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equitation222
Nov. 8, 2010, 06:15 PM
Wondering if anyone had any ideas. I am 17-years old and live in Virginia. My parents have two kids in college, so cannot afford a horse. However, I really want to get my name known in the horse world. Last year, I showed at A-rated shows on my trainers sale horses but my trainer has since moved, and I am now stuck. I have a new trainer but not any showing opportunities as the horses are school horses and not fancy enough for rated shows. Does anyone have any ideas on how to get my name out and show on the circuit?

Trixie
Nov. 8, 2010, 06:30 PM
Find someone who needs some horses hacked, and be willing to work for it. There's not a ton of opportunity for unknown riders to just go "show on the A circuit" but there are plenty of horses that need riding, esp if you're willing to do some grunt work. The more you show different people you can ride well, the more opportunities you will have.

Be sure to be gracious and thank anyone who gives you a horse to ride PROFUSELY for the opportunity.

morganpony86
Nov. 9, 2010, 08:31 AM
I agree. Once you get your name out there as a good rider, other owners will start coming to you to ride their horses, whether it's just temporary (while they're on vacation) or a more permanent situation. At my barn there are several owners with multiple horses who just don't have the time to ride & show them all, so they try to find young individuals who can.

You probably won't be taking anybody's horse to rated shows for a while, until you find yourself a permanent situation with an owner who is VERY gracious. If I had a fancy horse good enough for the A shows, you can bet that I would be the one riding them in said A show, whether I was the one who schooled him at home or not.

Another option, if you're dead set on showing, is to make your own $ to afford a horse. I supported two horses on my own starting when I was 18.

loshad
Nov. 9, 2010, 08:55 AM
Another thing to think about is that the local shows in VA tend to be fairly competitive. Just because your trainer's horses aren't quite at rated level doesn't mean you can't get out there and get some valuable show experience (sometimes on the same grounds where the rateds are held). In addition, some trainers show both rated and local, so doing a nice job with what you've got is a good way to get noticed.

In addition to what Trixie said about being gracious and thanking the owners for any hacking opportunities, make sure you always show up on time and do not cancel at the last minute because something else came along or you just didn't feel like going that day. If I had a dollar for every teen who didn't show up to hack my horse when she said she would, I'd have 3-4 horses by now. ;)

meupatdoes
Nov. 9, 2010, 09:04 AM
In addition to what Trixie said about being gracious and thanking the owners for any hacking opportunities, make sure you always show up on time and do not cancel at the last minute because something else came along or you just didn't feel like going that day. If I had a dollar for every teen who didn't show up to hack my horse when she said she would, I'd have 3-4 horses by now. ;)

Agree 100%.

Flakiness is the number one thing that makes me walk away from an owner or rider in T-2 seconds. I am busy and I have to schedule my life and what horses I ride and when in advance.

I have ZERO patience for someone who derails my schedule by cancelling last minute or no showing because their alarm didn't go off or whatever.

Especially if I am the one giving THEM something for free.

sar2008
Nov. 9, 2010, 09:15 AM
Agree 100%.

Flakiness is the number one thing that makes me walk away from an owner or rider in T-2 seconds. I am busy and I have to schedule my life and what horses I ride and when in advance.

I have ZERO patience for someone who derails my schedule by cancelling last minute or no showing because their alarm didn't go off or whatever.

Especially if I am the one giving THEM something for free.

^^^^ This. Finding someone reliable is my #1 problem. With two kids, I need someone that is going to show up, be ON TIME, willing to take direction and be ready to ride--not dilly dally around for 30 minutes before getting on a horse.

(OP this is totally not directed towards you...I'm just sayin....)IME, All the "great junior rider's" out there think we owe them something. I got news for ya, there are a gazillion great junior riders out there. Your a small fish in a huge pond **and you don't know everything**

But if your willing to work your a$$ off to get where you want to be, it's doable. It just takes loads of patience, persistance and hard work. Don't turn your nose up at the minor riding opportunities...a horse is a horse...learn to ride the bad ones then the good ones will come along.

Personally, when someone comes out to test ride for me, I put them on my worst/greenest horse in the barn. If they can make him look good, they are hired ;) Normally they don't come back because they *think* they are "too good to ride something like that." LOL If they only knew :D:lol::lol::D


Another thing to think about is that the local shows in VA tend to be fairly competitive. Just because your trainer's horses aren't quite at rated level doesn't mean you can't get out there and get some valuable show experience (sometimes on the same grounds where the rateds are held). In addition, some trainers show both rated and local, so doing a nice job with what you've got is a good way to get noticed.

Take this into consideration as well. I have sales horses. It's important for me that the young ones are eligible pre-green/green divisions at the time of sale. I don't even take them to the local RATED shows. They go to the non-rated shows to gain experience. Doesn't mean they are any less nicer than the horses showing at HITS or Culpeper....just means I don't want them to break their green quite yet ;)

Where in VA are you located? I may be able to point you somewhere with nice horses to ride...