Well, the blanket was actually only $150...but the trainer had to tack on charges for ordering it, taking it out of the packaging, and putting it on the horse. :lol:

She has Clothes Horse invoice for the $350 amount, and yes, a nice stable blanket (not turnout rug) in stable colors, maybe monogrammed? from Clothes Horse isn't cheap :) But it IS nice.

findeight
Nov. 15, 2010, 12:25 PM
If it has the barn logo on it or any other custom trim, it is possible that jacked up the price. Especially with a single or just a few pieces in an orderplus shipping.

What do you mean your trainer is not ripping you off, Clothes Horse is???? Who ordered the thing?

Nice if she had told you in advance.

My answer on how much trainer can spend without my prior approval? Unless it's vet or farrier related of an urgent nature? $0. And I have always been in AA barns.

MyGiantPony
Nov. 15, 2010, 12:32 PM
Equsrider, that tidbit was not from OP :)



She has Clothes Horse invoice for the $350 amount, and yes, a nice stable blanket (not turnout rug) in stable colors, maybe monogrammed? from Clothes Horse isn't cheap :) But it IS nice.

Oh, I was just teasing, considering all the recent threads about trainers fees.

And yes, the custom winter parka is $345...but I'd be asking if it was truly a custom blanket for my horse.

Equsrider
Nov. 15, 2010, 12:32 PM
Me bad... so sorry to be incoherent today! Apologies!!! maybe I should go back to bed?

MyGiantPony
Nov. 15, 2010, 12:33 PM
Me bad... so sorry to be incoherent today! Apologies!!! maybe I should go back to bed?

I've been thinking that ALL DAY...well, actually, I'd love to be curled up on the couch with the Pugs today...:D

findeight
Nov. 15, 2010, 12:36 PM
And yes, the custom winter parka is $345...but I'd be asking if it was truly a custom blanket for my horse.


Most of these from CH are monogrammed and/or have the barn name embroidered so that would make them custom. And price it up.

Have no problem with the price. Problem with not consulting OP before the thing was ordered-like a month or more back. And it's not returnable if it has any embroidery.

whbar158
Nov. 15, 2010, 12:36 PM
I think it depends on the barn, the set up, and the clients. Most places I have been usually do say "hey your horse broke their halter/blanket/bridle do you have another? I can order you one if you want". I don't think I have ever seen something bought that the owner really didn't know about unless they were out of town/out of reach for whatever reason. I have seen the barn replace something without charge if it was broken by them ie help grabbed the wrong halter and it got broken, borrowed a blanket and it got ripped etc.

Although I know some of the clients likely wouldn't have cared if they replaced a broken item without asking and charged as many of them don't keep spares at home. I highly doubt my trainer would have ever done that for me, as I was very hands on and there almost every day and often did have spare stuff at home.

dags
Nov. 15, 2010, 12:39 PM
Me bad... so sorry to be incoherent today! Apologies!!! maybe I should go back to bed?

it's monday, all bets off :lol:

bascher
Nov. 15, 2010, 12:43 PM
I have extra blankets at home, so I would much rather my trainer call me and let me know if she thinks my horse needs a new one instead of just buying it.

Lucassb
Nov. 15, 2010, 12:43 PM
My trainer's current boarding agreement specifies that she or the BM is authorized to call the vet and/or farrier in an emergent situation without my prior approval (but with the understanding they will TRY to reach me first.)

They are not authorized to buy anything else on my behalf, without prior approval. Like several other posters have mentioned - I have spares of nearly everything already.

Now, when we DO order stuff in barn colors or whatever, they WILL often circulate the order form, so that anyone who wants to get in on the "group purchase" can do so; it's often less expensive that way. But they would never just place orders for clients without getting permission to do so.

The BM for the BNT barn I rode with last winter tried that stunt, and ordered me a martingale (from Beval) that she thought I "needed" without clearing it with me first.

I told her to enjoy it, since a) I already have several very high end martingales in my trunk, and b) I don't use one on this particular horse, and wasn't interested in making a change (especially not just "to dress him for the party.")

Luckily (for her) she backed down and took the charge off my bill. Don't know if she returned it or kept it for barn use, but I didn't pay for it. And that kind of BS is a big part of why I left that barn, despite the fact that the instruction was really terrific.

pattnic
Nov. 15, 2010, 12:44 PM
I'm going to guess it was a custom stable blanket in barn colors... or the most expensive Rambo, but that's really more a turnout...

Anyway, that is a LOT of money... kudos to you that you can afford it, but in my case, NO ONE spends my money without my okay first.

Really makes me glad I'm on my own and don't have a trainer.

plain bay
Nov. 15, 2010, 12:45 PM
Guys, come on, we're talking an A show barn I believe (based on OP's other posts I've read) not your run of the mill boarding barn; a $350 stable blanket from The Clothes Horse is kind of typical of a lot of A show barns. And a lot of A show barns require you to have certain items, you can't just buy/bring whatever you want to put on your horse when you decide to become a part of that barn/trainer's program. Some barns/trainers want their horses all to look uniform because it creates a neat, tidy picture. With all that being said, I would probably be a bit miffed that I was not given the heads up that the purchase was being made, but I would not be mad, because that's what I signed up for when I joined that barn.

ETA - just wanted to make it clear that I am referring to earlier posts, not Luccasb's as there are a lot of really nice A show barns that don't run this way either (ie you're not required, but encouraged, and notification is given first); my post is taking into consideration that OP knew going into this program that this is how things are done in that program (you are required to have the items the barn/trainer specifies).

spacytracy
Nov. 15, 2010, 12:46 PM
I would say anything over like $50-100.
Its not like trainer saw your horse had no blanket, it was pouring so he/she went out, bought one from a local store, so that pookie could have a blanket that day. This was well-planned, and took awhile to come in - so there was plenty of time to shoot a text or call to say what was up.

I'm just curious though - is the horse in full training/far away? How would you not have noticed that the horse didn't have a blanket anymore? I'm assuming that these custom blankets take awhile to come in? So assuming that, horse would have to be nekkid for several weeks.

findeight
Nov. 15, 2010, 12:46 PM
OP....maybe you should look at your contract with trainer. Did you authorize any and all purchases deemed necessary by the trainer (outside of vet and farrier)?

Might want to look at that just in case trainer is eying a new Childric or something.

Many of these AA barns do require certain blankets and trunks and so state in their contracts. BUT, that should not give them carte blanche to get whatever they want and bill the owner. Usually you get told "hey, Sissy stepped on her turnout rug and you need to get it fixed or have us do it or we can replace it". Have seen some pretty ugly fights over new show bridles and such the owner was unaware of until billed-fact never even seen on their horse until they demanded possession.

Check your contract. Not going to help you on that blanket though but you can stop it from happening again for an Edgewood you didn't know you "needed ASAP".

Jsalem
Nov. 15, 2010, 12:47 PM
The Clothes Horse sells beautiful custom blankets. And yes, that's how much they cost. Sounds like OP's barn is the type to have such clothes- not for COTH'ers to judge.

OP, the answer to your questions is, "It depends." We have clients that count every penny and budget, budget, budget. Other clients are a little more "free wheeling" with the funds. Those clients really appreciate when we take the initiative and pick up things for them from the tack store- a new halter, special hoof stuff, etc.

We do a lot of communication by email. Our clients might get sick of hearing from us, but we send out lots of short emails, "Weather getting really cold, make sure all your turnouts are at the barn," "Here's our tentative 2011 Show Schedule. We welcome your input." "Please welcome so and so to the barn".

We wouldn't have spent that amount without an email- even for the big spender types. We do order blanket tags and maybe pick up little tack store items without notice.

M. O'Connor
Nov. 15, 2010, 12:51 PM
This is definitely a topic to discuss with a trainer in advance, so that each of you can be clear about what to expect, and to agree on a "policy."

I am generally prone to forewarn customers about expenses way in advance of when they are incurred. I would never spring a surprise, unless it could not be avoided, and I can't even imagine a circumstance where that would be the case.

allintexas
Nov. 15, 2010, 12:51 PM
I've been at a few show barns, and I can't think of one that would have spent that much money without asking me first, unless for emergency vet, farrier, etc. I don't think anyone spent over $100 or so without asking

Life is Good 2
Nov. 15, 2010, 12:54 PM
Wow I am at an upscale a barn in the midwest and would never expect that to happen. I always have my cell phone with me and expect a call for any expenditure. For our matching show blankets a sign up goes up and we order at once to get a better rate. This kind of thing would make it hard to budget. If there is even a hole or rip I know about it that day and take it home to fix so I would not be in the same situation.

NYCGIRL
Nov. 15, 2010, 12:55 PM
Most of these from CH are monogrammed and/or have the barn name embroidered so that would make them custom. And price it up.

Have no problem with the price. Problem with not consulting OP before the thing was ordered-like a month or more back. And it's not returnable if it has any embroidery.

Honestly, I would rather trainer/barn manager just make the call that the horse needs the blanket etc. I work long hours etc. I recently got some new blankets and the prices I saw were about that. The blankets were from Clothes horse just a side note but I think they were worth every penny, they look great. I think in the area I live in it is very common for trainers to just buy blankets etc. However, I think just a quick convo with whoever does ordering to let them know that if you spend above X I would like to be notified should fix the problem.

Seal Harbor
Nov. 15, 2010, 12:56 PM
She's not ripping me off, the bill is (and always is) directly from the manufacturer. I am not in the wrong barn (but thanks.) Blanket is I think the Clothes Horse?

I was just wondering.

It's custom. Not just some off the shelf blanket. It fits properly because it is custom made to the horse's measurements - there are 5 measurements that are taken not just length.

Sounds as though this is a barn that does all their horse clothing purchases through TCH and that is what they cost.

SmartAlex
Nov. 15, 2010, 12:56 PM
My take on it is... it's not so much the amount as it is the "lead time". I mean, did the blanket get shredded beyond repair overnight? If so, did the horse live through the debacle :confused: ;)

It seems to me, a simple memo to the effect of "as usual, we will be ordering new stable blankets next month. Please do not be alarmed by your bill" would have been in order.

Alterrain
Nov. 15, 2010, 01:01 PM
Thanks for all replies-

I didn't notice his old blanket was ruined cause 1. the guys threw another one on him (an old customers that left years ago) while mine was being ordered, and 2. usually when I get there (ride after work) he is already cleaned and wearing a cooler and therefore I don't see the blankets.

I don't WANT to return it, I NEED the blanket. I was just shocked that I wasn't forewarned. Usually I get a "heads up, we bought you a new bridle. Don't be shocked."

dags
Nov. 15, 2010, 01:05 PM
Heads up is definitely more than warranted.

It could be, though, that it was going to happen anyway (this is not justification, just further development of points previously raised). If this is a barn that requires a certain stable blanket (which makes for a gorgeous barn aisle at the show and is certainly within their rights to require), then the fact that the horse was going to get a new $350 Stable Blanket was entirely unavoidable.

Not saying it was right, but that even if they did ask permission, it's not like OP had a real 'choice' in the matter (quotes b/c yes, she can always leave, but I'm assuming she signed up for this program for a reason). More an illusion of choice to ask.

Notification is probably the right word. Yes, she should have been notified, but I do see this a bit different than the bridles mentioned. If the blanket was thrashed, someone's got to do something about it for the horse's benefit.

shawneeAcres
Nov. 15, 2010, 01:06 PM
I am a SMALL trainer, not an "A" show barn here. I don't spend clients money, only exceptions are that the horses ARE regularly trimmed/shod according to the schedule I deem fit and they are billed BY THE FARRIER, not me and does not come to me, unless it is a marketing horse that I never see the owner, then I pay for the farrier visit and they send with next board check. Likewise for vet, my contract has a clause that allows me to authorize veterinary charges in the even of an emergency if owner cannot be reached, and I also schedule routine vet care (shots, coggins, teeth floating) and it is billed directly to them from the vet. Anything else is "discussed" and nine times out of 10 the owner buys the needed item(s). If a horse tears a blanket up beyond use, I will "loan" a blanket if I have one that fits, until they can buy a new one. No charge unless horse tears up MY blanket! Any expeditures for marketing horses or horses in training are relayed to owner for their "OK", i.e. showing, hauling, clipping, joint injections etc. I think it is unethical to do otherwise unless owner and trainer have SPECIFICALLY agreed to some other arrangement.

