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skyy
Nov. 7, 2010, 07:38 PM
How do you get over your nervousness?

DD is now almost 13 and quite a good rider. Pony is quite a good jumper-scopey, clean, and brave. Together they are starting to move up the levels. I know that letting her jump bigger is the right thing to do (she only jumps in lessons) and I trust our trainer. However, watching her come to a 3'6" wide oxer in her last lesson was enough to make me almost physically ill. All I can think about is what could happen if pony happens to drop a leg and catch a rail. The entire time she is jumping the bigger fences or moving up to the next level at a show I find myself praying over and over "Please God, let them be safe."

I ride and jump so I understand the allure. However, I am a bit of a nervous rider when the fences go up and will never get past 3'3" or so because of my head. I don't want my fear to be transmitted to my daughter. I don't want anything I do or say to make her start second guessing her own judgment or that of our trainer. How do you get over this? If you can't get over it, how do you manage it?

chunky munky
Nov. 7, 2010, 07:44 PM
Be sure that she is not under mounted for the tasks at hand. A good horse willmake you very confident. Thatbeing said, my mother could never watch when aI did the jr.jumpers years ago.:-)

spacytracy
Nov. 7, 2010, 07:44 PM
I have no idea, just wanted to send some cyber hugs. Now that I have a child (granted, she's 3) I cannot imagine how my mom let me ride, period.

WorthTheWait95
Nov. 7, 2010, 07:47 PM
How do you get over your nervousness?

DD is now almost 13 and quite a good rider. Pony is quite a good jumper-scopey, clean, and brave. Together they are starting to move up the levels. I know that letting her jump bigger is the right thing to do (she only jumps in lessons) and I trust our trainer. However, watching her come to a 3'6" wide oxer in her last lesson was enough to make me almost physically ill. All I can think about is what could happen if pony happens to drop a leg and catch a rail. The entire time she is jumping the bigger fences or moving up to the next level at a show I find myself praying over and over "Please God, let them be safe."

I ride and jump so I understand the allure. However, I am a bit of a nervous rider when the fences go up and will never get past 3'3" or so because of my head. I don't want my fear to be transmitted to my daughter. I don't want anything I do or say to make her start second guessing her own judgment or that of our trainer. How do you get over this? If you can't get over it, how do you manage it?

Don't watch. That's how my parents handled it. They were supportive and came to shows (even out of state) but they always mysteriously vanished about 10 mins before-10 mins after each of my rides after I left the 3' level. They passed the video camera off to another parent or groom so they could watch after they knew everything turned out okay.

My trainer as a kid was notorious for banning parents from watching within a certain radius of the ring if she thought the kids were picking up on the parent's nervous energy.

Trixie
Nov. 7, 2010, 07:58 PM
My mom loves to watch, but when i was growing up, a friend's mother couldn't bear it. She would turn around when her daughter went into the ring, and my mother would tell her when the kid landed over the last fence. Then she would turn around and clap like mad! :lol:

supershorty628
Nov. 7, 2010, 08:00 PM
My mom finds something to do so that she can watch and be occupied at the same time. For her, that's video taping my ride. While she can see what's going on, it's through a viewfinder and she gets so focused on filming that she doesn't get as nervous. You can see in some of my videos that she is (particularly in the video from the first grand prix I did, haha!), as the camera shakes a fair amount ;), but I think it makes her more comfortable having something to do.

My dad, on the other hand, only watches videos. He won't watch me show in person - although, to his credit, he did come and watch IHSA Nationals, but I know it was very hard for him.

BrookdaleBay
Nov. 7, 2010, 08:09 PM
I recently got back into jumping after a long break after a bad fall as a teenager, but watching me ride in general made my mom nervous. When I was old enough to safely handle the horse alone, she holed up in the car with a book until my lesson was over. Even now, she has seen me ride my boy only a handful of times. I'm going to start showing again next summer in the jumpers, and I doubt I will be able to get her to come out... probably for the best, though, since I do pick up on her nervous energy.

