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View Full Version : Is there a market for 15.1hh WB's?



Slow Motion
Nov. 14, 2010, 09:26 PM
I have a 3 year old warmblood with three quality gaits and a fantastic jump. This horse is sound and very sane, does lead changes in both directions and has plently of step & scope. I don't think she will have any problem jumping 3'6. To ride she doesn't feel like 15.1hh at all (you don't feel like you are posting every 0.02 seconds).

What should I choose as a career path for her? Childrens hunter?

Is there a market at all for horses this small?

fordtraktor
Nov. 14, 2010, 09:32 PM
You are going to hear lots of anecdotal people saying there is a market, but honestly, I think there is not much of one. There is much less discrimination in the eventing world. I would market this horse as an eventer.

Maybe it's just me, but I have never had anyone interested in paying more than 4 figures for a horse in the 14.2-15.2 range. I'm sure others will disagree.

If you think it will make up into a $7500 Childrens Hunter, though, and you are willing to let it go for that, I've had success there. But it is expensive to make up a Children's Hunter as they need a show record, and a show record is expensive to put on them.

shawneeAcres
Nov. 14, 2010, 09:36 PM
The biggest market right now is in the dressage world where there are quite a few adult riders that are seeking smaller horses with rideable, but fairly big gaits. In the hunter world, not so much!

Mara
Nov. 14, 2010, 09:36 PM
At age three she may grow a bit more. Probably not over 16H - but what do you know of her breeding? How big were the parents and perhaps even more tellingly, how big are the horses 2 gens back (grandsires/granddams)?

Slow Motion
Nov. 14, 2010, 09:40 PM
Both parents are 16.1hh. All horses in her pedigree going back 2 generations are at min, 16hh. She is a late 3 year old so she may grow a bit.

SimonandGus
Nov. 14, 2010, 09:58 PM
If you are confident she could make it as a 3'6" horse, a solid small junior can be very valuable, but the show miles to get there is expensive and a long road. She will need a BIG step and definitely the scope for the big oxers. As a 3 year old, I'm not sure what to tell you if you are looking to sell her now.

PNWjumper
Nov. 14, 2010, 10:04 PM
The easiest horse I've sold lately was my 15.1h DWB mare. She has a HUGE step (you have to be mindful of what you're doing to not leave strides out of lines set on a 12' stride), and the scope to do the High Junior/AO Jumpers.

I thought her size would make her a very difficult sell, but I found a kid who didn't mind her size, as long as she had the step and jump necessary to do the big jumpers. I hadn't yet started advertising and she was sold by word of mouth only shortly after the first show of the year. With that being said, she had a good show record with another kid in the 1.10m jumpers and had proven that she had the step and scope to do a lot more. And size isn't quite as important in the jumpers as it is in the hunters, so take that for what it's worth.

Anyhow, my girl sold for a decent 5-figure price, but I think I could have asked two or three times more if she'd been 16.3h rather than 15.1h. So I guess my feeling is that I got pretty lucky to stumble across who I stumbled across, but not nearly as many people were turned off by her size as I thought would be. If your mare is really what you say she is (meaning she has a large-for-her-size step), then I don't think it's as much of a detriment as it may have been at the peak of the huge-horse-itis that seemed to hit 5 or 10 years ago. The question if you're aiming her towards the hunter ring is whether she can slowly lope down the lines set on a 12'+ step or whether she'll really have to motor to make it.

But I also agree with shawneeAcres that there seems to be more of an actual market for smaller horses in the dressage world where people are legitimately looking for a smaller size. The h/j world still seems to be in more of a "will tolerate it" when the horse shows promise rather than a seeking-it-out type of mindset (though there are obviously plenty of exceptions to that rule).

(As a side note, and FWIW, my mare was 15.1h out of a 16.3h mare and a 16.2h stallion. Her full brother is huge, she just ended up teeny tiny by whatever fluke of genetics and just never grew beyond her 3yo year.....so I certainly don't think that her young age is a guarantee that she'll end up bigger, though it's certainly quite possible).

horsepoor
Nov. 14, 2010, 10:45 PM
Are you selling her now, or just trying to figure out where to aim her in the future? I just would think she'll grow, but of course, you never know for sure until it happens. But if she ends up at that tall end of the smalls, so getting toward 15.3, and is a quality horse, she'll sell. I'd love to find something that size -- whenever I'm looking, seems they are all 16.2++.