Lucassb
Nov. 15, 2010, 01:08 PM
A quick note - most big show barns have "barn inventory" of commonly used stuff (extra blankets, scrims, coolers etc.) Those will typically be used if something gets shredded/lost/outgrown. I very much doubt that the horse went nekkid while the new blanket was on order. ;)

And I agree that it is very common for big show barns to have a laundry list of required items that clients are expected to purchase when they move into a program. They do tend to be custom, and pricey. Some barns have a list of "core" items (sheet, blanket, dress sheet) that you have to get right away, and will give you time to acquire the other stuff, realizing that the outlay for the whole list can be significant (and you might not need that custom scrim in, say, November.) As someone who has several custom trunks in various colors - packed with the custom clothes those barns required - I always appreciate the opportunity to see if the program is actually going to work out for me in the long term before I drop a few grand on new versions of things that I already own in spades.

kimball1
Nov. 15, 2010, 01:08 PM
I was at a full service breed barn for several years, and stuff like that just got ordered. You were told when you started boarding this is what your horse needed, and it got ordered from a specific company. (Radon, not the Clothes Horse). It just got put on your bill, because you were told in writing if you wanted to board and show with them, you would have X, Y, and Z. The trainer preferred to order the stuff because then she knew it would fit, would be the right item etc. She would tell you about it first usually, but sometimes stuff just appeared on your bill. I wouldn't have a problem with it if the expectation had been set up front.

Seal Harbor
Nov. 15, 2010, 01:09 PM
They probably just forget to warn you. Horse shredded blanket, ordered new one, horse was wearing another - somewhere between order and arrival of bill/blanket it fell through the cracks. I know Katrina and Crew are pretty fast at TCH but even they don't typically whip up a custom blanket over night.

luckyduck
Nov. 15, 2010, 01:09 PM
Whether its a TOP "A" barn or a local dive.... I still think the customer should have SOME control over what is spent on thier behalf....

OP may have had ordered an "extra" and had it sitting in her house for all the trainer knew.

Communication seems to be a thing of the past.

With e-mail, texting, cell phones, IM, e-mail and plain old paper and pen...I find it sad that there is such a breakdown in simple words.

I know that in some people's worlds money is growing on trees for them....but in other people's worlds, $350 is half a months board.

I think in this day and time trainers, BM and BO's should at least take into consideration that maybe out of respect...the customer would just like to be notified.

JMO

findeight
Nov. 15, 2010, 01:10 PM
Soooo...you need to go and talk to the trainer so this does not occur again.

You have every right to do so. You are a valuable client and you are not happy with the service rendered to the point you mentioned it on this BB.

Tell trainer that, unless you are specifically notified, no purchases over, say, $50 are to be made and added to your bill. Unless there is specific language in the contract allowing purchases without your specific knowledge, it is reasonable. Hardly out of line for you to speak up about a 400 surprise.

Thing that gets me here is a CH blanket takes about 8-12 weeks from order to delivery. That should have been plenty of time for them to tell you. Let them know you expect to be told in the future before they spend your money.

whbar158
Nov. 15, 2010, 01:11 PM
I can see this being a practice at some barns. There are many people out there who as long as they know this is how the barn runs up front are completely happy with. I think what the OP is asking in this sort of situation, where you have given the ok to buy things without asking if the horse needs it, what price does it come to be hey lets give the owner a heads up? The OP is obviously ok with the trainer making these decisions. While in this day and age many people would be very weary of this system. With honest people I see it as a very good system to make sure that every horse has everything they need and not have to wait for the owner to get around to doing it. Where this goes wrong is when the trainer gets greedy (or barn help whatever) and start charging for a new bridle when the horse might not really need it and if the owner isn't around enough they use it on their own horses. That makes this system look like the trainer is just ripping people off.

GreyHunterHorse
Nov. 15, 2010, 01:14 PM
Where I board, what would have happened is, my horse would have borrowed one from my trainer, I would have gotten a call, and then I would have brought out/bought a new one. That's how it works where we are.

On the other hand, if yours is from the Clothes Horse, it sounds like trainer has specific colors and requirements, which makes sense. Plus, Clothes Horse makes a fantastic product....so...either way, I'm sure its very nice :yes:

Mara
Nov. 15, 2010, 01:15 PM
If I'm spending $345, I want the frequent flier points, dammit!

meupatdoes
Nov. 15, 2010, 01:15 PM
YHGTBFKM.

That is more than I pay in board and farrier for one barefoot horse.

ExJumper
Nov. 15, 2010, 01:20 PM
YHGTBFKM.

That is more than I pay in board and farrier for one barefoot horse.

Don't be so judgmental.

Everyone has different needs and priorities. It does no one any good to judge the OP on what she is willing to pay for a stable sheet.

meupatdoes
Nov. 15, 2010, 01:24 PM
Don't be so judgmental.

Everyone has different needs and priorities. It does no one any good to judge the OP on what she is willing to pay for a stable sheet.

Who is judging the OP?

It was the trainer who was willing to spend the OPs money on the stable sheet, if I recall.

If my trainer suddenly
a.) lost his fool mind and
b.) tried to pull that mcshizzle with me WITHOUT EVEN ASKING
he would have bought himself a new stable sheet.
I'm sure he'd be just delighted that he had spared none of his own expense to get the highest quality product in his colors.

REH
Nov. 15, 2010, 01:26 PM
If I'm spending $345, I want the frequent flier points, dammit!

This. If it's humanely possible for me to pay for something myself, I'd like to pay for it myself, particularly if it can be paid on a credit card.

findeight
Nov. 15, 2010, 01:36 PM
This. If it's humanely possible for me to pay for something myself, I'd like to pay for it myself, particularly if it can be paid on a credit card.

And that's a good point. Owner should be able to make the choice of how to pay for it-up front on the monthly bill or spread out via CC with reward points (unless they are paying the monthly bill with the CC anyway).

I always got a notice "we are ordering blankets in September" and a notation "you need to get one". Never had anybody just go do it. Would not sign a contract that allowed it either. Fine for the barn to require it, just let me do the buying.

AnotherRound
Nov. 15, 2010, 01:44 PM
Well, despite the fact that I personally wouldn't want any money spent without my approval, except for vet and farrier, it seems to me that the purchase was right along the norm for your barn - if you say you usually are forewarned before such a purchase, or given a heads up before its done, and this time you weren't, then I would say it was a slip and your communique was lost along the way, or forgotton to give you the call.

Remind them you need a phone call about purchases to be billed to you or whatever you feel comfortable with and hope it doesn't happen again with a high end item.

My limit for such items would be $100.00 tops, anything more, such as $105.00 needs my approval.

Cheers!:cool:

Tucked_Away
Nov. 15, 2010, 01:44 PM
Usually I get a "heads up, we bought you a new bridle. Don't be shocked."

O.o

I'm glad your barn works for you, OP, but I gotta say...if anybody says to me, "Hey, I bought you a new bridle," they had better be notifying me of a gift, not about to hand me a bill!

I'm happy to hear out my trainer's suggestions when it comes to tack and equipment. But if it's my money, I'm the one who decides whether or not it gets spent.

Seal Harbor
Nov. 15, 2010, 01:52 PM
It probably did go on her credit card, since she mentioned that all bills are from The Clothes Horse, they aren't showing up on her board bill.

It was not a stable sheet. It was a blanket. I only mention this because that misinformation would get carried forward as the price for a stable sheet from TCH and it is not, or the price the barn charged her and it was not.

People in that sort of program are told in advance of boarding there what is expected, they managed to forget to let her know that a new blanket was on order and coming as was the bill for it. They should not have forgotten.

Depends on the season as to the lead time for The Clothes Horse. There are times when it is as little as 4 weeks. Still 4 weeks is time enough to have it slip someone's mind that a blanket was ordered.

DMK
Nov. 15, 2010, 02:01 PM
Who is judging the OP?

You, by all appearances.

Like others said, sometimes a big show barn has certain equipment (blankets, show boxes, etc.) that are mandatory and go into creating a look and presentation that people spending that amount of money expect.

The fact that somebody is in a barn that has these requirements (and how you feel about it as it relates to your personal spending habits) is important to the conversation how?

I thought the question was more along "at what point does the purchase need advance approval/notification?"

To that end there was some pretty good advice about a solid contract/agreement between trainer/owner.

meupatdoes
Nov. 15, 2010, 02:04 PM
You, by all appearances.

Like others said, sometimes a big show barn has certain equipment (blankets, show boxes, etc.) that are mandatory and go into creating a look and presentation that people spending that amount of money expect.

The fact that somebody is in a barn that has these requirements (and how you feel about it as it relates to your personal spending habits) is important to the conversation how?

I thought the question was more along "at what point does the purchase need advance approval/notification?"

To that end there was some pretty good advice about a solid contract/agreement between trainer/owner.

You should probably also quote the next sentence I wrote to avoid the appearance of selectively responding to only half of what I wrote.

gottagrey
Nov. 15, 2010, 02:07 PM
I can see all these uniform items for show use, but for everyday use - turnout/stabling it's really idiotic for a trainer not to allow their clients to spend their own money in the manner they wish, nor do I think they can compel them (legally) to. The city/locale where you reside cannot compel you to purchase auto or homeowner's insurance from X company, why should your trainer? Your emplolyer cannot compel you to purchase your work clothes from X store -they can say you have to wear a blue shirt w/ kahki pants but they can't tell you to purchase them from Ralph Lauren instead of LL Bean. Why should a trainer be any different? If you are required to wear a uniform for your work, you can either deduct that from your income tax return or often employers offer an allowance for uniforms. Trainers do not.

Certainly if a trainer wants you to have certain items in barn colors- thats fine but what's the difference if you get the same item from the local tack shop, Dover, Smartpak - as long as the item is similar or identical in appearance and quality who cares?

To the OP - obviously you were shocked at the bill so I would re-read your contract and if there is nothing in there about expenses being charged w/o your permission, then I suggest you put an addendum on your contract stating that any charges above X amount you must be notified of in advance otherwise you have the right to dispute (not pay) any charge you did not agree to in advance... might want to include that any such charge must be OK'd in writing ahead of time...

FineAlready
Nov. 15, 2010, 02:07 PM
Okay. I'm not that surprised at the price of the blanket given that it is custom and from The Clothes Horse. I AM surprised at the gumption of the trainer going out and ordering the dang thing without approval from the client.

Here's the list of people my trainer can call before calling me about anything relating to my horse: 1. vet (for an emergency), 2. farrier (for a lost shoe, etc., but not for a change in the way he is being shod). Then I am to be the very next call. So, in the case of an emergency - heck yes, call the emergency vet right away. Then call me so I can drive my bawling butt out to the barn or the vet clinic ASAP. If they can't get ahold of me, they are allowed to go ahead and do what they need to do on the recommendation of the vet.

I've been in A show barns my whole life, and, no, it's not just "standard" that in all A show barns the trainers can purchase whatever they want for you on your dime. I've seen it with some clients in some barns, but I assume that was pre-approved operating procedure. It's never happened to me. And if it ever does, someone will be getting an earful.

FineAlready
Nov. 15, 2010, 02:10 PM
I'd also note that I'd be particularly peeved if my trainer ordered a blanket for me without my pre-approval. I mean, what if I wanted lined shoulders, etc. and she didn't include that in the order? Even with "standard" attire that all horses in a barn are required to wear, there are still usually some options that you need to pick out - lined shoulders, fleece at withers, d-rings for leg straps...

meupatdoes
Nov. 15, 2010, 02:12 PM
I can see all these uniform items for show use, but for everyday use - turnout/stabling it's really idiotic for a trainer not to allow their clients to spend their own money in the manner they wish, nor do I think they can compel them (legally) to. The city/locale where you reside cannot compel you to purchase auto or homeowner's insurance from X company, why should your trainer? Your emplolyer cannot compel you to purchase your work clothes from X store -they can say you have to wear a blue shirt w/ kahki pants but they can't tell you to purchase them from Ralph Lauren instead of LL Bean. Why should a trainer be any different? If you are required to wear a uniform for your work, you can either deduct that from your income tax return or often employers offer an allowance for uniforms. Trainers do not.

I agree that items for use at shows should be uniform,, I don't agree w/ being forced where to purchase them if an identical item is available elsewhere at cost savings... and for everyday use when it's just going to get dirty/muddy outside what's the point?

Well, trainers aren't employers.

There is a golf course next to Pebble Beach that doesn't allow black people. It is a private club not an employer, they can admit who they want and exclude who they want and say everyone has to wear a LaCoste shirt from the 2010 collection in the color "pool" if that is how they want their dress code to be.

Customers have the choice to a.) get the LaCoste shirt in "pool" or b.) golf elsewhere.

Not that I don't think it is frackin' ridiculous for a trainer to require x brand of stable sheet, but there is nothing immoral about people having crazy rules for their customers. And if people want to bend over, they can.