Muggle Mom
Nov. 7, 2010, 08:09 PM
It's hard to believe now, but it does get easier. One thing that helped me at the beginning was to watch a lot of other riders jumping bigger jumps. It desensitized me a bit and made it feel more normal when I saw my DD jump them. Since I don't ride myself, I think getting used to her riding at all was the hardest part for me. It sound silly, but the fact that she so bravely takes on such a dangerous sport is what helps me relax and be confident in her abilities. I'm proud that she can do something that I couldn't dream of doing, and this pride helps me to support her. I think I'll always be nervous, though, so you're not alone. Wishing you and your DD all the best!:yes:

sptraining
Nov. 7, 2010, 08:15 PM
Sorry, can't understand where you're coming from. When I asked my mom to help me set fences, she usually set them half a foot higher than I wanted them - usually around the 4'6" + mark. hahahaha. She's always asking if the horse can jump higher or go faster (in the jumpers). She's not a rider either. hahaha. I dealt with her competitiveness by handing her a camera...

Accidents will happen. Make sure she wears a helmet that fits. I believe it does get easier. Be careful not to rub your nervousness off on her either because you can't question yourself when you're riding down to a big oxer. It's amazing what you can accomplish with confidence.

Can you sit above the ring? Fences look smaller from up high.

Congrats to your daughter though for doing well! :)

Go Fish
Nov. 7, 2010, 08:22 PM
Hey, put it in perspective. She doesn't have her driver's license yet.

GPjumper
Nov. 7, 2010, 08:28 PM
In all honesty, try to relax as much as possible...my mother was subsequently banned from the barn/shows by my trainer. At the in gate she was always, "Are you nervous, you look nervous?etc" I understand her fears (especially since she is a non horse person) but she made me SO nervous that I'd usually crash on course even if it was schooling at home, just because she got me doubting myself.

lotc2005
Nov. 7, 2010, 08:54 PM
When all else fails, send in the Aunt! I will admit that I am reliving my childhood vicariously through my niece, but she LOVES riding. She started riding when she was 2, and just turned 5. She competed in the Ground Rails divisions this year.

My sister will sometimes come to the lessons and to the shows (when she isn't working). No disrespect to her, but things go better at lessons when she isn't there. Fortunately, the first time the kid fell off, her mom was busy talking on the phone so she was somewhat distracted.

The kid has fallen off a couple times throughout her riding career, and if I forget to say something to my sister, my niece will tell her, but usually a day or two later. She is beginning cross rails now, and my sister just says she doesn't want to know what she is doing in her lesson, just that it went well.

My sister rode very little when she was growing up, but never had any bad falls. My mom and I both grew up riding and showing, so I think its somewhat different for us.

EqTrainer
Nov. 7, 2010, 09:01 PM
I understand... And mine isn't even jumping yet! The first time she cantered I almost fainted. I have never wanted drink so bad...

The way I handle my nerves is by making sure she has good safe equipment and tack, and by making sure she rides safe ponies. I look at it like this - my daughter is likely to be an adult ammy who rides 3x a week and shows once a month. There is no reason for her to learn to ride broncs unless she decides she wants to be a pro.

I've seen too much to think at the age of seven, she needs a challenge :lol: I keep my nerves in check by doing everything I can to keep her safe. I am seriously considering making up and keeping my oh-so sensible five year old for her to ride when she is 12!

Muggle Mom
Nov. 7, 2010, 09:03 PM
In all honesty, try to relax as much as possible...my mother was subsequently banned from the barn/shows by my trainer. At the in gate she was always, "Are you nervous, you look nervous?etc" I understand her fears (especially since she is a non horse person) but she made me SO nervous that I'd usually crash on course even if it was schooling at home, just because she got me doubting myself.

LOL I can definitely relate with your Mom! I learned early on to stay away from the in-gate and tried hard to be seen and not heard. I'd run for the forgotten gloves or show number, and otherwise stayed far away from DD before she showed. It was best for her nerves and mine.:lol:

ktm2007
Nov. 7, 2010, 09:04 PM
Hey, put it in perspective. She doesn't have her driver's license yet.

:lol::lol:

Sundown
Nov. 7, 2010, 09:48 PM
Get a stress ball! That's what I gave my dad. :D I believe he broke one...

sptraining
Nov. 7, 2010, 10:09 PM
Man, my parents must not have loved me very much. Guess that's what I get for having medical professionals for parents. :lol: Their general response was "did you hit your head? no?" Get up and take care of your horse.

leilatigress
Nov. 8, 2010, 09:11 AM
Man, my parents must not have loved me very much. Guess that's what I get for having medical professionals for parents. :lol: Their general response was "did you hit your head? no?" Get up and take care of your horse.

