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ss3777
Feb. 21, 2005, 06:04 PM
Well, I have a Bouvier puppy and I am in LOVE! He seems respectful of horses (after 2 near misses) he travel wells and he comes when he is called. What more can I ask for?

Sorry if this is way off the eventer topic.

ss3777
Feb. 21, 2005, 06:04 PM
Well, I have a Bouvier puppy and I am in LOVE! He seems respectful of horses (after 2 near misses) he travel wells and he comes when he is called. What more can I ask for?

Sorry if this is way off the eventer topic.

*In Your Dreams*
Feb. 21, 2005, 06:13 PM
SHELTY http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

eventable
Feb. 21, 2005, 06:15 PM
Jack russells and fox terriers seem to be pretty popular down here. I like German pointers http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

deltawave
Feb. 21, 2005, 06:17 PM
I've been thinking about this topic on and off, too, as my beloved retrievers age. http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/sadsmile.gif The next dog will ideally have all of these qualities:

*Not huge, but no ankle-biters
*A super watchdog for the new farm, including good at keeping varmints away
*Great with kids, including being protective and best friend material. A dog like "Lassie" who would run for help should kid get in trouble would be perfect...without all the collie HAIR. http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/lol.gif
*Not a wandering idiot who's going to disappear
*Good with chickens since I want to have a few of those on the new place
*Not horrendously hairy so it can hang out in the house, but not a wussy thing that can't hack it overnight in the barn, either.
*Good with horses but I don't care if it loves them, just so long as it's not nuts around them and has the good sense to stay away from the hard, pointed ends. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Any ideas for the ideal farm dog? It can come to events with me if it doesn't bark constantly. Oy, there is NOTHING more irritating than listening to the pitiful crying of a miserably unhappy dog left behind in the stabling area while its owner who "can't go anywhere without poochykins" is off walking the course or riding or whatever. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_mad.gif

SimplyIdle
Feb. 21, 2005, 06:21 PM
Anything rescued from the pound http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Of course, I may be a little partial, with my two rescues and all http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

olympicprincess
Feb. 21, 2005, 06:22 PM
Labs- yellow, of course!! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Shipsinator
Feb. 21, 2005, 06:27 PM
I would say Australian Shepherds, because they are so darn smart. You do have to be careful about which kind you get, the herding kind or the family kind. The one I have is wonderful around horses and wont run away. However, i have never taken him to an event. I think there are mini Aussies too!

Dale Area 1
Feb. 21, 2005, 06:39 PM
Austrial Shepards are great. Very smart, loyal, great with horses, wonderful with kids, cats, anything with 2 or 4 legs. I love my aussie, he is the best dog I ever owned. Athletic, but not too high, great brain.

I also have a rescue border collie, very sweet, but he has tons of energy and a short attention span http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif My aussie is great with him, keeps him in line, calms him down.

goodymar1188
Feb. 21, 2005, 06:48 PM
CORGI'S!!!

I've been around tons at shows... so many people love them. I know a little Corgi who goes around at events and gives everybody sad, hungry faces and then she comes back with a full belly and has to sleep with the horses overnight.

VERY friendly, and very smart when it comes to the horses.

bornfreenowexpensive
Feb. 21, 2005, 06:50 PM
I have a couple of rotties and a boarder collie. While one of my rotties is an wonderful show dog and has been around the show jumper circuit and the event circuit (she's now getting up in years--12 this 4th of July)--my boarder collie is more portable. He's also great out on hacks and very smart!

LadyRed
Feb. 21, 2005, 06:51 PM
My farm dogs are all english mastiffs! They are great with the kids, don't chase the horses, can't fit through the fences, don't bark, stay put, loves the cats, scares away strangers by their sheer size, fit in foal halters, and I can tie then at the washrack to bathe them. http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/yes.gif I loff them! They are just like having ponies.

JER
Feb. 21, 2005, 06:51 PM
I'm partial to the dreaded Australian Cattle Dog. Smart, loyal, attentive, cheerful, no dog smell, indestructible. Most don't bark much, which is good as their bark is distinctive and ear-splitting.

Another advantage of the ACD is you can't lose one. They will never leave you. You can leave home for a week and they'll sit glued to your front steps.

You will also never need an alarm clock. They keep farm hours no matter where they live and get horribly worried about you if you don't want to get up at first light. If you don't like this trait, black-out fabric for your windows does the trick.

Ishi
Feb. 21, 2005, 06:58 PM
Pit bulls. Mine come on my road work with me, they are both therapy certified, so they are well behaved at HTs with any kids (or adults who happen to act like kids LOL) and honestly more people don't know what an American Staffordshire Terrier looks like until I tell them. They are a good energy for a working farm, little hair/shedding, and all around great dogs. Quiet and clean, but bark just enough that you know there is a dog there.

Deltawave, I used to show a smooth coat collie. Just like the rough coat hairy version, only a whole lot less hair!

eventamy
Feb. 21, 2005, 06:59 PM
THe best dog I ever had around horses was my St. Bernard. He was the best! He just passed away this past November. I've been thinking about another dog, and will probably get one towards the end of spring (as an educator I get summers off and will have more time).
SimplyIdle,
Unfortunately, rescuing from the "pound" is easier said then done when you have young children. I'm finding it almost impossible to find a suitable dog, not because they're not out there, but because the local shelters, rescues etc are hesitant to adopt to families with young children. There's one near my parents' place that won't adopt out to families with children under the age of 7!!! And this is to me, a person with a M.Ed and certification in Canine Behavior and Training, years of experience in kennels, and I worked at the humane society as primary caretaker to the dogs when I first moved to NH! I'm not giving up, as I would love to give a dog a home that needs one, I'm just saying it's very discouraging! They'd rather adopt out to college students that will leave in a few months! (College town).

El
Feb. 21, 2005, 07:04 PM
My Bernese Mountain Dog is GREAT with horses, cats, kids, people. I am addicted to the breed.

holsteinersrock
Feb. 21, 2005, 07:30 PM
Australian cattle dog.

I’ve had a few dogs, but this has been the only breed that has successfully followed me on horseback on trails and cross country. "Blue", a common name for an ACD, came with me on trails for many years. She never harassed or bit my horse (or me!), she ran along, and did her job = made neighborhood dogs that tried to chase my horse back off, killed groundhogs, etc! We live in the middle of nowhere and she successfully protected me and our property, yet was the sweetest, most loving family member you could imagine and the perfect girl at horse shows, to the point that my then trainer was trying to lure her to come live with him. No success, these are one person dogs but will love the family.

She was a working girl. I could sick her on a nasty pony that at feeding time terrorised the geldings he was turned out with. She followed hand and voice signals and kept him at bay… he pawed and bucked and was furious, but she lay down and nailed him with her gaze, if he dared to approach the herd she’d cut him off. She even watched the sports channel with my boyfriend, and let his son pull her ears! We miss her.

Now I have Luke, an AKC Champion and hell on wheels, probably the smartest and most curious dog I’ve ever met (hey, I have lived with Dobermans ect!) and I have Scarlett, a sweet little puppy cattle dog (kind of) from the same local pound where Blue came from.

This breed comes with a warning label, however: Not for beginners. I had good luck with ones from the pound but you have to train these guys. Some are impounded because without human interaction and proper guidance they are outlaw cattle chases and the neighboring farmers call the animal control. They think like a dingo, bite like an alligator, and take a blow like a prize fighter (= this should appeal to eventers, or not?).

For some folks puppies work best, as if you catch them young you can train them to like cats and what not, more at www.cattledog.com (http://www.cattledog.com) if you are up for a rescue, check out http://www.petfinder.org/shelters/TN239.html , they will arrange for shipping to aproved homes.

If you want a dog that is ten times smarter than you, is the bushman’s best friend, will die for you with his/ her boots on, and is some hundred times tougher than you, think dingo. That’s the main ingredient that went into this breed, together with a myriad of sheep dogs from England and environs, dalmatian (to make them horse friendly), kelpie (another smart breed), bull dog (for bite) and others. A good history of breed is at http://www.kombinalong.com/study/index.htm

Hey, who got me started on this? ACDs rule!

PS. I had a Bernese Mountain dog when I was a kid. LOVE them, and will have one again, but they're not quite hardy enough to follow and protect you for hours and hours on trails/ cross country. A fantastic family dog, though!

www.westwiththewind.com (http://www.westwiththewind.com)

Cisco's_Mom
Feb. 21, 2005, 07:34 PM
Greyhound! They are greyt dogs! In fact, I'm waiting to adopt my first.... should have her before show season starts. Can't wait to bring her along - yippee - http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

RAyers
Feb. 21, 2005, 09:28 PM
Around here, Heelers rule! It seems there are tons of them around Area IX. So I am right there with you concertogrosso.

Reed

3dazey
Feb. 22, 2005, 04:38 AM
Any dog that is well-behaved, friendly, and stays with its mom/dad or is on a leash at shows is good for me! I love dogs, but not rummaging through my stuff, peeing & pooping in front of my stall, or whining, barking and snapping at other dogs/people.

But Corgis rule...just ask mine!!!

Fred
Feb. 22, 2005, 05:07 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by deltawave:
I've been thinking about this topic on and off, too, as my beloved retrievers age. http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/sadsmile.gif The next dog will ideally have all of these qualities:

*Not huge, but no ankle-biters
*A super watchdog for the new farm, including good at keeping varmints away
*Great with kids, including being protective and best friend material. A dog like "Lassie" who would run for help should kid get in trouble would be perfect...without all the collie HAIR. http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/lol.gif
*Not a wandering idiot who's going to disappear
*Good with chickens since I want to have a few of those on the new place
*Not horrendously hairy so it can hang out in the house, but not a wussy thing that can't hack it overnight in the barn, either.
*Good with horses but I don't care if it loves them, just so long as it's not nuts around them and has the good sense to stay away from the hard, pointed ends. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Any ideas for the ideal farm dog? It can come to events with me if it doesn't bark constantly. Oy, there is NOTHING more irritating than listening to the pitiful crying of a miserably unhappy dog left behind in the stabling area while its owner who "can't go anywhere without poochykins" is off walking the course or riding or whatever. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_mad.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

deltawave, I can certainly relate. When my wonderful Chesapeake started to really age, I didn't know how I could ever love a dog as much, or find a better farm dog.
We ended up getting a German Shepherd. What I didn't realize was that the breed was started in an attempt to create just that - the best farm dog. Protective, loyal, intelligent, good with children and other animals.. not too much hair, but enough so that you can leave them out in the pen or out in the snow and rain with you.. etc
My GSD who I have now was a retired show dog/breeding bitch, who I got after our last GSD died. This girl had never seen a cat, except at the vet's, had never seen a chicken or a horse.. and when she came here.. she just melted in - has never chased a chicken or cat (the kitties climb all over her and some (eek) try to nurse on her) - she made one woof the first time she saw a horse - and never chases, but always stays close to me, yet far enough away from the hooves....
BIG LOUD BARK only used as necessary! LOL PLUS, we have neighbours with small children, I have mares and foals- I don't worry about this dog chasing, biting (although I do def. keep an eye on her when the little children are around, just in case)
I agree with the other posters though, a good dog is a good dog, whatever the breed.
When the sad day comes that this girl passes on, I would imagine that we will get another GSD, although we still love Chesapeakes....

ps this dog loves to go with you in the truck, front or back - as soon as the farrier arrives and puts down the back of his truck, she jumps in.. and when the vet comes, she wants to jump into his truck too (maybe she wants to get away from me?? http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif)

greywitch
Feb. 22, 2005, 05:29 AM
If you want a hero like Lassie, then its hands down, collies! I have had them for years and they adapt to anything and know instinctively what you want of them.