That said I agree with FineAlready.
I have been in plenty of A show barns and have even done tack store runs with a customer's credit card to kit out their horses and I have never seen equipment be ordered willy nilly without prior approval to the tune of $300+ for one item. This is not "standard procedure" as far as I have personally experienced.

Giddy-up
Nov. 15, 2010, 02:14 PM
Amount my trainer can spend before talking to me - $0.

But I am not at that type of barn. I suggest you speak with your trainer & select whatever amount makes you comfortable being spent before your consent is needed. For some people it might be $50, others $500.

dags
Nov. 15, 2010, 02:22 PM
I'd also note that I'd be particularly peeved if my trainer ordered a blanket for me without my pre-approval. I mean, what if I wanted lined shoulders, etc. and she didn't include that in the order? Even with "standard" attire that all horses in a barn are required to wear, there are still usually some options that you need to pick out - lined shoulders, fleece at withers, d-rings for leg straps...

It's all different strokes for different folks. The OP wasn't even aware her blanket was tattered beyond repair, so I'm guessing she doesn't have a huge opinion on shoulder gussets, or more likely, trusts her trainer to have the correct one.

It's not "standard" at A barns, I don't think anyone said that, but it is standard at some barns.

nomeolvides
Nov. 15, 2010, 02:23 PM
That's outrageous! The whole barn/trainer thing baffles me anyway, it's sounds do different from what I'm used to over here. If anyone dared spend a single penny of my money without my prior permission I would be absolutely furious.

gottagrey
Nov. 15, 2010, 02:26 PM
Well, trainer's aren't employers.

There is a golf course next to Pebble Beach that doesn't allow black people. It is a private club not an employer, they can admit who they want and exclude who they want and say everyone has to wear a LaCoste shirt from the 2010 collection in the color "pool" if that is how they want their dress code to be.

Customers have the choice to a.) get the LaCoste shirt in "pool" or b.) golf elsewhere.

Not that I don't think it is frackin' ridiculous for a trainer to require x brand of stable sheet, but there is nothing immoral about people having crazy rules for their customers. If people want to bend over, they can.

I used the employer as an analogy to everyday life...an employer can tell it's employees they have to wear LaCoste (or X brand but they cannot demand they purchase them at Nordstrom vs EBay... and that's my point... Why should a trainer be any different.. and it's amazing how many people don't question such practices... as you say if they want to bend over...

And any country club or golf club that would also demand their members wear X brand would no doubt be having a massive membership drive in short order.. Many CC and Tennis clubs had (and a few might still have) a white attire only (I think Wimbleton might still require white attire only) but they cannot demand you purchase X brand from X store... again and that's my point.

DMK
Nov. 15, 2010, 02:29 PM
You should probably also quote the next sentence I wrote to avoid the appearance of selectively responding to only half of what I wrote.

I didn't actually think that improved your response much, just yanked your judgy pants into a bit more of a wedgy...

FineAlready
Nov. 15, 2010, 02:30 PM
It's all different strokes for different folks. The OP wasn't even aware her blanket was tattered beyond repair, so I'm guessing she doesn't have a huge opinion on shoulder gussets, or more likely, trusts her trainer to have the correct one.

It's not "standard" at A barns, I don't think anyone said that, but it is standard at some barns.

'Tis true. I do agree that if she did not know her blanket was trashed, she probably also does not know the specifics of what her horse requires in the blanket options department.

Not a judgment, btw. I just had not read that particular bit of info before I posted, and it does lend a certain clarity to the whole situation.

I guess I would submit that if a person is not involved in the day-to-day details of their horse's life, then the dollar limit on discretionary purchases by the trainer - who IS presumably aware of the day-to-day details of the horse's life - should be much, much higher. Upwards of $300 does not really surprise me under these circumstances.

FWIW, I am in a barn that requires everyone to have certain custom horse apparel. No one has ever ordered it without my approval, but I've also always been a very involved horse owner and have taken care of such things promptly on my own. I'm not sure what they would do if owners failed to order the "required" items? I'm pretty sure there would not be any consequences, and I don't think they'd order the items for the person. Well, at least judging from the number of horses at my boarding barn who are sporting "unapproved" items...

hntrjmprpro45
Nov. 15, 2010, 02:33 PM
As a trainer I usually keep it around $50-$100 although I almost always ask before hand. The only time I don't get permission is if I see something on sale, call my client, they don't answer and I leave a message. In these events I would spend as much as I felt was absolutely necessary and only if I could use it if they didn't. That way, if the owner called me back and said they didn't want it, I would tell them I went ahead and purchased it and will just use it for one of my own horses (letting them borrow it if necessary). I've done this with girths and bridles. So basically I wouldn't spend more than I was willing to dish out myself.

findeight
Nov. 15, 2010, 02:39 PM
That's outrageous! The whole barn/trainer thing baffles me anyway, it's sounds do different from what I'm used to over here. If anyone dared spend a single penny of my money without my prior permission I would be absolutely furious.

It is very, very different from what you have over there plus the OP here is in a top show barn that shows nationally. Rather like you presenting a string at Ascot or Aintree, things look better of they are matched throughout the barn.

However, we also scream bloody hell when trainers spend our money without our consent.

meupatdoes
Nov. 15, 2010, 02:42 PM
I didn't actually think that improved your response much, just yanked your judgy pants into a bit more of a wedgy...

The OP made a post asking COTHers about what they would think if a trainer spent their money in the way the OP described in her post.

I answered.

Just because I would find that trainer's behavior unacceptable if it were MY money they were spending does not mean I am judging the OP. She can do whatever she wants, and I am guessing the reason she posted this thread was to get a variety of inputs to help her calibrate her thoughts on her situation. My input is simply one end of the spectrum.

Do your best to paint me as the villain but I believe I can say "I would find that behavior unacceptable from my trainer" if somebody asks "what do you think about this situation?"

Equilibrium
Nov. 15, 2010, 02:59 PM
Was not going to reply to this but if my trainer takes to ordering abba a rug that expensive he can eat the cost himself. Mind you I know that isn't a worry.

How and ever I can't stop laughing about DMK's judgy pants quote. Unfortunately I am not clever enough to quote it properly. I just might have to share it somehow. And I mean no disrespect to meap as I like her.

Terri

Peggy
Nov. 15, 2010, 03:02 PM
For my trainer and me: $0. Unless it's an emergency, such as a vet. Other clients are less hands-on and money might get spent, but I think it's generally with prior approval to go shopping. And there may even be a phone call before any significant $$$ gets spent. This is not an AA barn, but we do have clients that would not be aware that their horse's blanket is in bad shape for the simple reason that they pretty much never see said blanket.

It's kind of understood that if your winter blanket is still hanging in front of your horse's stall in, say, May that it's going to get bundled off with the rest of them to get cleaned and repaired as necessary and that you will pay for that. I generally take care of my own, but a cooler ended up in the pile one year because I had loaned it to someone and forgotten to retrieve it (and, yeah, they had forgotten to return it) but I did pay the bill.

Alterrain
Nov. 15, 2010, 03:04 PM
I think what the OP is asking in this sort of situation, where you have given the ok to buy things without asking if the horse needs it, what price does it come to be hey lets give the owner a heads up?

^^This was my question

Someohow I never say what I mean :)

DMK
Nov. 15, 2010, 03:07 PM
Alterrain, somehow I managed to understand it the first time so I don't think you were that far off base. ;) But then I was thinking "probably a Clothes Horse blanket" as well...

purplnurpl
Nov. 15, 2010, 03:17 PM
I guess the question is, What amount of your money does your trainer have to ask you before spending?



for those that did not take the time to read other posts and/or look up the OPs new stable blanket:
http://www.theclotheshorse.com/stableClothes.html

I bet is beautiful. But IMHO trainers over time become too comfortable spending the money of their students who are as generous as our OP.
IMO a trainer should notify their client BEFORE spending their money.

This person is buying for you and they should check to make sure it is an item that you need and want--whether $10 or 1K.

It will continue to happen and quite possibly become more expensive as time goes on if you don't have a quick chitty chat chat chat. :cool:
Something simple such as: "please send me a quick email when you need to make a purchase so that I know what is expected of me before you buy."

Tha Ridge
Nov. 15, 2010, 03:18 PM
I haven't read every single reply here, but FWIW, the practice is pretty standard at a lot of big "A" show barns. Some, as we've seen, consult the owner prior to purchase, and some do not.

I worked for a barn in California where the trainer had client's credit card information on file and would order what she saw fit, sometimes on a whim. I.E., "Oh, that Edgewood bridle is too light for you horse. $650 EquusSport custom? Sounds good to me!"

One of my duties was going through everyone's trunk and making sure that all the horses had the exact same "clothes" - scrims, stable blankets, sheets, dress sheets, boots, etc. If they didn't, all of that was ordered right away as well.

Clients who have the money are more inclined to tolerate it, although you do get the occasional one who does a double take at the bill. Those don't typically last too long. :lol:

purplnurpl
Nov. 15, 2010, 03:23 PM
Communication seems to be a thing of the past.

With e-mail, texting, cell phones, IM, e-mail and plain old paper and pen...I find it sad that there is such a breakdown in simple words.


JMO

sigh, I say this every time I go on a date and a week later Prince Charming turns out to be the same old Prince Douchebag.

(on top of a horse)

CBoylen
Nov. 15, 2010, 03:31 PM
Alterrain, somehow I managed to understand it the first time so I don't think you were that far off base. ;) But then I was thinking "probably a Clothes Horse blanket" as well...

Me too. I've always been at the barn on a nearly daily basis, so I usually do my own purchasing, but it's certainly not uncommon for a barn to order tack or clothing as needed for client's horses. I've also always been at barns that require cc # on file.

whbar158
Nov. 15, 2010, 04:20 PM
OP- I think I would just nicely mention that you would like a heads up on major buys. My guess is the ball just got dropped somewhere. Maybe they ordered a few at the time, saw another client right away and told them about it and honestly forgot to tell you. As much as we all want to be perfect all the time this stuff happens. Maybe even left a note on your trunk and it got thrown away before you ever saw it, I don't know how things work at your barn, but I do know people forget things. I forget to tell my husband things all the time and I live with him!

REH
Nov. 15, 2010, 04:36 PM
And that's a good point. Owner should be able to make the choice of how to pay for it-up front on the monthly bill or spread out via CC with reward points (unless they are paying the monthly bill with the CC anyway).

I always got a notice "we are ordering blankets in September" and a notation "you need to get one". Never had anybody just go do it. Would not sign a contract that allowed it either. Fine for the barn to require it, just let me do the buying.

This would also be resolved if trainer had CC on file. I just don't want to see thousands of dollars of stuff that could be my miles instead coming out of a checking account!

enjoytheride
Nov. 15, 2010, 05:08 PM
It sounds like normal practice in the OPs barn, and the barn probably didn't even think it would bother her. She is obviously busy, shows up after work to find a cleaned and ready to go horse. The barn is designed to make her life easier so she can enjoy her horse.

I think if the OP has an issue she should discuss it with the trainer, however, what other options for a blanket would the OP have? If that is the blanket brand required then she didn't really have a choice anyway.

nlk
Nov. 15, 2010, 05:20 PM
Honestly I would never give anyone leave to spend my money with out telling me first. Call me, E-mail me etc....unless it's an emergency of life and death for the animal, then it's treat him as your own.

I also do not spend my clients money. I may make suggestions such as color or fit but NEVER they have to but XYZ...

mroades
Nov. 15, 2010, 05:22 PM
sigh, I say this every time I go on a date and a week later Prince Charming turns out to be the same old Prince Douchebag.

(on top of a horse)


oh my, this just happened to me...on a job interview...lol

Back to the OP's question, I suspect it was simply a miscommunication, that she does need to bring up, so it doesn't happen again.

findeight
Nov. 15, 2010, 05:37 PM
... however, what other options for a blanket would the OP have? If that is the blanket brand required then she didn't really have a choice anyway.

But the question, as I understand it, is should they have let her in on the fact they ordered that blanket and provided her billing address to a third party. I take it she does not have a credit card and universal approval on file at the barn for any and all charges deemed necessary or she would not have received an invoice from CH.

On one hand, it is NBD they got the blanket. On the other, it is if they did not share and assumed she would pay with no specific wording in the board/train contract they have the right to order in her name and bill with no prior notification or authorization.