On growing -- my boy that is a late 5 year old (born in July) just grew 3/4" over the last two months. Surprised the heck out of me! I only know because I've been monitoring all these measurements for him because he's on a diet. So I sure would expect your 3 year old to grow some over the next couple of years.

Jo
Nov. 14, 2010, 10:49 PM
I'm curious on this topic as well - only mine is a 15.1 OTTB, chestnut mare - of course!!!!!!!!

"Luckily" for us - we are currently at a dressage barn so we'll get some good instruction going that direction.

I got on her for the first time today and she feels much larger than she looks. She's probably the best build horse I've seen, with a fabulous temperament, and lots of chrome. I'm trying not to fall in love - I'm 5'9"!!!!

Lucassb
Nov. 14, 2010, 11:16 PM
15.1 is tough, but at 3... you might still get a couple more inches.

The one I sold last year at WEF was 15.1 as a three year old, and 15.3 on a tall day when I sold him (a couple years later,) and we had quite a lot of interest in him (and he sold at a very decent price.)

Go Fish
Nov. 15, 2010, 01:05 AM
If the horse can honestly chip badly into a 3'6" vertical and still make it down the line to the 3'6" oxer without running hell bent for election, then perhaps you won't have a problem selling. I don't know how, at age 3, you can know that for sure.

You will have to make the horse up at some level to prove to buyers that a 15.1 horse can meet this challenge. At age 3, no one is going to believe you.

I agree with others though, at age 3 the horse may grow another couple of inches. My current show gelding was 15.2 as a long 3-year-old and he's just a pinch under 16.3 now.

VirginiaBred
Nov. 15, 2010, 07:55 AM
The market would be the same as it would be for any other horse that's 15.1.

That being said since it's a warmblood, they typically grow until they are five. Stay tuned.

Beethoven
Nov. 15, 2010, 08:54 AM
I agree that she will probably do some growing. My TB mare grew till she was 8. I am not even joking. She had a baby at 3 when she was at a TB breeding farm. I got her as a 5 yr old and she was a little above 15.3, but now she is a around 16.2 maybe just under. :) She just kept on growing. I always say its because I plan(ed) to sell her and she is trying to become the horse I want. I am 5'8" with long legs so a slab sided TB thats 15.3 looks ridiculous. Well now I do not fit her that bad. She still needs about 200 lbs of fat and muscle to really be filled out(thats another subject) and then I will probably look perfect.

recent shot of us:
http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=44023963&l=20b4dfa2f7&id=19200064



If I was looking at a 15.1 hh horse at 3 and a WB then I would expect it to grow at least a little bit. I wouldn't count on 16 hh, but I have been shocked in the past by some horses late growth. If she makes it to 15.3 hh and has the scope and step to be successful in the small juniors then she would be pricey, BUT at this point I would not pay much for her due to her size and lack of experience.

coloredhorse
Nov. 15, 2010, 08:58 AM
Well, I have one right here in my back yard and would love another! :lol:

That said, though I occasionally dabble in the hunters with my horses, I am primarily a dressage rider. In the dressage/eventing world, there is a very good market for the smaller horse, and I think the comments about the differences in the markets are pretty spot-on. In fact, I acquired my current short WB mare (who has beautiful hunter movement and a textbook jump) for a great price several years ago because she lingered on the market as a hunter prospect.

fordtraktor
Nov. 15, 2010, 09:08 AM
Is there really much that is 15.1 in the small junior ring? I see a lot of 15.3 to 15.3 7/8 with its shoes off (that size is fine value-wise IMO), but 15.1 -- I haven't seen many of those.

Good luck, Slow Motion -- sending you growing jingles! I agree that 3 is young and you will hopefully at least get another inch or two on her. Hopefully two, 15.3 is very marketable in hunterland.

bizbachfan
Nov. 15, 2010, 09:09 AM
I am betting the horse will grow as most have said, also if she makes 15.3, which is very possible, how she is built and movement, etc will be a big factor. Though some people refuse to look below say 16.2 there is a market of shorter folks who will be glad to have a shorter horse as long as it can do the job. Isn't Hickstead just barely 16 hh?

findeight
Nov. 15, 2010, 12:13 PM
Biggest selling obstacle right now is it is 3 and unshown so, regardless of the fact OP thinks it has the step for 3'6"? cannot prove it with a rider down the 13-14' lines on a regular basis even if it was 17.2, just because it's big does not mean it has the step.