If hair is a problem, Deltawave, get a smooth-haired Collie. Same Lassie, short hair!

south_pacific
Feb. 22, 2005, 05:38 AM
I have a Irish Wolfhound X Lab that I got from the Humane Society a year ago....I couldn't have asked for a better dog! Rescues are a great way to go!

slp2
Feb. 22, 2005, 05:43 AM
I am another one who thinks the pound rescue is the best choice!! But use "rescue" groups like the ones you can find on www.Petfinder.com (http://www.Petfinder.com). The reason is that these dogs are in "foster homes" and they know the dogs personality. Many of the traits you are looking for--you can "shop for" on that website!! You can even get purebreds through the breed rescue organizations on that website. It's sad that there are so many thousands out there looking for a home. Since my hubby and I both work all day we were able to adopt an adult that was already housetrained. Bonus!!

I have had 2 rescue dogs that have been terrific. The first was a mixed breed of the long barrel-bodied, short-legged, long haired variety! She was the sweetest dog ever. She hung out by my trailer, or stall ALL DAY quietly while I was at a show. After she passed away--we got another "rescue" dog (through Petfinder). She is a husky/lab mix (probably) and again--is everything that the foster home had promised. She is WONDERFUL with kids, horses, cats, other dogs, etc. Not barky, stays with me--just a great dog.

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content"> Unfortunately, rescuing from the "pound" is easier said then done when you have young children. I'm finding it almost impossible to find a suitable dog, not because they're not out there, but because the local shelters, rescues etc are hesitant to adopt to families with young children. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
I don't think this is standard practice--I think it may be your area that does this! Again--consult rescue organizations--I doubt they would reject a good family situation like yours just because you have young children! I know they would have let our dog go to a home with children. They usually just have certain dogs that are identified as "not good with kids". Please don't be discouraged. Again--try: www.petfinder.com (http://www.petfinder.com).

tle
Feb. 22, 2005, 06:32 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by deltawave:
*Not huge, but no ankle-biters
*A super watchdog for the new farm, including good at keeping varmints away
*Great with kids, including being protective and best friend material. A dog like "Lassie" who would run for help should kid get in trouble would be perfect...without all the collie HAIR. http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/lol.gif
*Not a wandering idiot who's going to disappear
*Good with chickens since I want to have a few of those on the new place
*Not horrendously hairy so it can hang out in the house, but not a wussy thing that can't hack it overnight in the barn, either.
*Good with horses but I don't care if it loves them, just so long as it's not nuts around them and has the good sense to stay away from the hard, pointed ends. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Hmmm... guess the hair complaints (as well as chasing varmits) leaves Newfies off the list! http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/lol.gif Reese is excellent though and I couldn't have asked for a better first dog. Those who know him know he's the sweetest boy on the planet, totally "mom's shadow" but also the worlds biggest throw rug/speed bump. I stand to talk for a couple seconds and he's laying down. No wasted energy there! newfs are wonderful if you don't mind the hair (my vacuum is having objections at this very moment! Ugh)

maplebrook
Feb. 22, 2005, 07:19 AM
I have a rottweiler who I think is the most perfect dog I've ever known. She is incredibly smart, loves all people, and is protective of children. And I've never met a dog who has such a command of language.
My dog has had limited exposure to barns and horsers, but handles it with ease. She stays out of the way but never wanders.
While rotts aren't for everyone, I wouldn't hesitate to get another. I'm hooked!

Perfect Pony
Feb. 22, 2005, 07:23 AM
Well I just got my second JRT. But I don't think that is the kind of dog you want.

Since you are looking for medium sized dogs, I would think something like a Lab, Queensland Heeler (or Blue Heeler or Austrailian Cattle Dog) or a German Shepherd would all do nicely.

saratoga
Feb. 22, 2005, 07:31 AM
Pound puppies all the way! Horse people with "trendy" dogs like JRTs and corgis bother me. (sorry!)

displacedyank
Feb. 22, 2005, 07:42 AM
I can tell you what dog is NOT an eventer's dog...the english bulldog. Had one and poor thing, couldn't take the cold, couldn't take the heat, couldn't jump up into the truck, got rolled twice by two horses (and still didn't learn). But I still LOFFED him dearly until he passed away last summer of a heat stroke. http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/sadsmile.gif But I wouldn't get another one....just not farm dogs. http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/no.gif

deltawave
Feb. 22, 2005, 08:30 AM
...and speaking of UNsuitable farm/eventing dogs, I wouldn't want one of my Siberians (we used to breed and race them) as a farm dog, LOL! Lovely dogs, good souls, but when given the chance they would head for the hills and more often than not come back (or more likely be captured) with some sort of dead animal in their mouths or stomachs. http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/dead.gif Chickens, cats, rabbits, even a poodle on one unhappy occasion. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif My own Loki thought taking on a young bull was also a good idea, but thankfully the bull was sleepy and slow to get mad. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif Of course they can be trained, but ours were kind of feral sled dogs and not house pets. Still, they are big-time wanderers and not above thinking of smaller (and even BIGGER) critters as snacks. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

slp2
Feb. 22, 2005, 08:47 AM
True enough DW! But cross them with something (mix up those genes!!) and you can get a great, well-behaved dog. Sorry--but I'm partial because our current dog is half-husky. And sooooo cute too! But we don't know what else she is. Yellow lab? Maybe that's the half that makes her so good!!

Robby Johnson
Feb. 22, 2005, 08:49 AM
Firstly, I have never met a dog that wouldn't chase a chicken at some point or other, so I'd mark that off your list of criteria. I don't know why you'd want a damned yard buzzard to begin with as I find them vile and unpredictable, but I'd never hold a dog to the "no chickens" rule because eventually you will be disappointed.

ACD's? Good for one. Not great for others. The one at Rhodey's barn has worked her way into my heart and I agree with JER, but they're herders by nature, like to nip ankles to herd, and love to her horses even more. Shock collars are a must.

Also support the Aussie where your other criteria are concerned. Most are lovely dogs.

I have Jack Russells, but I also don't really think mine are dogs.

Robby

AngelEventer
Feb. 22, 2005, 09:02 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by deltawave:
I've been thinking about this topic on and off, too, as my beloved retrievers age. http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/sadsmile.gif The next dog will ideally have all of these qualities:

*Not huge, but no ankle-biters
*A super watchdog for the new farm, including good at keeping varmints away
*Great with kids, including being protective and best friend material. A dog like "Lassie" who would run for help should kid get in trouble would be perfect...without all the collie HAIR. http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/lol.gif
*Not a wandering idiot who's going to disappear
*Good with chickens since I want to have a few of those on the new place
*Not horrendously hairy so it can hang out in the house, but not a wussy thing that can't hack it overnight in the barn, either.
*Good with horses but I don't care if it loves them, just so long as it's not nuts around them and has the good sense to stay away from the hard, pointed ends. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Any ideas for the ideal farm dog? It can come to events with me if it doesn't bark constantly. Oy, there is NOTHING more irritating than listening to the pitiful crying of a miserably unhappy dog left behind in the stabling area while its owner who "can't go anywhere without poochykins" is off walking the course or riding or whatever. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_mad.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Sounds like my puppy EXACTLY!!! He's GREAT! he's a Beagle, Pointer cross - and is WONDERFUL. He's high energy, but he'll mellow out if you tell him. He's been GREAT at shows, just lies down and sleeps - makes no noise. We DO have chickens - that's his downfall.... he likes to chase them.... He LOVES kids - and won't jump on them (I think he likes that they are his size). He weighs just over 30 lbs and is a medium - large dog (in sizing.... other than that, he's medium, and wears a size 24" blanket...) He stays at my side - and won't run off - he also LOVES walking the XC course! Here are some pics.... http://community.webshots.com/album/226680376zRbleB

OH! and he is the PERFECT size for traveling!!! I got him from the pound for my 16th birthday - the best BDay present ever!! (unless Mom would give Angel to me....)

3dayQ
Feb. 22, 2005, 09:05 AM
My vote is for a mutt. I've had lots of dogs and mutts ALWAYS boil down to being the best. There are no expectations, you didnt spend lots of money, and they're forever just "happy to be here." Plus, you'd be doing a very good deed http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Dale Area 1
Feb. 22, 2005, 09:42 AM
Unless I got extremely lucky, my Aussie Shepard is the best (speaking like a proud mom LOL).

His breeding is from a strong working line from Texas, but he only showed some hearding traits during puppyhood. We worked on this with training, never herds a thing. He is great agility dog also.

I always had mutts from the rescue in the past, "wilson" is the first dog I ever paid money for.

The border collie I just rescued last year has some issues. He is a very sweet dog, someone kick the s*** out of him, broken hip, ribs. But he is so friendly. He is a chaser, herder. Working with him in training, but as my trainer stated, he has a lot of baggage, from his previous life. I think they just tied him up outside all day. My Aussie has been wonderful with him, keeps him happy playing, gives him all the toys, his bed, etc.

Some thing about an Aussie, they seem to understand everything.

Elliot
Feb. 22, 2005, 10:03 AM
Another vote for the pitbull here! Ours is probably a cross, rescued from the local animal shelter and wonderful. Short beautiful coat, loves to go out riding, very obedient and just the right amount of protective. This breed has definitely gotten a bad rap, but I couldn't ask for a nicer dog. And I always feel safer when I'm wandering around at night on our farm in the middle of nowhere and I have her by my side!

glfprncs
Feb. 22, 2005, 10:09 AM
I have a pound puppy, probably a lab./pitbull/shepherd cross. He went to his first horse trial @ Pine Top this past weekend, and he had a BALL. He never realized rolling in cow poo could be so fun. Plus, horse manure has a distinct flavor. In addition, there were holes to shove your head in, other dogs to greet, and a cross country course to walk. I think he shows great promise as an event dog.

IFG
Feb. 22, 2005, 10:12 AM
Don't laugh--Standard Poodle. From the rescue of course. We shave him naked once a month, he never seems to get cold--even playing out in the cold. DOESN'T SHED! I use the horse clippers on him with a number 7 blade.

Great around the horses, very smart, once he settled in very obedient. Seems to think that he's a JRT as he goes after rodents like there's no tomorrrow.

Long Shadow Farm
Feb. 22, 2005, 10:21 AM
I love my lab. She is great now that she is getting past that puppy stage. The horses don't seem to mind her and she is always up for a ride in the truck or a hack down the road. I did a lot of obedience and retriever training on her, so she has a great off-leash heel and knows that here means get here now and no questions asked. My Sheltie is also great but he is kinda a timid soul. But loves people and to travel.

Mom and Dad have a great JRT. She was bred by my aunt who is super picky about the JRTs she raises. Bailey is not hyper at all and easy to be around.

BarbB
Feb. 22, 2005, 10:33 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by RAyers:
Around here, Heelers rule! It seems there are tons of them around Area IX. So I am right there with you concertogrosso.

Reed </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Heelers rule in your truck!
Picking on quiet, well behaved whippets.....the PERFECT eventers dog. http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/lol.gif

3girls
Feb. 22, 2005, 10:45 AM
IFG - I second the Standard Poodle. They are great dogs, good tempered, smart as whips. Now I am biased, because we raise and show them, but my two oldest who just died last year at age 13 and 14 respectively, were great with our daughters when they were babies and little toddlers. My female even let our daughters pull on her to help them stand up when learning to walk. I used to take her to the barn where we boarded and I taught and she would just hang out with me, not getting in the way of little kids on horses, etc.