My dad was like this!
Now I did not jump but I did do barrels and exercised TBs on the track. Mom became a religious woman and always hail maryed with her back to the ring for my shows. Dad would tell her "She's good" and she'd turn and clap. Now with DD already having two falls under her belt I thought I could handle watching her jump. Nope! I do a please be okay when she no hands in two point over the cross rails. Watching her take her first jump was exhilarating and the most scary thing I have ever seen. I'll let you know if it ever gets better. I do try to see her over the jump and safe before she is, and I am thankful she is mouthy enough to tell me 'get over it mom its not that big!'

ponymom64
Nov. 8, 2010, 09:32 AM
Hey, put it in perspective. She doesn't have her driver's license yet.

My DD is jumping the bigger jumps with her green horse AND has her driver's license - I spent a lot of the time being *very* nervous LOL!!

Anyway - my advice is make sure she is correctly mounted for what she wants to do - nothing like having a scopey horse to set your mind at ease and make sure that you have complete confidence in your professional. Having a trainer that knows what they are doing and has your child's best interests and safety at heart should make you less nervous.

Also, never let your child know that you are feeling nervous - that is a recipe for disaster! I always try to stand quietly by the ring next to our trainer so I can listen to her commentary or with a friend, I can watch but not be totally focused on the height of the fences, and I've learned never to actually *say* anything to the DD on her way into the ring - that is her time to go over last minute details with her trainer. I'm frequently there to give the boots a last minute dusting and wipe the horses mouth and give him a pat, but that's the limit of what I do ;) but it keeps me busy and less likely to be stressing out.

barnbum81
Nov. 8, 2010, 10:12 AM
I haven't read every response, but agree with the right mount, a good trainer is also crucial, one who pushes just enough but never expects more than a child is capable of. I think no matter what as mother's we are going to be nervous. They're are babies! But we have to remember not to let our fears hold them back or influence them! I never let the kiddo know I get nervous for her! Maybe we should have mommy cocktail hours during lessons and shows LOL

bazinga
Nov. 8, 2010, 11:05 AM
My mother is banned from watching me, she gets so nervous that she starts distracting me (talking to me while i'm being coached etc.). I told her if she wants to watch she has to be hidden/ not talk and distract me, now she only comes to the big shows.

My dad is there all the time when I ride, he watches me ride almost every day he enjoys it and doesn't get nervous at all for me.

SmileItLooksGoodOnYou
Nov. 8, 2010, 12:34 PM
Being the child on the other end with a Dad who gets incredibly nervous...

Make sure your daughter is safely mounted for what she's doing, make sure you trust in her trainer's judgement, and don't EVER tell her you're nervous.

Also, it might help if you watch sitting by the trainer, and just focus on what the trainer is working with her on. Try to learn what's going on. It also helped my Dad to see me school bigger at home and in the warm-up than I was showing. Then he (like me) would look at show jumps and say "Your horse can jump much bigger than that."

My Dad's seen me jump my old horse over 4'6 (which is funny because he rarely came to watch lessons after I could drive, and I only jumped the old guy that big 2 or 3 times in 5 years of owning him) I never showed the old guy over 1.15, but we frequently jumped the last warmup jump at 1.20-1.25M. It made the horse sharp, and made me worry less about the fences in the ring.

And I know he's seen me jump my new one over at least 4', but I have yet to show him over 1.20.

Riding at home I don't really get nervous about having Dad there biting his nails. In the show ring I'm much better off when he's in another state and I send him a video later.

eclipse
Nov. 8, 2010, 12:50 PM
If you trust your daughter's trainer, then don't watch! Nothing is worse than a parent than interfers and pushes their fears onto the child. (this is coming from somebody that competed in gymnastics at a high level and who's mother was banned from the gym!) :lol: My mom was terrified to watch me train, to the point that she would gasp, loudly, so my dad had her removed by my trainer! It actually took the stress off me and allowed me to relax and stop MY worrying about what my mom was thinking! (which could start with YOUR daughter and which could make her start riding backwards, etc).

At competions my mom would come and watch, but leave when I would compete on balance beam LOL. Make sure you are there to support her at shows and to cheer her on, but please do not allow YOUR fears to reflect directly on your daughter. It's a very hard lesson to learn but it can be dealt with in a variety of ways. But, don't be afraid to discuss it and let her know what your fears are (I knew my mom was afraid, I just knew they were HER fears and SHE had to deal with them not me). As dumb as it may sound, sports psycholigists are a great help, and would help both you and her :D

Skeezix
Nov. 8, 2010, 01:11 PM
Here is how I handle it:

Get very dark pair of sunglasses, if you feel like you are getting ready to pass out at certain points in the trip, shut your eyes. That way my daughter didn't know when I wasn't watching at that moment.

