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KateKat
Nov. 5, 2010, 11:37 AM
is the sizing the same for these as normal girths? Just wondering since they obviously don't have the elastic ends.

Also, would love to hear anyone's experience with these. My girl is a little girthy and I've been reading that most horses love these. I'm also seeing a wide range of prices from $20 for the cheap blends to almost $100 for the pure mohair. Preferences?

spacytracy
Nov. 5, 2010, 11:40 AM
I honestly don't know about the sizing but we used them at camp many years ago, and they do shrink a bit when washed. Just be aware of that.

findeight
Nov. 5, 2010, 11:45 AM
Tried one. Hated it. It pinched/pulled alot of hair out between the strands so I ended up using a cover, horse was still girthy.

Had better luck with a double elastic ended synthetic. Relatively inexpensive and washable.

For what it's worth, I rode Western forever and always had a mohair cinch but....the English girth is alot longer and the way it attaches to the shorter English billets means more of the girth is against the horse and right under your leg-that is my theory on why it rubbed when the western one never did.

gingerbread
Nov. 5, 2010, 11:53 AM
Pure mohair string girths are very soft and very durable. Hand wash them in Woolite once in awhile--- easy.

Excellent for horses with a fine coat,sensitive skin--my Arab gets rubs with other materials.

Not sure how the measurement compares but the place where you buy the girth will know.

KateKat
Nov. 5, 2010, 11:55 AM
Tried one. Hated it. It pinched/pulled alot of hair out between the strands so I ended up using a cover, horse was still girthy.

Had better luck with a double elastic ended synthetic. Relatively inexpensive and washable.

For what it's worth, I rode Western forever and always had a mohair cinch but....the English girth is alot longer and the way it attaches to the shorter English billets means more of the girth is against the horse and right under your leg-that is my theory on why it rubbed when the western one never did.

Good point. I'm also wondering why these are recommended for girthy horses...just because they're supposed to be so soft? However, if I got a wool lined girth couldn't it potentially have the same effect?

gingerbread
Nov. 5, 2010, 11:58 AM
Tried one. Hated it. It pinched/pulled alot of hair out between the strands so I ended up using a cover, horse was still girthy.

Had better luck with a double elastic ended synthetic. Relatively inexpensive and washable.

For what it's worth, I rode Western forever and always had a mohair cinch but....the English girth is alot longer and the way it attaches to the shorter English billets means more of the girth is against the horse and right under your leg-that is my theory on why it rubbed when the western one never did.

I ride English, using an all-purpose saddle---the same length girth H/Js would use...my mohair girth does not pinch or pull hair at all. It could be that the one that is mentioned as doing this was not pure mohair, but made of something else--or a mix. Gotta be pure mohair.

skyy
Nov. 5, 2010, 12:22 PM
We tried just about ever girth style out there on DD's Welsh/TB thin skinned pony mare. The string girth was the only one that didn't give her rubs.

findeight
Nov. 5, 2010, 12:30 PM
Good point. I'm also wondering why these are recommended for girthy horses...just because they're supposed to be so soft? However, if I got a wool lined girth couldn't it potentially have the same effect?

Yes, a wool or wool type synthetic is also nice and soft against the skin.

Strikes me that I got rubs as an adult on a big bodied horse in a forward seat/close contact saddle and those that did not get rubs were a kid on a Pony, a rider with an all purpose saddle and somebody with an Arab.

Got to be the amount of contact along the lower leg and calf, especially with a big barreled horse and the close contact saddle. Probably put my calf right on that girth-hence the rubbing. I once had a brass name tag on top of a leather girth that wore a hole in my chaps right about the top of the calf-same reason.

Keep1Belle
Nov. 5, 2010, 03:31 PM
When I worked at MarketStreet a few of Hoffy's Hunters went in string girths. The only reason was that she said the horses liked it better and perhaps it distributed pressure in a way that was more pleasing to the horse. Several differnt strands vs. on broad band...idk but there were a few that went in them and it stuck out to me because I had not seen one used since I was a child in a pony lesson program.

I found one the other day at a consignment shop and tried it on my guy who goes in between girth sizes depending on the saddle. He seemed to like it just fine, no more or less than his normal girth.

chillydc
Nov. 5, 2010, 04:25 PM
We had an older gray horse with very sensitive skin and it was the only thing he could wear, he would get AWFUL girth galls otherwise. Seems that they help a lot of horses.

Creaghgal
Nov. 5, 2010, 05:33 PM
I've had a Stubben Cord girth for years and there isn't a single sign of wear on it. I use it a lot in the summer, thinking it's like wearing a pair of sandals instead of a pair of leather boots.
I dunk it in a bucket of water after the ride and we are all set to go again next day.

CR Gorge Girl
Nov. 5, 2010, 08:01 PM
I don't know if you can find an english version, but I was a Classic Equine String girth that is made from Alpaca wool/hair/whatever it is. Softest girth I've ever used. They do stretch however, but I think it would shrink again after being washed with some warm water.

Langfuhr
Nov. 5, 2010, 08:58 PM
I hate those things. After a while, it seems as if there was a mop on his girth. My I have a Fleeceworks girth cover and its plenty cushy.

Fillabeana
Nov. 5, 2010, 09:15 PM
I ride western and english- I'm a former Training Level eventer, but it's been awhile. I put in lots of 8 hour rides, in a western saddle, on our ranch now, so I've learned what gives girth galls and what doesn't.

I ride on a ranch, and as far as western goes, I don't use anything but a natural fiber cinch- mohair or alpaca, if the horse is really sensitive.
The secret to the western cinches is to make sure you aren't trying to put something too wide right in the 'armpit' area- think how any shaped girth narrows for the elbows.

I just bought a mohair girth for my jumping saddle, this is the one:
http://www.doversaddlery.com/ovation-mohair-girth/p/X1-02174/cn/98/
I measured it when it came, and it was about 5 inches shorter than its 'size'- oh no! But they stretch, and with mild pressure (not a strong pull) it measured its 'size'.

The girth has stretch to it, and I feel like it has as much stretch as a girth with one elastic side, but the stretch distributes on both sides. It breathes, and it has grip to it. Horsehair will absolutely appear between cords if it is properly tightened, so a white one on a dark horse might look a bit weird.

My mare is a bit cinchy, and she is still cinchy with this girth. My gelding doesn't bat an eye at this girth, though he does sometimes protest very mildly when I tighten the western cinch, so I think there IS a good effect for a cinchy horse, though not a big one.

So, for $20, I really like the girth I bought, though I don't think I'd spend $100 on one. I'd say it might help a sensitive horse, depending on what the sensitivity problem is.

mbmarsh
Nov. 8, 2010, 11:00 AM
Fair warning though, if you have a horse that likes to play around or buck some, you can end up with a spur caught in the girth - happened to my trainer, and that was the end of using the string girth......