Now that our horses are at home, they come to the barn with me every morning just to help feed the horses. And when we ride, they hang around the general area, without bugging the horses or running off.

DW, the other plus is we have had chickens in the past and the Standards would never hurt them. My chickens would free range and could walk around with the dogs. I would go for a girl over a boy, though, because my male would give chase to some roosters (wouldn't touch the hens - go figure). http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

IFG
Feb. 22, 2005, 11:21 AM
Our Standard is a male. He came from the rescue at age 6, and I think that he had led a sheltered life, so he does chase cats. I think that he is just one good scratch away from learning that this is not acceptable.

He really is wonderful. Sleeps in the house, but is all bounce once he gets outside. I read somewhere that poodles bounce, and it is true. They just take great joy in life.

olympicprincess
Feb. 22, 2005, 12:12 PM
For those of you looking for a rescue but have young children; check out breed rescue groups.

For instance, I know the Lab rescue group will adopt out to families with children.

Usually MANY young Labs end up there because the people didn't realize how high-energy (& immature until age 3+) Labs are, but they were just great with the family's children. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

rebeginner
Feb. 22, 2005, 12:43 PM
Dobermans!! Medium-sized (don't go for the SuperSized ones that people got into breeding), little or no shedding (and no grooming other than the occasion bath/nail clip), loyal, and were developed specifically to be watch dogs. They won't herd people or horses (or chickens) but all mine have loved both. No loose lips (I'm not crazy about flying spit (I get enough from the horse, thankyouverymuch)) The dobies with natural ears will fool people into thinking that they're hounds of some sort.

purplepants
Feb. 22, 2005, 03:24 PM
DW! You know I have plenty of suggestions where dogs come in and just happen to know plenty right now that meet your description and are dying for homes. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif Seriously though rescues are the way to go, especially ones that temperment test and have their dogs in foster homes. I am actually helping Renee find one for her family right now. The herding breeds tend to be nippier and can get into trouble where that goes so they do make me nervous around smaller animals. So although you can have a few breed ideas in your head the best thing is just to evaluate the individual dog and take the foster parents suggestions since they know the dog best.

JER
Feb. 22, 2005, 04:30 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">ACD's? Good for one. Not great for others. The one at Rhodey's barn has worked her way into my heart and I agree with JER, but they're herders by nature, like to nip ankles to herd, and love to her horses even more. Shock collars are a must.
</div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Actually, ACDs/heelers are not herders, they're drovers. They'll drive cattle right through a fence.

My ACD does not nip ankles although some do, usually due to lack of proper guidance. ACDs have other curious behaviors which seem to be quite hard-wired. They greet you by taking your hand in their mouth (no, they don't bite or intend to, it's a gentle greeting). They charge running water, like when you turn the shower or dishwasher on. More than anything else, they don't like closed doors. You'll often hear a new heeler owner saying "We're getting used to not closing doors behind us."

What cattle dogs like are rules. They love simple, clear, unequivocal rules and will appoint themselves as chief enforcer. Don't want dogs in the feed room? Just tell your heeler. Don't want cats on the furniture? The heeler will alert you immediately to all infractions. You will very quickly learn to recognize when your heeler has come to tell you that someone is violating house rules.

Never tried the shock collars. Mine is 12 now and they didn't have the modern versions when she was a pup. I might have been tempted -- she was quite a handful, despite being on three legs much of the time (hit by car).

Also, female ACDs are often much smaller than males. Females run between 30-40 lbs; I've seen males up to 90 lbs.

Incitatus
Feb. 22, 2005, 04:40 PM
Nobody else for Maltese? C'mon Ishi, you know you love Charlie-dog!
My elderly rescue Maltese is far from froo-froo. Tough as nails and cute too! He can run all day, and we keep his long hair tastefully cut. He absolutely loves being a yard dog and his work ( http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif) has given him a new lease of life!

sophie
Feb. 23, 2005, 08:43 AM
Another vote for the Standard poodle!
Mine is a 5 yo female that I got when she was 4 months. She's the best dog I've had so far. Great with my kids, so easy to train I never thought I was actually "training" her...
She hangs with me when I take her to the barn, will stay by the ring when I ride, ignores the horses (or flatly runs away from them LOL) will follow on trail rides, will stop dead, whatever she may be doing (even when chasing a squirrel) with only a sharp "STOP".
I keep thinking, if I really HAD taken the time to train her, what a dog she'd be now. LOL.

You're right, these dogs bounce. LOL. Heck, I could take her on hunter paces, she'd jump all the fences behind us!

Robby Johnson
Feb. 23, 2005, 08:48 AM
Our ACD is much like what you describe, particularly with the running water. She really has grown on me, but she will chew the leg off of anyone strange and they just seem to have a suspicious look on their face all of the time.

Robby

airbornegirl
Feb. 23, 2005, 09:08 AM
Well I have my Doberman, Min-PIn, and Weimaraner accompany me to my shows! My Dobey is a seasoned show goer and the Weim puppy is learning, but the Min-Pin is a different story, she thinks she is just as important as all the people showing and riding and just doesn't understand the concept of relax, or sleep! She is just all over the place! With the exception of the little ones extremely outgoing attitude, they are all great show companions!

Karosel
Feb. 23, 2005, 10:55 AM
I have cattle dogs too. And a min pin, but he is an indoor dog.

I like boxers too. Does anyone have any experience with them being good farm dogs? I dont think they have a thick enough coat, so they may not be able to take the cold Canadian winters.

3girls
Feb. 23, 2005, 11:19 AM
Karosel

I just had to place a 6 month old Boxer puppy due to allergies (that's why I have always had Standard Poodles in the past, but thought I out grew the allergies http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif) Anyway, she is a smart dog, rather obedient when on walks or in the house, but we have our horses at home and she thought their tails were the greatest thing to chase, especially when Mom was on top of the big horse YIKES. Also, she LOVED going in the paddock and wanted to play with the horses, especially when they were down rolling in the sand! or would munch on their manure http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/lol.gif Anyway, we live in Michigan where the winters can get pretty cold and she didn't have a problem with the cold at all. We put dog blankets on her, and our other dogs, which she promptly removed!

Emstah
Feb. 23, 2005, 11:56 AM
AngelEventer- My friends have a Beagle/Pointer mix too! She is colored much differently from your puppy, but sounds like she has the exact same temperment. I have been trying to steal her from these stupid college kids for over a year now! Here (http://community.webshots.com/photo/188112101/280980337QtqPqK) she is http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

holsteinersrock
Feb. 23, 2005, 01:01 PM
Whippets for eventers? The post made me smile, as a few weeks ago our neighbor called (she's hunter rider). She was missing her whippet and wondered if we had seen him. She was worried because it was cold and he left the house without his coat, and "he was too stupid to find his way home" (HER exact words, not mine!!!).

Now I would never knock any breed, especially one as exquisite as the whippet, we love them all!!! Perhaps this particular one was, hmm.. confused?

For example we had a three-legged chihuahua called Tripod. We could write a book about his antics. He certainly pulled his 9 pound weight many times, in terms of entertainment. But the only eventing he ever did was in the living room, watching Mark Todd videos in my lap.

Back to the ACDs (heelers): they are not for everybody! If you are not inclined to train one, do not get one. If left without supervision they will make their own rules and they’re clever enough to find all kinds of ways to entertain themselves, most of which will be (an unpleasant) surprise to you.

As for shock collars, if I put one on my red male ACD he will give me a dirty look and go lie down in the tack room. After two tries he’s too smart to fall for it. He knows better than herd horses without being told to do so.

However, the ability comes in handy: it was pouring rain and I was showing a colt to a potential buyer. The colt and filly decided not to move from a far corner. After slipping in the sacred soil of Virginia (red clay here!) for 15 minutes without any success to make them trot I called the dogs. Immediately they had the subjects cantering and trotting, until called off. (Don’t try this unless you have an "off" button. Our dogs have done basic obedience!)

So, here I have wasted another perfectly good hour reading the Chronicle forum! It’s a glorious day outside and I should be riding our bay stallion (the grey is in Florida with David O’Connor).

www.westwiththewind.com (http://www.westwiththewind.com)

ohioeventer
Feb. 23, 2005, 02:54 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by greywitch:
If you want a hero like Lassie, then its hands down, collies! I have had them for years and they adapt to anything and know instinctively what you want of them.

If hair is a problem, Deltawave, get a smooth-haired Collie. Same Lassie, short hair! </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I have two collie rescues, one smooth and one rough. They are great because they love kids, don't bark, and (because they are herders) stay close. The plus, they herd by droving not nipping. I would recommend these guys to anyone, and there are plenty of breed rescues too.

fourhorses
Feb. 23, 2005, 03:01 PM
Dobies rule!
I have had 3 Dobies in my life, one of which still graces my sofa, bed, recliner chair most of the day -- 2 from rescue, and do I dearly love the breed -- distinguished, calm, loving, good watchdog, oh-so sweet, I could go on forever -- and you can accessorize them in the same blankets as your horse http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif. But I would also have to say that they're not for folks who'll let them go untrained or should be bought from rotten unethical breeders.
And a good dog is a good dog -- we have or have had: Dalmatians, ACDs, JRTs and Rat Terriers (practically the same thing if you ask me), Brittanys, Bassets, Goldens, Heinz 57s, Airedales, Huskies, and another fav of mine -- German Shepherds (again, well bred, well trained must be part of the qualification just as the Dobies, but man what a dog you get for a little commitment!) We've loved them all, and they were all pretty good dogs (although the Husky DID like to ehm, explore the county at all possible opportunity, and the JRTs/Ratties are naughty little rascals, and I'm sorry but our ACD stank like a skunk most of the time!) they were all different, but so endearing with their quirks and they all were pretty decent (as dogs go) at the barn -- and all but a few were obtained from rescue, which I really endorse.
My husband wants a Greater Swiss Mountain Dog -- but I want to look into a Greyhound.
One other thing I really don't like to just turn my dogs loose at the barn (unless I know that my kids and I are going to be the only ones out there) and especially not at a public horse gathering (clinic, event, show, etc.)-- it's asking for something/one to get hurt, and out in public it's just plain rude -- we don't take our horses and turn them loose at dog shows do we?

BarbB
Feb. 23, 2005, 03:02 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by concertogrosso:
Whippets for eventers? The post made me smile, as a few weeks ago our neighbor called (she's hunter rider). She was missing her whippet and wondered if we had seen him. She was worried because it was cold and he left the house without his coat, and "he was too stupid to find his way home" (HER exact words, not mine!!!).

] </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

well, they ARE hounds.... http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif
I have German Shepherds (the most awesome 4-legged critters ever hatched), Afghan Hounds and one Whippet. The whippet is my barn dog.
If you have never lived with a sighthound, the experience can be......hmmmm.......different.
But way back whippets were crossed with terriers, which doesn't make them any more trainable than a terrier (which varies widely), but it does make them slightly less likely to take off for the horizon at the drop of a hat.
http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/lol.gif

RAyers
Feb. 23, 2005, 03:29 PM
Now Barb, just because your dog stretched out into my dog's half of HIS truck...