Also, stand next to a trash can, if you need to get sick, you just lean over and take are of things. (nerves make me nauseous)

Always works for me.

Oh, and the most important thing, when she comes out in one piece, hug the horse and whisper a heartfelt thank you in the ear.

Lets just say I have had a lot of practice :)

EqTrainer
Nov. 8, 2010, 02:57 PM
Skeezix, thanks for bringing that up... I thank Nanny with treats in hand :lol:

Isabeau Z Solace
Nov. 8, 2010, 04:05 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vo0Cazxj_yc&feature=share


Okay so you watch this... then DON'T let her watch it. (wouldn't want to give her any more crazy ideas !!:D)

hellerkm
Nov. 8, 2010, 05:13 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vo0Cazxj_yc&feature=share


Okay so you watch this... then DON'T let her watch it. (wouldn't want to give her any more crazy ideas !!:D)

Watched it, and can I say I am GLAD my kids ride? LOL some of that stuff is just plain SCARY!!!!!

bits619
Nov. 9, 2010, 09:53 PM
Honestly, I was shocked when my mom told me years later (during a riding hiatus) that she was always a little nervous when she watched me ride, especially over fences, especially-especially on the OTTB who would take an 18" course and turn it into the most spastic 'grand prix' trip ever attempted. (We were actually 100% improved- and so were my mom's nerves- when we started raising the jumps in lessons!)
I think the biggest thing was that my mom never reacted visibly or audibly (at least not visible/audible to me). She's not a big gasper or shrieker, or hands over face type of gal. More of the chin-to-chest, breath in with a simultaneous, raspy "dear godddddd...." (i know this from watching WIHS with her one year!!!)

I think it'd be harder for me (no kids, just speculating) to be calm if my kid was really confident. I would feel like SOMEONE needed to be doing the worrying, so there was a balance (superstitious much??) :) And vice-versa; my neice was doing the rock climbing wall at their fall festival and was really confident while in line (I was impressed, but a little apprehensive inside). Once she was harnessed in, different story- she was nervous and i was the one to say, "Girl, you GOT this! YEAH!!"

SEP
Nov. 9, 2010, 11:33 PM
A friend of mine once said " The longest 2 minutes of your life is watching your child jump their first Grand Prix"

M. O'Connor
Nov. 10, 2010, 08:32 AM
Be sure that she is not under mounted for the tasks at hand. A good horse willmake you very confident. Thatbeing said, my mother could never watch when aI did the jr.jumpers years ago.:-)

I second this. Moving up to the bigger jumps is a threshold that is easy to trip over.

You shouldn't have any reservations if your daughter is mounted on a capable horse, and being coached by an experienced and knowledgeable trainer.

If there is any doubt in your mind that either of these areas are lacking, you might be right to be nervous.

alittlegray
Nov. 10, 2010, 08:43 AM
Drink a LOT, and invest in good hair dye! Lol.

I have so much gray hair it isn't even funny. I can't watch her first round at shows without shaking, but once she comes off the last fence in that first round, I am fine! I'm not sure why the first round does me in...do I think she has forgotten how to ride between shows?? :)

You will be fine with some deep breathing exercises and like the previous posters have said, doing everything YOU can to ensure her safety via an appropriate mount for the job, a good trainer, and good tack.

Trees4U
Nov. 10, 2010, 08:58 AM
I know exactly how you feel. I think being a rider yourself makes you very aware of stuff that can go wrong. My dtr is now 26- riding/showing for 20 yrs, & I remember being very nervous and having to make a conscious effort to keep quiet so my nerves wouldn't transfer to her. I would squeeze the rail so hard sometimes I think I left fingernail digs in them! I finally learned to gaze in her direction but not "ride every fence" with her (if you get my idea) & that helped. Of course, I did video & there are some where you can hear me say"oh no" and drop the camera :eek:.
Its tough..