So, again, chat with trainer and examine contract.

horse n' around
Nov. 15, 2010, 05:40 PM
All I can say is OMG! My trainer is authorized to spend $0 of my money. If there is an emergency then I will get a call and I will authorized and the bill will come from vet, etc. To me this does not sound like miscommunication because the OP said that the trainer will tell you that you needed a new bridle and that she ordered it so don't be surprised at the outrageous bill cause I also tacked on a few hundred for me having to handle the package that I ordered. Real communication is "oh hey, I noticed your bridle/blanket/whatever is looking really worn. Do you want me to order you a new one or do you have another?". I understand barns having matching things and whatnot, but I have never heard of them just ordering stuff for you without your knowledge and then saying oh hey here's a big surcharge on your bill. Crazy.

poltroon
Nov. 15, 2010, 05:42 PM
My answer on how much trainer can spend without my prior approval? Unless it's vet or farrier related of an urgent nature? $0. And I have always been in AA barns.

Ditto.

Seal Harbor
Nov. 15, 2010, 05:50 PM
All I can say is OMG! My trainer is authorized to spend $0 of my money. If there is an emergency then I will get a call and I will authorized and the bill will come from vet, etc. To me this does not sound like miscommunication because the OP said that the trainer will tell you that you needed a new bridle and that she ordered it so don't be surprised at the outrageous bill cause I also tacked on a few hundred for me having to handle the package that I ordered. Real communication is "oh hey, I noticed your bridle/blanket/whatever is looking really worn. Do you want me to order you a new one or do you have another?". I understand barns having matching things and whatnot, but I have never heard of them just ordering stuff for you without your knowledge and then saying oh hey here's a big surcharge on your bill. Crazy.

The bill came from The Clothes Horse. She was not billed through the trainer.

Many barns do order stuff for the horses. Including a proper wardrobe. Just because you have never heard of it doesn't mean it doesn't happen. Different circles.

I honestly think the original question was how much is your trainer authorized to spend without prior approval. For many here it is $0, except for the vet or farrier. For others it is whatever they need, cost doesn't matter. I don't think any of those people are posting here.

TarheelJD
Nov. 15, 2010, 05:56 PM
My trainer is authorized to spend anything she deems necessary -- I gave her my credit card info when my horse moved into her barn. She did not ask for my credit card info, I offered it to her, because I never wanted her to be in a position where he needed something, she could not reach me, and having to front the money for something potentially expensive.

All of that being said, in over a year, she has never once used the credit card info. Whenever he has needed anything, she calls, emails, or tells me in person, and I take care of it (usually in consultation with her, so I know I get the right thing).

I trust that if she ever has to use the credit card info, it would be for something he really needs and she would tell me right away.

These trainer threads always make me want to buy my trainer a really good bottle of wine to let her know how much I appreciate her! When I started up with her, I did not realize how rare it is to find a trainer you can trust completely with your horse, your safety, and your money!

Lucassb
Nov. 15, 2010, 06:00 PM
All I can say is OMG! My trainer is authorized to spend $0 of my money. If there is an emergency then I will get a call and I will authorized and the bill will come from vet, etc. To me this does not sound like miscommunication because the OP said that the trainer will tell you that you needed a new bridle and that she ordered it so don't be surprised at the outrageous bill cause I also tacked on a few hundred for me having to handle the package that I ordered. Real communication is "oh hey, I noticed your bridle/blanket/whatever is looking really worn. Do you want me to order you a new one or do you have another?". I understand barns having matching things and whatnot, but I have never heard of them just ordering stuff for you without your knowledge and then saying oh hey here's a big surcharge on your bill. Crazy.

Well, I don't think there was any suggestion that the trainer tacked on any kind of surcharge, at least in this case.

And it is QUITE common in big show barns for trainers (and/or barn managers) to simply order the things they feel are needed - and many require customers to provide a credit card on file to use for that purpose. You may never have heard of it, but it is not crazy or unheard of. Some customers do prefer this as it is one less thing for them to worry about, and they can afford to "pay the freight" so to speak.

Personally I prefer to be consulted on matters like that and simply won't hand over my Amex (nor will I allow others to incur charges on my behalf without my authorization.) That said, I am not opposed to getting certain items in barn colors, and realize it is simply part of being associated with most BNT show barns... and I have the trunks full of matching gear to prove it, LOL - so it has never been a problem. I just prefer to know about and approve those expenditures in advance. Once those trainers understand that I will get the stuff they care about - they are usually fine with the collaborative approach. Sadly I cannot say the same for some of the barn managers those BNT's employed... :o

findeight
Nov. 15, 2010, 06:24 PM
Ummmm, NOBODY has my cc#s on file. Not my vet, not my barn. I just don't do business that way.

There are plenty of barns (and vets) that don't or are willing to waive the requirement for knowledgable, involved owners who prove they keep up to date with all charges.

I see no reason anybody should not expect detailed invoices montly from each service provider listing ALL charges and have thre right to question anything. It's cool, I just what to know what and when...and I will not pay for depo for 10 others when mine is on regumate and gets no depo under the guise of "meds at show".

This should NOT be a problem with even the biggest names. If it is? maybe you need to think about that.

In the case of the really BBBBNT barn that does require a CC#? They better tell me before they run it. That is reasonable and fair.

STA
Nov. 15, 2010, 07:19 PM
So the last blanket is in pieces, how long will it be before this one is in the same condition?

Alterrain
Nov. 15, 2010, 07:29 PM
STA- I've had this horse for over 2 years, and this is the FIRST time he has shown any interest in blanket shredding. So hopefully it was a one time thing :)

barnbum81
Nov. 15, 2010, 07:34 PM
The only other hobby I have other than horses, is shopping, and more often than not the shopping is for the horses, they truly are better dressed than I am. I am more than willing to buy every single thing a trainer tells me I need, but they damn well better be okay with me going out and buying it myself. I will not sacrifice the joy of shopping because someone says so.

Jaideux
Nov. 15, 2010, 07:45 PM
If I was in (what I imagine is) the OP's financial/time-crunch position, I would probably be okay with some minor charges being made that I get billed for- like new bell boots, or to replace something broken or run out of. Stuff that I would have to pay for no matter what, anyway.

I'm not wild about leaving a credit card on file. While my vet has it on file, they also never automatically bill- they always ask me how I want to pay. It's really just there to make my life simpler because I never carry cash. It also lets the barn get a "group rate" on shots, etc, because even if you (the owner) are not there, the vet can still get paid that day, and so they in turn give us owners a real deal on the barn call as an incentive.

But for a large item going through another vendor? I would probably want my trainer to call the vendor and say, "Jaideux will be calling this afternoon to order an item. Please write down these specifications so the order is complete and accurate. Thank you!".

And then I would want to call myself.

But, I have more time than money currently, so I don't see the value in saving myself the hassle of a several-minute phone call. If my time = big $, then perhaps I would be of the mind that my trainer/BM should be doing tasks like that.

But no matter what, I would hope my trainer would be calling me before (and if not, DEFINITELY after!) the fact to alert me. If I know something is going to be posted to my credit card, I might be inclined to pay off some of the balance early so I don't incur any charges for going over the "limit".

Hunter/JumperMom
Nov. 15, 2010, 07:54 PM
Daughters barn has my credit card on file, makes life much easier. Mostly used for entires for horse shows. But if something is needed, a phone call is usually made. And when I had to place my 1000 order to The Clothes Horse, they asked me if I wanted to get all at once or a few at a time.

toomanyponies
Nov. 15, 2010, 08:06 PM
Thanks for all replies-

I didn't notice his old blanket was ruined cause 1. the guys threw another one on him (an old customers that left years ago) while mine was being ordered, and 2. usually when I get there (ride after work) he is already cleaned and wearing a cooler and therefore I don't see the blankets.

I don't WANT to return it, I NEED the blanket. I was just shocked that I wasn't forewarned. Usually I get a "heads up, we bought you a new bridle. Don't be shocked."

To all of you bitching and moaning about the terrible trainer who ordered a blanket without consulting with the owner. . . this is the same trainer who put one of their extra blankets on the horse for no charge for a month to 6 weeks.

Also, the OP is clearly in a full care situation - part of full care is not having to worry that your horse is too cold or too hot. They just take care of it. The trainer was providing a service. Some busy people consider full care a worthwhile service. Some don't. Both ways are fine.

fordtraktor
Nov. 15, 2010, 08:47 PM
OMG, Alterrain, they bought you a new bridle too! That I could not tolerate! I would want to pick out the loveliest, plushest Hadfields bridle with my very own grubby paws, not show up to see my horse wearing some bridle without the perfect stitching/padding/whatever.

Bridles are my weakness. I cannot imagine having someone else inform me that they purchased one on my behalf. It better be perfect, or I would be one angry customer!

PebblesNana
Nov. 15, 2010, 08:48 PM
Well, the blanket was actually only $150...but the trainer had to tack on charges for ordering it, taking it out of the packaging, and putting it on the horse. :lol:

***gasp and faints to floor***

Oh wow. Just wow. I've never been in a barn like that so I cannot imagine! My trainer tells us we need something, makes suggestions, helps us find the item etc. But it's up to the horse owner to purchase.

AHorseSomeDay
Nov. 15, 2010, 08:50 PM
Yikes! That is expensive! The most I ever spent on a blanket is when I bought a Baker blanket a month ago and it was nowhere near that amount.

I would love to have that kind of money. :)

On the other hand if the barn bought me something without consulting me first I would not be too happy about it.

The only situation that the barn does not have to consult me first if they have to call the vet or farrier due to an emergency or lost shoe. This is stated in the contract.

Pirateer
Nov. 15, 2010, 08:56 PM
My only objection would be because I love to shop for things myself.

One trainer said that since I didn't have the rich amateur hunter, at least I dressed myself like I did :)

Linny
Nov. 15, 2010, 10:16 PM
She's not ripping me off, the bill is (and always is) directly from the manufacturer. I am not in the wrong barn (but thanks.) Blanket is I think the Clothes Horse?

I was just wondering.

Holy Crow, that stable blanket ought to come over to your house and cook your dinner for that price!
Other than a case where the immediate life or health of the horse is involved, the answer to your first question is $0. In the case of the blanket, I want a call. I might have an old but serviceable blanket at home. Certainly the barn can find something to cover him with until later tonight? To avoid a $350 blanket bought on my account I'll pay "local tack store" price and get the blanket on him tonight. I'm not sure where you are but in upstate NY it has been moderate enough out that a stabled horse can stand nekkid for a few hours.

Every barn I have been at has had enough basic equipment around to suffice for the short term. Gear is left behind by students who leave or when clients get out of horses all together. Older stuff if kept around "just in case" when new stuff is bought. Any decent trainer should call you and let you know your bell boots are torn or your horse just swallowed his blanket or his halter is in ribbons and find something to make due for a day or so until replacement can be arranged. The stuff might not be fancy but it can tie you over. It's a simple coutesy to grab and old schoolie's halter out of a box rather than send over to the local shop and order a triple stitched padded leather halter for $100 on my behalf.

Honestly, I'd be bundling the blanket up for return! When and if a trainer is spending money on your behalf, they at least owe you the fiduciary responsibility of finding a moderately priced option. $350 for a stable blanket is like saying you need basic transportation and coming home with a new Mercedes!

Seal Harbor
Nov. 15, 2010, 10:31 PM
They did cover the horse with a blanket they had until the horses new blanket came in, these aren't off the shelf blankets. They are custom made to fit the horse and in the barn colors.

It isn't as though they went to the feed store and bought a blanket and charged her $300+ for it. Her horse was not naked for the 4 weeks+ it takes to get a custom blanket made.

Why would she send it back? Just because YOU wouldn't spend $300 on a custom blanket doesn't mean it was financially painful to her, just a surprise from what I understand. The horses at this barn (and many other barns! ) are dressed by The Clothes Horse, the blanket she was going to wind up getting had they called her would have been from The Clothes Horse. Custom Blue Ribbon or pretty much anything else in that weight is going to cost the same, sometimes more.

poltroon
Nov. 15, 2010, 10:37 PM
STA- I've had this horse for over 2 years, and this is the FIRST time he has shown any interest in blanket shredding. So hopefully it was a one time thing :)

Frequently it is the horse's only way of pointing out that he was uncomfortable in some way, too warm, or something twisted and pulling, etc.

gottagrey
Nov. 15, 2010, 10:41 PM
To all of you bitching and moaning about the terrible trainer who ordered a blanket without consulting with the owner. . . this is the same trainer who put one of their extra blankets on the horse for no charge for a month to 6 weeks.
.

This statement just makes me want to gag..and vomit... so now the trainer is a hero because they blanketed a horse in their care?

LeeB10
Nov. 15, 2010, 10:50 PM
I am sorry but $345 is a ridiculous price for a blanket. My daughter rides at a A show barn and these are the blankets we use:

http://www.doublehwesternwear.com/shop/product3.html

Amazing it has everything the clothes horse one does, you can get them monogrammed and in most every color, and the fit is great, they are made in California, and the price is one third what you paid. I bought three blankets for $350 and one is a wonderful one that is nylon and lined in wool.