My ACD, Max, is the best horse show dog I have ever had. Well behaved and enjoys the road. More people greet me with "Where's Max?" than "Hello." I love my ACD. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Reed

WNT
Feb. 23, 2005, 03:32 PM
I wouldn't trade our Cocker Spaniel for the world. He doesn't go out to the barn much, since I respect my BO's wishes to keep dogs at home. He's been around horses, though, and is very respectful. He did give Hoot a kiss on the nose once (safely ensconced in my dad's arms). Ususally, if he goes to the barn, it's for a short time on a cool day and he sleeps on the horse blankets in my truck.

Honestly Riding
Feb. 23, 2005, 03:41 PM
Vote #4 for the DOBERMAN. FANTASTIC DOGS!!! http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/yes.gifHIGHLY intelligent too!!! http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/yes.gif....even my equine vet now has one! http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/yes.gif

tecumsea
Feb. 23, 2005, 03:47 PM
I have to vote for the whippet. I have one and since he has grown up only in a barn he is great. Now I do have to watch him for he will go for the chase verey now and then. Okay every day, but the cat always seems to find the loft. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

Demi
Feb. 23, 2005, 04:06 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Karosel:

I like boxers too. Does anyone have any experience with them being good farm dogs? I dont think they have a thick enough coat, so they may not be able to take the cold Canadian winters. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Boxers are awesome dogs, but DEFINITELY are not a good option for barn dogs. I have 2 of my own and did volunteer work with a local boxer rescue, and from that experience I can tell you that it probably won’t work.

I used to bring mine up to the barn, but eventually stopped. They don’t like the cold, hate the rain, and don’t do too well in the heat. They’re also too friendly; they get into all sorts of trouble just trying to be friendly with the horses, and can sometimes frighten people at the barn who don’t know them and assume that they’re insane pitbulls. Neither of mine have an ounce of horse sense. The last time I took my boy up to the barn I found him standing right behind a horse, chewing on his tail.

Boxers are really loving goofs, wouldn’t hurt a fly. They make awesome family pets, and are just the best friends you could ask for. Personality plus! The only thing you need to be aware of is that they can be really stubborn and really smart. Because they’re can be big and strong too, you really need to be ready to put some time into training properly.

Karosel: If you're ever seriously considering getting a boxer, get in touch with Boxer Rescue Canada. I got my girl from them and did volunteer work with them, they're awesome.

AngelEventer
Feb. 23, 2005, 04:16 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Honestly Riding:
Vote #4 for the DOBERMAN. FANTASTIC DOGS!!! http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/yes.gifHIGHLY intelligent too!!! http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/yes.gif....even my equine vet now has one! http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/yes.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I loved my dobie - he was SOOO kind, an absolute gem... he would do anything, and listened well... Unfortunately he died just before thanksgiving due to Kidney failure as a result of lyme disease... poor boy! It was so sad... but he was a great dog (although he did have a bit of an odor problem....)

eventer_mi
Feb. 23, 2005, 04:26 PM
Shelties. Looks like Lassie,but half the size. And, contrary to popular belief, they don't constantly shed hair. If you brush them once a week (more during shedding season), you pull out the fluff that sticks to your carpets. They don't seem to shed the long guard hairs at all.

They're incredibly intelligent, loyal, active dogs (great on course walks!), but they're also content to snuggle. They're also so gosh-darned cute - everybody makes comments about them when I take them to shows. I think that horses are a bit big to be considered "fair game" for herding - they're more suited to herding ducks, small children, goats, etc - NOT horses. My two aren't interested in herding the ponies at all. Plus, they're BRED to stay by your side and check in with you - I can walk my two off-leash just about anywhere. Great dogs.

Gry2Yng
Feb. 23, 2005, 04:40 PM
I think this is vote #3 for the pitbull.

Short hair, easy to train. 40ish pounds. Smart as a whip. Bess (18 month old female rescue) goes to every show with me. I can put her in the back of my Tahoe, with the tailgate open and she will sit there ALL DAY in the shade with her bowl of water and watch me walk back and forth to the ring. She loves to run to the trailer and "Go get dinner for the boys."

She is a great farm dog and runs out with the guys all day to bring horses in and out. She probably runs 10 miles every day. She loves cats and wishes they would play more. She goes out on hacks and knows that she cannot go in the sand rings. She loves all other dogs and can't wait to get to the shows to see what new friends she can make.

I am with Robby on the chickens.

I had a Huskie for 14 years and it broke my heart when he died, but you could never let that son of a gun off the leash. He would be gone for days! And talk about selectively hard of hearing. I have seen many nice mixes, but the purebreeds might as well be cats.

deltawave
Feb. 23, 2005, 04:42 PM
LOL, I must be the only person in the world whose dog is as dumb as a ROCK. http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/lol.gif My golden, bless his dopey heart, is a lovable goof at age 12. He's clever enough when it's something near and dear to him (there was a time when he knew all of his toys by name) but either he's now getting demented, the fact that he's getting deaf makes a difference, or--well, he's a big DOPE. Forgets his ball outside then wakes me up at 2am frantic because he "needs it".
(very much like a preschooler, in fact) http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/lol.gif

Anyway, I'd have to give him an "average" on the "intelligence" score, but I love him no less for it! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif My lab is far more clever than the dopey golden, but she's scared of horses.

hee hee, I love chickens! This Jersey girl was definitely raised in the wrong part of the country! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif Fresh eggs, cheap poop-scattering, bug-eating labor, a friendly (if often slightly hysterical) greeting every morning, and always a good laugh because they are the ULTIMATE drama queens! http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/lol.gif

greywitch
Feb. 23, 2005, 05:21 PM
Go OhioEventer! Nothing like Collies!

Karosel
Feb. 23, 2005, 06:13 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Demi:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Karosel:

I like boxers too. Does anyone have any experience with them being good farm dogs? I dont think they have a thick enough coat, so they may not be able to take the cold Canadian winters. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Boxers are awesome dogs, but DEFINITELY are not a good option for barn dogs. I have 2 of my own and did volunteer work with a local boxer rescue, and from that experience I can tell you that it probably won’t work.

I used to bring mine up to the barn, but eventually stopped. They don’t like the cold, hate the rain, and don’t do too well in the heat. They’re also too friendly; they get into all sorts of trouble just trying to be friendly with the horses, and can sometimes frighten people at the barn who don’t know them and assume that they’re insane pitbulls. Neither of mine have an ounce of horse sense. The last time I took my boy up to the barn I found him standing right behind a horse, chewing on his tail.

Boxers are really loving goofs, wouldn’t hurt a fly. They make awesome family pets, and are just the best friends you could ask for. Personality plus! The only thing you need to be aware of is that they can be really stubborn and really smart. Because they’re can be big and strong too, you really need to be ready to put some time into training properly.

Karosel: If you're ever seriously considering getting a boxer, get in touch with Boxer Rescue Canada. I got my girl from them and did volunteer work with them, they're awesome. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I am familar with boxers as my brother has one; absolutely gorgeous fawn with 4 white paws a thin strip on her face and a white chest. Lola is the sweetest thing. It seems like she has springs on her feet because she doesn't walk/run- she bounces around!

I just wasnt sure how they were around horses. Lola has been around my horses, and she didnt chase them (although they chased her!), but I wasnt sure if that was just her or the breed in general.

holsteinersrock
Feb. 23, 2005, 07:02 PM
Who has the cocker? My red heeler would like to have her phone number.

Seriously, I took Luke (subject ACD) to agility class, and it did not go great 'cause he had a major crush on a white and chocolate brown cockerspaniel in the same class. He did all the obstacles right off the bat including the tunnel and swinging bridge (done it once, there was nothing there, so what's the deal?) but his heart was not in it as he was figuring out ways to get to the cocker (= he had to do the final course on leash).

My boyfriend had a ball. Every time I looked up to the spectator stand the crowd around him was getting bigger and bigger b/c of the jokes he was cracking at our expense. He decided to call Luke "Ed", for "special ed".

What can I say. Too much testosterone in my life!

www.westwiththewind.com (http://www.westwiththewind.com)

NRB
Feb. 23, 2005, 10:30 PM
Have always had Aussies shepards around horses and lots of chickens (And guinnie hens, pheasants, peacocks) Never seen my Aussie, my mom's Aussie's (4) or my Aunts Aussies (4) chase a chicken. They do require work and obedience training. Thye do shed.

Have also seen neighboor standard poodles around horses and on the trail w/ their owner adn have been very impressed w/ the intellegence and trainability of the breed.

Rockin'
Feb. 24, 2005, 03:00 AM
Have a whole gang of corgis,brought several of them from the USA to NZ with me.I have over 50 acres for them to run on.They love to chase the rabbits and the Pukekos but leave all the goats ,sheep,cattle,horses,chickens and cats(they definately rule http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/lol.gif)alone.The only one who makes an attempt at being a "herding" dog is Gwenyth but her method is a little unorthodox to say the least.She thinks if she runs in front of the sheep,goats,or cattle and entices them into chasing her that is herding.... http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/no.gif.
Heather and Sheena are the hunters and try to catch all the mice,rats,possums and rabbits,do a pretty good job too.And on a hot day love to jump in the creek for a swim.When I lived near the beach in NC and Delaware they loved to go to the beach to chase waves and take a dip...!! Trevor my male dog is a big woose,most embarrassing moment was at the HT at Tryon when walking the cross-country course at the water complex he ran out of dry stones to step on halfway across and refused to budge...might get his widdle white paws wet.. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gifso had to go back and carry him across...!!!
They did enjoy doing the X/C at Rolex and chasing the squirrels but the HT's here won't allow dogs so life for them here off the farm is not as dog-friendly as back in the USA.

Cody
Feb. 24, 2005, 04:51 AM
I am now a ACD (Australian Cattle Dog) convert. I've had Australian Shepherds and I do love them, I met an ACD and was instantly impressed. So a very good breeder knew me and has given me one of her puppies. I was reluctant, mostly cos' I work during the day and Rocking Horse's show season is in full swing....but this pup has been GREAT! Yep for lack of a better name his is Blue. So for me, it will be a cattle dog from now on. But I could never have had such a good dog without this breeder "picking" mine out. I now know when she calls and say's she has a puppy for me, to RUN to go get it.

Anyone at RH III this weekend, he'll be there.

holsteinersrock
Feb. 24, 2005, 12:50 PM
Hi Cody "Blue"'s owner, I'd love to meet you and Blue at Rocking Horse, however I have a mare to foal out, but look for our grey Holsteiner stallion Cicera's Icewater with Team O'Connor... he's scheduled to show at Rocking Horse 25-27th Feb and so far I haven't heard that he's not going.

Icewater knows blue and red heelers, the few times he's actually been at our farm, ever since he was 2 yrs old (he was born 1998 and imported as an eary 2 yr old), he has been in close contact with cattle dogs, who sometimes shared his grain (well, they did not ask him if it was OK) out of a tub in the stallion paddock!

www.westwiththewind.com (http://www.westwiththewind.com)

Perfect Pony
Feb. 24, 2005, 01:39 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Gry2Yng:
I think this is vote #3 for the pitbull.

Short hair, easy to train. 40ish pounds. Smart as a whip. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

How funny. My Pit Bull is 100lbs, wont listen to a thing, is as dumb as a 2x4, and you can't take him anywhere unless you have 2 men to control him (not mean, but just the biggest, dumbest, most PITA dog on the planet....)