Personally, if OP wants to sell in the next year, I'd point it towards Childrens Hunter with the possibility of a move up and get it going in the 2'6" Baby Greens next spring. Get it sold and let the buyer make the decisions. Alternatively, she can keep it 2 more years and go thru to First years and market it then...but that is going to probably cost more then she can realize out of a sale, especially if it is not successful.

Not singling anybody out personally here but...keep reading and hearing all this "plenty of step for 3'6"+ Hunters" but never see anything below 15.3ish in the 3'6" Hunters on a USEF rated level.

Your buyers are going to be as skeptical as I am unless it can be proven. At any age or height.

Thomas_1
Nov. 15, 2010, 12:28 PM
There's quite a few very nice Dutch Warmbloods of about that size doing horse driving trials (combined driving events).

If she's only 3 though, then she's some more growing to do.

Peregrine Farm
Nov. 15, 2010, 12:30 PM
Interesting thread. I also have a 3-year old WB cross filly on the market right now. She's sitting between 14.3 and 15 hh, and has beautiful expressive gaits. She's dressage bred, but I have had interest from both dressage and hunter riders. She's been on the market for over a year now, and I have had a number of people interested in her, until they ask about her size. My experience has been that height below 16 hh appears to be a show-stopper for a lot of people. Because she's over 14.2 (and still may have some growth in her), she's sort of "tweener" -- not eligible as a pony, but not tall enough for many riders. It has been somewhat of a frustrating experience, as I believe she's got a ton of potential (I know, we all think our homebreds are great, but she really does!). I've dropped the price into the mid-4 figures in hopes that a good young rider or smaller adult amateur might snatch her up and do well with her -- my thoughts (though yet unproven) is that is the best market for the smaller horse.

Video here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QlQWzXNBTJ8

Alterrain
Nov. 15, 2010, 12:34 PM
If she is super fancy and talented and easy she will be worth the same as any other super fancy and talented and easy horse.

If she is not, she will sell for about 50% less than any other horse over 16.2HH comparable to her.

IME :)

I did hear of one 15 HH (barely) chestnut mare sold this summer to a BNR for :eek:$$$$$:eek:

But that was a jumper.

Hunterlover17
Nov. 15, 2010, 12:36 PM
Speaking from a previous experience, it is a HARD sell. We had a homebred WB that topped out at 14.3 at age 3. We waited another year but she only filled out more. She was green so she needed a tiny adult or a very good kid.

After two years on the market while showing on the A circuit with my trainer fairly successfully, we only had a few bites. We started at lowish 4-figures and kept dropping the price but it didn't help. She was a fancy mare with full blaze/3 high socks, a fantastic mover, and a brave/scopey jumper. Also an easy keeper and barefoot!! We ended up donating her to a local school. After a few years at the school, she ended up having a career in H/J afterall. She helped at least 2 kids so far move up from the ponies.

She really is a great mare that people just overlooked or wrote-off due to her size. :(

findeight
Nov. 15, 2010, 12:42 PM
Well, say the same thing I did earlier, it is 3 and looks real pretty going around the field. You can't really market it as Hunter potential when it is not even under saddle yet let alone jumping a course. Your average Hunter buyer wants some assurance it can do the job-that means it's broke and started over fences.

On top of that though, this one does not have Hunter gaits, too much suspension in that trot and too uphill. It's just not a Hunter. But it is a nice horse.

Far as Dressage? Maybe a better marketing target for you but, again, buyers would need to see something more then it trotting around loose-although that is a nice trot. Problem is your likely small working adult or school age kid buyer is not going to have the time or skill to break and train it.

The size thing...you know maybe Dressage has a growing kid division where this one would fit? I dunno. I do know that in the Hunters, it really is not going to look as nice and stylish between and over the Jumps if it's up to a foot shorter then the rest of them. And Hunters are judged on style.

Maybe Thomas' driving suggestion is a good one? Look into that.

Peregrine Farm
Nov. 15, 2010, 01:12 PM
Well, say the same thing I did earlier, it is 3 and looks real pretty going around the field. You can't really market it as Hunter potential when it is not even under saddle yet let alone jumping a course. Your average Hunter buyer wants some assurance it can do the job-that means it's broke and started over fences.

Totally agree - very hard to sell on potential alone, especially if they are a shorty. The good thing is that my significant other trains horses for a living, so we should have her going well by the time next summer rolls around, with only sweat-equity and no significant cash investment into her initial training. After that, we'll see what happens.

Thanks for your thoughts - much appreciated!