I'd be ticked if my daughters trainer spent that much on a blanket without a call to me first. And looking at the Clothes Horse prices for bakers blankets they are high on those as well. I got the sheet and turnout blankets for far less than their listed prices.

LeeB10
Nov. 15, 2010, 10:52 PM
sans hoodie I might add. And yes they are western but their fit is far superior to any other blanket we have ever used. And we use a nice navy with silver - no red. :)

mvp
Nov. 15, 2010, 10:58 PM
And it is QUITE common in big show barns for trainers (and/or barn managers) to simply order the things they feel are needed - and many require customers to provide a credit card on file to use for that purpose. You may never have heard of it, but it is not crazy or unheard of. Some customers do prefer this as it is one less thing for them to worry about, and they can afford to "pay the freight" so to speak.


Yeah. So I'm standing at the counter of Beval's Gladstone about a decade ago and someone puts about $1,200 worth of horse boots on the counter.

"WTF?" I wonder.

and then "Man, I'd like to shop like that."

I asked the buyer What up with that. She was a BM or assistant for some big barn. A few clients had just bought new horses. According to this lady, outfitting a new horse is a $10,000 proposition. Stuff gets bought by barn staff and clients billed, I take it.

I think an expensive saddle then was $3K. I don't know if she included a new trunk and cover (add another Grand), or what.

Lucassb
Nov. 15, 2010, 11:10 PM
Yeah. So I'm standing at the counter of Beval's Gladstone about a decade ago and someone puts about $1,200 worth of horse boots on the counter.

"WTF?" I wonder.

and then "Man, I'd like to shop like that."

I asked the buyer What up with that. She was a BM or assistant for some big barn. A few clients had just bought new horses. According to this lady, outfitting a new horse is a $10,000 proposition. Stuff gets bought by barn staff and clients billed, I take it.

I think an expensive saddle then was $3K. I don't know if she included a new trunk and cover (add another Grand), or what.

Yeah, LOL, I hear ya.

I know plenty of barns (not all BNTs, by the way) whose list of "required" items could easily total that amount. Including the trunk, probably... but not the saddle.

The thing is, in those environments... I think a lot of clients actually just *expect* it. They sign up for that kind of program, they WANT to fit in and have the "barn outfit," and they can afford it.

Heck, even when I really couldn't easily afford it... I wanted that stuff. I am a diehard HP at heart, and I loff me those gorgeous custom blankets, rows of matching tack trunks, and tack rooms full of really stunning, bespoke strapgoods that fit each horse perfectly, right down to the row of bridle buckles lining up perfectly at the horse's eye level. Tasty.

asterix
Nov. 15, 2010, 11:24 PM
yikes.
Just, yikes.

Just in case you were wondering, this sort of thread totally confirms what those of us who are not a "program" think goes on.

Would be lovely if a barn like this one year took a mild hit on their custom horse outfit budget (!) and donated the "extra" to a horse rescue.

Pirateer
Nov. 15, 2010, 11:29 PM
yikes.
Just, yikes.

Just in case you were wondering, this sort of thread totally confirms what those of us who are not a "program" think goes on.

Would be lovely if a barn like this one year took a mild hit on their custom horse outfit budget (!) and donated the "extra" to a horse rescue.


I don't think that the budgets like that would be affected by a donation.

That said- I HATE HATE HATE the attitude that if you have money you should give it away to a "rescue" or other charity case or you are some kind of monster.

Seal Harbor
Nov. 15, 2010, 11:36 PM
It's not the barn's budget, it is the horse owner's budget. Those people do donate to their favorite charities and causes.

Seal Harbor
Nov. 15, 2010, 11:41 PM
Yeah, LOL, I hear ya.

I know plenty of barns (not all BNTs, by the way) whose list of "required" items could easily total that amount. Including the trunk, probably... but not the saddle.

The thing is, in those environments... I think a lot of clients actually just *expect* it. They sign up for that kind of program, they WANT to fit in and have the "barn outfit," and they can afford it.

Heck, even when I really couldn't easily afford it... I wanted that stuff. I am a diehard HP at heart, and I loff me those gorgeous custom blankets, rows of matching tack trunks, and tack rooms full of really stunning, bespoke strapgoods that fit each horse perfectly, right down to the row of bridle buckles lining up perfectly at the horse's eye level. Tasty.

Tasty is right. I've been in 5 barns where matching everything was expected. I managed to sell my old stuff, trunk and all to one barn, still have barn number 3's stuff in the garage, barn number 4 I wasn't there long enough and was no longer showing but they did order me a sheet in the barn colors and a stall sign, and barn number 5 - I'm the instigator. And happily supported by Mr. Trainer's wife.

NCE
Nov. 16, 2010, 01:01 AM
I absolutely will not spend a dollar of a client's money without getting their consent first, unless it is a complete emergency. I have had clients who have given me a check book for the horse- literally a book of signed checks that is attached to an account whose funds are for the horse's expenses. And even with these folks, I get permission from the horse owner first. The only exception to this is the rare client who has given me carte blanche to spend whatever money is necessary for the horse and has asked that I "handle" everything. And even in this case, I make sure I keep all the receipts for them, and I don't tack on hidden "service fees."

If the blanket was that badly out of shape, it should have been brought to the client's attention sooner. Client could have had the blanket repaired. And, if something had to be ordered, it stands to reason that it will take some time to arrive, so the horse will either have to stay in the current blanket or be put in something else. Ordering the blanket immediately, without taking the time for a simple phone call to client, was not going to accomplish much in the way of getting the blanket to the horse sooner. So, this incident really could not be called an emergency.

Equilibrium
Nov. 16, 2010, 01:33 AM
In viewing The Clothes Horse website I was drooling over the custom coolers and such for Abba. Then decided to check out the "who we are section". The owner is Katrina Coldren who actually used to be a really good friend of mine from horse camp in Gettysburg many many moons ago.

So I will be trying to save for a nice cooler for Abba!:)

FWIW, I told my trainer about this thread and he has decided he'd like to try a more American approach to his barn instead of the Irish way. Irish way is that trainer is responsible for all things tack and horse related. Mind you he is more of a young horse barn which sells on, but still. I seem to be the only one who brings things for her own horse. Although sadly, my crystal bling browband bridle got the axe. :winkgrin:

OP, just tell them to give you a heads up next time like they did with the bridle. It seems to me you are someone who works very hard to enjoy and support your horse so maybe they should take the time to even send you a small text to let you know what's going on. Appreciation works both ways.

Terri

SnicklefritzG
Nov. 16, 2010, 01:41 AM
No one has any authorization to spend my money except me. :D

I make an exception on occasion when my parents find things that they know I need or that I am actively looking for. I trust their judgment because they know my tastes and are mindful of my budget. They also know when it makes sense to pay top dollar for something vs when to take time to look for bargains.

A lot of trainers don't have the time for that which is one reason why I would never consider authorizing anyone to charge me for stuff.

mvp
Nov. 16, 2010, 06:25 AM
Yeah, LOL, I hear ya.

I know plenty of barns (not all BNTs, by the way) whose list of "required" items could easily total that amount. Including the trunk, probably... but not the saddle.

The thing is, in those environments... I think a lot of clients actually just *expect* it. They sign up for that kind of program, they WANT to fit in and have the "barn outfit," and they can afford it.

Heck, even when I really couldn't easily afford it... I wanted that stuff. I am a diehard HP at heart, and I loff me those gorgeous custom blankets, rows of matching tack trunks, and tack rooms full of really stunning, bespoke strapgoods that fit each horse perfectly, right down to the row of bridle buckles lining up perfectly at the horse's eye level. Tasty.

Tasty is right. I'm much poorer than my horse's clothing would suggest. And, dammit, I'll be first in line to want a barn of any level to get all matched up.

Yes, because people buy barn-centric stuff, it makes the parting of the ways extra uncomfortable sometimes. If you are lucky, Trainer will help you sell stuff-- that is your trunk, cover, blanket, cooler (Iris and Wool), rain sheet, scrim.... maybe bonnet and whatnot to another client. If there isn't one in need or trainer isn't your buddy? Well, make room in your garage for a pile worth a few thousand. See Seal Harbor, below.

So when I-- who will never be a pro-- think about designing farm logos, I have *explicitly* considered the tension between customizing trunks with monograms and creating a more general logo and using brass saddle plates to attach labels.

Seriously.


Tasty is right. I've been in 5 barns where matching everything was expected. I managed to sell my old stuff, trunk and all to one barn, still have barn number 3's stuff in the garage, barn number 4 I wasn't there long enough and was no longer showing but they did order me a sheet in the barn colors and a stall sign, and barn number 5 - I'm the instigator. And happily supported by Mr. Trainer's wife.

RockinHorse
Nov. 16, 2010, 07:33 AM
Yes, because people buy barn-centric stuff, it makes the parting of the ways extra uncomfortable sometimes. If you are lucky, Trainer will help you sell stuff-- that is your trunk, cover, blanket, cooler (Iris and Wool), rain sheet, scrim.... maybe bonnet and whatnot to another client. If there isn't one in need or trainer isn't your buddy? Well, make room in your garage for a pile worth a few thousand. See Seal Harbor, below.



Instead of making room in my garage, I think I would be tempted to go to some shows and find the worst turned out and most ill prepared riders and give the stuff away to them so they could be sporting it all over the show grounds :lol:

ThrushBuster
Nov. 16, 2010, 07:56 AM
What am I missing? My trainer would never buy anything and send me the bill.
Sorry to say, some of these trainers have way too much control over their clients.
I don't know, but I would liketo be able to make my own decisions, regarding my horses wardrobe.

Jsalem
Nov. 16, 2010, 08:15 AM
One person's "exerting way too much control over clients" is another person's "offering a service." If OP doesn't want trainer to purchase items for her, she just needs to say so. There are a lot of assumptions here that trainer wouldn't allow it or would freak out. Communication people......

SmartAlex
Nov. 16, 2010, 08:28 AM
According to this lady, outfitting a new horse is a $10,000 proposition. Stuff gets bought by barn staff and clients billed, I take it.

Now there is a career path I missed... I want to be an "A" barn shopper. :D

JumpWithPanache
Nov. 16, 2010, 08:53 AM
I guess I'll mention my two cents. If I could afford to board at a barn that required a uniform I would expect to pay those prices for the blanket. I would also expect the barn to have a file with the Clothes Horse so I, as the owner, could call TCH when horse shredded his blanket to place the order myself. Now, that's because I'm a hands-on owner. If I wasn't a hands-on type of person, then by all means, have the barn deal with the hassle of placing the order and send me the bill. Either way, the price tag is the same.

Madeline
Nov. 16, 2010, 08:54 AM
...The city/locale where you reside cannot compel you to purchase auto or homeowner's insurance from X company, why should your trainer?
...

Because they are Trainers ( with a capital T).

Hunter/JumperMom
Nov. 16, 2010, 09:05 AM
Now to really make your heads spin, many of these big show barns also charge a "supply fee", which will include fly spray, shampoo, brushes, clippers and blades, turnout boots, treats, saddle pads, ear bonnets, show pads, girths, exercise bridles, etc. etc., so whatever is spent will be divided between the 30 - 60+ horses in the program, at least 5 show barns we looked at have this fee, and it ranges anywhere from 50 - 175 a month, depending on the month. this was many years ago when we were looking.

Jsalem
Nov. 16, 2010, 09:06 AM
This statement just makes me want to gag..and vomit... so now the trainer is a hero because they blanketed a horse in their care?

Well, no, no one said the trainer was a hero. But you know, I've been in a situation where I've put out the call (email) for owners to bring out their blankets. I've had an owner not get the job done. I've used one of my personal blankets on the horse- for a week or two until owner got their own blanket out there. Then, come blanket cleaning time I've paid to have that blanket cleaned. That was going above and beyond.

The trainer in question takes the initiative and makes sure that horse is warm and dry, using one of their own, personal blankets. Trainer then takes the initiative and orders a "uniform" for the horse and makes sure that owner receives the paperwork documenting the purchase. Sounds like very nice service to me. Perfect, in fact, if trainer had sent a quick email to give the owner a heads up. OP should probably thank trainer and politely request a heads up next time. Done.

Jsalem
Nov. 16, 2010, 09:09 AM
Now to really make your heads spin, many of these big show barns also charge a "supply fee", which will include fly spray, shampoo, brushes, clippers and blades, turnout boots, treats, saddle pads, ear bonnets, show pads, girths, exercise bridles, etc. etc., so whatever is spent will be divided between the 30 - 60+ horses in the program, at least 5 show barns we looked at have this fee, and it ranges anywhere from 50 - 175 a month, depending on the month. this was many years ago when we were looking.