WNT
Feb. 24, 2005, 01:39 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by concertogrosso:
Who has the cocker? My red heeler would like to have her phone number. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I don't think Monty would appreciate the affection too much! One, he like boys, but not that way http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif and two, he thinks he's a little spoiled rotten boy (well, he's spoiled rotten anyway). http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/winkgrin.gif

Wizard_of_Oz
Feb. 25, 2005, 06:56 PM
my favorite is a border collie

we adopted ours in november and she is doing great with the horses, she went to obidience class and i can give her voice commands while i'm riding and she has endless galloping energy and is a good traveller(just need to give her 5 minutes with my holing my pony to get the horse respect thing)

dannysgirl
Feb. 26, 2005, 06:41 PM
Berenese Mountain Dogs! I have two and absolutely love them. The male hangs out in the barn and attempts to eat hay. :http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/sigh.gif: I can bring the female anywhere- she's like a baby. Also have a jack but she's another story entirely... http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

Macnas
Feb. 26, 2005, 07:01 PM
NO one has foxhounds, really?

I love my hounds so much - I have a foxhound that I found in Central Park when I lived in NYC, who loves farm life as if he were born on one, and a beagle who I have taken from farm to apartment to house to NYC and back to farm and she's never blinked an eye. The first day I walked her over to the park she was trembling from the noise of the buses and the subway under the street. Then she heard the familiar clopping of a carriage horse jogging down the street and perked right up. They both love kids and horses, but they will EAT chickens...

FloridaEventer
Feb. 27, 2005, 12:49 PM
OK, I have the fru-fru dog here. A cute, little Lhasa Apso, that I keep trimmed short.
He loves the outdoors, and being a little guy of about 13 lbs, he is an eventer at heart. He'll go all day walking the XC courses, down banks, drops into the water jumps.
He'll lick you to death though.
Who ever started the Jack Russel thing, ugh.
Lhasas rule!

Ishi
Feb. 27, 2005, 02:02 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by displacedyank:
I can tell you what dog is NOT an eventer's dog...the english bulldog </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I have one too, she was my show dog, finished her, spayed her and now do some agility with her. I'm not kidding. I also didn't say she was fast http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif Mine is a geat Eventing dog, but you are so right, they are heat/cold intolerant and people love to feed her stuff that makes her already gassey self just that much worse http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/dead.gif

LOL Buzz, your maltese and another one I know are kick butt dogs! Now, aren't you glad I suggested that breed to ya http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif I love Charlie Dog, he rocks, even if you do dress him up on occaission!

ponygrl
Feb. 27, 2005, 03:13 PM
we have corgis.

Can't complain about them but some have a reputation for being "yappy". not a problem with ours but I guess something you need to nip inthe bud before it starts.

Finnegan
Feb. 27, 2005, 09:13 PM
I'm a boxer person. We have 2 and another person at our farm has 2 and they get on at the farm well. Excellent with people, they do not bark, they do not harrass other farm animals (mine are obedience trained though), quick moving to get out of under hooves, all the ones I've seen are wise with the horses (allow the horse to say hello on his terms but is prepared to leave post haste if necessary). Mind you, again, mine are obedience trained. I've never had a problem with boxers and cold (even when we had them in England), but boxers and heat - now that can cause a problem. The do get heat exhaustion at high temps & lots of activity. The whole "German" thing, they do fare much better in cold weather in my experience. On a hike one summer we ended up carrying Angus back as he was getting heat exhausted where my cocker with a full coat was totally fine.

They are great for people who can't excercise their dogs a lot too. They LOVE to blob as much as they love to run big spastic circles around the yard. 5 minutes of spaz time and they are happy to come back in and blob out with you.

I would suggest obedience training any boxer before they become 70lbs of pure muscle. I've never had a problem with stubborness with either of ours, but we started at 12 weeks old. I could not even imagine them without the training - big bouncing balls of spastic energy running amuck.

~Bev

Row Wisco, Row!
Feb. 28, 2005, 07:28 AM
I would also suggest Corgis or a Boxer/Boxer-X

Our Corgis have excellent manners and sense--in the house, in the barn, and at shows. They are delightful and I truly think that if mine (Fergus and Mollie) could wear that big multi-coloured afro clown hair and a big red Bozo the clown nose, they would. They're just that goofy and have awesome personalitiies. I absolutely adore them. They love to be outside in the dead of winter, which worries me, but they're well equipped. The only time I really worry about them is on the absolute hottest days of the summer. Usually for about 2 weeks in the middle of the summer either they stay home when I travel, or I get really creative about finding cool shelter for them. They are ridiculous couch potatoes most of the time (they'd sleep 26 hours a day if they could), but will also play for about 20 minutes and then just pass out again. They're game for anything. The breed can be yappy and chase things, or you can whip that, bad--but innate, habit before it ever starts. I couldn't ask for 2 better companions.

I've also had great experiences with Boxers. As previously mentioned, they're just delightful, a great companion gushing with affection, hearty, a good family dog, and equally happy running around hell bent for leather or staying in bed all day long. They're loyal, almost to a fault, but also open to the idea of meeting new people. Every Boxer I've known was extremely well behaved around the horses. And once you have one stand over you with its little butt wiggling and it its little tail wagging with a big, loving smile on its face, you'll never turn back.

I also don't think you'll find a dog that is a guaranteed 100% non-chicken-chaser. It's a pleasant notion, but it just can't hold all the time.

roundbale
Feb. 28, 2005, 07:44 AM
Deltawave....OK I confess I haven't made it through 5 pages but what you describe is a Standard Poodle to a T. Fabulous dogs, no shedding, protective without being dangerous, very athletic, will go after those dreadful gophers, great house dogs, funny and charming, but happily independent. Poodles are not neurotically in need of a job like so many of the herding types - no offense to the border collie lovers out there but if you have a job that you can't take your dog to.....herding breeds may not suit you.
There is a standard Poodle rescue on the web, but standards rarely need homes as most owners will move heaven and earth to get their beloved poodle back.....

Gry2Yng
Feb. 28, 2005, 04:11 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Perfect Pony:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Gry2Yng:
I think this is vote #3 for the pitbull.

Short hair, easy to train. 40ish pounds. Smart as a whip. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

How funny. My Pit Bull is 100lbs, wont listen to a thing, is as dumb as a 2x4, and you can't take him anywhere unless you have 2 men to control him (not mean, but just the biggest, dumbest, most PITA dog on the planet....) </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
OMG! You made me laugh out loud! I am fostering an 8 week old male until the Rescue organization finds him a perm home. He seems to be very smart and also of the very laid back temperment. I have no idea how big he will get.

Robby Johnson
Feb. 28, 2005, 04:23 PM
OK, let me just say this ... everyone gather 'round and pull up a chair ... it's going to be an Alabama story. Y'all comfortable? Everybody got some tea? OK, let's begin ...

Picture it, Mobile, 1982. My father - the king of the hoopty deal - takes my baby brother Travis and me to his friend Jip's (or something like that ... my dad has worked in the shipyard for years so he has friends named things like Shorty and Naples and stuff like that) in Prichard. Prichard is to Mobile what Compton is to Los Angeles.

Our goal that day was to pick out a puppy.

From, quite literally, the pit.

We picked a black male puppy and when he was ready, my dad brought him home one night and he was waiting for us Saturday morning. In fact, we went in the living room to watch cartoons and this little black thing made an ankle dive at me, prompting me to shriek like a little girl as I thought it was a big rat.

It was, of course, the dog who would become Major. I named him that after the big black horse in the book "A Horse Called Mr. Ragman."

Major was THE BEST pit bull alive. He was about 85-90 pounds of dense, foreboding black. He was as sweet as he could be, though he was intimidating enough to ward off "bad spirits."

He wasn't so much a chicken killer as he was a kitten killer. But only when they got too close to his food, and really only because his massive jaws were so strong that his quick shake of their necks snapped them like pretzels.

Harsh, I know. I love cats too. Needless to say, we had many cat funerals.

Major lived for about twelve years and we were all sad to see him go. In Alabama, our dogs were outside farm dogs who weren't nearly as accommodated as my Jack Russells, but we loved them and took good care of them, as they did to us.

If I had to get a dog right now to replace the terriers, I would absolutely get another pit bull - rescue of course - because I just think the world of them.

Gry, your 8-week puppy made me pang for good old Major.

OK, Alabama story over.

Robby

camohn
Feb. 28, 2005, 04:53 PM
What's popular around here are first Jack Russells, then Aussie Heelers. I don't like JRs. I don't like high strung yippy dogs to start with. They irritate me. All but one of them I know are very aggressive and pick fights with other dogs.......ESPECIALLY other JRs. Most I know chase the horses heels and we have one mare that hates her heels nipped. I saw a bumper sticker at the EquineExpo yesterday that said "Jack Russells Are Football Shaped For A Reason" I laughed when I saw that.......I thought of my mare http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/lol.gif . MOst of the Shelties and Aussies I know I generally like as pets but they also tend to try and herd the horses and not all our horses appreciate that http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif . We have always had Retrievers. My hubby has always had Goldens (we especially appreciate Murphy The Groundhog Killing Wonder Dog http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif). I have had a Yellow Lab and a Chesapeake. We have decided the next dog is going to be a Weimereiner. It's fluctuates between that or another Chessie. The Weims are less territorial so safer with folks wandering by if the dog is loose..........but no trespassing hunters ever messed with Harley the Chessie http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/yes.gif.

gillenwaterfarm
Feb. 28, 2005, 06:23 PM
My lab puppy is a great farm dog. He keeps up with the horses, not chasing but along for the run. His off leash heel isn't as good as I'd like it to be, but as he ages (he is 1.5 now) it gets better. He is great with my year old daughter...she uses his head as a step to get onto the couch. He doesn't chase the cats, or at least he hasn't since one boxed him on the nose as a 12 week old puppy. I do think he would terrorize chickens though. The hair isn't that bad, there is shedding involved, but it isn't like a double coated dog like a GSD's twice yearly blow out of the fuzz. I used to own an Elkhound, and don't miss any part of that kind of hair. My only complaint is that he likes to run around in my muddy water collecting low spot. And usually right after a bath. Typical Lab, he will find any water to play in. My lab isn't a "bench" bred lab, rather one from hunting lines. He is tall and lean in body type. I attribute the body build for his ability to trek all day with the horses out on a hack.

My next dog will most likely be a German Wirehaired Pointer, because I love everything about them. Especially the beards!

fanfayre
Mar. 1, 2005, 01:22 PM
Well, we've always had golden lab crosses or retreiver, but I couldn't exactly say they were my barn dogs. However they never chased the chickens and rarely chased the cats... (Actually, the retreiver didn't retreive or chase. Ever)
I've always wanted, for myself, two dogs: an Irish wolfhound and a whippet, I don't know why

x
Mar. 2, 2005, 11:05 AM
I, too, second the Cocker Spaniel. Actually, pretty much any spaniel.

That said, I've been very, very impressed with standard poodles.

Barnfairy
Mar. 2, 2005, 02:27 PM
Robby! I looooooved "A Horse Called Mr. Ragman". What a great book!

fanfayre -- two sight-hounds at either end of the spectrum! That's a hoot. My vet has Irish wolfhounds; oohhhhh, what lovely dogs they are. Big loves. Big, big, big loves.