Go Fish
Nov. 15, 2010, 01:40 PM
Peregrine - agree with Findeight - that filly screams dressage. You're one step ahead of the game if you can get her broke and going yourself. She's 3? I'd get started right away. If she stays small, adult ladies and kids will be the market. She'll have to prove she's a solid citizen.

Looks like you have a lovely farm! :D

Perfect Pony
Nov. 15, 2010, 02:21 PM
but never see anything below 15.3ish in the 3'6" Hunters on a USEF rated level.

Wasn't Strapless really only around 15.2hh or less?

I know of several horses that are less than 15.3 doing fine over 3'6". As a matter of fact, most horses are smaller than advertised. A true 16.2hh is a really tall horse. I have done experiments measuring peoples horses, and many are really 1-3" shorter than their owners claim.

I know this horse is shorter than 15.3
https://www.horseshowtime.com/showexhibitorresults.asp?Show=2850&HorseID=142530

Edited to add that Vanessa Brown's Demitasse was also very small and won Championships at Thermal over 3'6"

smileyrileyxoxo
Nov. 15, 2010, 02:36 PM
In my opinion as long as she can get down the lines without looking rushed there will definitely be a market for her. And, if al else fails and she is in fact as nice as you say you could most definitely make her worth something in the lower mid 5 figures as a childrens hunter.

Peregrine Farm
Nov. 15, 2010, 02:38 PM
Peregrine - agree with Findeight - that filly screams dressage. You're one step ahead of the game if you can get her broke and going yourself. She's 3? I'd get started right away. If she stays small, adult ladies and kids will be the market. She'll have to prove she's a solid citizen.

Looks like you have a lovely farm! :D

Thanks for the nice words! She is dressage bred, and that is where she is likely headed, but we will cross-train her initially and then let her talents sort themselves out. Despite that, I figured the issue of the market for smaller horses is pretty universal - I did not mean to steer the thread away from H/J. :)

findeight
Nov. 15, 2010, 02:56 PM
Wasn't Strapless really only around 15.2hh or less?


No. IIRC she was 15.3 7/8ths or something on her card.

I know for sure she was bigger then my mare who sticks at 15.3 as I shared the warm up ring with them a few times and that mare once visited our barn for some mid circuit turn out. Not that small up close and personal, not a dainty type either.

I never said there have never been any either, but Small Juniors is substantially smaller then Larges and most are a hair below 16h. not 15.1 or 2.

Meadow36
Nov. 15, 2010, 03:16 PM
Don't forget to look into marketing to the eventing crowd; in some parts of the country the pony club market is fairly "high end". Even mainstream eventers don't mind a smaller horse if it can do the job (i.e. Theodore O'Connor).

Royal Monaco
Nov. 15, 2010, 05:57 PM
I am a 30 y.o. mother of a 2 y.o. (and pregnant again) and I bought a new horse last year. The two last criteria on my list were height and color. The first criteria was a SAFE horse. I didn't mesure the horse when I bought her. I knew she was small, but it didn't matter to me because she had breathtaking gaits, fabulous jump, huge stride and quiet mind. I wanted a talented safe horse. She is only 3 y.o. and 15h2, so I know she will grow some more but it is really the las of my concerns. Now that I am a mother, all I want is a safe ride every time I sit on my horse.

I think there is a market for smaller horse. It is just smaller ;) than the "regular" market.

I paid 2$$$$ for that perfect match.

llsc
Nov. 15, 2010, 06:18 PM
I just sold one that was a Welsh/Holsteiner cross, 15 hands, 7 years old, amazing mover, and I mean amazing. Very good jumper and had a huge stride; just walked the lines. He was for sale for 9 months before he finally sold. No hunter people even looked at him. All eventers and dressage people, even though he had been showing in the hunters and was as honest as they come.

Hunter people don't even come look when the find out that it's under 16 hands, not even when they need one for a tiny kid or adult. They were all afraid that even if he was perfect for them, he would be tough to sell down the road.

findeight
Nov. 15, 2010, 07:41 PM
I just sold one that was a Welsh/Holsteiner cross, 15 hands... don't even come look when the find out that it's under 16 hands, not even when they need one for a tiny kid or adult. They were all afraid that even if he was perfect for them, he would be tough to sell down the road.

Well Hunter people may look a little under, not 8" under when they are scored on style and how they compare with others when the average is 16.2 to 17h. Hunters are scored on the curve, not a national standard. No matter how free moving, a horse 8 or 10 inches shorter will APPEAR to be rushing a 14' line and look like it's working harder to get over a big oxer.