And how else is the barn supposed to pay for those items? Oh, wait, that's right- out of the board! Because there's plenty of wiggle room in board. Barns can easily afford it!

Gnalli
Nov. 16, 2010, 09:11 AM
I guess the question is, What amount of your money does your trainer have to ask you before spending?

I kind of freaked out the other day because I got a bill for a new ($365) stable blanket which I didn't know my guy needed. It ended ok when I saw the old- completey shredded- one beyond repair. But I did have a "Please let me know when you spend more than X of my money" talk with trainer.

I've never questioned any amount before- shoeing increases, meds, misc tack, etc. So I guess my answer is about $350 :) There are definitely people at my barn who would rather have the money just spent and not be bothered with the phone call though!

Any expenses would have to be discussed with me before a dime was spent if my horses were in training. In most cases, I have extra tack, etc floating around, and I would be on top of the condition of my tack and supplies so as not to get caught by surprise. Just a quick phone call- hey Fluffy needs xx. I would have already made notes on the calendar and arrangements made for shoeing, supplements etc. The only exception would be vet calls for emergency cases.

Sansena
Nov. 16, 2010, 09:12 AM
This statement just makes me want to gag..and vomit... so now the trainer is a hero because they blanketed a horse in their care?

Not a hero makes, but for a month to 6 weeks is a bit excessive. Don't you agree?

You have 20 horses at your facility. Suddenly 3 of them decide to demolish their blankets. You have 2 that happen to fit. How long are you expected to clothe other people's nags?

This is a pet peeve of mine. We have boarders who feel entitled because they pay board, and waltz around taking every unidentified black polo, martingale, breastplate, even - yes - blanket, simply because they pay board and feel it's their 'right' to have things supplied for them.

Meanwhile trainer's items become lost, abused, threadbare, filthy.. and when she needs them for a true emergency situation, all we get are blank stares.

Again.. a pet peeve of mine. Client should have been called soon as blanket demolition was discovered. And, no, $350+/- for any blanket is just stupid IMHO. But to expect anyone to dress someone else's horse for more than a few days falls into the 'user' category.

Wake up and get off the entitlement bandwagon..

Hunter/JumperMom
Nov. 16, 2010, 09:16 AM
And how else is the barn supposed to pay for those items? Oh, wait, that's right- out of the board! Because there's plenty of wiggle room in board. Barns can easily afford it!

dont get me wrong, I totally agree with it, you can't make money on board! And to nickel and dime what horse uses what is just crazy. But seems many are shocked that a barn manger or trainer would purchase stuff, in these bigger barns, many of the clients really have no input in what is bought, sadly all they know is they write the check.

GreystoneKC
Nov. 16, 2010, 09:27 AM
And how else is the barn supposed to pay for those items? Oh, wait, that's right- out of the board! Because there's plenty of wiggle room in board. Barns can easily afford it!

You smoke crack if you think the everyday boarding barn actually makes money off of the board.


This is a pet peeve of mine. We have boarders who feel entitled because they pay board, and waltz around taking every unidentified black polo, martingale, breastplate, even - yes - blanket, simply because they pay board and feel it's their 'right' to have things supplied for them.

Meanwhile trainer's items become lost, abused, threadbare, filthy.. and when she needs them for a true emergency situation, all we get are blank stares.

This is actually starting to get to me in my own barn. Not only the sense that my boarders can use "barn" stuff (which should be used on the lesson horses only) rather than buy their own, but also that the kids keep going and using MY OWN stuff for MY horses on the lesson horses and also the boarder horses. It drives me insane sometimes because then I go to give a bath and all of my shampoo is gone, or go to pull a mane and my comb is gone, or go to get a granola bar and all of my treats are gone... UGH.

DMK
Nov. 16, 2010, 09:30 AM
The thing is, in those environments... I think a lot of clients actually just *expect* it. They sign up for that kind of program, they WANT to fit in and have the "barn outfit," and they can afford it.

Precisely.

Look, there are a whole lot of boarding flavors out there - it's so far from one size fits all it's laughable.

If you want/prefer the complete package where every last detail is managed, more power to you. If you are not really comfortable with being out of control of any expenditure other than feed/shavings, there's an app for that too. And a few hundred other variations as well.

Pick what you like, keep a healthy attitude and accept what works for someone else shouldn't evoke much more of a response other than "not for me, thanks, but no thanks" or, "I wish I had the time/money to do it that way"... (and then promptly remember that your entire life is just one big choice involving things you don't have the time/money/ability to do exactly as you wish, so you should probably buck up little beaver and get on with life.)

Jsalem
Nov. 16, 2010, 09:36 AM
Greystone, I was joking. Believe me, I know how difficult it is to make ends meet with boarding.

One of the best things I ever did in my business was to keep seperate checking accounts for the Boarding Operation and the Training business. I won't compromise on the care of my horses- I buy the best quality feed, hay, etc and do what needs to be done to take care of the animals. And at the end of the day, I don't expect a profit from the Barn Operations side of my business. But it does have to operate in the black. My attitude is this: "It is what it is, people." I have a lot of children here. When they get out of hand in the sloppy department- leaving their stuff out, scattering water bottles everywhere, leaving poop in the washrack, I say, "Either clean up after yourselves, or I will hire enough labor to clean up after you and raise the board accordingly." The same with leaving the lights on, helping themselves to extra hay, being wasteful with the community flyspray and shampoo. It is was it is- your board has to cover it.

ponymom64
Nov. 16, 2010, 09:40 AM
STA- I've had this horse for over 2 years, and this is the FIRST time he has shown any interest in blanket shredding. So hopefully it was a one time thing :)

My DD's horse is very hard on his clothes - can easily (and has!) shred a cheap sheet/blanket in one night - that said, I started buying his things from The Clothes Horse and they are in perfect condition a year later, so while I know you were shocked at the sticker price, you will be very happy with the quality, as the blanket will last fo-evah!!

Back to the OT - a lot of the big AA barns require you to have matching things and will just order whatever they see fit for your horse. Usually, you know this going in.....

ponies123
Nov. 16, 2010, 10:09 AM
As for the argument about "trainers can't force you to purchase x item from y company" just like employers can't force you to buy your blue shirt from nordstroms, just as long as you have a blue shirt. Um?? Ever been to a store where the employees shirts are all monogrammed? You think that all those employees set on their own for the best deals on monogrammed polos and somehow got all of the polos to look the same? Or do you think that the employer said you need to wear this shirt it will cost $20 per shirt? Yes, they order the shirts for you. No, you do not have a choice to go shopping for a better deal. Secondly, choosing to board at a private barn and working somewhere is comparing apples to oranges. I would compare clothing your boarded horse to clothing your private school education child. The private school will have a uniform and, in most cases, the uniform is not "a black polo and khaki jeans", it's "this black polo we will order in your child's size from the company we use and these khaki pants we will order for you in your child's size from the company we use. And you need these black shoes too, and the matching belt, etc." Same thing at the boarding barn that requires everyone to match, not match all with blue blankets (because you know some people will get royal blue, some navy blue, and some light blue) but match with blue blankets from Clothing Horse or from some other company. If you don't like it? You can choose to send your child to public school (where they can wear whatever they want) or choose to send your horse to a barn with a less-rigid program (where they can wear whatever you want).

Gnalli
Nov. 16, 2010, 10:09 AM
The only other hobby I have other than horses, is shopping, and more often than not the shopping is for the horses, they truly are better dressed than I am. I am more than willing to buy every single thing a trainer tells me I need, but they damn well better be okay with me going out and buying it myself. I will not sacrifice the joy of shopping because someone says so.

:D:lol: You know, that makes perfect sense.

danceronice
Nov. 16, 2010, 10:17 AM
Ummm...if the barn where I kept my horse sent me a bill for something they could have called me for and I could have ordered....I would have had a cow! Further....if they billed me for a NON emergency item without calling, e-mailing or texting....they could take the bill and pay it themselves!

Ditto. Unless it is a life-threatening emergency or they are racehorses in whose day-to-day care I have borderline-zero say, call me.

Gnalli
Nov. 16, 2010, 10:43 AM
My DD's horse is very hard on his clothes - can easily (and has!) shred a cheap sheet/blanket in one night - that said, I started buying his things from The Clothes Horse and they are in perfect condition a year later, so while I know you were shocked at the sticker price, you will be very happy with the quality, as the blanket will last fo-evah!!

Back to the OT - a lot of the big AA barns require you to have matching things and will just order whatever they see fit for your horse. Usually, you know this going in.....

True, but what kills me is that when the horse leaves, not all the stuff does or it is the rattiest stuff in the barn that goes with your horse. I know a trainer who requires a new show bridle, caveson set, tail set stall blanket, wraps and 2 halters-1 for show and one for the barn. Unfortunately, it rarely ALL goes with the horse.

Seal Harbor
Nov. 16, 2010, 11:11 AM
Everything I own from The Clothes Horse or any other vendor has my name embroidered on it. It goes with me when I leave. OR I can remove my name embroidery and sell it to someone, I've done that when baby horse outgrew his last sheet. I do keep track of my stuff. Most of it lives in my trunk if not in use on the horse or out for cleaning.

Some of my old things got donated to this barn for general use, a custom Irish, 2 Rambo turnouts and a square cooler. Mr. Trainer supplies the every day stuff, clothes for cooling out and all turn out blankets/sheets. The horses don't live out they get turned out in a paddock.

They also don't charge to do laundry, or for supplies. I've been in many barns that charged for those things, so I tack on an amount to help pay for doing laundry and I do buy supplies and put them in the groom stalls for everyone to use. I buy sweat scrapers by the dozen and things like cheap sponges for tack cleaning as well. Our board/training is very reasonable and I don't mind adding a bit to help.

findeight
Nov. 16, 2010, 11:24 AM
Far as the mandatory supply fees for fly spray, shampoo etc????

In a big barn with full care and mutiple owners, it's the only way. For example take a 50 stall show barn with 30 owners who have 30 tack trunks in the tack room. Trixie, Dixie and Pixie get turned out together. They need splint and bell boots. They need fly spray. All are owned by different kids who are in school and all the tack trunks are locked. Pixie and Trixie need a bath when they come in, all the shampoo is in the locked tack trunks. Dixie has a minor scrape and needs some antibiotic cream.

So either the barn contributes nothing at all, they use their own stuff at no charge-which is unrealistic, nickle and dime the use of these things or they charge that misc. supply fee.

I happen to have found that very convenient and saved me from having to continually go buy singles of these things when the barn can buy in bulk. Not to mention putting the horse in the crossties after a bath and retuning to find my shampoo gone or losing that single bell boot in a muddy field, weekly.

Not saying some don't overcharge here, but mine did not and I found it a good deal not to have to buy anything at all for the daily care or let too many people know the combination to my tack trunk just so they can use some fly spray.

REH
Nov. 16, 2010, 11:31 AM
Everything I own from The Clothes Horse or any other vendor has my name embroidered on it. It goes with me when I leave. OR I can remove my name embroidery and sell it to someone, I've done that when baby horse outgrew his last sheet. I do keep track of my stuff. Most of it lives in my trunk if not in use on the horse or out for cleaning.

Some of my old things got donated to this barn for general use, a custom Irish, 2 Rambo turnouts and a square cooler. Mr. Trainer supplies the every day stuff, clothes for cooling out and all turn out blankets/sheets. The horses don't live out they get turned out in a paddock.

They also don't charge to do laundry, or for supplies. I've been in many barns that charged for those things, so I tack on an amount to help pay for doing laundry and I do buy supplies and put them in the groom stalls for everyone to use. I buy sweat scrapers by the dozen and things like cheap sponges for tack cleaning as well. Our board/training is very reasonable and I don't mind adding a bit to help.

Also seam rippers. If you want to be a hero, have a bunch of new seam rippers to hand over at the next show. They get broken/lost so often, sharp new ones are always in demand.

Thanatos
Nov. 16, 2010, 11:46 AM
My answer on how much trainer can spend without my prior approval? Unless it's vet or farrier related of an urgent nature? $0. And I have always been in AA barns.