I recently lost my beautiful lab/setter mix dog, Tee. I don't think I'll ever own as good of a farm dog as Tee was. He was raised right on our farm, and was respectful of the horses right from the start. We had a batch of kittens, too, when he was just 6 months old, and he was so gentle with them...somewhere I have an adorable picture of puppy Tee curled up on the floor with a kitten curled up sleeping in his tail. While I did barn chores Tee would wait just outside the barn for me, conveniently out of the way, on a down-stay. Tee went with me everywhere; he especially loved going for truck rides to get hay or grain. He would retrieve a ball or frisbee forever, if I wanted to, or he would just as happily crash with me on the couch if I was too tired to play. He had a hearty bark to announce the arrival of visitors, but only just to say "welcome!" He loved everybody, especially kids. I trusted him as much as any dog could possibly be trusted. And he was beautiful, too, with a long black glossy coat and soft eyes. He was so sweet. God, I miss him. http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/cry.gif

I'm starting over now with a fancy shmancy Irish setter, Aiden, who is now 4 months old. Cute cute cute and a dear little soul.

Good training is essential no matter what the breed. My all-time fave dog-training books: The Art of Raising a Puppy and How to Be Your Dog's Best Friend both by the Monks of New Skete. Don't let the name of the authors scare you off!-- the books aren't religious at all, just really good training advice for the owner as much as for the dog.

Perfect Pony
Mar. 2, 2005, 03:03 PM
OK I can't stand it, I just have to share...

Here's the newest addition, 5 mo old Sophie (http://community.webshots.com/photo/284962018/284962276HzUdWw)

Here's the best dog in the world, my 14 yo JRT Nellie, CC Jumping (http://community.webshots.com/photo/141637982/141639599YSEArU)

And here's the BIG dumb dog himself (http://www.fototime.com/{BFC0D9F0-726E-4C44-8F63-7275D71C0E5E}/picture.JPG)

But he's really as sweet as can be (http://www.fototime.com/{C7FCC4ED-68D2-4B1D-B50E-52D653B98CC0}/picture.JPG)

But seriously, I think any dog can be a good dog, it just takes a good owner http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

dannysgirl
Mar. 2, 2005, 05:23 PM
I know JRs have gotten a reputation for being... spastic but ours is very calm. She and my dad do the army crawl in the back orchard for hours trying to get groundhogs. Picture here. Its wicked funny to watch and I fully intend to win 10k for the video of it on that show they have! Ruby(the jr) is really very sane though... Theres just this one thing she has about her crate. At times she refuses to leave! She just lies in there with her 10 million stuffed toys and guards them from our nutty cat. Oh and she sits on top of my berner in the summer. Picture of them here. I think she wants to be taller!

kileyc
Mar. 3, 2005, 08:56 AM
This morning I had to put down the best horse show dog ever....my Aussie Kiley-- she was almost 17 years old and I can't count the number of x-country courses she walked. I am thinking of spreading her ashes on the x-county course at Las Colinas, she loved to play in the water jump. Here are some pictures of her and my Jack, Cabo.

http://www.picturetrail.com/gallery/view?p=999&gid=1806667&uid=939332

Bensmom
Mar. 18, 2005, 10:32 AM
Ok, I had to go back and revive this thread to put in a vote for my new puppy as a great horse show dog! http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/yes.gif

I have a four month old Scottie, and I wasn't sure how he'd be at a show. He came out to Red Hills last week, simply because I picked him up from the groomer on Monday and he was so good that he just got to stay, and stay and stay http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

He LOVES riding the four-wheeler, and riding in golf carts/mules, was happy walking around and meeting other dogs, and was also happy to go back in the office and into his crate for a nap. He was absolutely delightful! He is the new stabling staff mascot http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

On Sunday, he got too hot down at stadium and had to sleep all afternoon, but other than that, he did great, and got so much attention! I was worried that he'd be wild and/or barky, but he was neither. What a Good Dog http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif Hopefully, he'll have more shows in his future!

Libby & Tag, the wonder puppy

Rockin'
Mar. 20, 2005, 03:44 AM
I can't make up my mind which is my favourite... http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif!!!

mohawkrider
Mar. 20, 2005, 10:55 PM
Hey Concerto,
Loved only a couple dogs in my life, but Blue was one of them. She was a great dog and a really cool friend to hear when you pulled up to the barn in the morning. Both my husband and I thought a great deal of Blue and Tripod, and well, if you ever get this, you'll know that we both really felt it the day I found out about their passing. In the meantime, Scarlett is great and so is Luke--they are very cool, very fun pups to hang out with.
Cheers,
N

annikak
Mar. 21, 2005, 04:55 AM
Well, I have to add that my aussie has never chased our chickens, they may have chased him, but never, ever has he even batted an eye at them.

He is a wonderful dog- trained himself- at least I don't remember training him.... He is very sensitive, but oh well... I kinda like that. I do not own a leash for him (wait now before anyone says anything) because he stays totally with me if we are out doing anything.
However, if loose and alone, he will go after the horses- and has the missing teeth to prove it. And invisible fence means nothing to him; it's just a puzzle to figure out when the bleeps occur so he can jump between them. The new house has a fenced yard, and I can go ride for hours, and I know he could slip thru the gate, but he does not...that is against the Aussie Code Of Conduct, apperently. And since the fence for the horses is no-climb, you hear him sigh in relief- "Oh, good, the horses are safe...I can just rest now..." the best ball-playing, frisbe catching dog ever....

We have a lab- my hubby loves them, and I just think they are loveable, but dumb. And he is neurotic- cannot leave the house without having a breakdown.

The next dog, I think, will be a St. poodle. I love them, they don't shed, don't herd, are smart and sensative- great qualities for a dog.

But, I had a serious soft spot for a dog on Sat- A boxer obviously fell in love with me, and followed my horse and me thru FENCE, over a very deep stream, and was as settled with being with me as I have ever seen a dog. She was HAPPY to have found her NEW person. She did not want to be rescued into a car and taken back to her real, and scared parents. Kinda a love the one you're with kinda dog.... She was adorable, however....

WhoaHorsieWhoa
Mar. 21, 2005, 05:25 AM
Lab/Pitbull here

He is a huge dog and just loves playing with the boys in the pasture. Not even a year old yet, and has lots of engery. He took our horses jolly ball away from the boys and now that's his fav toy. Carries that thing every where. He wears a studed collar that cost 75 $$ ouch http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif Great around kids, and boy does he love those cats http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

jodyjumper
Mar. 21, 2005, 05:18 PM
Any Poodle or poodle X- mine have loved trail rides and buggy rides. Smart! They don't shed, but need haircuts (buzz cut!)about 3 times a year. I haven't noticed the doggy odor too much either.

CookiePony
Jan. 13, 2006, 08:36 AM
Just found this thread! What a great one!

My little shepherd mix (if anyone has any ideas about what he is from my picture gallery, let me know!) was found on the city streets of Nashville. He's a little naughty at the barn (wants to chase the barn kitty in the worst way!) but he is the most faithful little companion I could have. Not too big, not too small, dirt brushes/shakes off his coat, and jumps to boot (no formal agility training yet, but I did try him over a couple of fences in the backyard http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif ).

AppJumpr08
Jan. 13, 2006, 08:52 AM
JRTs all the way http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif Mine are both shorties, and the best girls in the world!! very different personalities - Bella, almost 2, is very much a lap dog, while Sadie, almost 4, is the true JR - very independent most of the time but does enjoy a good cuddle now and then http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif
And the best part? The fit into small spaces and are easy to travel with...2 JRs in the back seat still leaves lots of room for bags http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

mosmom
Jan. 13, 2006, 08:56 AM
I have a Boxer and a Yorkie/Shih Tzu mix. My Boxer is great at events though we can't take him when it gets too hot. Now my Yorkie/Shih Tzu mix is only 4 lbs. and she's a blast at events, but since she's so small I really have to watch her so she doesn't get stepped on.

Cisco's_Mom
Jan. 13, 2006, 09:24 AM
Cookiepony:

OMG! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif Scoutie looks like my little shephard mix "Zoey"!!!

A shelter dog - and she's the BEST! Just the right size, short coat, sweet, smart, and she likes to jump too! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

They must have been separated at birth!

Pictures:
http://www.geocities.com/sjsimpson2000/zoey/zoey.html

StrawberryFields
Jan. 13, 2006, 09:25 AM
I have a big chocloate Lab!

ladypoco
Jan. 13, 2006, 09:40 AM
Shelties, German Shepards, and a Border Collie mix who is one of the smartest dogs I have ever been around. Shelties and Shepards have my heart.

kookicat
Jan. 13, 2006, 09:52 AM
I adore my spaniel. He's lovely, great with the horses, and other animals. Adores kids too!

My yorkie is such a great little dog- he has game and will take on rats! He is hyper most of the time, and never stops jumping around. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

Sebastian
Jan. 13, 2006, 10:32 AM
Our barn is populated with what we affectionately call "dump" dogs. We're way up in a canyon in So Cal -- a place people like to go and "dump" they're unwanted dogs.

My trainer has 7 at the moment (property is 11 acres, so we're hardly crowded...lol):
2 Heelers
1 Sled dog mix
1 Lab Terrier mix
1 American Bull Terrier
1 Shep Chow mix

We love all our mutts. The littlest heeler goes to shows with us a lot, and she's just the best Horseshow Dog in the world.

Sue's placed a number of other dump-dogs with clients as well. We keep telling her she needs to become a Rescue and get the tax write-off...lol.

Seb http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Purely4Pleasure
Jan. 13, 2006, 11:53 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Perfect Pony:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Gry2Yng:
I think this is vote #3 for the pitbull.

Short hair, easy to train. 40ish pounds. Smart as a whip. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

How funny. My Pit Bull is 100lbs, wont listen to a thing, is as dumb as a 2x4, and you can't take him anywhere unless you have 2 men to control him (not mean, but just the biggest, dumbest, most PITA dog on the planet....) </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

My Pit girl is right in the middle - 65lbs, VERY attentive/trainable when she cares to be (and apparently stone deaf otherwise), never met a person (especially children) who isn't her newest bestest friend.... And views any horse-related events as big "poop buffets."

Her new baby brother is a sheltie-shepherd mix. We'll see how he turns out.

Purely4Pleasure
Jan. 13, 2006, 12:00 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">He wasn't so much a chicken killer as he was a kitten killer. But only when they got too close to his food, and really only because his massive jaws were so strong that his quick shake of their necks snapped them like pretzels.
Robby </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Ouch!! Is it very wrong that I laughed as I winced? I've never seen my Chyna hurt anything intentionally. But she does treat the neighbor's 2 pugs as her own, personal, self-ambulatory squeeky toys.

tbeventer21
Jan. 13, 2006, 12:14 PM
My Jack Russell is great at the barn, the cats rub on him and he hacks out like a pro, evening swimming across streams with a strong current. Plus he loves it when the farrier comes.

BigRuss1996
Jan. 13, 2006, 03:08 PM
I have two Lurchers and a Jack Russell.Only one travels to events with me at a time. I had an English Mastiff but she passed away thispast summer (She was 10!) She really was the best dog ever. Once I get a farm of my own and get moved in I plan to get another. For now the htree I have keep me busy.

alterforsaftey
Jan. 13, 2006, 03:37 PM
I have two jerk Russell's (not a typo)

I was told they are foot ball shaped for a reason. I refuse to comment on weather if have felt the need! ;-) LOL

Bid_Low
Jan. 13, 2006, 03:44 PM
I will have to say that I haven't found mine yet! I have two dachshunds and are SO NEEDY and worry about everything! and can easily get squashed by the big ponies! I love my pups to death, but barn dogs they are not. I have to leave them with a sitter when I go to shows.http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif A few years from now, I am thinking that the Corgi would make a good pet.

bornfreenowexpensive
Jan. 13, 2006, 04:01 PM
My old rottie was the best show dog http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/sadsmile.gif. She acted as guard dog for one of the most famous show jumpers (when I was his groom)--well sort of...we tied her in front of his stall at shows to deter people from bugging him but everyone figured out she was a love--would have two or three kids hanging around her all the time (give her a cookie and she'd show you where my jewelry was). In her younger days, she'd hacked out with me on conditioning rides and knew my gallop loops so she'd meet me where I finished. Went to many a HT and three-day. She was a cool dog.

