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View Full Version : Tell me about free jumping.



diddlez66
Nov. 13, 2010, 05:12 PM
At my school we are currently going through all of the horses and evaluating them to see what sort of riding they are best suited for and what their abilities are and what they need work on, etc.

One of the ponies I am evaluating has pretty decent flatwork and I have taken her over some jumps. Of course, on the lower jumps she didn't put in a lot of effort and just felt like she didn't completely know where to put her feet, but as I jump her a little larger she seems to feel better and give more effort. But I want to free jump her to actually get to watch her jumping form and to try some larger jumps.

I have watched people free jump horses, but I have never attempted it myself. I assume it is pretty straight forward, just set up the shoot with a few smaller jumps and then gradually raise the last one to see what we can get from her.

Is there anything else I should do or know?

Thanks!

Isabeau Z Solace
Nov. 13, 2010, 06:35 PM
1) Free jumping doesn't work for every horse. Especially older horses (have been under saddle a while.) Some just get crazy and run like lunatics.

2) I recommend training the horse to go through the chute on the first day. Then adding poles, then fences over the next few sessions. People get nuts when their own neck is not on the line and will overface the poor animal trying to get it to jump 4'+ on the first day. Not fair to the horse in my opinion.

3) I prefer to train horses in the round pen to respond to commands (mostly physical and not verbal.) Then work them loose in the arena. Then add a chute. Then some poles. Then jumps. I can freejump one or more horses with just myself. If the horses understand the idea there is not need for a group of people to chase and catch the critter. Here's some video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=keN68SThOcI

Is this particular situation the bay is something of a slug. The grey gets him going through the chute much better than if the bay is on his own. (Mostly because the bay likes to chase the grey:D, but cha' know whatever works...) What I like about my method is the horses are entirely calm and organized. Not charging. If it takes much more than the one swing of the whip (you hear towards the end) to get them through then you are on the wrong track.

The mare in the link below was a 3 year old. She was a rock star. Took to it great. And though she over jumped in this video still I never set the fence to the height she offered.

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=59649272804&set=a.59647957804.82877.536672804

I am limited to free jumping in the colder months when the many large doors on the farm's indoor are shut. I tried a few times with gates up on the doors, but it was not a workable idea... I do it every winter to break up the winter routine, even with the horses that are already trained to jump.

judybigredpony
Nov. 13, 2010, 07:33 PM
I have a 60X60 square pen w/ corners 45ed.

I have a chute on 1 side w/ a single jump and on the other side a few trot poles, they don't get going fast and have to actually jump up and off their hind end since they will land and turn in a few stride.
While not ideal it really has worked well for evaluation and getting greenies to calmly accept jumping confidently without a riders interferance.

I was told by more than one knowledgable older trainer If a horse jumps well free it will jump well under tack.
If a horse jumps less than stellar free doesn't necessarly mean it will jump poor with a riders help.

HappyHorselover
Nov. 13, 2010, 09:59 PM
1) Free jumping doesn't work for every horse. Especially older horses (have been under saddle a while.) Some just get crazy and run like lunatics.

2) I recommend training the horse to go through the chute on the first day. Then adding poles, then fences over the next few sessions. People get nuts when their own neck is not on the line and will overface the poor animal trying to get it to jump 4'+ on the first day. Not fair to the horse in my opinion.

3) I prefer to train horses in the round pen to respond to commands (mostly physical and not verbal.) Then work them loose in the arena. Then add a chute. Then some poles. Then jumps. I can freejump one or more horses with just myself. If the horses understand the idea there is not need for a group of people to chase and catch the critter. Here's some video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=keN68SThOcI

Is this particular situation the bay is something of a slug. The grey gets him going through the chute much better than if the bay is on his own. (Mostly because the bay likes to chase the grey:D, but cha' know whatever works...) What I like about my method is the horses are entirely calm and organized. Not charging. If it takes much more than the one swing of the whip (you hear towards the end) to get them through then you are on the wrong track.

The mare in the link below was a 3 year old. She was a rock star. Took to it great. And though she over jumped in this video still I never set the fence to the height she offered.

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=59649272804&set=a.59647957804.82877.536672804

I am limited to free jumping in the colder months when the many large doors on the farm's indoor are shut. I tried a few times with gates up on the doors, but it was not a workable idea... I do it every winter to break up the winter routine, even with the horses that are already trained to jump.



I love your method of training them - I tried free jumping the other day and it was a fiasco with my TB - if I had taught him the chute one day, then poles, then jumps I'm sure it would have gone much better! It didn't occur to me to do that which is silly really, your moethod makes a ton of sense.

By the way, I love the bay in the video - cute!

Isabeau Z Solace
Nov. 16, 2010, 12:38 PM
HappyHorselover,


Thanks. The bay is a cutie ( and as precocious as they come :D)