Not saying a big percentage of buyers are not ignorant and do not need any 3'6" potrential to do their speed bump classes and see AA shows only in their dreams. They still will not flock to see a 15 hander.

The truth is...they do 2'6" max and 11 foot lines but...your buyer pool thinks they need a 3'6"er with 14' line capability when all they will ever do is speedbumps at 11'. Can't change that any more then you can change what 25 to 35 year old car buyers think they need. That happens to be the most common demographic that can pick up that horse. An upwardly mobile, younger professional. Or a prent buying for a kid that needs to sell in 3 years for college. They are simply not going to buy something 15.h or under.

You HAVE to market what buyers will buy.

Thanatos
Nov. 15, 2010, 07:47 PM
There's a market for anything. At my barn right now we have a very tiny, petite woman who is looking for a horse around that size to do the 3 foot on at local and some rated shows. But, you may have to take more time to place the horse or accept less money if you're in a hurry.

As for saying she's a 3'6" horse? Meh, my theory is I can chase anything with a broom and make it jump 3'6". But to actually canter a course, consistently, week after week and school higher at home (since I want to know cantering up to that 3'6" fence that my horse is capable of clearing higher than that and not thinking "dear god, this is the highest my horse can jump! i hope we don't biff!!!") and stay sound, sane and be competitive at that level? I think 3 is a little young to make that assessment but that's just me.

findeight
Nov. 15, 2010, 07:54 PM
There's a market for anything. At my barn right now we have a very tiny, petite woman who is looking for a horse around that size to do the 3 foot on at local and some rated shows.

Yeah, and for the third time, a 3 year old not yet broke to saddle of any height is the biggest obstacle to selling that ammy the horse.

After you get them broke and going well over show courses in an actual show ring? Then you can whine about size blocking any sales.

Until then, if it's not broke over fences, or at all, your market gets considerably smaller. Even if it's 17h. Unless it's mother is Rox Dene and daddy PopeyeK and the seller has developed numerous Hunter winners? A buyer has squat to go on and is not going to put alot of $$$ on the line..

Fun Size
Nov. 16, 2010, 01:04 AM
This is a really interesting thread for me, because I would totally be interested in a horse under 15.3, as I am only 5' tall and my legs are really the short part of me.

In my completely uneducated opinion, I can't be the only short rider out there. If the horse has the step and the jump, how great would that be for us short people!

Slow Motion
Nov. 16, 2010, 08:48 PM
I'm not looking to sell anytime soon. Just deciding on what career path to take to be able to market this horse best in the future. I have free jumped her down a 3'6 5 stride set long (twice, as she is only 3) just to see what she could do, and she cantered down it nicely and made the distance, and picked great spots. I suppose time will tell.

CBoylen
Nov. 16, 2010, 08:53 PM
I have free jumped her down a 3'6 5 stride set long
What is "set long" in regard to freejumping?
This is an honest question. I don't have much freejumping experience. I would think it would be hard to replicate a hunter type line of that length with a loose young horse.

Slow Motion
Nov. 16, 2010, 09:11 PM
What is "set long" in regard to freejumping?
This is an honest question. I don't have much freejumping experience. I would think it would be hard to replicate a hunter type line of that length with a loose young horse.

Set based on a 13.5' stride. It's not hard to replicate if you have a big indoor and a horse that free jumps well (she just kind of goes on her own, loves jumping). I even used flowers & boxes. :D

sptraining
Nov. 17, 2010, 12:17 PM
A solid and sane riding horse that is athletic and has a 12' stride will find a home. Your best option is to put good miles on it and show it a little. That's the best you can do by any horse.

It still has time to grow too. My mare was about 15.2 at 3 and now is pushing the 16h mark at 5. Big bodied. Doesn't look small until you put her next to something that's big. I'm 5'7" and don't look like a giant on her.