Now I still have my Border Collie--he use to gallop with me but now that he's 8 I only bring him along on slower hacks. Very portable, smart and trainable. I pick my HTs by where I can bring him along. He's very happy to hang out at the trailer with me, go on a course walk and be my company on the drives. He's a good dog.

CookiePony
Jan. 13, 2006, 06:36 PM
Cisco's Mom-- you're right! We've always wanted to know what Scoutie looked like as a puppy b/c he was a year old when he showed up-- now we know! http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/yes.gif

His brother is the jumper, tho. Scout won't stand for that foolishness. He _does_ enjoy the poop buffets, I'm sorry to say. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

Platinum Equestrian
Jan. 14, 2006, 05:37 AM
Italian Greyhound - great for travel, walking the course, or hanging out with while you wait.

SBClancy
Jan. 14, 2006, 06:12 AM
I have a JRT and a Pembroke Welsh Corgi. This is the second Corgi I've owned. My first one had to be put down at the age of 6 from complications of Lyme Disease. He was the love of my life. There will always be a Corgi in my household. They are the most devoted dog I've ever owned.

One Star
Jan. 14, 2006, 06:41 AM
Two Jack Russell Terrorists. This is not an endorsement of the breed, merely a statement of fact. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

tommygirl
Jan. 14, 2006, 06:55 AM
My beloved Vizsla, Keats! He was the best dog ever. He loved to travel and loved to jump all the XC jumps, even the advanced ones. I think he knew it made me feel better knowing he could jump them, so my horse should have no problem http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif
I miss him. I lost Keats this year to an autoimmune disease common in dogs from the southern states (florida, texas, louisiana, mississippi, etc.)

One Star
Jan. 14, 2006, 07:08 AM
tommygirl, what disease? Pemphigus? Or something else? And how was it contracted? I am so sorry about Keats...my two also love to travel and walk the xc. But being JRTs, they can only make it over the novice and training fences. Although my female, the larger of the two, did jump off the Intermediate bank at Rocking Horse once!

LaraNSpeedy
Jan. 14, 2006, 11:55 AM
I have a very energetic - great at agility Border Collie that I got from the humane society. He is one of those extra big ones - a little chubby now but not fat - and still 90 lbs. He is just really big for a BC. I thought he was a cross (and could still be) but I went to some herding trials and met a lady who breeds the "Scottish line" whatever that is - and all her BCs looked like mine.

Anyways - though I LOVE HIM DEARLY, next one will not be so big and so full of energy. I like the Corgi idea and the Jack Russell - I know they have a ton of energy too but at least they are small!

Honestly though, I will probably look for those two TYPES at the pounds. And I may do it sooner than later so Indy can have a buddy.

Indy is great around the horses though and the agility training is the key - if I foresee him running after a horse or getting excited - I can point to far across the pasture at a log and he will run all the way there and jump it. Keeps him busy!

Funny though - I have a medium to large pony who is just 4 and he is a reining bred QH and he and Indy do not know what to do with each other - they are constantly trying to sqaure each other off.

tommygirl
Jan. 14, 2006, 12:13 PM
one_star_or_bust
We are not sure...it is a disease where the red blood cells attack themselves...he at least went in his sleep, with no pain http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

fergie
Jan. 14, 2006, 12:51 PM
You can't go wrong with two golden retrievers. They acted as a "goat" for my nervous horse at her first three day. She would whinny for them and get very upset when they left her. It was so touching.

mademoiselle
Jan. 14, 2006, 01:59 PM
My dog is a rhodegian ridgeback and he is really cool.
When I'm at events, I always have people who come to see me to ask me about him.

He is very quiet inside and can run hours outside. He doesn't pay attention to the horses, just ignore them.
So, far he has been very, very good with my baby girl (11 months old) when she is all over him, he licks her to death to make her go away http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif, he is nice with the kittens and never barks.

At shows, he is very well behaved.

The only thing is that RR are hard to train, Mine listens to me most of the time but He is stubborn.

My next dog will be a RR.

Finnegan
Jan. 14, 2006, 03:49 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by deltawave:
I've been thinking about this topic on and off, too, as my beloved retrievers age. http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/sadsmile.gif The next dog will ideally have all of these qualities:

*Not huge, but no ankle-biters
*A super watchdog for the new farm, including good at keeping varmints away
*Great with kids, including being protective and best friend material. A dog like "Lassie" who would run for help should kid get in trouble would be perfect...without all the collie HAIR. http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/lol.gif
*Not a wandering idiot who's going to disappear
*Good with chickens since I want to have a few of those on the new place
*Not horrendously hairy so it can hang out in the house, but not a wussy thing that can't hack it overnight in the barn, either.
*Good with horses but I don't care if it loves them, just so long as it's not nuts around them and has the good sense to stay away from the hard, pointed ends. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Any ideas for the ideal farm dog? It can come to events with me if it doesn't bark constantly. Oy, there is NOTHING more irritating than listening to the pitiful crying of a miserably unhappy dog left behind in the stabling area while its owner who "can't go anywhere without poochykins" is off walking the course or riding or whatever. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_mad.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Deltawave needs a BOXER!!! You just described one. But left out devoted, silly, regal, intellegent, fun loving, quiet (don't bark unless on duty against a stranger). They can look ferocious, but are truly wonderful with people/critters. Protective if you're not home/with those they don't know, but not the type to just randomly attack. And they stay goofy/silly till they die. Only goofy with their family, to others they look stoic and regal. Nice tight coats. Handle cold well, heat over 100 can be taxing though. Just generally good souls.

~Bev

SHStables
Jan. 14, 2006, 04:13 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Austrial Shepards are great. Very smart, loyal, great with horses, wonderful with kids, cats, anything with 2 or 4 legs. I love my aussie, he is the best dog I ever owned. Athletic, but not too high, great brain.

I also have a rescue border collie, very sweet, but he has tons of energy and a short attention span My aussie is great with him, keeps him in line, calms him down.
</div></BLOCKQUOTE>

LOL http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/lol.gif
This is my exact situation! The aussie is a great level headed dog while the boarder collie is a spaz.
My vote is for the Aussies. My female is hands down the best dog that I have ever had.

RHdobes
Jan. 14, 2006, 08:06 PM
I have Dobermans and CAN'T consider owning a different breed. I recently lost one who was EXCELLENT with my horses, and he accompanied my Thoroughbred gelding and my Morgan mare on many trail rides. HOWEVER, he got cold easily, and Dobermans are not necessarily the breed for everyone.

That being said, a former riding teacher had two Bouvier des Flanders that he let run loose in his barn at night. Small, they aren't.

My dog training teacher has had German Shepherd Dogs for over thirty years. Some have been VERY intense and one person/family dogs, and a couple of them are sweeter than sweet with people. However, one of those sweeter than sweet has a huge prey drive, and I wouldn't trust him around small dogs, cats, or poultry.

If you take a small dog to a horse show and lock him in a stall, you take the risk that someone just might steal your dog. No kidding. Either because it is "cute" or because it would make good "bait." Just a warning.

And about pitbulls. I happen to know a very nice one and have met other nice ones. BUT MANY CITIES/COMMUNITIES are either regulating or outright forbidding the ownership of this breed (or similar breeds). BE SURE TO FIND OUT WHETHER you can even own one in your hometown. Some insurance companies, too, will either NOT cover you if you own a certain breed, or you will have to pay EXTRA to own a "dangerous breed of dog."

The Westminster Dog show will shortly be televised. They always give a description of the breeds when each champion is introduced. It's a good way to educate yourself.

Now, if the Doberman Pinscher had never been created, I would be looking at a Standard Poodle. (Do you know that you can earn Retriever Trial Championships on these dogs?) I woudn't necessarily say that it would be a dog I'd leave in a barn overnight, but they have a LOT going for them---size, non-shedding, very intelligent, hypoallergenic.

kileyc
Jan. 14, 2006, 08:52 PM
I have an awesome JRT--we call her the anti-jack--she is sweet, loves to be in your lap--short legged --a little on the football side. Everyone says "she is so quiet for a Jack"!

And I had a 17 yo Aussie who died last year... and now am on the waiting list for a mini-Aussie---should be born in 4 weeks http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif--that is really going to p*ss my JRT off, but turnaround is fairplay, the arrival of the JRT really p*ssed of my old Aussie--she'll be giggling her head of on rainbow bridge!!!

Finnegan
Jan. 14, 2006, 09:18 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by RHdobes:
I have Dobermans and CAN'T consider owning a different breed. I recently lost one who was EXCELLENT with my horses, and he accompanied my Thoroughbred gelding and my Morgan mare on many trail rides. HOWEVER, he got cold easily, and Dobermans are not necessarily the breed for everyone.
</div></BLOCKQUOTE>

After my female Boxer died this year and left our 10 year old Boxer buddiless, I had to get him a friend. THAT'S when I realized that Boxers had sky rocketed in price. I don't have $1200-$1600 for a pet quality pup, so off to the shelter I went.

After MONTHS of looking for just the right dog finally found one. This litter had been born in the shelter with the mum. Mum was pure Doberman, and pups looked it too (?) The shelter even docked the tails (ears natural). Out of the 9 pups I spent hours getting to know them and settled on Axle. So far he is one cool dude. He's now 6 months and I've not had one problem at all with him. I do seem to have problems with others around us though. I have people pulling their children away from him, reeling in their dogs, etc. And he is the FRIENDLIEST, goofiest, bounciest ball of happiness - but people seem to be a bit put off. He's very well behaved, always at my side, never rushes people, never jumps on people, does not bark, only makes happy faces, lots of puppy play bows with the butt in the air and rolling over and bouncing up, nonetheless people seem to be scared of him.

He's very friendly with all people and animals, doesn't flick an eye at the 30 some chickens that roam free on farm, or the peacocks, and is great with other dogs. But I did read that male Dobermans get aggresive with other dogs as adults (read this on several web sites) which worries me as he is predicted to reach 100lbs. As of right now I couldn't imagine it - he's great at dog beach, dog park, the farm, anywhere and all dogs. I just hope that some time in the future he doesn't just snap and turn into an "adult Doberman". But as of right now he's a great barn dog who comes everywhere with me.