jai65
Nov. 10, 2010, 09:13 AM
The first time my daughter went off she was about 6 yrs old. It was her fault. The pony she was on had just been bitted that week for the first time(it was an ex pony party pony) and was in an indoor for the first time. During a break she was walking along the rail and kicked the wall. The poor pony took off, made a hard right and she went off. I start across the ring and the trainer is waving me off. "shes ok, we don't like to made a big deal" I continued to my daughter who still hadn't moved, knelt and shook her. She had already had blue lips. My daughter would stop breathing even if she tripped and fell. After that the trainer waisted no time if she went off. Thankfully that only happened one more time when she was little, and now if she gets the wind knocked out of her, she doesn't stop breathing like that.
My husband does not watch anything. Even video. He does not want to see what the kids are doing. Even at 20 and 22 he has trouble. If they went off as kids, it was up to them to tell dad. And since he always threatened to get rid of the horses if they got hurt, they didn't tell him much.
The only time I get nervous is if the footing is bad/muddy on cross country. But since I take pictures or video, it keeps me busy.

skyy
Nov. 10, 2010, 12:04 PM
Thanks for all of the tips. I work at the farm where we board/train and our trainer is excellent. On top of it, she is a mom too and has known my daughter since she was 18 months old. Our kids are practically growing up together. Our trainer also knows my nervousness well - she trains me too- and has to deal with that in my lessons on a weekly basis!

The pony was purchased as a hunter prospect with extreme hopes of maybe being able to do the Large's at some point. It quickly became apparent that pony wanted to be a jumper which suited DD quite well and off they went. Pony is now proving herself to be very scopey and careful and trainer realistically thinks that pony is scopey enough to the do Pony Jumpers (do you know they can set those things to 3'9"?!?!)

So far, I have been able to keep my mouth shut during lessons and at the shows I am the groom and nothing else. DD and trainer do their thing and I watch. DD has fallen off a fair number of times. She takes a fall and bounces back up. She has just never fallen off over a fence or on the off side. So far, pony has been stupid brave, jumping from spots (and clearing) where a lesser beast would throw on the brakes. Maybe a little vodka in my water bottle will improve the situation :)....

everafterfarm
Nov. 10, 2010, 12:24 PM
My mom still can't stand to watch me jump a 2' fence and I'm in my 30s!!!

If this helps, there is a tiny girl at my trainer's who is 9 I think, and small for that. She doesn't have any trouble getting her MEDIUM pony to do the 3'9" fences! It blows me away to watch them! Pony is not for a beginner either, but he is very brave and loves his job. He's been around too, he's a teenager himself.

Muggle Mom
Nov. 10, 2010, 12:49 PM
Maybe a little vodka in my water bottle will improve the situation :)....

Ah yes, there's always that ...:lol:

M. O'Connor
Nov. 10, 2010, 12:54 PM
Thanks for all of the tips. I work at the farm where we board/train and our trainer is excellent. On top of it, she is a mom too and has known my daughter since she was 18 months old. Our kids are practically growing up together. Our trainer also knows my nervousness well - she trains me too- and has to deal with that in my lessons on a weekly basis!

The pony was purchased as a hunter prospect with extreme hopes of maybe being able to do the Large's at some point. It quickly became apparent that pony wanted to be a jumper which suited DD quite well and off they went. Pony is now proving herself to be very scopey and careful and trainer realistically thinks that pony is scopey enough to the do Pony Jumpers (do you know they can set those things to 3'9"?!?!)

So far, I have been able to keep my mouth shut during lessons and at the shows I am the groom and nothing else. DD and trainer do their thing and I watch. DD has fallen off a fair number of times. She takes a fall and bounces back up. She has just never fallen off over a fence or on the off side. So far, pony has been stupid brave, jumping from spots (and clearing) where a lesser beast would throw on the brakes. Maybe a little vodka in my water bottle will improve the situation :)....

Fallen off a number of times?

Jumping from spots where a lesser beast would throw on the brakes?

Couple of red flags right there...

shawneeAcres
Nov. 10, 2010, 01:56 PM
I am not a parent but a trainer. However, I get VERY nervous when my kids are doing their "first" anything, particularly at a show. Of course I NEVER let it show to them, but man I nite my nails when they are out there and I can't be out there with them! However, they are all mounted on the BEST ponies/horses that money can buy!! I know those ponies like the back of my hand. Still, the one old 24 yr old last year, got "wedged in" at a show in the hck class between another pony and a fence, he does NOT like that sort of thing and threw a little buck in and the then nine year old tumbled off. It was SO funny as she strutted across the ring to where the judge was holding the pony, swatted him once with her crop and popped back up! All before I could even jump in the ring. And went on to win every other class in the SS division and go champion!