:yes: My trainer DOES have three blank, signed checks at her house (just down the street from the barn) in case a horse loses a shoe in the turnout and needs a quick farrier job done, or one of them is feeling a bit under the weather and I am stuck at work and she has to call the vet. However, she always calls and tells me the amount before doing anything. When I go out of town out of the country, I leave her checks, the insurance info and authorize her to spend up to $500 and then after that, it's a call to my mother who will make the decision on what additional money to spend if no one can get a hold of me.

equidae
Nov. 16, 2010, 12:10 PM
Now to really make your heads spin, many of these big show barns also charge a "supply fee", which will include fly spray, shampoo, brushes, clippers and blades, turnout boots, treats, saddle pads, ear bonnets, show pads, girths, exercise bridles, etc. etc., so whatever is spent will be divided between the 30 - 60+ horses in the program, at least 5 show barns we looked at have this fee, and it ranges anywhere from 50 - 175 a month, depending on the month. this was many years ago when we were looking.

I actually would LOVE it if my barn did this.. especially at those rates you mentioned.. as long as I got SOME say in the matter.

Jsalem
Nov. 16, 2010, 12:38 PM
On the subject of the supply fee rather than clients buying their own: I found that it makes a huge difference in the neatness of the barn. There used to be all these bottles of shampoo, fly spray, hoof stuff, etc laying around with client names on them. Then clients would complain that people were stealing their stuff! Um, no, you left it out!

red mares
Nov. 16, 2010, 12:50 PM
True, but what kills me is that when the horse leaves, not all the stuff does or it is the rattiest stuff in the barn that goes with your horse. I know a trainer who requires a new show bridle, caveson set, tail set stall blanket, wraps and 2 halters-1 for show and one for the barn. Unfortunately, it rarely ALL goes with the horse.

When I changed trainers over the summer, she and I inventoried everything I had down there: saddles, bridles, harness, tail set, blankets, etc. All my stuff went when the horse did, and that was clearly understood from day one. Remarkably, we both missed the same piece of the harness on the inventory. I called about it & it went with the horse to the next barn. I think the main reason was to prevent me from claiming that tack was lost or stolen by her, since our parting wasn't on the best of terms.

gottagrey
Nov. 16, 2010, 01:13 PM
On the subject of the supply fee rather than clients buying their own: I found that it makes a huge difference in the neatness of the barn. There used to be all these bottles of shampoo, fly spray, hoof stuff, etc laying around with client names on them. Then clients would complain that people were stealing their stuff! Um, no, you left it out!

We do this at my current barn at first I was a bit put off as I had "favorites" of this or that..but after I moved it I found it was a great policy - I can't remember the last time I needed to buy fly spray or anything for that matter! But to keep this in tone w/ the original question - the BO/Trainer asked me upfront about the supply program to participate or not... it wasn't automatically billed w/o your knowledge.

In general I think most people are more appreciative and thankful if they are consulted about such things /expenses (even if an emergency) and are put off by surprise costs /expenses or fees.

meupatdoes
Nov. 16, 2010, 02:02 PM
True, but what kills me is that when the horse leaves, not all the stuff does or it is the rattiest stuff in the barn that goes with your horse. I know a trainer who requires a new show bridle, caveson set, tail set stall blanket, wraps and 2 halters-1 for show and one for the barn. Unfortunately, it rarely ALL goes with the horse.

I had the opposite situation.
I planned to move my horses out of their barn and gave my notice. I had just gotten a job working a few states away so there was a little lag time in between my notice and when the horses would follow me.

Trainer was using my gear (with permission) to ride half her string so on my last weekend before I had to start work I packed up my bridle, martingale, saddle, girth, decreased the 'barn' population of saddle pads by at least 50%, reclaimed my polos, wraps, boots, pulled my bits out of her bridles, etc etc etc and left the horses there with their halters, blankets and leadropes.

Wow did I ever get a phone call.
"HOW ARE WE SUPPOSED TO RIDE YOU LEFT AND TOOK EVERYTHING!"

Dude.
Yeah.
Indeed I did.

GreystoneKC
Nov. 16, 2010, 02:02 PM
Greystone, I was joking. Believe me, I know how difficult it is to make ends meet with boarding.

Oooooooooooooooooooh..... LOL Well, smack me with the dense shovel... Honestly, I thought that sounded a bit odd coming from you! lol

Pennywell Bay
Nov. 16, 2010, 02:31 PM
I had the opposite situation.
I planned to move my horses out of their barn and gave my notice. I had just gotten a job working a few states away so there was a little lag time in between my notice and when the horses would follow me.

Trainer was using my gear (with permission) to ride half her string so on my last weekend before I had to start work I packed up my bridle, martingale, saddle, girth, decreased the 'barn' population of saddle pads by at least 50%, reclaimed my polos, wraps, boots, pulled my bits out of her bridles, etc etc etc and left the horses there with their halters, blankets and leadropes.

Wow did I ever get a phone call.
"HOW ARE WE SUPPOSED TO RIDE YOU LEFT AND TOOK EVERYTHING!"

Dude.
Yeah.
Indeed I did.

Love it!

SuperSTB
Nov. 16, 2010, 03:12 PM
I would "like" a call but honestly if I can afford to spend money for a custom blanket in an A rated barn- I couldn't get upset about the situation if I wasn't called.

I worked at a place where boarders paid for top quality services and they received it. Clients were billed additionally for stuff from exercise rider time to fly spray but never called about it. For most items, it was just a percentage applied to the bill (fly spray, wraps, grooming, etc.) The owners had their own stuff to use when they were around, but barn staff had the barn supplies to use which was really nice. We did everything from mucking to grooming. Everything was custom- blankets, stall plates, halter plates, etc... I don't think anyone was intentionally ripped off but they were paying an absolute premium for products.

It was a huge adjustment for me when I went to a small strictly boarding facility for my next job... I was always freaking out because I had to rummage through boarders stuff to find things for their horses. Fly spray of every brand dilligently labeled with said horse's name. PITA when you're on the other end of the barn getting said horse ready for turnout and you spend 15 mintues combing the barn looking for his fly spray that wasn't even going to work after the first 15 minutes anyway! But I loved the boarders there so I guess one thing made up for another.

danceronice
Nov. 16, 2010, 04:33 PM
If the owners aren't doing things like shampooing and fly-spraying themselves, I can't see how the barn could make it practical NOT to pool expenses (unless one horse is getting Super Special Organic All Natural Hand-Picked Herbs From the Slopes of Ararat Fly Spray because his sensitive skin requires it and everyone else is getting SuperShield and the 'couture' product isn't being paid for separately.) If it's a communal situation they can either buy it all at once in bulk, or end up chasing down owners to restock when 'their' supply is out.

I do question including "personalized" equipment like polos and bell boots in there. If it's not something EVERY SINGLE HORSE (within reason) uses, it shouldn't be in the 'supply pool.'

Peggy
Nov. 17, 2010, 01:46 AM
The unofficial rule at our barn is that you supply your own consumables when you tack up your own horse, whereas the barn uses theirs when they tack up, either for a trainer ride or for the people who pay extra for groom service. Trainer got tired of kids applying more fly spray to the atmosphere than to their horses and people using the barn fly spray on horses not in training. Horses have their own wraps in labeled SmartPak-like plastic drawers and their own boots in the boot cabinet. There are some generic boots that get used on horses who don't have them, have destroyed theirs, or whose owners buy boots that are a PITA to put on and take off.

There's shampoo and Nolvasan in the wash rack area, tho I tend to use my own.

I have paid a supply fee, but not for several years. Trainer borrows my consumables enough that I'd probably have to charge her one back.

fordtraktor
Nov. 17, 2010, 08:42 AM
I have never had a problem getting all my stuff to follow me from barn to barn, but I am always at the barn and know exactly what is mine. I can and do recommission it for myself -- I don't just expect it to be sent along.

From the other side of the fence -- my family has a boarding barn (not training). we have about 10 boarders. As a BO, I know exactly what is mine -- but I have NO IDEA whether X brush or saddle pad or hoof dressing or girth belongs to Boarder A or Boarder B. If a Boarder expected me to send all their stuff along to the next barn, there is no way I could do an accurate job. We generally have individual lockers which helps, but people leave their saddle pads and girths out to dry, and we stack them in the tack room where they can identify them themselves. People leave their brushes and boots and other things out on the grooming rack and they go in a communal claim spot. We suggest labeling, but few actually do it.

bazinga
Nov. 17, 2010, 09:57 AM
I had the opposite situation.
I planned to move my horses out of their barn and gave my notice. I had just gotten a job working a few states away so there was a little lag time in between my notice and when the horses would follow me.

Trainer was using my gear (with permission) to ride half her string so on my last weekend before I had to start work I packed up my bridle, martingale, saddle, girth, decreased the 'barn' population of saddle pads by at least 50%, reclaimed my polos, wraps, boots, pulled my bits out of her bridles, etc etc etc and left the horses there with their halters, blankets and leadropes.

Wow did I ever get a phone call.
"HOW ARE WE SUPPOSED TO RIDE YOU LEFT AND TOOK EVERYTHING!"

Dude.
Yeah.
Indeed I did.

BAHA my old coach was the same!

We had very high end stuff at that barn (bridles, saddles, etc) and of course she would use it on all the horses she was supposed to ride. She even used my old CO GR8 helmet. Well when I gave my notice I took all of my stuff out of there, and well no horses got ridden for quite a long time.

Linny
Nov. 17, 2010, 12:12 PM
I have never been at a "full service" barn in the sense of a place where everything is done for you. MOre typical have been places where barn staff does turn out and prefer that you leave any required boots or gear out for staff to use. One barn had small canvas tote bags on each stall for "horse specific gear" like bells or brushes or polos. At the current barn the bell boots and turn out boots are hung on the blanket rack on the stall door.
The barns purchase supplies like fly spray and brushes etc for their horses, schoolies or horses in training or sales horses but boarders are expected to have their own and most do. If I want my horse sprayed before turnout, I leave it out and note it on the whiteboard on his stall. If they use the last of my spray, I get a note but since I am there alot, I usually know when I am low.
I use my own bathing supplies, even when bathing the barn owned horses, just because I have a routine that works.
I guess if the barn were doing all the caring for the horses, having their own stuff would suit.

Schune
Nov. 17, 2010, 12:24 PM
I know that in some people's worlds money is growing on trees for them....but in other people's worlds, $350 is half a months board.


Try a full month's board, in my home area :lol:

But back on topic, my first thought was HECK NO, HECK NO, HECK NO. After I thought about it, my second, third, and fourth thought was HECK NO, HECK NO, HECK NO.

This would be totally UNacceptable to me, and had I been in the OP's situation, I would either not be paying for the blanket or leaving.

No one charges that amount of money without clearing it by me, with the exception of a serious emergency that requires immediate attention by a vet. A fancy, tricked-out stable blanket with all the shebangs and whistles?

Nope. Not in this lifetime or the next.

mvp
Nov. 17, 2010, 12:47 PM
And how else is the barn supposed to pay for those items? Oh, wait, that's right- out of the board! Because there's plenty of wiggle room in board. Barns can easily afford it!


You smoke crack if you think the everyday boarding barn actually makes money off of the board.



Oooooooooooooooooooh..... LOL Well, smack me with the dense shovel... Honestly, I thought that sounded a bit odd coming from you! lol

Well.... given the original supply fee quote-- $50-175/month.

I can tell you that a friend of mine paid a flat $150 supply fee for a high-end Westchester County (NY) barn. Training board (the only kind they did) was $3.5K per month. This was about 7 years ago. You can probably increase both numbers now.

Land was/is expensive there. Facilities, hay, bedding and grooming are all exquisite. But 1) They needed $150 on top of $3.5K? 2) Any horse actually uses $150 of consumables per month? Really?

Look-- if you get a custom Clothes Horse blanket, it will cost $350 and be very nice as well as durable. If it is in barn colors, then I'd fully expect some help from the trainer selling it (at a loss) to some other client in the barn when I left.

In some ways, I think the barns who simply charge a big fee for custom horse clothing rental have the right idea. If they can limit this to show items, it's even better. I do like a pretty barn aisle, so barn trunks to be rented by the year are a great idea, too.

FineAlready
Nov. 17, 2010, 01:12 PM
Regarding supply fees... I'm fine with a supply fee, in theory. What really annoys me, however, is when supplies run out and I have to purchase my own [insert item here - usually fly spray], which then gets used for the WHOLE barn because the barn isn't supplying it as they are supposed to.

That's annoying. And, you know, theft.

Cita
Nov. 17, 2010, 01:38 PM
I think what most people are reacting to here isn't the trainer's decision, but the blanket itself, and how it's way more expensive than they would accept! ;)

I think you are right to ask for a "heads up."

I don't see anything ethically wrong with the trainer's actions, but I do think it's impolite and disrespectful to charge someone without saying anything. It's just assuming that the client's income is always at the trainer's beck and call - a little presumptuous, I think. A gentle request for advance notice next time would be perfectly reasonable, IMO.