~Bev

Cisco's_Mom
Jan. 15, 2006, 04:33 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">He _does_ enjoy the poop buffets, I'm sorry to say. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

LOL!! Oh my... Zoey is a fan of the 'poop buffet' too. (much to my dismay http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/dead.gif )

Painted Wings
Jan. 15, 2006, 05:34 AM
I got my mother-in-law a corgie pup for Christmas. He is the cutest thing. We'll see how he is when he grows up but right now he's the best dog ever. She had always wanted a Corgie.

yellowbritches
Jan. 15, 2006, 06:12 AM
Personally, I love a good old dog-dog. A mutt, a mix-breed, call it what you will. My old dog, Montana, was a ridgy/lab mix and she was super cool and the absolute BEST. (http://faircroftstables.com//images/Montana2.JPG) My new dog, Stella, is of such un-determined breeding that it is almost a game now to see what strangers will say about her. I routinely get pitbull, I've gotten Weimeraner (sp?? I have no idea...), there is probably some sort of herding breed in her heritage, and we are all convinced she's got greyhound (we've clocked her at 35 MPH, and she can keep up, if not gain, on a deer in full flight). I had one lady who was just SURE she had pointer in her...because of a handful of black spots in the middle of a white patch on her chest http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif All I know is that she is, like her predecessor, super cool and so much fun!

mademoiselle, I'm jealous of your ridgy, though. Because of having Montana, I learned soo much about that breed and really fell in love. If I were to do a purebred it would be a huge toss up between the long time family favorite of a lab and a ridgeback.

ottb dressage
Jan. 15, 2006, 08:15 AM
i have always loved the english bull dog but have never had one. dogs are like horses, a lot of work. i also don't allow dogs around my horses. i don't think dogs and horses mix, and i'm the person at the shows who complains to management when dogs are roaming around free. huge safety issue in my mind and i have seen and heard about plenty of unnecessary dog accidents that should never have put a horse into jeopardy.

JenNor18
Jan. 15, 2006, 08:18 AM
I'm getting my feet wet in eventing this year. I have a Lab/Chow mix, and boy oh boy...
So glad my horse has more sense than her. I suppose if she were a horse, she'd probably be an OTTB...Very intelligent, but way too energetic, ready to do anything, but you'd better not expect to stop http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif
Still, I love her...

But yet I wonder why my horse - the only prey animal in this equation, has more sense than my dog and cat. It really amuses me.

ss3777
Jan. 15, 2006, 09:46 AM
Wow, when I started this thread last year, I had no idea that it would still be active this winter http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif Here is the latest picture of my Bouvier (GREAT farm dog, not for the person that wants a clean dog or house http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif) and his australian shep "cousin".

http://community.webshots.com/photo/223990680/533156367aCzvUS

yellowbritches
Jan. 15, 2006, 10:53 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by ottb dressage:
i have always loved the english bull dog but have never had one. dogs are like horses, a lot of work. i also don't allow dogs around my horses. i don't think dogs and horses mix, and i'm the person at the shows who complains to management when dogs are roaming around free. huge safety issue in my mind and i have seen and heard about plenty of unnecessary dog accidents that should never have put a horse into jeopardy. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I actually feel the exact opposite. Dogs and horses are like burgers and fries...perfect together!!! That being said, in public and at shows people need to be responsible for both their horses and their dogs. If a dog is ill behaved, then it needs to stay at home (same goes for the horse....and the kid http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif). But I have no qualms with dogs at shows, and as long as a loose dog ("accidental" or not) isn't torrmenting my horses, my dog, or me and isn't loose around rings or on cross country, I'm ok with it. Stella and I started obedient classes this past week (because I, as a responsible dog owner, realize she's posing a challenge for me). The orginization that gives the classes handed out a GREAT article on good dogs vs. rude dogs, good owner/handlers vs. rude owner/handlers, and proper dog socialization. I should do a search for it and put a link up...it was SO informative...I wish it could be given to every person who buys, adopts, or picks up a stray dog. Maybe everyone's dogs would be better behaved and happier because of it.

Of course, this isn't a thread on whether dogs should or shouldn't be allowed at shows, nor should it be turned into one. This is a thread about what most horse lovers consider the next best thing to their horses...their dogs!!! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

RHdobes
Jan. 15, 2006, 08:28 PM
Finnegan, it's in the Doberman Pinscher written standard, I believe, that Doberman Pinschers, LIKE MANY OTHER BREEDS, can be same-sex aggressive.

That being said, there were 4 adult male Dobermans Pinschers, 1 male Peekapoo, 1 female Doberman Pinscher, and 1 female Shetland Sheepdog living here at the same time. Of them all, I only had trouble with one adult male Doberman Pinscher, and he came to me with a LOT of "baggage", both dealing with dogs AND humans. And that same dog earned two obedience titles, the only time showing "aggression" at a show was when a Golden Retriever stuck HIS nose in MY dog's face as my dog was resting on his "blankie."

Because I was ALPHA, and I don't tolerate crap from anything, we maintained peace in my house. My same-sex aggressive male had his own space (a crate) and preferred to be in it, sucking on his blanket.

The rest of the males, Dobermans and Peekapoo, tended to use each other as pillows and blankets. They were best buddies and friends, and I NEVER feared that they would try to hurt one another.

I was in a park once with my wonderful Doberman, Dante'. Two friends and I had met there to work our dogs together. They owned a Dalmatian and a Keeshond. A woman with her 2-year old grandson came over to see the dogs. When she realized that mine was a Doberman (natural ears), she pulled her grandson to her. Meanwhile, both of my friends' dogs were on their hind legs, friendly, wild, and trying to get to the visitors. Both friends had to hold their dogs tightly to keep the dogs from jumping all over the grandmother and her grandson.

While the grandmother was talking to my friends, her grandson managed to slip out of her grasp and toddled over to my Doberman. He fell against my dog' rear and grabbed hold to keep from falling to the ground. All my dog did was brace himself and let the boy hold on.

You should be FINE with a puppy being introduced TO the "pack." They are very smart dogs and should have some obedience training ("sit", "stay", "come", "down", "off"---use "down" for "lie down" and "off" for not jumping on you), but they are hardly the "demon dogs" of legend. In fact, on my block, there is a Pitbull, two Chows, a Shar Pei, my Dobermans, a couple of Cocker Spaniels. Guess who is the most dangerous (I kid you not, he chases kids, kids on bikes, and cars) dog on the block? A Yorkshire Terrier (Terror).

Congratulations on rescuing your dog!

Nancy!
Jan. 15, 2006, 09:15 PM
Cattledogs for me. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif Gotta love those silly dogs. Mine loves cross country course walks especially the water. I make her jump all my jumps on course. I figure if she can do it my big gelding should have no problems.

Nancy!

RegentLion
Jan. 16, 2006, 06:28 AM
ACD! My fiance has a red heeler. I don't think she has AKC papers but I've met her parents. She's the coolest dog ever.

My fiance took her with him in his semi-truck for the first 6-8 months of her life, and as a result she's very socialized and well behaved. She's super RED and has huge ears. Very pretty.

I think she understands English. Very responsive to the slightest sound, you can bring her back from across the horse pasture with just a "kiss" sound or saying her name.

She will "heel" the horses/pigs/cows if you ask her to but never does it on her own... unless the piglets get out of their pen.

She is super friendly but doesn't "heel" people or chickens (free range). Sparky got one once but she was reprimanded for it and hasn't looked at one since. She and the tom turkey harass each other a bit but not much.

Sparky never wears a leash because she doesn't need one (well she gets one in public), but she's right near us all the time.

I can't say enough good about her. I think she isn't "nuts" like some are said to be because she does have a job as a FARM DOG.

Her full sister from a different litter, on the other hand, will heel the horses without permission. The horses, though, don't mind and they sort of play "tag" back and forth.

So if anyone knows of a RED stud dog, (preferably one that works animals or does obedience) LMK because we want to make good puppies... (We'd keep them all in the family).


I love this dog. She goes to horse shows and events with us, traveled to a race track to pick up a horse, etc. Sparks does wig out a little with a leash on because she sees it as punishment, but she's FINALLY getting used to a collar.

And she's great with kids. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

ss3777
Jan. 16, 2006, 01:08 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Cattledogs for me </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Nancy to Bouviers count? They were bred to drive cattle and be a overall farm dog. I LOVE minehttp://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Purely4Pleasure
Jan. 16, 2006, 01:27 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">And about pitbulls. I happen to know a very nice one and have met other nice ones. BUT MANY CITIES/COMMUNITIES are either regulating or outright forbidding the ownership of this breed (or similar breeds). BE SURE TO FIND OUT WHETHER you can even own one in your hometown. Some insurance companies, too, will either NOT cover you if you own a certain breed, or you will have to pay EXTRA to own a "dangerous breed of dog." </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Very True. Sad, but TRUE. We changed our home/car insurance when we got Chyna, rather than lie about her (we could have gone with "boxer mix" on the registration). Many insurance plans will immediately refuse you or charge you higher rates if you have a: Pit, Dobe, Rottie, GSD, Chow, or any mix thereof. And the breed-specific legislation is just stupid - they generally ban any of the bully breeds, or any mix thereof, and THEY get to decide what kind of dog you've got! So if they say your lab/boxer is a pit bull - BAM! - it's a pit bull. Insanity.

Please spay or neuter. Really.

Nancy!
Jan. 16, 2006, 01:31 PM
ss3777:

Bouviers are great but it is those rotten Australian cattledogs that are my downfall. Bred to chase cattle, yet like to sleep on the bed, couch, truck, LQ trailer, eat my food, "save" me http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.giffrom the horses, dogs, cows, etc.

ohioeventer
Jan. 16, 2006, 01:42 PM
I have two collies, both rescues, one smooth, one rough. They are wonderful dogs, quiet and calm, but if asked can go for hours. Great with kids, horses, cats, etc. Mine are big enough to scare away people with their size, but loving enough that I don't have to worry about a stray hand petting them.

I'm hoping for a rescue Greyhound next or maybe a Dobie, but who knows who will need to be rescued when the time comes. I may get lucky with another lassie http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

My boys (http://www.kodakgallery.com/PhotoView.jsp?&collid=633363183103.953312001203.1137447690402&photoid=109512001203&amp;view=1&amp;page=1&amp;sort_order=0&amp;al bumsperpage=12&amp;navfolderid=2004)

bovon
Jan. 16, 2006, 01:44 PM
I have two greyhounds who spent their first few years of life racing. I adopted them from GPA( not the helmet folks) the Greyhound Pets of america adoption group.. Honestly the sweetest dogs I have ever had.

WindyIsle
Jan. 16, 2006, 01:54 PM
We have our Barn Dawgs.

Duke a English Springer/Lab Mix - looks like a Lab with Springer's coat markings. Gorgeous dog and so bloody smart. He's pretty good around horses and my stallion loves him.

I was riding The Quietman (my stallion) the other day and Duke was tagging along. I stopped fro a minute to adjust my stirrup and Duke put his paws on Quietman's shoulders and stood on his hind legs kinda leaning against him. Quietman just turned his head, looked at him and blinked.

My aunt also brings her labs to the farm and they are great dogs - won't chase a horse if you make them. Our one gelding used to follow them on the other side of the fence.

We also have two English Springer bitches, Tia and Abby, that we're training to be gundogs. Been raised with horses since they were weeks old and wouldn't dream of chasing them.

Adore people and just love to snuggle but will chase a ball/run after you if you want them to play. Smart as whips, next to no hair shed and of medium size.

On the other side we also had a dog named Tequila (for the color of his coat) a mutt-mix that was absolutely horrible with horses. Got kicked once and finally stopped chasing them but we wouldn't let him near a foal.

eks
Jan. 17, 2006, 10:32 AM
I have a 1 year old Boston Terrier. She is the smartest dog I have ever had. Was easy as anything to house train, great size (only 15 lbs) awesome with my kids, although she is small, she is not yippyy at all...will only bark if she hears a strange noise, great and easy to travel with, hardly any shedding at all, but like the English bulldogs they don't tolerate the heat and cold well.