Good luck! :)

checkersandboots
Nov. 18, 2010, 01:12 PM
I love the "overgrown" ponies as am I under 5'3" with a small pony leg. My current horse has the height (16 hands) but he is so short coupled that he rides like a large pony. That's why I could afford him; everyone else looked too big on him. :)

monalisa
Nov. 18, 2010, 01:30 PM
I had a very fancy 15'1ish mare that I sold a few years back and got a lot of money for her. She was very lovely, a TB/WB cross, GREAT mover, decent jumper. The people who bought her just wanted to own her and she is now a broodmare. I got very lucky as she was small and only smaller riders looked good on her (I am 5'3). I love the smaller ones, but it has to have the step to get down the A show lines to be a hunter.

jumpforjoy
Nov. 18, 2010, 01:53 PM
I am looking for a small hunter, but I am not your ideal buyer. I want to stay under 10K and must have something confirmed safe. At 56 and 5'4, I need a horse that will jump me around a small course and then head out to the trails with a smile on his face and mine. I am not hugely competitive, but I'd like to enter a few classes in a show without fear. Also, I think it is hard for us to find you; I tend to look for horses over 5 with a temperment rating of about 3! In order to find such horses, we look at dreamhorse or equine.com I don't like doing it, because I know nothing about the seller's reputation, but if you don't live in h/j land, it is what you do. Perhaps there are lots of us older, baby boomer amateurs looking for a 15.1 hand horse, but we aren't the kind of buyers you make any money selling to ....(sorry about the preposition) :-)

Jo
Nov. 18, 2010, 02:44 PM
jumpforjoy, you sounds like the ideal home for our little mare. We just want her to go to a good home - I hope we can find someone like you when we're ready to put her on the market. :)

LittleblackMorgan
Nov. 19, 2010, 10:22 AM
Short answer-


YES

I just bought one. 15.2. I'm 5'3 with short legs and normally ride a 14h pony. The first thing the seller said to me was "She IS small..." I giggled and told them the size of my gelding.

I got an unbelievable horse for a song, because she sat for a few years, needs miles, is short, and doesn't jive with the HJ world. Combined training? Hell yeah.

Let's_Motor
Nov. 19, 2010, 10:51 AM
The other idea I don't think I have seen mentioned yet is - what about the jumper ring? Does this horse have to be a hunter?

I know of plenty small adults, with demanding jobs, that just dream of being the 3' or 3'6" adult jumper champion of the world. That might be another market to explore if you have a pretty solid citizen of a horse.

My horse is, at BEST 15.1, and can get me out of plenty of trouble at 3'6" in the show ring, and easily up to 4'3" at home. And, you can get pretty good ribbons in the adult jumpers (not the combined child/adult cause the kids are nuts) on a consistent, forward round with good turns, over most of the break-neck speed gallops who miss the good turns. :yes:

jumpforjoy
Nov. 19, 2010, 10:59 AM
So as I am reading it, there is a market, but it boils down to how to put the two together...
I know what I need, but it feels impossible to find. You know what you have but it feels impossible to reach that buyer... I don't know the answer. I understand the problem with advertising on the Boards, on the other hand, it is frustrating when you think you have a resource of a pretty good group of buyers and sellers that can't connect. sigh...

Slow Motion
Nov. 19, 2010, 12:49 PM
The other idea I don't think I have seen mentioned yet is - what about the jumper ring? Does this horse have to be a hunter?

I know of plenty small adults, with demanding jobs, that just dream of being the 3' or 3'6" adult jumper champion of the world. That might be another market to explore if you have a pretty solid citizen of a horse.

My horse is, at BEST 15.1, and can get me out of plenty of trouble at 3'6" in the show ring, and easily up to 4'3" at home. And, you can get pretty good ribbons in the adult jumpers (not the combined child/adult cause the kids are nuts) on a consistent, forward round with good turns, over most of the break-neck speed gallops who miss the good turns. :yes:

If she doesn't sell as a hunter then I plan on doing jumpers with her (I am a jumper rider).

fordtraktor
Nov. 19, 2010, 01:15 PM
Slow Motion, I sold a few Children's/Adult Jumpers in the 15.1 - 15.2 range. I had absolutely NO problem selling them fast as they were winning and easy to ride, always an easy sell for a C/A horse. And I got more $$ than I ever could have for that size horse in the hunter ring -- not a fortune but usually low to mid five figures. This was about 10 years ago though. Jumpers is not a bad idea for her if that's what you do.

findeight
Nov. 19, 2010, 02:19 PM
As a breeder though, please note many of these favorable reponses have mentioned they got their 15.1 ish horse for a song...or less.

How many are willing to pay what you need to realize?

Dressagelvr
Nov. 19, 2010, 02:58 PM
The biggest market right now is in the dressage world where there are quite a few adult riders that are seeking smaller horses with rideable, but fairly big gaits.
Actually, not really. I've been doing the dressage thing for a decade now and they think bigger is better too.