AppendixQHLover
Nov. 10, 2010, 02:11 PM
My mother closes her eyes and turns around when I jump. She wishes that I would stick with dressage. :D

Blue Star
Nov. 10, 2010, 03:39 PM
I decided early on that if my daugter has the guts, the work ethic, the experience and the passion to DO it, I should pull up my big girl panties and have the guts to WATCH her....I don't have to enjoy it all the time, but I do in support of HER passion.

Watching ALL the big rings alot also helps...you see lots of refusals and falls enough to demonstrate that they usually are not life threatening and statistics are on your side.

I stay away from the in gate at all costs and only approach the exit AFTER her debriefing... with treats for the horse and a water bottle for her. This is all about HER and she does not need to worry about or manage ME....she has enough on her hands with the horse and the course!

skyy
Nov. 10, 2010, 05:52 PM
To clarify - "fallen off a fair number of times" means that she's been riding since she was 4 and in the past 9 years she's fallen off maybe 8 times, usually over something stupid like she's walking around with no stirrups, loose reins, chatting with a friend and pony does a spook spin because a fox just ran across the outdoor under her nose. No big deal.

As for jumping from bad spots, this pony will jump from anywhere. The long one, the super deep one, she is very forgiving. Some of the ponies I have been around lately require a near perfect distance before they will jump. Anything less and they stop.

M. O'Connor
Nov. 10, 2010, 06:57 PM
Ok...just the way those two things appeared in the one post had me a little worried...

Keep us posted!

We Ride
Nov. 11, 2010, 12:16 PM
Man, my parents must not have loved me very much. Guess that's what I get for having medical professionals for parents. :lol: Their general response was "did you hit your head? no?" Get up and take care of your horse.

:lol: I am that parent!! My DD is 10 yrs old and a bit of a worrier. If I feed into the it, she'd probably still be just walk trot... And believe me, she loves jumping. She just doesn't want to show:sadsmile:... but I'm ok with that. I have plans on showing her mare myself :yes:

That's not to say that I don't ride EVERY course along side her. I chirp the horse on from the stands, half-halting, giving more leg right from my seat.... Other parents find it funny... I ride along side their kids too :yes:.

I guess part of it comes from being a rider, and past trainer. I've come off my share of horses and have gotten back on every time. I tuck and roll (and seem to be very bendy) so when I've fallen, i've only gotten hurt once... and even then, when I regained conciousness, I got back on just long enough to say I got back on.

LeeB10
Nov. 11, 2010, 12:28 PM
My daughter has been riding since she was 7, she is now 17. When she was 8 I bought her a 4 year old pony, when she was 11 I bought her a 4 year old horse, when she was 13 I bought her a 6 year old horse, and when she was 15 she got on a 7 year old horse. She is a jumper rider and the highest she has jumped at a show - so far - is 4'3". She has fallen off her horses lots - they were all young and difficult when she got them. She says she has mastered the art of falling off and landing on her feet. I honestly rarely get nervous - even when she comes off her horse, she knows what she is doing and I enjoy watching her do it. Her first trainer was a tough one, she set these rules that when your kid happened to fall off you were NOT allowed to enter the arena - only she could do that. And if you came off you were to get back on and do it again until it worked. Made my daughter tough as nails and I think it desensitized me a little bit. Whatever it was I was rarely nervous even when she was 7 - 8 and now I love to watch her go.

lucyeq
Nov. 11, 2010, 09:30 PM
I know that my mom gets nervous when I jump no matter HOW high it is. It helps her to be able to ask my trainer questions (she has never ridden) while we're going around. Since you're a horsey mom, that probably wouldn't help you haha. I also agree with the good horse/good trainer comments above.

skyy
Nov. 14, 2010, 12:07 PM
I may have found a trick to help me cope.... DD and pony went to the Woodedge show at NJHP yesterday and ended up doing a Pony Jumper class because they were set low (for pony jumpers). They moved the PJ's to the West Ring which has kind of a weird set up. The ingate is like a funnel so that spectators can't really stand on the rail to watch. You end up standing about 30-40' back from the ring rail. From this perspective, the jumps didn't look too big to me and I was hardly nauseous at all! Usually, I'm right at the gate with her but I think I'm going to try this approach for her next lesson. I will be close enough to watch but not up close and personal!