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View Full Version : Renting farmland for growing hay/pasture-rates??



mpsbarnmanager
Nov. 5, 2010, 02:09 PM
A little background:
I will be needing enough hay to feed 20 horses this summer. I have enough to last till then because I paid a neighbor to bale our pasture for me, and it turned out great! Will not be able to do that this year because the horses will be turned out on it by then. My Dad was a trucker and he used to go get me hay form Ohio from a family friend for $2-3 a bale. I pay the neighbor $2 per bale to bale it. He passed away in April, so that is no longer an option either. It would be out of my budget to get it brought in commercially. Or rather, I would have to raise my board to cover it, and chances are at least one boarder would have to leave, and I am back to where I started financially. So here is my idea:

I am fortunate enough to live in a very agricultural area. My new barn is in the middle of a field that used to farm before we bought it. My uncle has a large dairy farm right behind me. It is one of those areas where everyone knows everyone and they all owe each other favors all the time, everyone more or less gets along.

So I think the best course of action may be to rent 10-15 acres of farm land and grow hay ourselves. Like I said, we have done this sucsesfully in the past. I just have no idea how much farmland goes for per acre per year for a lease. Has anyone else ever done this?

AnotherRound
Nov. 5, 2010, 02:57 PM
No, but I have contemplated it, and with your situation, I would figure out what I could afford - ie, how much would it cost for me to spend $3.00 per bale for all the bales I need, including seed, tractor, etc. and then get a number you can live with and make an offer.

I imagine that someone with a hay field might find the lease more appealing than the work of haying bailing and selling. You might also offer to continue the lease through the winter for your horses to go out on in the winter, and see if a year's lease is appealing to them. Your offer may be cheap per month, but what farmer is making money off his hay fields from November through April, as well as May through October (haying).

I am making this up and haven't don it but that is what I have been thinking about.

AnotherRound
Nov. 5, 2010, 02:58 PM
How many bales do you get off of one acre, BTW? I am assuming 75-100 pound bales?

Guilherme
Nov. 5, 2010, 04:16 PM
Tamara can give you some good information, here, but for a start:

http://www.extension.iastate.edu/Publications/AG96.pdf

http://www.agry.purdue.edu/ext/forages/rotational/articles/PDFs-articles/calculating-hay-yields.pdf

I would think calling your local Extension Agent or asking you uncle would be in order, too. :)

G.

mpsbarnmanager
Nov. 5, 2010, 04:30 PM
How many bales do you get off of one acre, BTW? I am assuming 75-100 pound bales?

Last year and this year we got about 50 bales per acre per cutting and they were 45 to 50 lb bales. I did have the soil tested and it was right on target. If I rent a naked field, I will have to lime, fertilize, plant, pay for farmer to do above things, and that's already like 3k, so I would need at LEAST a 3 year lease, ideally 5-10.

SmartAlex
Nov. 5, 2010, 04:35 PM
I rent mine by the acre for the same rate I pay in taxes on it. The farmer is responsible for making whatever improvements he needs (i.e. replanting, liming, replacing culverts). Of course, he makes these improvements with the understanding that the usage is a long term agreement and he will benefit from them.

Tamara in TN
Nov. 5, 2010, 05:08 PM
So I think the best course of action may be to rent 10-15 acres of farm land and grow hay ourselves. Like I said, we have done this sucsesfully in the past. I just have no idea how much farmland goes for per acre per year for a lease. Has anyone else ever done this?

your county extension agent will be able to give you the exact rate for your area

Tamara in TN

Equibrit
Nov. 5, 2010, 05:27 PM
Our Dept of Ag Market Bulletin usually has ads for land rentals.

This might help; http://usda.mannlib.cornell.edu/usda/current/AgriLandVa/AgriLandVa-08-04-2010.pdf

horsetales
Nov. 5, 2010, 05:46 PM
I rent mine by the acre .

We lease out 18 acres with the lease being per acre

Daydream Believer
Nov. 5, 2010, 07:15 PM
Have you considered buying by the tractor trailer load of hay? I buy it that way from New York from a farmer I've done business with for years. I can't get it for $3.00 a bale...somewhat more than that...but it's way cheaper than buying it from local hay dealers. You can also sometimes find another stable to split a load with if you don't want it all.

mpsbarnmanager
Nov. 5, 2010, 08:30 PM
Daydream, I have looked into that, most quotes I have gotten want 1500 or more just for shipping, with the hay being about 4 a bale, between 400 to 700 bales per load. I have no clue how they get so much in a load, we could only ever get 350 max into a 53' trailer. I understand fuel is expensive and drivers have to make a living too, but sheesh! I guess I have just been spoiled and now I'm getting a reality check. So is that on target with what you have found?

Daydream Believer
Nov. 5, 2010, 09:25 PM
I get 700 or more in a 53' trailer loaded in New York. Now those are smaller bales but it's about 14 to 15 tons of hay. They stack it all the way to the ceiling...it's tight. I won't say what I pay on this forum since that is between me and the person I'm contracted with but if you PM me, I'll tell you approximate costs.

Tamara in TN
Nov. 5, 2010, 10:27 PM
I have no clue how they get so much in a load, we could only ever get 350 max into a 53' trailer. I understand fuel is expensive and drivers have to make a living too, but sheesh! I guess I have just been spoiled and now I'm getting a reality check. So is that on target with what you have found?

the differences are the weights and dimensions of the bales...we put 750 sm sqs in a 53 foot 102...the weight is however- 22 tons(44,000 lbs per load)...the more tonnage on a trailer the lower the delivery fee is per bale delivered

22,000 lbs delivered for $1500 is more expensive than
44,000 lbs delivered for $1500

it is that tonnage that makes or breaks hay deals generally


Tamara in TN

GoForAGallop
Nov. 5, 2010, 10:48 PM
I rent mine by the acre for the same rate I pay in taxes on it. The farmer is responsible for making whatever improvements he needs (i.e. replanting, liming, replacing culverts). Of course, he makes these improvements with the understanding that the usage is a long term agreement and he will benefit from them.

Same. We rent out our certified organic land for basically what it costs in taxes....it's to a good neighbor and family friend and 4th-removed-cousin-something :lol: so we don't need to be making a profit. Plus we buy our hay off him and he gets his crew to stack it in the barn for us for no extra $$.