Honestly I think it's hard to set a dollar amount as for what the allowable "discretionary spending without notice" amount would be. Maybe as a percentage of board would make more sense.

For a lot of people, a surprise $350 bill would mean they would be eating ramen for the next month. ;) But even if that amount is just a blip on the radar, I think it's quite reasonable to ask for notice of "major purchases."

gottagrey
Nov. 17, 2010, 02:05 PM
I'm changing my tune a little here. I'm still not getting from the OP why when the trainer purchased the bridle for her that wasn't an issue but she was shocked by the bill for the blanket? Which could have set the precedent for the trainer's ordering blanket w/o advance notice...

Linny
Nov. 17, 2010, 02:23 PM
I'm not sure about how for 6 weeks the horse was wearing a blanket not his own and the OP didn't know it, but as I said, I've never been at a true full service barn where your horse's gear is a mystery. If I showed up tonight and Ti wasn't wearing his Baker, I'd rampage through the barn to find it!

As for stuff all matchy-matchy, I love how it looks but realistically it's superficial. I hang my saddle and bridle a certain way but don't expect everyone to do the same.
I also think that as far as everything matching at shows, it's more a marketing tool for trainers than a practical one for owners and if so, then they can fund (or at least supplement) it.
I guess it's just as well that I will probably never be able to afford such a barn.

findeight
Nov. 17, 2010, 02:26 PM
I'm changing my tune a little here. I'm still not getting from the OP why when the trainer purchased the bridle for her that wasn't an issue but she was shocked by the bill for the blanket? Which could have set the precedent for the trainer's ordering blanket w/o advance notice...


Oh, just a guess but I'd bet OPs trainer felt whatever bridle she has was unsuitable, no longer fit well or would not adjust properly for a new bit.

However, OP probably has a cooler, escadron, fly sheet, rain sheet, shipping blanket, lightweight turn out rug, mid weight turn out rug, Baker sheet AND a still useable or spare stable blanket so felt a bit blindsided.

And, again folks, trust us, your board may be equal to that fancy blanket. Board in a a full service AA level showbarn runs 3 to 10 times that amount so it is all relevant. Most don't need a AA level full service show barn any more then they need a 350 stable blanket.

The thread was not about the price, it was about the OP not finding out until she opened up the bill from CH.

gottagrey
Nov. 17, 2010, 02:34 PM
Oh, just a guess but I'd bet OPs trainer felt whatever bridle she has was unsuitable, no longer fit well or would not adjust properly for a new bit.

However, OP probably has a cooler, escadron, fly sheet, rain sheet, shipping blanket, lightweight turn out rug, mid weight turn out rug, Baker sheet AND a still useable or spare stable blanket so felt a bit blindsided.

And, again folks, trust us, your board may be equal to that fancy blanket. Board in a a full service AA level showbarn runs 3 to 10 times that amount so it is all relevant. Most don't need a AA level full service show barn any more then they need a 350 stable blanket.

The thread was not about the price, it was about the OP not finding out until she opened up the bill from CH.

True - something tells me though I bet the OP has a few bridles as well ha ha ha

findeight
Nov. 17, 2010, 02:47 PM
True - something tells me though I bet the OP has a few bridles as well ha ha ha



IIRC she has done a little Jumping on something she did not end up buying...maybe she lacked the requisite figue eight with Mikmar, one set of braided reins and one set of rubber reins, running martingale, fleece shadow and cheek rolls. And a mongrammed bonnet in stable colors.
One simply must dress for the party-even in the schooling ring at home on somebody else's horse:lol::lol::lol::D.

ksetrider
Nov. 17, 2010, 02:58 PM
I had the opposite situation.
I planned to move my horses out of their barn and gave my notice. I had just gotten a job working a few states away so there was a little lag time in between my notice and when the horses would follow me.

Trainer was using my gear (with permission) to ride half her string so on my last weekend before I had to start work I packed up my bridle, martingale, saddle, girth, decreased the 'barn' population of saddle pads by at least 50%, reclaimed my polos, wraps, boots, pulled my bits out of her bridles, etc etc etc and left the horses there with their halters, blankets and leadropes.

Wow did I ever get a phone call.
"HOW ARE WE SUPPOSED TO RIDE YOU LEFT AND TOOK EVERYTHING!"

Dude.
Yeah.
Indeed I did.

LOL. Hysterical. Not to get off topic but I had the same thing happen in my personal life! Just a few months ago I was moving to a new apartment. I had a sublet who wanted to move in 3 weeks before I could move. So I packed my personal belongings (clothes, toothepaste, etc) and crashed at my mom's with the intention of moving the larger items (bed, couch, etc) when moving day came (since sublet had no furniture at all). When it came time to move, I gave the sublet 72 hours notice. She even left a key for me since she would be at work. Of course I took everything that belonged to me in one big swoop. She came home to an empty apartment (she should've know that would happen!). I've later found she's been crying all over town that I took everything without giving her notice. Golly, and I thought I was being nice by lending my furniture to her for a few weeks!

snaffle635
Nov. 17, 2010, 05:17 PM
These trainer threads always make me want to buy my trainer a really good bottle of wine to let her know how much I appreciate her! When I started up with her, I did not realize how rare it is to find a trainer you can trust completely with your horse, your safety, and your money!

Amen, sister!!!!!

gottagrey
Nov. 17, 2010, 05:24 PM
QUOTE=findeight;5228931]IIRC she has done a little Jumping on something she did not end up buying...maybe she lacked the requisite figue eight with Mikmar, one set of braided reins and one set of rubber reins, running martingale, fleece shadow and cheek rolls. And a mongrammed bonnet in stable colors.
One simply must dress for the party-even in the schooling ring at home on somebody else's horse:lol::lol::lol::D.[/QUOTE]


:lol::lol::lol:

Alterrain
Nov. 17, 2010, 06:11 PM
I'm changing my tune a little here. I'm still not getting from the OP why when the trainer purchased the bridle for her that wasn't an issue but she was shocked by the bill for the blanket? Which could have set the precedent for the trainer's ordering blanket w/o advance notice...

When I got this horse, his giant head did not fit into the only other show bridle I own. But that's not the point---

I was just wondering how much of your money your trainer can spend without telling you. I was given a heads up about the bridle, so that is not in the same category as this. Apparently, Trainer just forgot to tell me my guy shredded, and therefore needed, a new blanket. I was working late that whole week (no riding) and it slipped her mind by the time she saw me. Really no big deal. I just wanted to hear the varying opinions on Trainer shopping for your horse, and clearly that varies from Not one item without a call first, to Here is my credit card get whatever he needs.

I didn't mean for this thread to become such a mess, but I guess that is the wonder that is CoTH. :)

Alterrain
Nov. 17, 2010, 06:18 PM
I should've edited the price out of the OP to keep people on track, but I guess it's a little late now. :)

Everyone so bent out of shape about the price of a blanket: You don't know me- I could eat ramen every day and sleep in my car to pay for my horse hobby, or I could be Bill Gates. It doesn't matter, and I shouldn't have to (and won't) defend or explain my own choice of spending habits. I think a LOT of things people (probably you) spend a ton of money on are ridiculous, but I keep my mouth shut. To each his own.

Madeline
Nov. 17, 2010, 06:41 PM
I should've edited the price out of the OP to keep people on track, but I guess it's a little late now. :)

Everyone so bent out of shape about the price of a blanket: You don't know me- I could eat ramen every day and sleep in my car to pay for my horse hobby, or I could be Bill Gates. It doesn't matter, and I shouldn't have to (and won't) defend or explain my own choice of spending habits. I think a LOT of things people (probably you) spend a ton of money on are ridiculous, but I keep my mouth shut. To each his own.

I think the response would be about the same whether the price was silly or not. It WAS about trainer spending without asking. I think most everyone got that.

If you want to spend a ridiculous amount of money for a stable blanket in the "right" color with the "right" label just to keep your "right" trainer happy, that is not my problem.

snaffle635
Nov. 17, 2010, 07:45 PM
If you want to spend a ridiculous amount of money for a stable blanket in the "right" color with the "right" label just to keep your "right" trainer happy, that is not my problem.

Oh for Pete's sake, why can't people just be nice?

OP - my trainer doesn't buy 'stuff' for my horse. But sometimes horsie gets body clips without advance notice. With tips for the grooms, that's usually about $200...so my answer is $200. :-)

REH
Nov. 18, 2010, 09:13 AM
Oh for Pete's sake, why can't people just be nice?

OP - my trainer doesn't buy 'stuff' for my horse. But sometimes horsie gets body clips without advance notice. With tips for the grooms, that's usually about $200...so my answer is $200. :-)


You tip the grooms for clipping your horse? Does anyone else here do that? I've never done that unless they clipped on super short notice or something. Am I being a grinch?

alittlextra
Nov. 18, 2010, 09:21 AM
I tip for clipping, but hey, they do a great job and I am super appreciative so its totally my choice. I don't feel like I have to, just want to.

fefedog
Nov. 18, 2010, 09:29 AM
That sounds like a lot of money. My question to you would be what would the trainer have done if you were on a budget or what would the trainer say when you might not have had the money to pay for said expensive blanket? Most people have regular bills to pay and not alot of extra money at the end of the month.

Lucassb
Nov. 18, 2010, 09:44 AM
That sounds like a lot of money. My question to you would be what would the trainer have done if you were on a budget or what would the trainer say when you might not have had the money to pay for said expensive blanket? Most people have regular bills to pay and not alot of extra money at the end of the month.

When you are in a program where trainers have the latitude to purchase these kinds of items (with notification or not) ... you are generally prepared for these kinds of expenses.

snaffle635
Nov. 18, 2010, 01:56 PM
You tip the grooms for clipping your horse? Does anyone else here do that? I've never done that unless they clipped on super short notice or something. Am I being a grinch?

They charge $180 to clip and I usually give them $20 for a tip. My guy is a little bit of a pain, so I don't mind giving the guys a little extra for him.

TrakeGirl
Nov. 18, 2010, 02:02 PM
You don't know me- I could eat ramen every day and sleep in my car to pay for my horse hobby, or I could be Bill Gates. It doesn't matter, and I shouldn't have to (and won't) defend or explain my own choice of spending habits. I think a LOT of things people (probably you) spend a ton of money on are ridiculous, but I keep my mouth shut. To each his own.

Clap, clap, clap.

Peggy
Nov. 18, 2010, 03:06 PM
You tip the grooms for clipping your horse? Does anyone else here do that? I've never done that unless they clipped on super short notice or something. Am I being a grinch?Our groom gets paid directly for the clipping. I handed him $150 cash the day he did it, but no extra tip.

REH
Nov. 18, 2010, 03:28 PM
They charge $180 to clip and I usually give them $20 for a tip. My guy is a little bit of a pain, so I don't mind giving the guys a little extra for him.

Holy Cannoli. I'm going to pray my clippers don't read this thread. I'd sooner take the day off work and clip myself than pay $180 for a clip job. I hope the clippers don't unionize their rates like the braiders do.

Janet
Nov. 18, 2010, 03:28 PM
That sounds like a lot of money. My question to you would be what would the trainer have done if you were on a budget or what would the trainer say when you might not have had the money to pay for said expensive blanket? Most people have regular bills to pay and not alot of extra money at the end of the month.
If you were on that kind of budget, and you had an ounce of sense, you wouldn't be in THAT kind of barn.

poltroon
Nov. 19, 2010, 04:40 AM
When you are in a program where trainers have the latitude to purchase these kinds of items (with notification or not) ... you are generally prepared for these kinds of expenses.

I've seen people who were eating ramen and cutting a lot of other corners to be in a high end program. And these days especially, people don't necessarily have the disposable income they once did. That's not to say they wouldn't get the blanket, only that they'd like to know at the earliest possible time that the blanket was coming to ensure the money was going to be available. Even if you're making six figures, it's not nice to be surprised with a $350 extra expense.

I agree with the posters who mentioned that they enjoyed the shopping and didn't want to be deprived of the chance to do it.

fordtraktor
Nov. 19, 2010, 08:11 AM
I am one of the posters that enjoys shopping (for horses anyway) but here I wouldn't bother, since it is obvious there are no real "options" -- the trainer has a set list of exactly what has to be ordered. Takes the fun out of it for me, not like picking out a new bridle. So if I were in this type of program, and I knew going in what the requirements were, and my horse shredded the existing piece of required equipment, it wouldn't bother me that trainer ordered another one. Ideally I would want to be asked for approval first, but what are you going to do, say no and remove your horse from the program? I would just ask for a heads up first next time when handing in the check.